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http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924030898922 



THE 



IMPROVED 



MUTICAL ALMAIiC, 

OB 

TEUE NAVIGATOR, 

Astronomically, Mathematically, and Mechanically Arranged, 



BY WHICH 

THE TKUB MOTIONS OF THE EAETH AND PLANETS TO THE SUN AEE DEMON- 

STEATED, AND THE EEYOLUTIONS OF THE SfiASONS IN A SOLAR 

YEAR ACCUEATELY DEFINED, EEOM WHICH AEE OBTAINED 

THE UNDEVIATINQ- EULES FOE FINDJjNG LATITUDE 

AND LONGITUDE, AT SEA OE ON LAND. 

IlLUSTRATED BY EKGRAYMGS, 

SHOWING THE 

Tkite Position of the Eabth astd Planets at their EQcriNoxES and Solstices, bt 

Plates 1. and II., 

And thbie Rotation and Declination, by 
Plates III. and IV. 

Plate V. Dbmonsteates Local Atteaotion and the Laws of Atmospheeic 

Elboteioity. 

Plates VI., VII., and VIIL, the Eclipses foe the Yeaes 1869, 1860, and 1861. 



HAl^I. COI.BY. 



NEW YOKK: 
PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHOR. 

1859. 

& 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1858, by 

HALL COLBY, 

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York. 



stereotyped and printed 

By C. a. Alvord, 

15 Vandewater-st., New York. 



TESTIMONIALS. 



January, 1859. 
The undersigned have examined Hall Colby's Compend of Astronomy 
and Navigation ; we consider Ms method of illustration both new and use- 
ful, in a practical point of view, giving polarity and order, physically and 
mechanically, to the motions of the earth, and planets to the sun. We rec- 
ommend his Magnetic Theory of the polarity of the heavenly bodies to the 
consideration of all institutions of learning, testing their claims as set forth 
in his orrery, and in his plates and engravings — the nautical portion being 
for three years. We believe it will be found fully competent for the pur- 
poses of obtaining latitude and longitude at sea — the whole being designed 
for practical use and not for speculation. We are glad to see this work put 
in the way of distribution. 



Henut Eagle, 

Captain U. S. N. 

Ohaeles Boggs, 

Commander U. S. W. 

Joseph J. Oomstock;, 

Merchant Steam Marine. 

H. S. Knight, 

Ship ''New World." 

E. K. COENING, 

Bark ''Benefactor" China 
Trade. 



W. L. PIunsoN, 

TI. S. Wavy. 

Jos. H. TOONB, 

Ship-Master. 

Capt. S. M'Gowai^, 

Steamship "Illinois." 

Wm. Oitiwell,. 

First Officer " KathayP 

Capt. James Hall, 

Late of Russian Steam Cor- 
vette, "Japamese." 



HALL COLBY'S MAGNETIC ORRERY, 

AND ITS CLAIM. 



The Author published his Map of the Solar System in 1846 ; in this map he claimed the 
discovery of the Magnetic Polarity of the Heavenly Bodies, and their magnetic affinity to the 
Sun, in the mechanical arrangements of their polar forces, and their polar position at the 
Equinoxes, Solstices, and their Eclipses, changes of the Moon, &c. All of which were defi- 
nitely arranged in his Map in 1846 ; and in 1847 the Magnetic Orrery was constructed and 
exhibited to prove the Law of Action, as claimed in the Map, to be a negative and positive 
force or law. 

The adjustment of the Magnetic Orrery is simply to adjust the magnetic needle N. and S., 
causing the circle or wire to have a N. E. and S. W. direction across the gilt ball, represent- 
ing the Sun and Sun's equator. The engraving on the base on which it stands, shows the 
Earth at the Equinoxes and Solstices, and its maximum changes and angles of the poles, and 
consequent change of seasons. 

The suspended globe representing the Earth, being put on the hook or pivot, will, by being 
moved carefully from a west or winter solstice to a summer solstice, on the east side of the 
Sun, pass across the Sun's equator, giving a Node of the Sun and Earth, and constitutes a 
vernal equinox. By this device magnetically arranged the peculiar and wonderful law of the 
planetary system may be seen, negatively and positively worked out. 

By this device is also illustrated the universality and sovereignty of that law which is 
called positive and negative, or which may be otherwise designated as oxygen and hyd/rogen, 
known to be the inherent property of matter — and more definitely proved by means of chem- 
ical analysis^ to be the inherent property of water. 

The following testimonials are from men of more than ordinary talent : 

GotLEGiATB Institute, Eoohestee, 1846. 

The Plan or Map oi the Solar System, by Hall Oolby, is finely adapted to present to the 
aye of the learner in Astronomy clear and distinct views of the distances, revolutions, 
eclipses, &c., of the heavenly bodies. If it shall be used in connection with a globe, it will 
only become a more important auxiliary in the hand of the teacher, in communicating a 
great amount of interesting and important knowledge. Ghestee Dewet, President. 



Having examined Hall Colby's Magnetic Orrery, Chart, &c., of the Solar System. The 
Orrery is a rare invention, and may be so considered by any navigator or teacher of science, 
it having the capacity of exemplifying nature, or the natural phenomena of Astronomy. By 
the Orrery may be seen and illustrated the complicated motions of the Earth in her seasons. 
It also defines most beautifully the nodes of the Sun and Earth at the Equinoxes, and defines 
their position of axes and planes, solstices, &c. In short, all the mechanical order of the 
solar system seems to be the gift of the Orrery. The magnetic arrangements combined give 
it a force superior to any thing I have ever seen. The instrument being so lucid, I think a 
vast amount of correct knowledge may be obtained by its introduction to all seminaries of 
learning. Wm. L. Hudson, U. S. N. 

February 18th, 1854. 

\ 

The undersigned has cursorily examined Colby's Magnetic Orrery and Chart of the Solar 
System, and is of the opinion that they justify the recommendations given of them by Cap- 
tain Hudson and Professor Dewey. Hoeaob Websteb. 

Free Academy, N. Y., 21st February, 1854. 

Having examined Mr. Colby's Map and Magnetic apparatus, I am free to say that I fully 
coincide in the opinions of their utility in a practical point of view, as expressed by Captain 
Hudson. T. Steong, 

Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Eutger's College. 



Teenton, New Jersey, June, 1858. 
Hall Colby — Dear Sie : I have examined with much attention and interest your Mag- 
netic Orrery, designed to illustrate the physical laws of the planetary system. 

If your opinions as to the sublime theory of the polarity of the Sun and Earth and Moon, 
and of the Planets and Comets, are correct and can be sustained — and the workings of your 
Orrery certainly go very far toward establishing their correctness — then it will settle one of 
the most profound principles in nature, and your discovery will constitute one of the most 
important made in Astronomy for the last three thousand years. 
Wishing you all success due to your long and indefatigable labors, I subscribe myself. 

Your friend, 

F. W. Phelps, 
Principal of the New Jersey State Normal School. 



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SELECTED MATTER FROM DISTINGmSHED AUTHORS, 



AS AN 



|ntr0krt}0ii to l^stroMmj anir §!aMgatkii. 



The term Asteohomt, like most terms of science, is derived from the an- 
cient Greek language. Astronomia, astronomy, is compounded of astron, a 
star or constellation, and nomos, a law, the law of the stars. It may be 
defined the science which treats of the heavenly bodies. 

Astronomy is a science of great antiquity. Its early history has too many 
allegorical representations to admit of a satisfactory elucidation. It is, how- 
ever, probable, that some scanty knowledge of this science must liave been 
nearly coeval with the existence of man. The grandeur of the deliglitful 
canopy extended over his head, must have attracted the curiosity of the 
most careless and rude wanderer of the forest, much more of the attentive 
shepherd. Beside, the most common concerns of life are in some measure 
regulated by a partial knowledge of astronomy. 

Both the Chaldeans and Egyptians claimed a very high antiquity ; and 
equally claimed the honor of being the first cultivatoi-s of astronomy. It 
may not be easy, at this late day, to determine which has the best founded 
claim. Most authors seem agreed in fixing the origin of this science either 
in Chaldea or Egypt. The shepherds, who "watched their flocks by night," 
on the beautiful plains of Babylon, or in the extended vale of the Nile, could 
not be careless spectators of the varying aspects of the heavens. The tower 
of Belus was the boast of the Chaldeans. This is thought by some to have 
been an astronomical observatory. They gloried in their astronomer, Zo- 
roaster, placed by them five hundred years before the destruction of Troy. 
The Egyptians, with equal ostentation, vaunted of their priests. Tlie col- 
leges of these they considered as the depositories of every species of knowl- 
edge. In the monument of Osymandyas, it is said, there was a golden circle 
of three hundred and sixty-five cubits in circumference, divided into three 
hundred and sixty-five equal parts, according to the days of the year, with 
the heliacal rising and setting of the stars for each day. It is proper to 
state, that, whatever may be thought of the tower of Belus, or the circle of 
Osymandyas, both the Chaldeans and Egyptians were extremely well situ- 
ated for astronomical observations, being almost always favored with a pure 
atmosphere, and a sky of delightful serenity. A very favorable opinion of 
the Egyptians must be formed from the position which they gave to their 



4 ASTROiSrOMy AND NxVVIGATIOK 

pyramids, the faces of these being accurately directed to the four cardinal 
points of the heavens. 

Beside the Chaldeans and Egyptians, the Arabians may justly claim a 
high antiquity in astronomical knowledge. The land of Uz, famous for the 
afflictions of Job, was without doubt a district of Arabia. Authors are 
agreed that the book of Job is very ancient — is unrivaled in antiquity, ex- 
cept, perhaps, by the books of Moses. From the familiar manner in which 
Arcturus, Orion, and Pleiades are introduced in that book, it may be ascer- 
tained that, not only were names given to some of the stars, but constella- 
tions had been designated and named, so as to become objects of general 
notoriety. 

Among other relations of this kind may be reckoned what is mentioned 
by Josepnns in his Antiquities, who, in speaking of the progress that had 
been made in astronomy by Seth and his posterity, before the deluge, as- 
serts that they engraved the principles of the science on two pillars, one of 
stone and the other of brick, called the pillars of Seth; and that the former 
of these was entire in his time. He also ascribes to the antediluvians a 
knowledge of the astronomical cycle of six hundred years, which Mantucla, 
in his " Histoire des Mathematiques," thinks, with much greater reason, was 
an invention of the Chaldeans; and that whatever information was possessed 
by the Jewish annalist, with respect to this memorable period, was probably 
obtained either from that people, or from some ancient writings which no 
longer exist. 

Astronomy is a science useful and sublime in the highest degree. It is 
useful, not only on its own account, but as the foundation of other arts and 
sciences; and sublime, as it elevates the soul above the little objects of this 
world to scenes of infinite grandeur. 

Navigation, as an art or a science, is dependent on the principles of 
astronomy. The varying compass would not form a sure guide to the mar- 
iner on the pathless ocean, were it not for corrections derived from observa- 
tion on the heavenly bodies. Geography is equally dependent. By astron- 
omy are ascertained the figure and magnitude of the earth. The knowledge 
of latitude and longitude, the situation and distance of places the most re- 
mote, the true bearing of countries in respect to each other, and tlieir mag- 
nitude or extension, are most accurately obtained by astronomical principles. 
But above all, astronomy affords the most enlarged and sublime views of the 
Creator's works. In the vast expanse of the universe, the astronomer be- 
holds the stars, which bespangle and adorn our canopy, magnified into so 
many suns, surrounded with worlds of unknown extent, constituting systems 
multiplied beyond the utmost bound of human imagination, and measured, 
only by the omnipresence of Jehovah ; all moving in harmony, in subjection 
to his omnipotent control. '■'■The hea/uens decla/re the glory of God, and the 
Jt/rmmnent showeth his handy worhP "An undevout astronomer is mad." 

There have been three great systems of astronomy — the Ptolemaic, the 
Brahean, and the Copernican. The former two, however, though dignified 
by the name of systems, are more properly denominated hypotheses. 

The Ptolemaic system takes its name from Claudius Ptolemeus, or Ptolemy, 
who flourished at Alexandria or Pelusium, in Egypt, in the second century 
of the Christian era, in the reigns of Adrian and Antoninus, the Poman 
emperors. In this system, the Earth was supposed at rest in the center of 
the universe, around which the Moon, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, Ju- 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 5 

pitev, and Saturn revolved. Above the planets this hypothesis placed the 
firmament of stars and the two crystaline spheres, all included in theprimum 
mobile, giving motion to the whole. Still higher, according to some, he con- 
ceived, was placed the em.pyrecm hecmen, or heaven of heavens; all revolv- 
ing round the Earth, from east to west, in twenty-four hours, according to 
the ideas of the illiterate in all ages. 

The different phases of Mercury and Venus, their superior conjunctions 
without oppositions, and the apparent retrograde motion of all the primary 
planets, show the absurdity of this hypothesis. 

Tycho Brahe was a native of Sweden, being born at Knudstorp, in the 
year 1546 ; though, from education and residence in Denmark, considered a 
Dane. This celebrated astronomer was acquainted with the Copernican 
system, published before his time. But, rejecting some of its most simple 
principles, because he thought them irreconcilable to the literal meaning of 
some texts of Scripture, he adopted some of the greatest absurdities of Ptol- 
emy, in other respects making his system agree with the rules of modern 
astronomy. 

In his system the Earth is supposed at rest, the Sun and Moon revolving 
round it as the center of their motion, while the other planets revolve around 
the Sun, and are carried with it about the Earth. 

By this hypothesis the phases of Mercury and Yenus may be explained. 
But no satisfactory explanation can be given by it of the opposition of the 
superior planets. Both the Ptolemaic and Brahean systems are contrary to 
the modern principles of calculating and projecting eclipses. 

The Copemiea/ii system is now universally adopted by astronomers as the 
true solar system. Some of the ancient Egyptians discovered the revolution 
of Mercury and Venus I'ound the Sun. The general principles of the system 
were afrerward taught privately by Pythagoras to his disciples, five hun- 
dred years before the Christian era. But, being afterward rejected, it was 
nearly lost, till revived by Copernicus, a native of Thorn, in Polish Prussia. 
In the center of this system is placed the Sun, around which the primary 
planets revolve from west to east. The Earth turns on its axis. The Moon 
revolves round the Earth. The other secondary planets perform their revo- 
lutions around their primaries from west to east, at different distances and 
at different times, the satellites of Herschel only excepted. Beyond these, 
at an immense distance, are the fixed stars, as centers to other systems. 

Some authors inform us that Copernicus finished his great work in 1530 ; 
but did not venture it in print till near the time of his death, which hap- 
pened on the 22d of May, 1543. He died suddenly, by the rupture of a 
blood-vessel, soon after completing his TOth year, and a few days after 
revising the first proof of his work. 

Copernicus was an accurate mathematician, and applied his useful knowl- 
edge to the improvement of astronomy. Perplexed with the epicycles a,nd 
eccentrics by which Ptolemy attempted to account for the irregular motion 
of the heavenly bodies, he searched the lore of antiquity. " He tried to 
find among the ancient philosophers a more simple arrangement of the 
universe. He found that many of them had supposed Venus and Mercury 
to move round the Sun ; that Nicetas, according to Cicero, made the Earth 
revolve on its axis, and by this means freed the celestial sphere from that 
inconceivable velocity, which must have been attributed to it to accomplish 
its diurnal revolution. He learned from Aristotle and Plutarch that the 



6 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

Pythagoreans had made the Earth and planets move round the Sun, which 
they placed in the center of the universe. These luminous ideas struck him. 
He applied them to the astronomical observations, which time had multi- 
plied, and had the satisfaction to see them yield, without difficulty, to the 
theory of the motion of the Earth. The diurnal revolution of the heavens 
was only an illusion due to the rotation of the Earth, and the procession of 
the equinoxes is reduced to a slight motion of the terrestrial axis. The 
circles imagined by Ptolemy, to explain the alternate, direct, and retrograde 
motions of the planets, disappeared. Copernicus only saw in these singular 
phenomena the appearances produced by the motion of the Earth round the 
Sun with that of the planets ; and he determined, hence, the respective 
dimensions of their orbits, which till then were unknown. Finally, everj 
thing in this system announced that beautiful simplicity in- the operations 
of nature, which delights so much when we are fortunate enough to discover 
it. Copernicus published it in his work " On the Celestial Kevolutions." 
Not to shock received prejudices, he presented it under the form of an hy- 
pothesis. " Astronomers," said he, in his dedication to Paul III., " being 
permitted to imagine circles to explain the motion of the stars, I thought 
myself equally entitled to examine, if the supposition of the motion of the 
Earth would render the theory of these appearances more exact and simple." 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 



A DEFINITION OF ASTRONOMICAL TERMS. 



« 

Altitude is an arc of a vertical circle intercepted between the center of a heavenly body 
and the horizon. 

Amplitude is the distance of a heavenly body from the east or west point of the horizon, 
measured on an arc of that circle, the body being in it, or referred to it by a verticle. 

Antipodes, inhabitants living at opposite points of the Earth's surface, imder opposite 
meridians and in opposite parallels. 

Antasei, inhabitants living under the same meridian, but in opposite parallels, north and 
south. 

Aphelion, the point in the orbit of a planet farthest distant from the Sun. 

Apsis, the aphelion or perihelion point. The line connecting these is called the line of 
the apsides. 

Are of a circle, a part or portion of the circumference. 

Asteroids, four small planets between Mars and Jupiter. 

Axis, an imaginary line on which the Sun or a planet revolves. 

Azimuth, the distance of a heavenly body from the north or south point of the horizon, 
when the body is in that circle, or referred to it by a verticle. 

Centrifugal force, that by which a revolving body endeavors to recede from the center of 
its motion. 

Centripetal foree, that wliich attracts a revolving body to the center. 

Comet, a celestial body moving round the Sun in an orbit very eccentric. 

Conjunction, the meeting of heavenly bodies in the same longitude, on the same side of 
the Earth, tliough they may not be in the same latitude. 

Constellation, a number of stars contained in an assumed figure. 

Cosines, cotangents, and cosecants are sines, tangents, and secants of the complement of 
an arc. 

Cycle, a period of time. 

Declination, the angular distance of a heavenly body from the equator. 

Dichotomized, divided into two parts. 

Disk of the Sun or a planet, the hemisphere presented to an observer appearing like a 
plain circle. 

Eccentricity, the distance in a planet's orbit between one of the foci and the center. 

Eclipse, a partial or total obscuration of a heavenly body. 

Ecliptic, a great circle in which the Earth performs its annual revolution round the Sun, 
or in which the Snn appears to revolve round the Earth. 

Elongation, the angular distance of a heavenly body from the center of its motion ; as a 
planet from the Sun, or a secondary from its primary. 

Epact, the excess of the solar above the lunar year of 354 days, or twelve mean lunations. 

Equator, a great circle of the Earth drawn round the center from east to west. 

Equinox, a point in the ecliptic where it is cut by the equator. There are two equinoxes, 
the vernal and the autumnal. 

Eocus, a point in the elliptical orbit of a planet, round which it revolves. 

Eoci, the plural of focm, two points in the transverse axis of a planet's orbit. 

Galaxy, the milky way. 

Geocentric motion, the apparent motion of a planet as seen from the Earth. 

Gibbous, convex, protuberant ; applied to the Moon between the first quarter and the fuU, 
or between the full and last quarter; also applied to some of the planets. 

Globe, a sphei-e representing the Earth or visible heavens. 

Golden numter, a period of nineteen years ; the cycle of the Moon. 

Heliocentric motion, the motion of a planet as seen from the Sun. 



8 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

Hemisphere, half of a sphere or globe. 

Horizon, a great circle of the Earth, 90° from the zenith of a place, the plane of which 
divides the Earth into upper and lower hemispheres. This is denominated the rational 
horizon. The sensible horizon is the circle which hounds our sight. 

Inclination, the angular distance between the orbit of a planet and the ecliptic. 

Latitude of a heavenly tody, its distance north or south from the ecliptic. 

Latitude on the Earth, the distance north or south from the equator. 

Libration of the Moon, a periodical irregularity in her motion by which exactly the same 
face is not always presented to the Earth. 

Limits in a planeVs orbit, two points farthest distant from the nodes. 

Longitude of a heamenly body, its distance on the ecliptic from the first of Aries to the 
intersection of a secondary passing through the body. It is reckoned eastward 360°. 

Longitudlb on the Earth, the distance east or west from a fixed meridian. 

Meridian, a great circle of the sphere, encompassing the Earth from north to south. Half 
of this is sometimes called a meridiem. 

Nadir, the point in the heavens directly under the observer, and opposite to the zenith. 

Nebulm, telescopic stars cloudy in appearance. 

Node, a point at which the orbit of a planet crosses the plane of the ecliptic. The inter- 
section where the planet passes to the north is denominated the ascending node ; where it 
passes to the south, the descending node ; above being often used for north, and below for 
south, in astronomical terms. 

Oblate spheroid, a spherical body flatted at the poles. 

Obliquity, inclination, the angular distance of a circle from the ecliptic. 

Oblique sphere, a position of the sphere in which the equator and parallels cross the hori- 
zon in an oblique direction. 

Opposition, opposite part of the heavens. Two bodies are said to be in opposition when 
their distance of longitude is 180°, though they may not he in the saitie degree of celestial 
latitude. 

Orbit, the figure described by a planet in its revolution round the Sun, or its primary. 

Pa/rallax, the angular difference between the true and apparent place of a heavenly body. 

Parallel sphere, a position of the sphere in which the parallels of latitude and the equator' 
appear parallel to the horizon. ' 

Penumbra, the partial shadow of the Moon. 

Perihelion, the point in the orbit of a planet nearest to the Sun. 

Phases, the difierent appearances of the Moon, Mercury, and Venus, as the illuminated 
side is differently presented to a spectator. 

Phenomenon, appearance, often a novel appearance. 

Phenomena, plural of phenomenon. 
- Planet, a heavenly body revolving round the Sun, or some primary planet. 

Plane of a plane fs orbit, that imaginary surface in which it lies, or a supposed even sur- 
face between every part of its circumference. 

Pola/r circles, two circles drawn round the Earth from east to west, parallel to the equator, 
about 23° 28' from the poles. 

Poles of a planet or the Sun, the extremities of its axis. 

Precession of the equinoxes, their retrograde motion in the heavens. 

Prima/ry planets, those which perform their revolutions immediately round the Sun. 

Projectile force, that which impels a body in a right line. 

Quadrature, a quarter, a point in the celestial sphere 90° from the Sun. 

Quadrant, the fourth part of a circle. 

Radius, a right line from the center of a cii'cle to the circumference. 

Refraction, the turning of a ray of light from a straight course. 

Retrograde moUon, apparent motion from east to west. 

Right angle, 90°. When a line falls on another line, maiing the angles on each side equal, 
each is a right angle. 

Right ascension, the distance of a heavenly body from the first of Aries on the equator, 
or referred to that circle by a secondary. It is reckoned from the first of Aries to the point 
where the secondary, passing through the body, cuts the equator. 

Seconda/ry planets, satellites, or moons, small planets revolving round some of the primary 
planets. 

Secondary to a great circle, a great circle crossing it at right angles. 

Sidereal resolution, the time of a planet's revolving from a star to the same star again. 

Sine, a line drawn from one end of an ai'C perpendicular to the radius. 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 



9 



Sohtices, two points in the ecliptic, 90° from the equinoxes. 

Star, a luminous heavenly body shining by its own light. 

Synodical revolution, the time intervening between the conjunction of a planet with the 
Sun, and the succeeding conjunction of the same bodies. 

Syzygy, the conjunction or opposition of a planet with the Sun, as the change or full of 
the Moon. 

Tangent, a right line touching the circumference of a circle perpendicular to the radius. 

Tide, the alternate ebbing and flowing of the sea. 

Transverse, the longest axis of an ellipse. 

Tropical revolution, the time intervening between a planet's passing a node and coming to 
the same node again. 

Tropics, two circles parallel to the equator, at the distance of about 23° 28'. 

Twilight (crepusculum), the partial light before sunrise in the morning and after sunset in 
the evening. 

Vector radius, a line from a planet, in any part of its orbit, to the Sun. 

Vertical circles, circles cutting the horizon at right angles, and passing through the zenith 
and nadir of a place. 

Zenith, the point in the heavens directly over the observer. The zenith and nadir are the 
poles of the horizon. 

Zodiacal light, a pyramid or triangular beam of light, rounded a little at the vertex, ap- 
pearing before the twilight of the morning and after the twUight of the evening. 

Zodiac, a broad circle in the heavens between two lines on each side of the ecliptic, and 
parallel to it at 8° distance. 

Zone, literally a belt or girdle ; a large division of the Earth's surface. 





OHAEAOTERS. 






PLANTITS. 




2 


Mercury. 






? 


Ceres. 


? 


Venus. 






<^ 


Pallas. 


© 


Earth. 






u 


Jupiter. 


$ 


Mars. 






T? 


Saturn. 


fi 


Vesta. 






¥ 


Hersohel. 


5 


Juno. 
















SIGNS. 




T 


Aries. 






^ 


Libra. 


8 


Taurus. 






m 


Scorpio. 


n 


Gemini. 






t 


Sagittarius. 


© 


Cancer. 






ys 


Capricornns, 


SI 


Leo. 






^ 


Aquarius. 


m 


Virgo. 






K 


Pisces. 






8 


Sign. 








O 

/ 


pi 








ffr 


Third. 








= 


E 


quality. 





ASTRONOMY GENERALLY; 



OE, 



THE SOLAR SYSTEM. 



The Sun with his attendant planets and comets constitute the sola/r 
system. 

Conceive a large gilt ball suspended in open space, with several smaller 
balls moving around it from west to east, at different distances and with un- 
equal velocity ; imagine those nearest the large ball to have the swiftest 
motion, and that the movement of the others is more and more slow as you 
pass to those most remote ; imagine further, that several of the revolving 
balls have others moving round them, and carried with them, or round the 
central ball, and that all these motions are perpetual, and you will have 
some imperfect idea of the sola/r system. The idea will be more complete, 
if occasionally a ball with a liery train, or tail, be conceived moving with 
great velocity in a direction nearly to the central ball ; but that, passing 
round this, it recedes with retarded motion, the train increasing as it draws 
toward the center, and diminishing as it recedes. 

It is important that every instructor in astronomy should be furnished 
witli an orrery. To give a clear view of the whole, as suspended and re- 
volving in infinite space, is an object deserving the assiduous care of the 
well-informed teacher. 

Of the Sun. 

The Sun is the great source of light and" heat to the bodies of the solar 
system. It is an object pre-eminent — of inconceivable utility and grandeur. 
Diffusing its rays to an immense distance, and filling a sphere of incompre- 
hensible extent, it gives life and motion to innumerable objects. In some 
humble measure it resembles its divine Author. The most minute beings 
are not overlooked ; the greatest are subject to his control. 

The Sun is considered in the lower focus of the planetary orbits. But if 
the center of the Sun be considered the focus of Mercury's orbit, the com- 
mon center of gravity between Mercury and the Sun will be the focus of 
Yenus's orbit ; and the common center of gravity between Mercury, Yen us 
and the Sun will be the focus of the Earth's orbit. Thus the attraction of 
the planets nearest the Sun will, in a small degree, affect the foci of those 
more remote. Except the foci of Saturn and Herschel, however, those of 
all the orbits will not be sensibly removed from the center of the Sun. Nor 
will the foci of Saturn and Herschel be sensibly different from the common 
center of gravity between Jupiter and the Sun. 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. H 

Though stationary in respect to surrounding objects, the Sun is not desti- 
tute of motion. It revolves on its axis from west to east in 25 d. 15 h. 16 m., 
or, according to some authors, in 25*d. 10 h. The Sun's rotation is known 
from the revolution of its spots. 

The form of the Sun is globular. This is demonstrable from its always 
appearing a flat, bright circle, whatever side is presented to the observer. 
The diameter of the Sun is 883,246 miles ; its circumference, 2,774,897 
iniles. The Sun is 1,364,115 times larger than the Earth. Thus, surpassing 
in greatness the globe we inhabit more than one and a third million times, 
it swells beyond our conception. Some imperfect idea of the immense mag- 
nitude of the Sun may be formed by one or two computations. A celestial 
courier, passing at the rate of forty miles an hour, would be about one hun- 
dred and ninety Julian years in circumambulating the Sun. If the Sun 
were a hollow globe, and the Earth placed at its center, the Moon, at its 
present distance from the earth, 240,000 miles, might revolve uninterrupted, 
being but little more than half way from the center to the circumference 
of the Sun. Such a hollow globe might, therefore, contain within itself a 
brilliant system of revolving worlds. 

The physical construction of the Sun has excited much inquiry and spec- 
ulation. From time immemorial, an opinion seems to have prevailed tliat 
the Sun was a globe of fire. Some say, "The Sun shines, and liis rays, col- 
lected by concave mirrors, or convex lenses, burn, consume, and melt the 
most solid bodies, or else convert them into ashes or gas ; wherefore, as the 
force of the solar rays is diminished by their diverging, in a duplicate ratio 
of the distances reciprocally taken, it is evident their force and eff'ect are 
the same, when collected by a burning lens or mirror, as if we were at such 
a distance from the Sun where they were equally dense. The Sun's rays, 
therefore, in the neighborhood of the Sun, produce the same effects as might 
be expected from the most vehement fire; consequently, the Sun is a fiery 
substance." The force of this reasoning would lead us to conclude that, 
however antiquated or repudiated the opinion may be that the Sun is a 
globe of fire, its surface must resemble a vast combustion. 

But if heat come from the Sun, or the moving cause of heat originate in 
that luminary, why is it always cold in the upper regions of the air, though 
nearer the Sun than the surface of the Earth? And why are the tops of 
lofty mountains covered with perpetual snow, even under the equator? Tlie 
reply is, that animal heat is generated in the lungs from the oxygen of the 
atmosphere; that air is a bad conductor of heat, and of course a good de- 
fense against cold, or rather preservative of heat, preventing its escape 
from the body. The more dense the air is, therefore, the Avarmer is any 
situation. 

The density of the atmosphere is considered as decreasing in a geometrical 
proportion upward from the surface of the Earth. If the decrease be not 
always thus proportioned, it is well ascertained by experiments on the tops 
of lofty mountains, that the air becomes very rare in high regions. Hence 
the supply of heat from the oxygen of the atmosphere, and the security 
against cold, or the preservation of heat from the non-conducting power of 
the air, are greatly diminished. This must atfect sensation, and in some 
degree the thermometer. But this is not the only cause, perhaps not the 
principal cause, why high regions of the air are cold. According to clieni- 
ists, all bodjes, even those to us the most frigid, radiate heat. Hence, on 



12 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

the common surface of the Earth, uot the great mass of the globe only, but 
other bodies innumerable, with which we are surrounded, supply us with 
heat. But the elevated observer on the top of Chimborazo or Himalaya is 
retired, in some measure, above the influence of the Earth and the bodies 
on its surface. He must exhaust his own treasure of heat, while, except 
immediately from the Sun, he can receive next to nothing in return. It 
may be added that heat, or caloric, is by very many considered a fluid put 
in action by the Sun's rays. If so, it may be confined near the surface of 
the Earth, or be far short of the atmosphere in height. On the modern 
theory of caloric, therefore, elevation must greatly diminish, rather than in- 
crease the heat. 

The highest elevation to which human beings can ascend, though quite a 
proportion in regard to the height of the atmosphere, vanishes, when com- 
pared with the distance of the Sun. "What are four or five miles in com- 
parison to ninety-five millions! ISTo mountain is so elevated, no balloon 
can ascend so high as to make any perceptible difl^erence in respect to the 
distance of the Sun. 

In regard to the ancient theory, it is worthy of notice that the powerful 
attraction of the Sun is incompatible with its being a mass of flamie only, 
and the spots on its surface are conclusive that in part, at least, it must be 
composed of other matter. ^ 

The celebrity of Dr. Herschel, and the ingenuity of his hypothesis respect- 
ing the Sun, make this hypothesis deserve some particular consideration. 
Rejecting the terms spots, moclei, penumhroB^foGulcB, and lucuU, he adopts 
openings, shallows, ndges, nodules, corrugations, mdentations, and pores. 
Openings, he says, are those places where, by the accidental removal of the 
luminous clouds of the Sun, its own solid body may be seen ; and this not 
being lucid, the openings, through which we see it, may by a common tel- 
escope be mistaken for mere black spots. 

Shallows are extensive and level depressions of the luminous solar clouds, 
generally surrounding the openings to a considerable extent. Being less 
luminous than the rest of the Sun, they seem to have some very imperfect 
resemblance to penumbrse, which occasioned them formerly to be so called. 

Ridges are elevations of luminous matter, extended in rows of irregular 
arrangement. 

Nodules are also elevations of luminous matter, but confined in extent to 
a small space. Those ridges and nodules being brighter than the general 
surface of the Sun, and slightly differing from it in color, have been called 
luculi &iidfaculcB. 

Gorrugatwns are a remarkable unevenness or asperity peculiar to the lu- 
minous clouds, extending over the whole apparent surface of the Sun. The 
depressed parts of the coi-rugations being less luminous than those more ele- 
vated, the disk of the Sun has a variegated or " mottled" appearance. 

Indentations are the low or depressed parts of the corrugations. 

Pores are very small openings about the middle of the mdentations. 

By a number of observations, he would evince that the appearances, 
called spots in the Sun, are real openings in the luminous clouds of the solar 
atmosphere. 

His next series of observations is adduced to prove that the appearances 
which have been called penum,brcB are real depressions or shallows. Fol- 
lowing these are others, alleged to show that ridges are elevations above the 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 13 

luminous solar clouds ;_ that nodules are small but highly elevated luminous 
places; that corrugations consist of elevations and depressions; that inden- 
tations are dark places of the corrugations ; and that pores are the low 
places of indentations. He hence infers that the several phenomena, above 
enumerated, could not appear if the Sun's shining matter were a liquid ; 
since, by the laws of hydrostatics, the openings, shallows, indentations, and 
pores would instantly be filled up, and ridges and nodules could not pre- 
serve their elevation a single moment. But many openings have been 
known to last during a whole revolution of the Sun ; and elevations large 
in extent have continued for several days. Much less can this shining 
matter be an elastic fluid of an atmospheric nature; because this would be 
still more ready to assume a level by filling up the low places. It must, 
therefore, exist in the manner of luminous, empyreal, or phosphoric clouds, 
suspended in the higher regions of the solar atmosphere. 

"It appears highly probable," says Dr. Brewster, "and consistent with 
other discoveries, that the dark, solid nucleus of the Sun is the' magazine 
from which its heat is discharged, while the luminous or phosphorescent 
mantle, which that heat freely pervades, is the region whence its light is 
generated." The high authority of these men does not free their hypotheses 
from objection. If the spots are openings only in the luminous clouds of 
the Sun, why are they stationary for so long a time, except as they partake 
of the Sun's rotation? and why should heat be emitted from the dark body 
of the Sun, and not from its luminous mantle, when that mantle has so much 
the appearance of flame, from which heat is generally difi"used on the earth? 
But investigations into the nature of the Sun must be attended with so 
much uncertainty that, perhajjs, no theoiy on tlie subject can be free from 
objection. 

Much light has been thrown upon heat or caloric by the improvements 
of modern chemistry. But isatisfactory conclusions concerning its nature 
cannot be drawn. Lord Bacon considered heat "the efi'ect of an intestine 
motion, or mutual collision of the particles of the body heated, an expansive 
undulatory motion in the minute parts of the body." Count Eumford's ex- 
periments seemed to show that caloric "was imponderable, and capable of 
being produced ad inJmitMm from a finite quantity of matter." He con- 
cluded, that " it must be an effect arising from some species of corpuscular 
action among the constituent parts of the body." Other chemists consider 
it " an elastic fluid." 

Mr. Dick, a Scotch author of much ingenuity, in his " Christian Philoso- 
pher," has a note on the planet Mercury, deserving consideration. " From 
a variety of facts, which have been observed in relation to the production 
of caloric, it does not appear probable that the degree of heat on the_ sur- 
faces of different planets is inversely proportional to the square of their re- 
spective distances from the Sun. It is more probable that it depends chiefly 
on the distribution of the substance of caloric on the surfaces, and through- 
out the atmospheres of these bodies, in different quantities, according to the 
different situations they occupy in the solar system ; and that these differ- 
ent quantities of caloric are put into action by the influence of the solar 
rays, so as to produce that degree of sensible heat requisite for each respect- 
ive planetary globe. On this hypothesis, which is corroborated by a great 
variety of facts and experiments, there may be no more sensible heat felt on 
the surface of the planet Mercury than on the surface of Herschel, although 



14 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

one of these bodies is nearly fifty times nearer the Sun than the other. "We 
have only to suppose .that a small quantity of caloric exists in Mercury and 
a larger quantity in Herschel, proportionate to his distance from the center 
of the system. On this ground we have no reason to believe either that the 
planets nearest the Sun are parched with excessive heat, or that those that 
are most distant are exposed to all the rigor of insufferable cold ; or that 
the different degrees of temperature which may be found in these bodies 
render them unlit for being the abodes of sensitive and intellectual beings." 

This theory of caloric is modern and popular ; but, like others on the 
same subject, does not command unqualified assent. If heat be a fluid only, 
why is it radiated by all bodies ? and why, reflected, does it pass from ob- 
ject to object in rays, a manner so dissimilar to the movement of other 
fluids ? It may be that the learned world must be content, as in attraction, 
with knowing the operations of heat, without being able to investigate its 
nature. 

Any uncertainty respecting caloric must rest on the physical construction 
of the Sun, the prime agent of heat in whatever way produced. From what 
has been said of solar clouds, it must be apparent that some authors con- 
sider the Sun surrounded by an atmosphere of vast extent. They ground 
their opinion principally on the authority of Dr. Herschel, supported by his 
observations. " The height of the atmosphere he computes to be not less 
than eighteen hundred forty-three, nor more than two thousand seven hun- 
dred sixty-tive miles, consisting of two regions; that nearest the Sun being 
opaque, and probably resembling the clouds of our Earth ; the outermost 
emitting vast quantities of light, and forming the apparent luminous globe 
we behold." 

Hai'iiot, an Englishman, or Fabricius, a German, first discovered the 
spots on the Sun about the year 1610. According to some authors, they 
were first seen by Galileo or Scheiner. An account of his observations of 
them was published by Fabricius in 1611. The spots are various in shape 
and magnitude. Some have been observed large enough to cover the whole 
eastern continent, Europe, Asia, and Africa; some to cover the surface of 
the whole Earth ; and one was observed by Dr. Herschel, in 1799, com- 
puted to be more than fifty thousand miles in diameter. In most of them 
there is a very dark nucleus, surrounded by an umbra, or fainter shade. A 
distinct and well-defined boundary intervenes between the umbra and 
nucleus. The part of the umbra nearest the dark nucleus is generally 
brighter than that; portion which is more distant. 

A spot on the Sun appears at the Earth to perform a revolution round the 
Sun from west to east in a little more than twenty-seven days — a period 
longer than the time in which the Sun revolves on its axis. The excess is 
occasioned by the motion of the Earth in its orbit. The spots on the Sun are 
generally confined to a zone extending about 35° each way from the solar 
equator. None have been seen nearer the poles than the solar latitude of 
39° 5'. 

The Sun rarely appears pure and unsullied by spots. Sometimes, how- 
ever, none are seen on his disk for several years in succession. From the 
year 16Y6 to the year 1684:, not a single spot was seen on the Sun. 

Of MERcintY. 
Mercury is the planet nearest the Sun — so it is still considered, after the 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 15 

most accurate modern discoveries. It shines by a very brilliant and white 
light ; but the short period in which it can be viewed, and the position of 
its body seen through the mists of the horizon, have prevented important 
discoveries being made on its surface. Of all the planets Mercury is the 
most swift in its motion. On this account the name was given to it by the 
ancients, after " the nimble messenger of the gods." It was " represented 
by the figure of a youth with wings at his head and feet ; whence is derived 
5 , the character by which it is commonly represented," So great is the 
velocity of this planet, that it performs more than two revolutions to one of 
Yenus, and, commencing at a conjunction, would pass the Earth three times 
before it would complete a period, the synodic revolution of Mercury, as 
seen by us, being 115 d. 21 h. 3 m. 34 s. 

The mean diameter of the Sxm, as seen from Mercury, is 1° 22'. His 
mean distance from the Sun is to that of the Earth about as 4 to 10.3. The 
intensity of the light and heat of the Sun at Mercury must be about as 6.6 
to 1 at the Earth, being inversely as the squares of the distances. 

The heat of the Sun at Mercury was found, by Sir Isaac Newton, suffici- 
ent to make water boil. Hence, beings constituted like the inhabitants of 
this Earth, cannot endure the climate of Mercury, if Sir Isaac was right, 
and the degree of heat be in proportion to the proximity of the planet to the 
Sun. But, from what has been before considered, the circumstances of 
caloric and atmosphere may be so diversified ; they may be so rare at the 
surface of Mercury, as to render the climate of this planet not only toler- 
able, but salubrious — a comfortable abode for animal life. This, however, 
we know, that, with infinite ease, the Deity could form constitutions suited 
to any situation or climate, destined by him for the creatures of his care. 

The surface of Mercury contains nearly thirty-two millions of square 
miles. It may therefore sustain a population far more numerous than the 
present inhabitants of the Earth. 

According to Dr. Herschel, Mercury is equally luminous in every pai't 
of his body, having neither dark spots nor uneven edge, but a disk well de- 
fined in every part. Mr. Schroeter, on the contrary, pretends to have dis- 
covered in this planet not dark spots only, but mountains. On the author- 
ity of the latter observer rests the discovery of a revolution of Mercury on 
his axis. 

ELEMENTS OF MEECIJET. 

* Diameter, 3,180 miles. 

Mean diameter, as seen from the Sun, 16". 

Inclination of its orbit to the ecliptic, 7° 0' 1". 

Tropical revolution, 87 d. 23 h. 14 m. 33 s. 

Hourly motion in orbit, 110,113 miles. 

Diurnal rotation, according to Schroeter, 24 h. 5 m. 28 s. 

Mean distance from the Sun, 37,000,000 miles. 

Eccentricity, 7,557,630 miles. 

Of Yenus. 

Yenus is to us among the most brilliant of the luminaries seen in the 
nocturnal heavens. She appears west of the Sun from her inferior toher 
superior conjunction, and, rising before him, is called Phosphor, Lucifer, 
or the morntng sta/r. Appearing east of the Sun from her superior to her 
inferior conjunction, she sets after him, and is called Hesperus, Vesper, or 



16 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

the evenmg sta/r. She is in rotation east or west of the Sun about 292 daj^s ; 
but, obscured by his light when near that luminary, she is not visible quite 
so long. It is said that, before the time of Pythagoras, the morning and 
evening stars were supposed to be different, and that he first discovered 
them to be the same. 

The apparent motion of Yenus round the Sun is retarded by the motion 
of the Earth in its orbit, both being in the same direction. Her real revo- 
lution is performed in 22i d. 16 h. 49 m. 15 s. ; her apparent or synodic, in 
583 d. 22 h. t m. 20 s. She appears, therefore, east or west of the Sun longer 
than the whole time of a revolution in her orbit. 

The bright side of Venus is turned nearly or quite toward us at her supe- 
rior conjunction ; but she is then invisible, being near the Sun, or hidden 
behind his body. "When visible, and the illuminated part nearly round be- 
fore or after that conjunction, she appears small, on account of her great 
distance. 

Yenus shines with a light extremely pleasant. Her silver brightness far 
surpasses that of the Moon, and is unequaled by any of the heavenly lumin- 
aries, except sometimes by Jupiter, or by Sirius, the most brilliant of the 
"starry train." Yenus may occasionally be seen in the daytime by the 
naked eye. The obstruction of her morning and evening light frequently 
causes shadows, well defined, like those of a new moon. 

Dr. Herschel observed spots on Yenus. To him she appeared much 
brighter round her limb than at the intervening line between the enlight- 
ened and dark part of her disk. From this he concluded that Yenus, like 
the Earth, had an atmosphere, and that it was more luminous than the body 
of the planet. The height of this atmosphere, according to the computation 
of some, is about fifty miles. Such computation, however, ought to be re- 
ceived with great allowance for uncertainty. The surface of the planet 
being enveloped in her atmosphere may be the reason that so few spots 
have been seen on her disk. 

"Mr. Schroeter," says Dr. Brewster, "seems to have been very successful 
in his observations upon Yenus ; but the results which he has obtained are 
more different than could have been wished from the observations of Dr. 
Herschel. He discovered several mountains in this planet, and found that, 
like those of the Moon, they were always highest in the southern hemi- 
sphere ; their perpendicular heights being nearly as the diameters of their 
respective planets. From the 11th of December, 1789, to the 11th of Jan- 
uary, 1790, the southern hemisphere of Yenus appeared much blunted with 
an enlightened mountain, in the dark hemisphere, nearly twenty-two miles 
high." He states the result of four mountains measured by him: 



First, .... 22.05 miles. 



Second, . . . 18.97 



Third, .... 11.44 miles. 
Fourth, .... 10.84 " 



The bluntness and sharpness, alternately apparent in the horns of Yenus, 
arise, he supposes, from the shadows of high mountains. 

From the changes which appear in her dark spots, and, as inferred by 
Mr. Schroeter, from the illumination of her cusps when she is near her in- 
ferior conjunction, the atmosphere of Yenus is considered very dense. 

The diameter of Yenus has been considered about 220 miles shorter than 
that of the Earth. But it appears from the measurements of Dr. Herschel 
that her apparent mean diameter, reduced to the distance of the Earth, is 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 17 

18".79, that of tlie Earth being 11". S. "This resull," says Dr. Brewster, 
"is rather stirprising; but the observations have the appearance of accuracy." 

ELEMENTS OF VENUS. 

Inclination of her orbit to the ecliptic, 3° 23' 32". 

Diameter, Y,6S7 miles. 

Mean diameter, as seen from the Sun, 23".3. 

Tropical revolution, 224 d. 16 h. 46 m. 15 s. 

Sidereal revolution, 224 d. 16 h. 49 m. 15 s. 

Hourly motion in orbit, 79,226 miles. 

Diurnal rotation, 23 h. 20 m. 59 s. 

Mean distance from the Sun, 68,000,000 miles. 

Of MEEomtT and Yenus. 

Mercury and Yenus are both constant attendants on the Sun ; in the one 
part of their course, being the harbingers of the morning; in the other, 
brightening the vail of evening with their setting splendor. Often seen in 
conjunction with the Sun, but never in opposition, they form a demonstra- 
tion of the truth of the Copernican system. 

The inferior conjunction of Mercury or Yenus is, when the planet comes 
between the Earth and the Sun, or so near the connecting line between 
them as the obliquity of its orbit will admit. It is, when referred to the 
ecliptic, in the same longitude with the Sun, though it may be farther north 
or south. The superior conjunction of either of these planets is, when the 
planet, in that part of its orbit most distant from the Earth, comes into the 
same longitude with the Sun. It is then either hidden behind the great 
luminary, or passes by it on the north or south. 

Mercury and Yenus are called inferior planets, because their orbits are 
nearer the Sun than the orbit of the Earth. 

When an inferior planet is at its greatest elongation, a line passing from 
the Earth through the planet is a tangent to the planet's orbit. The great- 
est elongation of Mercury is 28° 20'; of Yenus, 47° 48'. The orbit of these 
planets being elliptical, the greatest elongation on one side. of the Sun may 
not be equal to that on the other side. 

Mercury, like Yenus, is alternately morning and evening star, though nofr 
generally thus known. Like Yenns, being west of the Sun from m& m^- 
ferior to the superior conjunction, it rises before him in the morning:, flrom 
the superior to the inferior, east of the Sun, it sets after him in the evening, 

The apparent motion of the inferior planets is greatest at the conjunctions., 
From, the greatest elongation on one side to the greatest elongation on, the 
other, through the superior conjunction, their geocentric motion is. direct; 
through the inferior conjunction, this motion is retrograde. At their great- 
est elongation, they appear stationary in respect to the Sun. A small part 
of the orbit nearly coinciding with the tangent line, and the eye of the ob- 
server being in that line, the motion of the planet must be either toward 
such observer or from him, and, of course, must be imperceptible. 

The retrograde motion of Mercury, in regard to the fixed stars, does not 
commence when the planet is at the greatest elongation east, noi' does it 
continue till the planet is at the greatest elongation west of the Snn. For at 
these greatest elongations, the planet will appear to move forward with the 
same velocity as the Sun appears to advance by the motion of the Earth in 
2 



^8 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

its orbit. The stationary appearance, in relation to a fixed star, must be, 
when the geocentric westerly motion of the planet counterbalances the bun s 
apparent easterly motion. ■,. . j ^ 

Venus, like Mercury, has her stationary appearance, her direct and retro- 
grade motion. .,,,1 -i.^ 

We are told by Eyan, in his "Grammar of Astronomy," that "the ditter- 
ent phases or appearances of Yenus were first discovered by Galileo, in 1611, 
which fulfilled the prediction of Copernicus, who foretold, before the dis- 
covery of the telescope, that the phases of the inferior planets would be one 
day discovered to be similar to those of the Moon. The accomplishment of 
this prediction affords some of the strongest and most convincing proofs of 
the truth of the Copernican system. 

One half of each of the planets is illuminated by the Sun. Thus it has 
been uniformly said by authors. On strict examination, however, it will be 
seen that a fraction more than a hemisphere is illumined, the Sun being a 
much larger body than any of the planets. The enlightened side of Mer- 
cury and Venus are turned from the Earth at their inferior conjunctions. 
In these conjunctions, when at or very near their nodes, they appear as dark 
spots passing over the Sun's disk. At other times, invisible to us, they pass 
the Sun unobserved. They appear nearly full at their superior conjunctions ; 
but never completely so, as their enlightened side is never turned directly 
toward us, except at the nodes, when they are hidden behind the body of 
the Sun. 

Of the Eaeth. 

Next to Yenus, in the solar system, is the Earth. TTiis is the planet by 
far the most worthy of our attention ; though astronomy forbids us fully to 
adopt the language of the poet : 

" Through worlds unnumbered, though the God be known, 
'Tis ours to trace him only in our own." 

Tlie Earth affords sustenance to innumerable animated beings which 
people its surface. It is our habitation in life, and kindly covers our re- 
mains when the parting spirit has taken its flight. In its peaceful bosom 
our dust must slumber, till called forth by " the voice of the archangel and 
the trum/p of God." 

The Earth is spherical in its form. It is not, however, a complete globe. 
Elevated at the equator, and flattened at the poles, its form is an oblate 
spheroid, resembling, in some degree, the well-known English turnip. 

Of the rotundity of the Earth any person may satisfy himself. The clouds 
at a distance appear to rise from the horizon, or to sink, below that circle, 
which they could not do were the Earth an extended plain. If, in a level 
country, a person travel north for many miles, he will find, by accurate ob- 
servation, the north star rising, and discover other stars unseen at his former 
station. If he go south, these stars will be depressed, and southern stars 
will rise to his view. 

The masts and sails of a ship at sea are seen by a speqtator on land, when 
the hull is hidden behind the convex surface of the water. Were the sur- 
face level, the hull, being largest, would first appear. 

The outline of the Earth's shadow, seen in partial eclipses of the Moon, 
is circular. This it could not be were not the Earth of a spherical form. 



ASTKONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 19 

For, as it presents different sides to the Sun in different eclipses, and even 
in the same eclipse, the outline of the shadow would be different, in con- 
formity to the original. 

The spherical figure of the Earth is placed beyond all doubts by its hav- 
ing been many times circumnavigated. 

The true form of the Earth, its spheroidical figv/re, was first discovered by 
the pendulum, a longer line being required to vibrate seconds toward the 
poles than at the equator. Some diversity in the proportion of the diameters 
is found in different authors. This is not wonderful in a case requiring so 
much nicety of observation. The excess of the equatorial diameter over 
the polar has been stated at twenty-four, thirty-four, and thirty-seven miles. 
In " Rees's Cyclopedia," the equatorial diameter is reckoned at 7,977, the 
polar at 7,940, considered by the author but "an approximation to a true 
estimation." In the "Practical Navigator" of Dr. Bowditch, the diameter 
is considered 7,964. Thus the mean diameter will be considered in this 
compend. 

The errors of antiquity, of childhood, and ignorance, in considering the 
Earth an extended plain, or unbounded in its dimensions, are corrected by 
philosophy. Its true form is now well-known to the scientific world. Eut 
the astronomical student is in danger of verging to the opposite extreme. 
When he considers the Earth as a planet, greatly inferior in magnitude to 
several wandering orbs of his own solar system — immensely less than the 
Sun ; and the Sun but a speck in the Creator's works — he seems to contract 
its true dimensions, and to be insensible that still, to its inhabitants, it is a 
globe of vast magnitude ; of which, and its kindred orbs, it may be truly 
said, " these little things are great to little man." Considering the diameter 
of the Earth 7,964 miles, the circumference is about 25,020 miles, and the 
superficial contents, or surface, 199,259,280 square miles. 

The equator is an imaginary circle encompassing the Earth from east to 
west; the plane of the circle dividing it into northern and southern hem- 
ispheres. 

The ecliptic is a great circle, in which the Earth performs its annual revo- 
lution; or in which the Sun appears to perform an annual revolution round 
the Earth. It is divided into twelve equal parts, denominated the twelve 
signs of the ecliptic, each containing 30° : Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, 
Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricornus, Aquarius, and Pisces. 

The plane of the equator is inclined to the ecliptic in an angle of about 
23° 28'. (See OUimnty). 

The division of the Earth's surface into zones is not imaginary, but has a 
foundation in nature. The torrid some comprehends all that region where 
the Sun is vertical at any season of the year. The temperate zones spread 
over the whole of the Earth's surface, from the tropics to the extreme limit 
of continual and successive day and night, the Arctic and the Antarctic 
circles being drawn at the bound, where the longest day is twenty-four 
hours. At that bound the Sun does not appear to set at the summer solstice, 
nor to rise at the winter solstice. 

The/rigid zones are enveloped in light and darkness in alternate succes- 
sion. The Sun, at its greatest declination north, shines over the north pole 
to the Arctic circle. The whole northern frigid zone is then illuminated, 
and, by the diurnal motion of the Earth, revolves, wholly in the light. Tlie 
southern frigid zone, precluded from the Sun's rays, is then involved in en- 



20 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

tire darkness. When the Sun is in his greatest declination south, shining 
over the south pole to the Antarctic circle, the southern frigid zone is en- 
lightened ; the northern, abandoned by the Sun, is shrouded in darkness. 
The continuance of light or darkness in the Arctic and Antarctic regions is 
longer, the nearer any place is to either pole, where the day and the night 
continue alternately for six months ; except the greater prevalence of light 
from refraction and other causes. 

The Earth has three motions : its diurnal rotation on its axis_; its annual 
motion in its orbit round the Sun ; and the revolution of its axis round the 
poles of the ecliptic. 

The rotation of the Earth on its axis is performed in 23 h. 56 m. 4 s. or 
one sidereal day. This is a most uniform motion. By bringing the different 
parts of the Earth to the Sun in succession, it produces day and night._ Given 
to this Earth, at its creation, by an all-benevolent Creator, it continues a. 
constant return of blessings to his dependent creatures. This motionis 
from west to east. It causes the apparent revolution of the heavenly bodies 
in a contrary direction, from east to west. 

Different parts of the Earth, in this rotation, move with unequal velocity. 
Greatest at tne equator, it decreases toward the poles, as the cosines of the 
latitude decrease. A place in Borneo or the Colombian Republic, at the 
equator, moves about 1,042 miles an hour ; "Washington city, 811 miles ; 
Boston Y70 miles; London, 649 miles; St. Petersburg, 522 miles; an in- 
habitant of Greenland, in latitude 80°, only 181 miles. When this motion 
is on the side of the Earth opposite the Sun, it nearly coincides with the 
immense velocity of the Earth in its orbit. By this motion the centrifugal 
force of an object near the equator is greater than at any parallel of lati- 
tude. This, as well as its distance from the center of gravity, causes objects 
to be lighter at the equator than near the poles. The farmer and mechanic 
know that the water on a grindstone, turned swiftly round, rises toward 
the highest part, and flies off by increased velocity. A similar effect would 
be produced on the Earth, were the motion sufficiently increased. " If," 
says Dr. Enfield, "the diurnal motion of the Earth round its axis was about 
seventeen times faster than it is, the centrifugal force would, at the equator, 
be equal to the power of gravity, and all bodies there would entirely lose 
their weight. But if the Earth revolved still quicker than this, they would 
all fly off." 

The circles, which the heavenly bodies appear to describe by this motion 
of the Earth on its axis, assume a different position as seen from different 
parts of the Earth's surface ; the great concave of the^ heavens, or celestial 
sphere, changing its appearance, as differently viewed by the spectator. 

At the equator the inhabitants have a right sphere, all the heavenly bodies 
appearing to rise and set at right angles to the horizon. The celestial equator 
passes through the zenith and nadir. The poles are in the horizon. 

From the equator to the poles, the inhabitants have an oblique sphere. 
The apparent circles, or circles formed by the apparent motion of the 
heavenly bodies, are oblique to the horizon ; but fonning angles with it less 
as they are farther from the equator ; till, at the poles, they become parallel 
to the horizon, or coincide with that circle. To a person passing from the 
equator toward either pole, the pole-star of his hemisphere appears to rise, 
and, at a distance from the equator, the stars,ithe same distance from his 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 21 

elevated celestial pole, do not set, but appear to revolve in circles greater 
as they are farther distant from the pole. 

The Earth makes a complete revolution round the Sun, or from a star to 
the same star again, in 365 d. 6 h. 9 m. 12 s. This is called the sidereal yea/r. 
From an equinox or a solstice to the same again, it revolves in 365 d. 5 h. 
48 m. 51 s. This is usually called the tropical yea/r; but sometimes the 
equinoctial or solstitial year. It is usually reckoned from the first degree 
of Aries, but may be computed from any other point of the ecliptic. The 
Earth performs a revolution, from the aphelion of its orbit to the same 
again, in 365 d- 6 h. 14 m. 2 s. 

The mean distance of the Earth from the Sun has been found to be 
about 95,000,000 miles. This was ascertained by observations made on the 
transit of Veniis, in the year 1761. Prior to these observations, the distance 
was considered much less. But their accuracy, confirmed by those on the 
transit of 1769, seems now to command the full assent of the philosophic 
world. Taking the distance as now reckoned, it makes the diameter of the 
Earth's orbit 190,000,000 miles, and the circumference 569,902,100 miles, 
about equal to the elliptical orbit. Tlie earth, moving this immense dis- 
tance in a year, must travel more than 68,000 miles every hour. All the in- 
habitants of the Earth are carried at this inconceivable velocity, one hun- 
dred and forty times greater than that of a cannon-ball, in their perpetual 
movement round the Sun. Even this velocity is increased, on a part of 
each day, by the motion of the Earth on its axis. It may shock the cre- 
dulity of those who are unaccustomed to philosophical observation, that a 
motion of such velocity should be imperceptible. But we must take notice, 
that terrestrial objects around the observer, even the atmosphere, move with 
him in the same direction ; so that with tlie heavenly bodies only can he 
compare his motion. By observation on those bodies, the motion of the 
Earth is ascertained beyond the slightest doubt of the astronomical student. 
But this motion, if wonderful, is not altogether singular. The passing of a 
vessel on still water is imperceptible, except from meeting the air, and the 
apparent motion backward of surrounding objects, till it strikes the shore or 
other obstruction. No motion on the stillest water is so uniform and even 
as that of the Earth in its orbit. 

The retrograde motion of the axis of the Earth round the poles of the 
ecliptic causes the difference between the tropical and sidereal years. The 
equinoxes are annually carried backward, from east to west, 50".118 in a 
year. Thus, in every year, they meet the Sun 20 minutes 24.4 seconds be- 
fore the Earth arrives at the point in the heavens whence it started at the 
commencement of the year. This retrograde motion is called the Recession 
of the eqvMioxes. With the equinoctial points move all the signs of the 
ecliptic. " It follows, that those stars which, in the infancy of astronomy, 
were in Aries, are now in Taurus; those of Taurus, in Gemini. Hence, 
likewise, it is, that the stars which rose or set at any particular season of 
the year in the times of Hesiod, Eudoxus, Yirgil, or Pliny, by no means 
answer at this time to their descriptions." An example of the change may 
be seen on our celestial globes. The constellations are placed 30° from the 
signs to which they originally belonged. This change of place shows the 
motion of the equinoxes for 2,154 years. A complete revolution of the 
signs requires a period of 25,858 years. Hence,- the pole-star, or the north 
poU, as it is called, will not always be. the point to which the pole of the 



22 ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATIOK 

Earth will be directed ; but in something more than 12,000 years will be 
about 47° from the pole of the Earth, and when on the meridian will be in 
the zenith of some parts of New England. 

How should the contemplation of these celestial motions and long periods 
constrain us to improve the short, fleeting moments of time assigned to us; 
and lead us to admire and adore the wisdom and power of Him who formed 
and still governs the universe with infinite ease; to whom "as thousand 
yea/rs are as one day!" 

The Moon. 

The Earth has one satellite, the Moon. This constant attendant is distant 
from the Earth 240,000 miles. The Moon, though inferior to most of the 
heavenly bodies, next to the Sun is to us by far the most interesting. By 
dispelling the gloom of night, she is the solace of the weary traveler ; ana 
by constantly changing her countenance, she gives Tariety and beauty to 
the nightly canopy. 

The Moon performs a revolution round the Earth, from a point in the 
ecliptic to the same again, in 27 d. 7 h. 43 m. 5 s. ; from a star to the same 
again, in 27 d. 7 h. 43 m. 12 s. It revolves from the Sun, to the Sun again, 
in 29 d. 12 h. 44 m. 3 s. This is called a meam hmation, and is a synodical 
revolution. The Moon always presents the same face to the Earth. Hence 
in the same time that it performs a revolution, it must revolve on its axis, 
unless the different sides of the Moon present the same prospect. That 
there should be a uniformity of appearance in the different sides of the 
Moon seems very improbable. Astronomers seem agreed in the coincidence 
of its revolutions ; or that it revolves on its axis in the same time that it 
performs a revolution round the Earth. If this opinion be correct, it must 
be considered that the side of the Moon next to the Earth is composed of 
matter more dense than that of the opposite side ; and that the powerful 
attraction of the Earth causes it to revolve on its axis. 

Several authors have asserted that the Moon performs a revolution in 29^ 
days ; and, in immediate connection, that it turns on its axis in the same 
time that it performs a revolution. The latter assertion is true ; but it is in 
the time of the sidereal revolution, 27 d. 7 h. 43 m. 12 s., and not in the 
synodical, or a lunation, about 29^ days. 

The diameter of the Moon is 2,180* miles. But it can be but 2,173 miles 
if its apparent diameter be 31' 8", as stated by De la Lande. 

The Moon, like the other planets, is opaque, shining only by the reflected 
light of the Sun. The side of the Moon which is next to the Sun is enlight- 
ened, the other half dark and invisible. Hence, when she comes between 
us and the Sun, she is not seen, her dark side being then toward us. 

When she is advanced a little way in her orbit, a small part of her illu- 
mined side becomes visible in the form of a beautiful luminous crescent. 
Tliis is called the new Moon. When she has performed one fourth of a lu- 
nation, her illunainated side becomes dichotomized, or one half of the bright 
side becomes visible. She is then said to be in h.Qv first qua/rter. From tiiis 
time to her oj)position, she is said to be gibbous, presentmg still more of her 
illuminated side as she moves forward, or becoming more protuberant. 
When she becomes opposite to the Sun, nearly the whole of her enlightened 
hemisphere is presented to the Earth. She is then said to he full; and is 
called the full Moon. It must be remembered, however, that the bright 



ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 23 

side of the Moon is never exactly toward us, as she is never directly oppo- 
site to the Sun, except in her nodes, when she falls into the Earth's shadow, 
and is eclipsed. From the full to the change, the Moon passes in a retro- 
grade order through the same phases ; first gibbous, then dichotomized in 
her last quarter, then horned, till, coming between the Earth and the Sun, 
she again becomes invisible. 

The dark parts of the Moon attract the attention of the most careless ob- 
server. Hence " the mam, in the Moon" is familiar to boyhood, and common 
to the unlearned. These dark parts were formerly thought to be seas, but 
are now considered dark cavities not reflecting the light of the Sun. 

The light of the Moon is exceedingly soft and cheering ; but is little in 
the extreme compared with that of the Sun. In this authors are agreed. 
But, from their different modes of computation, they have come to different 
results, and made considerable difference in the disproportion between the 
lunar and solar lights. Dr. Hooke, accounting for the reason why the 
the Moon's light affords no perceptible heat, observes, " that the quantity 
of light which falls on the hemisphere of the full Moon is rarefied into a 
sphere, two hundred and eighty-eight times greater in diameter than the 
Moon, before it arrives at us/' 

The uniformity of the Moon's visage, or its exhibiting always the same 
face, is subject to some alteration. Spots on the east and the west, on the 
north and the south of the Moon, appear and disappear in rotation. The 
phenomena are produced by the Moon's 1/ibrations. These are of four kinds. 
The diurnal motion of the Earth on its axis, carrying the spectator farther 
north or south, causes the daily libration of the Moon. 

The libration of the Moon in longitude is caused by her uniform motion 
round the Earth. 

The libration of the Moon in latitude is caused by the inclination of her 
orbit to the plane of the ecliptic. 

The other is a small libration, caused by the attractive force of the Earth 
on the spheroidical figure of the Moon. 

Of Maes. 

Mars, in distance from the Sun, is next to the Earth in the solar system. 
The red, fiery color of this planet attracted the attention of the ancients. 
Hence they gave it the name of their god of war. Hence also it "is usually 
represented by this character, $, , which is said to be rudely formed from a 
man holding a spear protruded, representing the god of war." 

Some have thought the color of Mars may arise from his being of a nature 
suited to reflect the red rays of light. But the prevailing opinion is, that 
it arises from the extended and dense atmosphere of the planet. The color 
of a beam of light, passing through a dense medium, inclines to red ; the 
color always being brightened in proportion to the density of the medium 
and the distance passed. The red, the least refrangible rays, seem more 
strong and vigorous than the violet, the most refrangible rays. The former 
will traverse an atmosphere, when the latter will be absorbed or diverted. 
Hence the ruddy appearance of this planet and of the Moon eclipsed ; and 
hence the beautiful tinge of the morning and evening clouds. 

In 1665, Dr. Hooke discovered spots on Mars. From a motion perceived 
in these, he concluded this planet had a rotation on its axis. In 1666, Mr. 
Cassini observed spots on Mars. By diligent observation on these, at difler- 



/ A" 



24, ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

ent times, he ascertained that Mars performed a revolution round his axis 
in 24 hours 40 minutes. 

ELEMENTS OF MAES. 

Mean diameter, 4,189 miles. 

Mean diameter, as seen from the Sun, 6 

Inclination of his orbit to the ecliptic, 1° 51' i 

Tropical revolution, 686 d. 22 h. 67 m. 68 s. 

Sidereal revolution, 686 d. 23 h. 30 m. 35 s. 

Diurnal rotation, 24 h. 40 m. 

Mean distance from the Sun, 144,000,000 mUes. 

Of the Astekoids. 

PALLAS. 

Pallas, discovered by Dr. Olbers on the 26th of March, 1802, is in mag- 
nitude nearly the same as Ceres, but of a color less ruddy. It is surrounded 
with nebulosity, similar in appearance to that of Ceres, and extended to a 
height almost equal. In the eccentricity of its orbit, it resembles Juno. 
Pallas is distinguished from all the other primary planets by 'the great in- 
clination of its orbit to the plane of the ecliptic, being about 35° ; nearly 
five times the inclination of Mercury's orbit. 

Mean diameter of Pallas, according to Herschel, 80 miles. 
Mean diameter of Pallas, according to Schroeter, 2,099 miles. 
Mean distance from the Sun, 265,000,000 miles. 
Inclination of its orbit, 34° 39' 0"- 
Tropical revolution, 4 y. 7 m. 11 d. 

Much labor and ingenuity have been employed to show that the Asteroids 
are but fragments of a larger planet burst asunder by some vast explosion. 
The hypothesis seems not supported by conclusive arguments. Against it 
there are strong reasons. The idea itself of such an explosion seems ex- 
travagant beyond conception. How vast must have been the force which 
could throw such bodies from each other to a distance of forty millions of 
miles ; or so as to revolve in orbits forty millions of miles distant ! Im- 
mense is the explosive force of Hecla, throwing lava or cinders to the dis- 
tance of one hundred and fifty miles. But how diminutive ! How are all 
the explosions of Yesuvius and Hecla, of Etna and Cotopaxi, annihilated in 
comparison ! Had these Asteroids constituted but one planet since the first 
attention to the heavenly bodies, it would have been seefi by ancient astron- 
omers, being sufficiently large for observation by the naked eye. It would 
have been enumerated among the planets. It may be added that the vast 
atmosphere of some of these planets, which would without doubt have been 
left behind in such an explosion, seems directly opposed to the idea of their 
having been hurled from a bursting planet. 

Of Jupitee. 

Beyond the Asteroids, or farther distant from the Sun, is Jupiter, the 
largest of the planets. Jupiter, next to Yenus, is the most brilliant of the 
planets. _ He sometimes even surpasses her in brightness. The form of 
Jupiter is an oblate spheroid, his equatorial diameter being to his polar as 
14 to 13. 



I ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 25 

The character if , by which this planet is represented by astronomers, is 
a zeta, the first letter of his Greek name, Z'eus; the lower part cut oif by a 
small line drawn across as a sign of abbreviation. 

The most remarkable phenomena in the disk of Jupiter are a number of 
belts orstripes by which he is encompassed. These appear variable at dif- 
ferent times, and even at the same time, viewed by telescopes of different 
powers. Yet they generally appear parallel to each other, and parallel to 
the equator of Jupiter. In very favorable weather, they sometimes seem 
formed of a number of curved lines, like the strokes of an engraving. Eight 
or ten belts have been seen at the same time. The belts have been observed 
at times of different breadths, and have afterward all assumed nearly the 
same breadth. Bright and dark spots are frequently visible in these belts. 
Like the belts, the spots are subject to continual change. When a belt 
vanishes, the contiguous spots disappear. Some of the spots, however, seem 
to make periodical returns. The spot first observed by Cassini reappeared 
eight times between the years 1665 and 1Y08. In 1713, it again reappeared 
in the same form and position. In 1780, May 28, the disk of Jupiter was 
observed by Dr. Herschel covered with small curved belts, or rather lines 
not contiguous. 

Different opinions are formed by astronomers respecting the cause of 
these appearances. By some they are considered the effect of changes in 
the atmosphere surrounding Jupiter, while they are regarded by others as 
indications of great physical revolutions on the surface of the planet. By 
others, again, it is supposed that the clouds of Jupiter, partaking the great 
velocity of his diurnal motion, are formed into strata, parallel to his equator, 
that the clouds reflect more light than the body of Jupiter, and that the 
belts are the body seen through the parallel interstices of the clouds. "But 
whatever be the nature of these belts," says Mr. Dick, " the sudden changes 
to which they are occasionally subject seem to indicate the rapid operations 
of some powerful physical agency — for some of these are more than five 
thousand miles in breadth— and, since they have been known to disappear 
in the space of an hour or two, and even during the time of a casual ob- 
servation, agents more powerful than any with which we are acquainted 
must have produced so extensive an effect." 

ELEMENTS OF JUPITER. 

Mean diameter, 89,170 miles. 

Mean diameter, as seen from the Sun, 37".7. 

Inclination of his orbit to the ecliptic, 1° 18' 51". 

Tropical revolution, 11 y. 314 d. 8 h. 41 m. 3 s. 

Diurnal rotation, 9 h. 55 m. 37 s. ^ 

Mean distance from the Sun, 490,000,000 miles. 

SATELLITES OF JIJPITEE. 

Jupiter is attended by four satellites. They are reckoned the first, second, 
third, and fourth, beginning with the one nearest to the primary. These 
satellites were discovered by Galileo on the 8th of January, 1610, and called 
by him Mediea sidera, Me(Ucecm sta/rs, in honor of his patrons, the family 
of the Medici. 

By some we are told these satellites are not to be seen by the naked eye. 
But Prior, in his " Lectures on Astronomy," informs us that, " with the ex- 



26 ASTBONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

ception of the third and fourth, they are never visible to the naked eye ; 
instances of these two being so seen are extremely rare, although they have 
been known to occur." He tells us, in another place, that, " according, to 
Dr. Herschel, the third is the largest ; the second the least ; and the first and 
fourth are nearly of the same size. They are all of them supposed to be 
considerably larger than the Earth ; but their dimensions are not exactly 
known." 

Through a good telescope the satellites of Jupiter present a delightful 
prospect. They seem generally ranged in a straight line, parallel, or nearly 
parallel, to his belts. Jupiter and his satellites eclipse each other. Like 
the Moon, they throw their dark shadows upon their primary ; and like her 
they fall into his shadow, and are eclipsed. These phenomena are a demon- 
stration that those distant luminaries are in themselves opaque, and shine 
not by their own light, but by rays borrowed from the Sun. 

The echpses of Jupiter's satellites are of great utility to as. By these it 
is found that light is progressive, which, before their discovery, was sup- 
posed to be instantaneous. By them the relative distances between the 
Earth, the Sun, and Jupiter can be ascertained. But the greatest benefit 
derived from these eclipses is to geography and navigation. They afford 
one of the best methods yet known for ascertaining longitude. It could 
not have occurred to Galileo, when he first discovered these satellites, that 
by an act so simple he was rendering so great a benefit to mankind. Here 
is verified the observation of a celebrated traveler, that the Deity every- 
where brings the greatest events from causes apparently the least. 

Distances from 
Satellites. Periodical times. primary in miles. 

1 1 d. 18 h. 28 m. 36. s. 266,000 

2 3 13 lY • 54 423,000 

3 7 3 69 36 676,000 

4 16 18 6 6 1,189,000 



Of Saturn. 

Beyond Jupiter in the solar system is Saturn, formerly considered the 
most remote of the planets. He shines with a dull, pale, leaden light. ■ 

The character of Saturn, '^ , is a scythe, rudely represented ; according to 
some, an old man leaning on a staff. In heathen mythology, Saturn was 
the father of Jupiter. 

Belts and dark spots have been discovered on the disk of Saturn. Five 
belts, nearly parallel to the equator, were discovered by Huygens. Several 
nearly parallel to the ring, and more extensive in proportion to the body of 
the planet than those of Jupiter, were seen by Dr. Herschel. By the spots 
of Saturn changing their position, hie diurnal rotation was determined by 
Dr. Herschel to be 10 h. 16 m. 0.44 s. Guy, in his "Astronomy," informs 
us, " later accounts say, 12 h. ISJ m." 

_ To an inhabitant of Saturn, the Sun's light and heat must be about ninety 
times less than they are to us. 

Yiewed Avith a good telescope, Saturn appears of a spheroidical figure. 
A remarkable circumstance is, the flattening at the poles does not seem to 
commence till the high latitude of 43° 20'. According to Dr. Herschel the 
proportion of his disk is : 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 27 

Diameter of the greatest curvature, 36 

Equatorial diameter, 35 

Polar diameter, 32 

The most remarkable phenomenon of Saturn is a ring with which he is 
encompassed. Something extraordinary in the appearance of this planet 
was discovered by Galileo. It seemed a large globe between two smaller 
globes. This discovery he announced in 1610. Continuing his observations 
till the year 1612, to his surprise the smaller globes disappeared, and the 
larger remained apparently alone. But after some time the smaller globes 
again appeared on each side of the larger globe, changing their form as he 
continued his observations ; appearing at different times round, semicircular, 
oblong like an acorn, with horns toward the globe, becoming gradually so 
long and wide as to encompass it with an elliptical ring. " Upon this ituy- 
gens set about improving the art of grinding object-glasses, and made tel- 
escopes which magnified two or three times more than any which had been 
before made, with w-hich he discovered very clearly the ring of Saturn ; and 
having observed it for some time, he published the discovery in 1656." 

The ring of Saturn is double, or rather consists of two concentric rings, 
detached from each other, and from the body of the planet. The two parts 
of the ring lie in the same plane, performing a revolution round an axis per- 
pendicular to that plane, in 10 h. 32 m. 15 s. It is visible to us when the 
Sun is on the same side of its plane with the Earth, but at no other times. 
A deep shadow is cast by the ring on that part of Saturn which is opposite 
to the Sun. In this dark shadow, each half of the planet in succession 
must be enveloped for almost fifteen of our years, or during one half of 
Saturn's annual revolution. During the same term, each in succession must 
be illuminated by the double ring, *he light of which is more brilliant than 
that of the planet itself. 

The ring of Saturn is considered by Dr. Herschel not as a shining matter, 
or aui'ora borealis, as supposed by some, but solid and dense as the body of 
the planet. 

DIMENSIONS OF THE EING. 

Miles. 

Inner diameter of the interior ring, . 146,345 

Exterior diameter, .■ 184,393 

Inner diameter of the external ring, . 190,248 

Exterior diameter, 204,883 

Breadth of the inner ring, .... 19,024 

Breadth of the external ring, . . . 7,317 

Breadth of the vacant space, . . . 2,927 , 

ELEMENTS OF SATUEN. 

Mean diameter, 79,042 miles. 

Mean diameter, as seen from the Sun, 18". 

Inclination of his orbit to the ecliptic, 2° 29' 34.8". 

Tropical revolution, 29 y. 162 d. 11 h. 30 m. s. 

Diurnal rotation, 10 h. 16 m. 

Mean distance from the Sun, 900,000,000 miles. 

Eccentricity, 50,958,399 miles. 



28 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

SATELLITES OF SATTJKN. 

Saturn has seven satellites, revolving about their primary, and accom- 
panying him in his revolution round the Sun. 

Distances from 
Satellites. Periodical times. primary in miles. 

1 Od. 22 h. 37 m. 22 s. 107,000 

2 1 8 53 8 135,000 

3 1 21 18 27 170,000 

4 2 17 41 22 1217,000 

5 4 12 25 12 303,000 

6 15 22 41 13 704,000 

7 79 7 48 2,050,000 

The seventh satellite of Sattirn is, by some, reckoned the fifth. This 
satellite is remarkably bright at its greatest v^estern elongation, surpassing 
all the others but one in luster. Yery small at other times, it entirely dis- 
appears at its greatest eastern elongation. This phenomenon was first ob- 
served by Cassini. It may arise from one part of the satellite being more 
luminous than the other parts. It was observed through all the variations 
of light by Dr. Herschel. He concluded that, like the satellites of Jupiter 
and our Moon, it revolved on its axis at the same time that it performed a 
revolution round its primary. 

"There is not, perhaps," says Dr. Herschel, "another object in the 
heavens that presents us with such a variety of extraordinary phenomena 
as the planet Saturn ; a magnificent globe, encompassed by a stupendous 
double ring; attended by seven satellites; ornamented with equatoi'ial 
belts; compressed at the poles; turning upon its axis; mutually eclipsing 
its ring and satellites, and eclipsed by them ; the most distant of the rings 
also turning upon its axis, and the saipe taking place with the farthest of 
the satellites ; all the parts of the system of Saturn occasionally reflecting 
light to each other ; the rings and the moons illuminating the night of the 
Saturnian ; the globe and the satellites enlightening the dark parts of the 
rings ; and the planet and the rings throwing back the Sun's beams upon 
the moons, when they are deprived of them at the time of their conjimc- 
tions." 

Of Heeschel. 

Herschel, Uranus, or Georgium Sidus, was unknown as a planet to the 
scientific world till the year 1781. On the 13th of March, in that year, it 
was discovered by the celebrated astronomer whose name it usually bears 
in this country. Before the discovery, it had probably been seen by astron- 
omers, but had attracted no particular attention. Prior, in his Lectures, 
tells us, " it had been observed by Flamstead and Mayer, but was considered 
by them as a' fixed star, and, as such, introduced into their catalogues." 
Viewing the small stars near the feet of Gemini, Dr. Herschel was struck 
with the appearance of one, less brilliant than the rest, but surpassing them 
in magnitude. He suspected it to be a comet. Observing it with different 
telescopes, he found that, contrary to the fixed stars, its disk appeared to in- 
crease with the magnifying power of the glasses. He found also, by meas- 
uring its distance from some of the fixed stars, at different times, that it 
moved about 2^" in an hour. That it was a planet, first occurred to Dr. 
Maskelyne. 

The name of Oeorgkim Sidus, or Georgian Star, wasgiven to this planet 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 29 

by Dr. Herscliel, in compliment to his patron George III., the then reigning 
king of Great Britain. It is often called Uranv^, in European publications. 
Uranus, in heathen mythology, was the father of Saturn. 

This planet is so distant, it is scarcely visible to the naked eye. In a 
serene sky, however, it appears like a star of the sixth magnitude, shining 
with a bluish-white light, and a brilliancy between the splendor of the Moon 
and that of "Venus. 

Such is the immense distance of this planet that no observations have 
been made upon it by which the time of its diurnal revolution can be deter- 
mined. 

Herschel is denoted by this character, H, the initial of a name immortal 
as human science ; " the horizontal bar being crossed by a perpendicular 
line, forming a kind of cross, the emblem of Christianity, denoting, perhaps, 
its discovery was made in the Christian era." The ball, however, repre- 
sented as pendent from the H, may be a globe or planet, as hanging on the 
discovery of the astronomer Herschel. ' 

ELEMENTS OF HERSCHEL. 

Mean diameter, 35,112 miles. 

Mean diameter as seen from the Sun, 4". 

Inclination of his orbit, 0° 46' 26". 

Tropical revolution, 83 y. 305 d. 7h. 21m. 

Mean distance of the planet from the Sun, 1,800,000,000 miles. 

SATELLITES OF HEESCHEL. 

Six satellites have been discovered accompanying Herschel in his dark 
and tedious roimd. " It is remarkable," says Prior, " that these satellites 
revolve in a retrograde direction, or contrary to the order of the signs, in 
orbits lying nearly in the same plane, and almost perpendicular to the plane 
of the planet's orbit." This statement is corroborated by other accounts. 
The satellites of Herschel were all discovered by Dr. Herschel. 

Distances from 



Satellites. 
1 


5d. 


Periodical times. 

21 h. 25 m. 


20 s. 


primary in mill 

230,335 


2 


8 


16 57 


47 


298,838 


3 


10 


23 2 


47 


348,388 


4 


13 


10 66 


29 


399,593 


5 


38 


1 48 





746,240 


6 


107 


16 • 39 


56 


1,597,708 



Causes of the Plajstetaet Motion. 

Matter is in itself inactive, and moves but as impelled by external force. 
An impulse being given to a body, it passes in a right Ime, till turned out 
of its course by a different impulse, not in direct coincidence or opposition 
to the former. Uninterrupted, it would forever move in the same direction, 
and at the same rate, or over equal distances in equal times. After every 
new impulse, it will take a new direction, and pass m a diagonal between 
its former course and the direction of the new impulse. 

Comets. 

The term comet is derived from the Latin cometa. This is a derivative^ 
from G<ma, a head or lock of hair. The original is a Greek primitive, comee, 



30 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

hair. "Without doubt, comets are so called from the train or tail they ex 
hibit when in the vicinity of the Sun. 

Comets are large heavenly bodies, moving round the Sun in various 
directions, and in orbits very eccentric. They seem to come from some far- 
distant region, make a short circuit round the Sun, and then retire to their 
unknown bound. By the unlearned, they are often called hlazvng sta/rs. It 
is not strange, if, as has been represented, in the days of barbarism and 
superstition, comets were considered portentous ; if they were regarded as 
the harbingers of war, famine, and pestilence ; if they presented to the 
frighted imaginations of men the conviilsions of states, the dethronement of 
princes, and the fall of empires. Even among the ancients, however, men 
of science regarded them in a very different light. Such men so far observed 
the motions of comets as to form ideas of them in some measure consonant 
to modern philosophy. By the Chaldeans, they were considered as planets ; 
and such they were regarded by the Pythagorean philosophers of Italy. 

Astronomers of the present day view comets not only as harmless, but 
designed by the all-wise Creator for benevolent and important purposes ; 
though most of those purposes must be unknown to us, or deduced by rea- 
soning from analogy. 

There is a great diversity in comets. "When viewed through a good tele- 
scope, a comet generally resembles a mass of aqueous vapor surrounding a 
dark nucleus. The shades of appearance are very different in different 
• comets. Even the nucleus seems wanting in some. Comets of this kind 
were observed by Dr. Herschel; some by the sister of that astronomer. 
Approaching the Sun, the nebulous light of a comet becomes more brilliant, 
and its luminous train increases in length. At the perihelion its heat is 
greatest, and the length of its train the most extensive. Here the comet 
sometimes shines with all the splendor of Venus. Its brilliancy decreases 
as it retires from the perihelion, till it reassumes its nebulous appearance. 
" History records," says Dr. Kees, " that some comets have appeared as large 
as the Sun." One of this magnitude is said to have been visible at Eome in 
the reign of Nero. " The astronomer Hevelius also observed a comet, in 
1652, which did not appear to be less than the Moon, though it was defi- 
cient m splendor, having a pale, dim light, and exhibiting a dismal aspect." 
— WilTcvnis Astronomy. 

The number of comets which have been seen within the limits of the solar 
system is not known. It has been stated at from three hundred and fifty to 
five hundred. 

Some cornets have approached nearer to the Sun than any of the planets. 
Of ninety-eight, whose elements have been computed, twenty-four passed 
between the Sun and the orbit of Mercury ; thirty-three between the orbits 
of Mercury and Yenus ; twenty-one between the orbits of Yenus and the 
Earth ; sixteen 'between the orbits of the Earth and Mars ; three between 
the orbits of Mars and Ceres ; and one between the orbits of Ceres and 
Jupiter. 

The tails of comets sometimes occupy an immense space. The comet of 
1681 stretched its tail across 104° ; that of 1769 subtended an angle of 60° 
at Paris, 70° at Boulogne, 97° at the Isle of Bourbon. 

By some, the tails of comets have been considered the rays of the Sun 
transmitted through the nucleus of the comet, believed to be transparent like 
a lens. This was the opinion of Appian, Cardan, and Tycho Brahe. Kepler 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 31 

thought the tail was formed by the solar rays driving away the denser parts 
of the comet's atmosphere. Euler thinks there is a great affinity bet\yeen 
the aurora borealis, the zodiacal light, and these tails ; and that the cause 
of them all is the action of the Sun's light on the atmosphere of the Earth, 
the Sun, and the comets. 

The hypothesis of Dr. Hamilton, of Dublin, deserves particular consider- 
ation. He supposes the tails of comets to be streams of electrical light. 
The doctor supports his opinion by these arguments: "A spectator at a 
distance from the Earth would see the aurora borealis in the form of a tail, 
opposite to the Sun, as the tail of a comet lies. The aurora borealis has no 
eifect upon the stars seen through it, nor has the tail of a comet. The at- 
mosphere is known to abound with electric matter ; and the appearance of 
the electric matter in vacuo resembles exactly that of the aurora boreahs, 
whjch, from its great altitude, may be considered in as perfect a vacuum as 
we can make. The electric matter in vacuo suffers the rays of light to pass 
through without being affected by them. The tail of a comet does not ex- 
pand itself sideways, nor does the electric matter. Hence he supposes the 
tails of comets, the aurora borealis, and the electric fluid to be the same 
kind of matter." It may be added, in confirmation of this hypothesis, that 
many astronomers have observed an undulatory motion in the tails of comets 
similar to what is sometimes seen in the aurora borealis. About the close 
of the Kevolutionary war the aurora borealis was most extensive and bril- 
liant in the United States. This, with vast undulations, covered the whole 
northern half of the hemisphere, collecting into a beautiful center in the 
zenith. To a spectator on a distant planet this might give the Earth an ap- 
pearance resembling, in some measure, the blazing effulgence of a comet. 

Eqttation of Time. 

' Though the apparent motion of the Sun has been used as a measure of 
time from the greatest antiquity, yet accurate observation has shown it is 
far from being uniform. The Sun is either faster or slower than a well- 
regulated cloci or watch during most of the year. At four times only do 
they coincide, viz. : the lith of April, the 15th of June, the 31st of August, 
and the 23d of December. From the 14th of April to the 15th of June, the 
Sun is fast of clock ; from the 15th of June to the 31st of August, it is slow 
of clock ; from the 31st of August to the 23d of December, it is fast of 
clock ; from this time to the 14th of April, it is slow of clock. From the 
difference of longitude, the days of coincidence are not all the same in the 
United States as in Europe. About the 1st of November the Sun is 16 m. 
14 or 15 s. fast of clock. This is the greatest inequality. The difference is 
caused by the elliptical figure of the Earth's orbit, and the obliquity of the 
equator to the plane of the ecliptic. 

The Ttoes. 

The tides are the alternate ebbing and flowing of the Sea. They are im- 
perceptible in the midst of the ocean, and can only be known by the rising 
of the water on the adjacent land, or where the depth of water will admit 
of sounding. 

Kepler was the first who discovered the true cause of the tides, and that 
the attraction of the Sun and Moon produced the constant flux and reflux 
of the water. But a " hint being giVen, the immortal Sir Isaac Newton 



32 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

improved it, and wrote so amply on the subject as to make the theoryof the 
tides in a manner quite his own, by discovering the cause of their rising on 
the side of the Earth opposite to the Moon. For Kepler believed that the 
presence of the Moon occasioned an impulse, which caused another in her 
absence." 

The attraction of the Moon is the principal cause of the tides ; but the 
attraction of the Sun operates to increase or diminish the height or depres- 
sion of the water occasioned by the lunar attraction. But were every part 
of the Earth equally attracted by the heavenly bodies, no tide could be 
produced. The unequal attraction, or the attraction of one part of the ter- 
raqueous globe more forcibly than the other, may be considered as the true 
cause of the tides. The force of attraction in any body decreases as the 
squares of the distances from that body increase. Hence the farther dis- 
tant any body is from the center of attraction, the less the operation, on . 
that body. The water, therefore, on the side of the Earth next to the Moon 
is more forcibly attracted than the body of the Earth, and the body of the 
Earth than the water on the opposite side. Suppose three particles of mat- 
ter, one on the surface of the Earth next to the Moon, one at the center of 
the Earth, and one on the surface opposite to the Moon. By the laws of 
gravitation the particle nearest to the Moon would be more attracted by her 
than that at the center,, and that at the center more attracted than the par- 
ticle on the opposite side. By the unequal attractions the distances between 
these particles would-be increased. One would be elevated from the center, 
and the center particle would be drawn from that on the side opposite to the 
Moon, amounting to the same thing as if the opposite particle were ele- 
vated. For, when the distance between the center of the Earth and a par- 
ticle at the surface is increased, the particle will appear raised from the sur- 
face. "We take notice of a tide, because the water rises on the adjacent 
land. This will be the case when the distance between the surface of the 
water and the center of the Earth is increased, whether the water be ele- 
vated from the Earth, or the Earth be withdrawn from the water. No more 
difficulty, therefore, arises in accounting for the tide on the side of the Earth 
opposite the Moon than for that on the surface nearest to her, both being 
the effect of unequal attraction. 

The points directly under and opposite to the Moon may be considered as 
the centers of highest elevation ; and 90° from these, or half the distance 
between them, as the circle of low water. This extends wholly round the 
Earth, and moves as the Moon moves. , 

When the Moon is in the equator the circle of low water, 90° distant, 
must extend from pole to pole. Every place from the equator to the poles 
must have its regular return of tides ; and these, uninfluenced by extraneous 
causes, must return at equal intervals. 

As the Moon moves from the equator toward either tropic, the circle of 
low water recedes from the poles toward the polar circles, arriving at these 
when she arrives at the tropics. 

This departure of the Moon from the equator must make flood tide at the 
poles, increasing as her declination increases, and highest when she is farthest 
distant from the equator. On her return the tides ebb at the poles, where 
it becomes low water when she arrives at the equinoctial. In a revolution 
of the Moon, therefore, two tides only occur at the poles, full sea returning 
at intervals of about 13| days. During the interval in which the circle 



ASTRONOMY AKD NAVIGATION. 33 

of low water is distant from the poles, places in any parallel touching the 
highest point of that circle have but one tide in a revolution from the Moon 
round to the Moon again. Places between that circle and the poles, in the 
same time, have but one, and that a partial tide ; while all below its highest 
point have two tides in succession. 

_ At the equator the intervals between high and low water, or between a 
tide and a succeeding tide, remain equal, whatever may be the declination 
of the Moon. When she is in the equator the tides return at equal intervals 
in all latitudes. But when she is in any degree of declination, places on each 
side of the equator, cutting the circle of low water in their diurnal rotation, 
or which are below the highest point of ebb tide, have unequal duration of 
ebb and flood, or of time between high and low water in difterent parts of 
the lunar day ; the farther distant from the equator, the more unequal the 
returns. 

The Moon being in her north declination, places in the northern hemi- 
sphere have their highest tides, but when she is in the south declination the 
opposite tides are the highest. In the southern hemisphere the whole is 
reversed. 

The tide, as raised by the Moon, is greater on the side of the Earth next 
to her than that on tlie opposite side. The cause of this is apparent. For, 
as she is nearer to that side, the semi-diameter of the Earth bears the greater 
proportion to the shorter distance. 

For convenience of explication, the highest tides have been considered 
directly under and opposite the Moon. It is, however, learned from obser- 
vation that the tide is not at its greatest height above or below the horizon 
till after the Moon has passed the meridian ; because the water having ob- 
tained a direction, continues that direction after the Moon has passed till 
prevented by external force. Similar occurrences are common. The heat 
of the day is most intense after the Sun has passed the meridian ; and the 
extreme of summer heat is generally not till some time after the summer 
solstice. 

The tides are in some measure altered by the inclination of the Moon's 
orbit to the plane of the ecliptic. Ilence the 'highest elevation of water 
may at times be more than 5° above the tropics ; and the region of single 
tide reduced as much below the polar circles. 

The tides, as we have seen, are affected by the influence of the Sun. The 
attraction of the Sun is more powerful at the Earth than that of the Moon, 
but has less effect in raising tides. The immense distance of the Sun from 
the Earth causes his attraction on the different parts to be nearly equal, the 
semi-diameter of the Earth bearing but a very small proportion to this im- 
mense distance. The influence of the Sun causes the tides to be earlier in 
the first and third quai'ters of the Moon; later in her second and fourth. 
In the former case the tide of the Moon is preceded by that of the Sun; in 
the latter, it is succeeded and retarded by the elevation of water raised by 
the Sun. The highest tides are denominated spring tides. These happen 
at the conjunctions and oppositions of tlie Sun and Moon, or at the changes 
and fulls. 

Eclipses. 

An eclipse is a partial or total obscuration of a heavenly body. 

So far as astronomical observation has extended, the Sun is the only 

2 



34 ASTRONOMY AND NAS^IGATION. 

lieaveuly luminary in the solar system that shines by its own light. The 
planets are in themselves opaque, and shine only by reflecting the solar rays. 
Hence on the side of those not illuminated by the Sun dark shadows are 
cast. These shadows are in the form of vast cones extending into the 
heavens. Tliey are but privations of light in the space hid from the Sun. 
That they are not coextensive witli the Sun's light, but terminate at a dis- 
tance far more limited is evident, because the primary planets never eclipse 
each other. Mars, though often in opposition to the Sun, is never eclipsed 
by the Earth's shadow. This must, therefore, terminate before it reaches 
that planet. 

The shadow of the Earth. when longest is about 219 of its semi-diameters. 
Different computations make a trifling difference in the mean extent of this 
shadow. If the diameters of the Earth and Sun be taken as before stated, 
and the shadow be computed from these, it will be found to be about 217 
semi-diameters of the Earth, equal to 864,094 miles. 

If the Moon revolved in the plane of the ecliptic, an eclipse would hap- 
pen at every conjunction and opposition, or at every change and full. But 
her orbit being inclined to that circle in an angle of 5 9' 3", varying a 
little at different times, eclipses cannot happen except when she is in or 
aboxit her nodes. In every other part of her orbit she is either too far 
north or south to eclipse the Sun, or to fall into the Earth's shadow, and be 
herself eclipsed. The limit is different in different species of eclipses. For 
if the Moon be within about 17° of either of her nodes at the change there 
will be a solar eclipse. But lunar eclipses can happen but when she is 
within about 11°, of her nodes. The greatest limit in solar eclipses, accord- 
ing to the tables in the author's larger work, is 18° 11'; the least, 16° 28'. 
The greatest in lunar, 11° 51'; the least, 10° 11'. 

In lunar _ eclipses, when a part only of the Moon's disk is covered, 
the eclipse is denominated partial; when the whole disk is covered, total; 
when the center of the disk passes through the center of the shadow, 
central. 

The Moon is visib'le when totally immersed in the Earth's shadow, ap- 
pearing of a dusky red color, like burnished copper. It is probable that 
the retracted rays of the Sun cause this phenomenon. These traversing the 
atmosphere of the Earth are by it turned inward, so as to fall on the Moon, 
and render her distinctly to be seen. 

In a lunar eclipse, all to whom the Moon is visible see her in the same 
instant of absolute time. 

Solar eclipses are much more frequent than lunar ; but most of the former 
are invisible at any particular part of the Earth. 

The dark shadow of the Moon sometimes reaches to the Earth, eclipsing 
a small portion of its surface ; sometimes that dark shadow is terminated 
before it arrives at the Earth. In the latter case, the Sun, at the center of 
an eclipse, appears like a luminous ring. The eclipse is then called annvr 
la/r. This beautiful phenomenon was seen in some parts of New England 
on the morning of April 3, l791 ; at Washington, September 17, 1811 ; and 
in the Eastern parts of the United States, February 12th of the year 1831. 
The dark shadow of the Moon is longest when she is in perigee and the 
Earth in aphelion ; shortest when she is in apogee, and the Earth in peri- 
helion. The inhabitants of our republic have had the satisfaction of viewing 
three annular eclipses since the commencement of the present century; one. 



ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 35 

September 17, 1811, another, February 12, 1831, and another, September 18, 
1838 ; the annular eclipses being three for the century. 

Two total solar eclipses are computed for the United States during the 
century ; one June 16, 1806 ; the other, August Y, 1869. It will appear 
from this, and from inspection of the tables of the semi-diameters of the Sun 
and Moon, that annular eclipses of the Sun are more frequent than total 
eclipses of the same luminary. 

The Moon's partial shadow is called her penumbra. All the inhabitants 
over whom this shadow extends see the Sun partially eclipsed. The dark- 
ness of the penumbra decreases as it diverges from the dark shadow of the 
Moon. The motion of the dark shadow and penumbra over the Earth is 
nearly from west to east ; except at the polar regions, when they sometimes 
pass in an opposite direction. 

The whole number of eclipses in any one year is never less than two, nor 
more than seven : when two, both are of the Sun ; when seven, four are of 
the Sun, three of the Moon. 

The line of the Moon's nodes has a constant motion from east to west, or 
backward in the ecliptic, making a complete revolution in 18 y. 223 d. 20 h. 
13 m. 32 s. In a year of 365 days its motion is 19° 19' 43", completing a 
revolution in 18 y. 224 d. 4h. 63 m. when leap-year is four times taken; in 
18 y. 223 d. 4h. 58 m. when leap-year is live times included. By the retro- 
grade motion of the nodes, either of them is brought round to the Sun, or 
passes from the Snn to the Sun again, in 346 d. 14 h. 52 m. 14 s. on a mean. 
Half of this time only intervenes between one node and the other passing 
the Sun. "When eclipses happen at the ascending node, other eclipses may 
be expected at the descending node in about 173 d. ; and, after a lapse of the 
same time, at the ascending node, thus continuing in rotation. 

When the Sun and Moon have been in conjunction with the Moon's 
ascending or descending node, they will be in conjunction again within 28' 
12" of the same node, after 223 mean lunations. Thus is formed a regular 
period of eclipses.' It is completed in 18 y. 11 d. 7h. 43m. 19 s. when leap- 
year is four times included ; 18 y. 10 d. 7h. 43 m. 19 s. when leap year is five 
times included. There is a regular series of returns to each eclipse. Eclipses 
at the ascending node first strike the Earth at the north, and pass oil" at the 
south pole, moving a little southward at eacli return. Eclipses at the de- 
scending node commence at the south and retire at the north pole. After an 
eclipse has completed a series, and left the Earth, it will not again return and 
commence a new series at the same node, till after an absence of more than 
12,000 years. The eclipses commencing at one pole are equal in number to 
those commencing at the other. The irregular motion of the Earth and 
Moon may accelerate or retard the commencement of a series about one 
hundred years. In one series an eclipse may visit the Earth but seventy 
times ; it will not surpass seventy-seven times. When an eclipse returns 
but seventy times, it will occupy about 1,262 years ; when it returns seventy- 
seven times, it will require 1,388 years. The memorable eclipse of June 
16, 1806, was total to a large part of New England. It happened at the 
Moon's descending node. Having traversed the mighty void from the crea- 
tion, it first met the South pole on the morning of the 6th of March, O. S. 
1049, at lOh. 11m. 39 s. Each visit has shown it a little farther north. 
On the 24th of June, 1824, it happened in the evening, the Sun going 
down a little eclipsed at Washington. It again visited the Earth, July 



36 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 



S, 1842. But, being at 2 h. 2 m. 2 s. in the morning, at Washington, it was 
invisible in the United States; but was large and total over a wide 
extent of the eastern continent. This eclipse will leave the Earth at the 
north pole on the 11th of May, in the year 2347, N. S. of the Christian era. 

The dark shadow of the Moon, when longest, and falling directly on the 
Earth, extends about 107 miles. Iti most cases, however, it falls obliquely ; 
in some, very obliquely, when it may cover an extent of more than 900 miles. 

The tables make the extent of the penumbra, when least, about 4,500 
miles ; when greatest, a little more than 7,000 miles. It is very different at 
different times, varying on account of the distance of the Sun and Moon, but 
more from the oblique manner in which it often strikes the Earth. ■ 

According to the tables in the author's larger work, total darkness in a 
solar eclipse will never continue in one place more than 5 m. 32 s. The 
duration will be a little longer, according to the tables of Enfield. Several 
authors state this duration short of the truth, making it three minutes, or 
about three minutes. In the June eclipse of 1806, total darkness was con- 
siderably short of the greatest possible duration ; yet, in the southern part 
of New Hampshire, the author, by the most careful observation, made it 
4 m. 20s. At Sterling, Massachusetts, Eobert B. Thomas, the author of the 
Farmer's Almanac, probably nearer the center of the shadow as it passed, 
found the time of total darkness 4 m. 45 s. 



ECLIPSES VISIBLE IN THE UNITED STATES. 



Tear. 


t 


Month. 


D. 


H. 


M. 


A. P. M. 


Remarks. 


1859 


© 


Feb. 


17 


5 


36 


A.M. 


Total. 




© 


July 


29 


5 


44 


P.M. 


Small, 


1860 


e 


Feb. 


6 


9 


17 


P.M. 






® 


July 


18 


7 


55 


A.M. 




1861 


m 


Dec. 


17 


3 


9 


A.M. 






© 


Dec. 


81 


7 


45 


A. M. 




1862 


© 


June 


12 


1 


18 


A.M. 


Total. 




f) 


Dec. 


6 


2 


43 


A. M. 


Total. 


1863 


m 


June 


1 


6 


30 


P.M. 


Total. Moon rises eclipsed. 




© 


Nov, 


26 


4 


21 


A. M. 




1864 
















1865 


® 


April 


10 


11 


29 


P.M. 


Very small. 




® 


Oct. 


4 


5 


60 


P.M. 


Very small. 




© 


Oct. 


19 


10 


27 


A.M. 




1866 


® 


March 


30 


11 


30 


P.M. 


Total, 


1867 


® 


March 


20 


3 


45 


A.M. 






® 


Sept. 


13 


7 


30 


P.M. 





ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 



37 



Tear. 


i 
s 


Month. 


D. 


H. 


M. 


A. P. M. 


Remarks. 


1868 
















1869 


f) 


Jan. 


27 


8 


21 


P.M. 






© 


Aug. 


7 


6 


6 


P.M. 


Total over a southern section of the 


1870 














[Union. 


ISYl 


® 


Jan. 


6 


4 


9 


P.M. 


Moon rises partially eclipsed. 


1872 


® 


Nov. 


15 





29 


A. M. 


Very small. 


1873 


D 


May 


12 


6 


23 


A. M. 


Commences 4h. 34m. Total in the 


1874 


© 


Oct. 


25 


2 


37 


A.M. 


Nearly total. [Western States. 


1875 


© 


Sept. 


29 


6 


12 


A. M. 




1876 


« 


March 


10 


1 


6 


A.M. 






® 


March 


25 


4 


45 


P.M. 


Small. 


1877 


© 


Aug. 


23 


6 


2 


P.M. 


Total. Moon rises eclipsed. 


1878 


« 


Fob. 


17 


5 


58 


A. M. 






® 


July 


29 


5 


35 


P.M. 






« 


Aug. 


12 


1 


3 


P.M. 




1879 
















1880 


© 


Dec. 


31 


7 


42 


A.M. 




1881 


f) 


June 


12 


1 


56 


A.M. 


Total. 


1882 
















1883 


e> 


Oct. 


16 


2 


8 


A.M. 


[Union. 


1884 


® 


April 


10 


6 


47 


A. M. 


Total in the western parts of the 




® 


Oct. 


4 


5 


14 


P.M. 


Visible, and total after the Sun sets. 


1885 


© 


March 


16 


1 


28 


P.M. 






© 


Sept. 


24 


2 


56 


A. M. 


[in the Western States. 


1886 


© 


March 


5 






P.M. 


Commences about sunset. Visible 




© 


Aug. 


29 


6 


23 


A.M. 


Very small. 


1887 


© 


Feb. 


8 


5 


4 


A. M. 




1888 


© 


Jan. 


28 


6 


6 


P.M. 


Total. 




© 


July 


23 





35 


A.M. 


Total. 


1889 


© 


Jan. 


1 






P.M. 


Penumbra touches Washington about 




© 


Jan. 


17 





18 


A. M. 


[sunset. 


1890 
















1891 


© 


Nov. 


15 


7 


36 


P.M. 




1892 


© 


May 


11 


6 





P.M. 


Visible after sunset. 




© 


Oct. 


20 


1 


40 


P.M. 




1893 
















1894 


© 


Sept. 


14 


11 


24 


P.M. 




1895 


© 


March 


10 


10 


28 


P.M. 


Total. 




© 


Sept. 


4 





49 


A. M. 


Total. 


1896 


© 


Aug. 


23 


1 


55 


A. M. 




1897 


© 


July 


29 


9 


45 


A. M. 




1898 


© 


Jan. 


7 


7 


16 


P.M. 


Small. 




© 


Dec. 


27 


6 


37 


P.M. 


Total. 


1899 


© 


Dec. 


16 


8 


34 


P.M. 




1900 


© 


May 


28 


8 


40 


A.M. 





38 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

Divisions of Time. 

Time, as measured by the celestial luminaries, is divided into periods, 
cycles, years, months, weeks, days, hours, minutes, seconds, and sometimes 
farther sexagesimal parts. 

Periods, in astronomical reckoning, are large divisions of time. The 
Cfialdeam Period is a circle of 25,858 years. This period respects the 
motion of the terrestrial poles. At the termination of it, the axis of the 
Earth points to the same stars as at the beginning. 

The JvMcm Period is formed by multiplying together the cycles 28, 19, 
and 15. It consists of 7,980 years. The creation of the world, according to 
the common computatiou, was on the 706th year, and the Dionysian era of 
Christ's birth, on the 4,713th year, of this period. According to some, the 
birth *of Christ was earlier by four years. The Julian period is found of use 
in comparing the dates of ancient events. 

The Dionysian Period, or circle of Easter, consists of 532 years, formed 
by multiplying the cycle of the Sun, 28, by that of the Moon, 19. 

CYCLES AEE EEVOLUTIONS OP TIME. 

The Cycle of the Sim consists of 28 years. By this cycle the days of the 
week are brought to the same days of the month ; the Sun to the same 
signs and degrees of the ecliptic, with little variation ; and the leap-years to 
the same state as at the commencement of the cycle. Each of these returns, 
separately, in a much shorter period. But, by the cycle, they are brought 
to coincide. 

The Cycle ojf the Moon is the Golden Nuinb&r. It is a period of 19 years, , 
at the eixpiration of which, the changes and fulls, with the other aspects of 
the Moon, return to the same months,' and days of the month, as at the be- 
ginning, or within a day of the same time. 

The Romam Indiction is a period of fifteen years, established by Constan- 
tine, in the year 312, for indicating the times of certain payments, made by 
the subjects to the government. 

For finding the cycle of the Sun, golden number, and indiction, add 4,713 
to the year of the Christian era, and divide the sum by 28, 19, and 16, re- 
spectively ; the remainders are the numbers sought for the year. 

Eequired the cycle of the Sun, golden number, and indiction, for the year 
1831. ^ 

4713 28)6544(233 19)6544(344 15)6544(436 

1831 56 67 60 

6544 94 "84 ~54 

84 Y6 45 

104 84 ~94 

84 76 90 

20 Cycle of Sun. 8 Golden number. 4 Indiction. 

The Efact is the excess of the solar above the lunar year of 354 days or 
12 mean lunations. It is taken for the age of the Moon, on the first day of 
January. •' 

For finding the Julian epact, multiply the golden number of the year by 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 39 

11 ; the product, if less than 30, is the epact. But, if the product exceed 
30, divide it by 30 ; the remainder is the epact. 

To find the Gregorian epact, the Julian epact must be first found. From 
this subtract 12, the number of days between the old and new style in the 
present century ; the i-emainder is the epact required. If nothing remain, 
aO is the epact. If the subtraction cannot be made, add 30 to the Julian 
epact, and subtract as before. 

The golden number and epact are little used at the present time, especi- 
ally where accuracy is required. The Roman indiction, still less important, 
is retained in our almanacs ; why, is difiicult to be conceived, unless as it is 
used in forming the Julian period. 

A TEAE. 

A complete revolution of the seasons constitutes a yea/r. The difference 
in the years, the tropical, the sidereal, and anomalistic, has been considered. 
The civil solar year consists of 365 days, and in bissextile, of 366. In this 
manner it is used in the United States, and most European nations. The 
lunar year consists of 12 lunar months, or mean lunations; computed at 354 
(lays, the surplus arising from the minutes and seconds of the lunation being 
generally dropped in tlie computation. In this calendar a month is added 
every third year, to make the lunar coincide with the solar year. This 
month is intercalary, or emholimic. 

The Jews computed their time by lunar years. " But, by intercalating no 
more than a month of thirty days, which they called Ye-Ader, every third 
year, they fell 3f -days short of the solar year in that time." 

The year of the Greeks consisted of 12 months, of 29 and 30 days, altern- 
ately taken, comprising 354 days, or about 12 mean lunations. This lunar 
year was with ditficulty connected with the solar year, or the revolution of 
the seasons, so as to make a particular month fall at the same season in suc- 
cessive years. " The Olympic games were celebrated every fourth year dur- 
ing the full Moon, next after the summer solstice; and the year of the Greeks 
was so regulated as to make this full Moon the first month. This purpose 
was effected by intercalations ; but these were managed so injudiciously, 
that, in the time of Meton, the calendar and the celebration of the festivals 
had fallen into great confusion." 

The ancient Romans computed their time by the iMstrvm,, a period of 
four years. They also reckoned by lunar years, as established by Romulus, 
till Julius Cossar reformed the calendar, introducing the system of computa- 
tion known as the Julian calendar to the present time. In this calendar 
three years were common, consisting of 365 days each. Every fourth year 
the 2^h day of February was twice reckoned, making it consist of 366 days. 
Tliis, being the 6th of the calends of March, was called his sextnis dins, de- 
nominated by us Ussextile. The intercalary day is now added to the lastof 
February, and from it the year is called bissextile, or leap-yea/r. The Julian 
calendar long prevailed in Europe. But, from observations on the time of 
Easter, the civil year was found to be too long for the tropical, and another 
attempt was made to reform the calendar. 

The vernal equinox fell on the 21st of March, at the time of the Council 
of Nice, 325 of the Christian era. In 1582 Pope Gregory XIII. observed, 
that the same equinox happened ten days earlier in the year than it had 
done at the time of the Nicene Council. To correct the style, he altered 



40 ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

the calendar ten days, ordering that the 5th day of October should be called 
the 15th. Thus amended, the style was called the Oregoricm, or ti&w style. 
Though adopted in several European countries, it was not received into 
England till the year 1752. The Julian calendar, or old style, still prevails 
in Russia. In the present century, the difference between the old style and 
the new is twelve days, as before stated. 

Pope Gregory stopped not at the alteration of the style. He endeavored 
to establish a principle by which the civil year and the tropical would in 
future coincide. By this principle bissextile is to be omitted three times in 
four hundred years. When the centuries of the Christian era are divided 
by four, if there be a remainder, the year at the end of the century is to be 
reckoned common ; but if nothing remain, the leap-year is to be retained, 
or the last year of the century is to be reckoned bissextile. Though the 
year 1800 would have been a leap year in the Julian calendar, yet it was 
considered common in all our almanacs on the Gregorian principle. Our 
computations to the present time are made on he same principle. Thus, at 
the end of the nineteenth century, the leap-year is to be omitted, there being 
a remainder when nineteen is divided by four ; but the year 2000 will be 
considered bissextile, because there is no remainder when twenty is divided 
by four. 

The omission of three bissextiles in four hundred years does not bring the 
civil year exactly to coincide with tlie tropical, as computed by La Place. 
The former still exceeds the latter twenty seconds, twenty-four thirds. Thip 
excess will amount to a day in about 4,236 years. The omission of one 
bissextile in one hundred and twenty-nine years would bring the different 
computations to great nearness. 

Months are the principal divisions of a year. These are lunar, solar, and 
civil. The sidereal lunar month is the time the Moon is passing from a 
point in the heavens to the same again, as from a star to the same star, as 
before stated. But the principal lunar month is a lunation, or the time the 
Moon is passing from one change to another. This seems to have given the 
name to this division of time, or to be the foundation of months. The solar 
month is the time the Sun is passing one of the signs of the ecliptic, or the 
twelfth part of a year. 

Civil months are of two kinds. The weekly month, always equally long, 
consists of four weeks. This is the true legal month. " A month in law, 
says Blackstone, " is a lunar month, or twenty-eight days, unless otherwise 
expressed ; not only because it is one uniform period, but because it falls 
naturally into a quarterly division by weeks. Therefore a lease for twelve 
months is only for forty-eight weeks ; but if it be for a twel/veTnonth, in the 
singular number, it is^ good for the whole year." 

The other months *are • those in our calendar. They are Roman in their 
origin. The Latin names are retained, some of them assuming an English" 
termination. The sixth month was called SexUlis till the time of Augustus 
Caesar. It was changed to Augustus, in honor of that emperor. To heighten 
the compliment, a day was taken from the last of February, and added to 
August. Before that time February, in a common year, consisted of twenty- 
nine days, August of thirty.* 

* The number of days in each month may be remembered by the following lines : 
" Thirty days hath September, All the rest have thirty-one, 

April, June, and November ; Saving February alone." 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 41 

A week, a well-known portion of time, and old as creation, undoubtedly 
had its origin in the resting of Jehovah from his work, and the establishment 
of the Sabbath. It consists of seven days. 

Days are anrtificial or natural. The certijlGial da/y is continually varying 
in length in most latitudes, being the time the Sun is above the horizon. 
The natural day is the time in which any meridian of the Earth moves 
from the Sun roUnd to the Sun again, being twenty-four hours. This is 
subject to a fractional variation at different seasons. The ancient Egyptians 
began their day at midnight. This is the practice of the United States, and 
of most European nations. It is the civil day with us, and is divided into 
two twelves. From common practice, it is too well-known to need explana- 
tion. The Jews began their days at the setting of the Sun. They divided 
the night and the day each into twelve equal parts. As this was done at all 
seasons of the year, not only the days but the hours, or divisional parts, 
must have been of unequal length ; though not so unequal as such a divi- 
sion would be with us, Palestine being nearer the equator than most of the 
United States. The ancient Greeks also began their day at Sun-setting. 
The same practice is followed among the moderns, by the Bohemians, the 
Silesians, the Italians, and Chinese. The day was commenced at Sun-rising 
by the Babylonians, Persians, and Syrians. This is the manner of compu- 
tation by the modern Greeks. 

The nautical or sea day commences at noon, twelve hours before the civil 
day. The first twelve hours are marked P. M., the last A. M. The astro- 
nomical day begins at noon, twelve hours after the civil day, and is reckoned 
numerically from one to twenty-four. 

An hour is the twenty-fourth part of a natural day. This division of time 
is very ancient. Herodotus observes, " that the Greeks learned from the 
Egyptians, among other things, the method of dividing the day into twelve 
parts. The division of the day into twenty-four hours was not known to the 
Eomans before the Punic war. Till that time they only regulated their 
days by the rising and setting of the Sun." The day was divided by them 
into four watches, commencing at six, nine, twelve, and three of the clock. 
The night was divided in the same manner into four watches, each consisting 
of three hours. 

The remaining divisions of time all proceed in the well-known sexagesimal 
order — the hour is divided into sixty minutes; the minute into sixty seconds ; 
the second into sixty thirds ; and so on to fourths and fifths. 

The donrniical letter is deserving a place in a work of this kind. The 
first seven letters of the alphabet were formerly placed in almanacs for the 
days of the week. Introduced by the' primitive Christians, they were used 
instead of the nundinal letters of the Eoman calendar. One of these, 
standing for the Sabbath, was written in capitals, and called the dominical 
letter, from J)ominus, the Latin word for lord. The dominical letter is 
still retained in our almanacs, while, figures are substituted for the other 

If 365, the days in a common Julian year, be divided by seven, the num- 
ber of days in a week, one will remain. If there were no remainder, and 
no bissextile, each succeeding year would begin on the same day of the 
week But one remaining, when a common year is thus divided, each year 
will begin and end on the same day of the week. When January begins 
on Sunday A is the dominical letter for that year. But the next year must 



42 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

commence on Monday ; A, therefore, or the substituted figure is set at that 
day. The Lord's day being the seventh of the month; G will be the domin- 
ical letter for that year. As the following year must commence on Tues- 
day, ^'is the dominical letter for that year. Thus the letters would follow, 
G, F, E, D, C, B, A, in retrograde order. At the end of seven years the 
days of the week would return to the same days of the month as at the be- 
ginning. But bissextile having 366 days, if this be divided by seven, there 
will be a remainder of two. Thus there must be an interruption of the 
regular returns. 

The letters were placed in such order that A stood at the first day of 
January, B at the second, O at the third ; thus on throudiout the seven. 
The sanie were repeated in succession through the year. In each succeed- 
ing year, therefore, the same letters stood at the same days of the month. 
This always brought O to the 28th of February. That this order might not 
be interrupted by leap-year, was placed at the 29th also ; or, according 
to some tables, D was repeated. Thus the same letters were set to the days 
of the succeeding months in bissextile, as in common years. K a year com- 
mence with D as the dominical letter, C at the 28th of February must in 
that case stand for Saturday; G also must be against the 29th, and of course 
being for the Lord's day must be dominical ; or, if D be repeated, C at the 
7tli of March becomes dominical, and thus continues through the year. The 
next year would commence two days later in the week. On account of this 
leaping in the retrograde order of the letters, the seven occupy five years 
in a revolution, when leap-year is twice included ; six, when it is once in- 
cluded. Hence the days of the week return to the same days of the month 
in five or six years, according as bissextile is twice or but once included. 
In twenty-eight years the seven letters will always have five revolutions, ex- 
cept at the end of the centuries, when leap-year is omitted. 

Obliquity. 

The obliquity of the equator to the plane of the ecliptic, being the cause 
of the variety of seasons, the different length of days and nights, and the 
pleasing vicissitudes resulting from the varying year, is well deserving 
a place, even in a compendium of astronomy. The principal inquiry is, 
whether the obliquity remains the same, or is subject to a constant diminu- 
tion. 

" The obliquity of the ecliptic to the equator," says Dr. Brewster, '" was 
long considered a constant quantity. Even so late as the end of the seventeenth 
century, the difference between the obliquity, as determined by ancient and 
modern astronomers, was generally attributed to inaccuracy of observation, 
and a want of knowledge of the parallaxes and refraction of the heavenly 
bodies. It appears, however, from the most accurate modern observations, 
at great intervals, that the obliquity of the ecliptic is diminishing. I3y com- 
paring about one hundred and sixty observations of the ecliptic, made by 
ancient and modern observers, with the obliquity of 23° 28' 16", as observed 
by Tobias Mayer, in 1756, we have found that the diminution of the obliqu- 
ity of the ecliptic, during a century, is 51" ; a result which accords wonder- 
fullv with the best observations." This would bring the obliquity at the 
present time, 1858, to 23° 27' 25". 

The above statement, though contrary to the opinion of some philosophers, 
is in accordance with the true principles of Newtonian philosophy, and is 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 



43 



corroborated by the best modern astronomers. Professor Yince, having 
'stated, the observations of many authors, ancient and modern, concludes : 
" It IS manifest, from these observations, that the obliquity of the ecliptic 
continually decreases ; and the irregularity, which here appears in the 
diminution, we may ascribe to the inaccuracy of the observations ; as we 
know that they are subject to greater errors than the irregularity of this 
variation." 

The following table will give an idea of the diminution of the obliquity 
for many centm-ies. It was extracted from "Eees's Cyclopaedia."* 





Obliquity of the Ecliptic, from Obserrations at 


Mean Obliquity for 






different Time 


i. 




40 Centuries. 








B. 0. 


o 


/ 


H 


B. 0. 


o 


i 


II 






Pytheas .... 


324 


23 


49 


23 


900 


23 


50 


26 






Eratosthenes . . 


230 


23 


51 


20 


400 


23 


46 


30 






Hypparchus . . 


140 

A. D. 


23 


51 


20 




A. D. 


23 


43 


15 






Ptolemy. . . . 


140 


23 


48 


45 


100 


23 


42 


26 






Arzachel . . . 


1104 


23 


33 


30 


500 


23 


39 


6 






Prbpatius . . . 


1300 


23 


32 




1000 


23 


34 


51 






Waltherus . . . 


1476 


23 


30 




1500 


23 


30 


33 






Tycho Bralie . . 


1584 


23 


31 


30 


1700 


23 


28 


49 






Kepler .... 


1627 


23 


30 


30 


1800 


23 


27 


57 






Flamstead . . . 


1690 


23 


29 




2000 


23 


26 


13 






Mayer .... 


1756 


23 


28 


16 


2500 


23 


21 


52 






Maskelyne . . . 


1800 


23 


27 


56-6 


3000 


23 


17 


31 





The Fixed Stabs. 

The fixed sta/rs are so denominated from their always retaining the same 
situation in relation to each other. We have seen that the Earth is, at one 
season of the year, 190,000,000 miles distant from its situation at the oppo- 
site season ; yet these stars have no sensible parallax. The star which is 
north at one time is north at any other time. Most of the stars, indeed, ap- 
pear to have a diurnal revolution round the Earth ; but this arises from the 
rotation of the Earth on its axis, and is no more than is caused by that 
rotation. 

That the stars always retain the same apparent situation, must be owing 
to their immense and inconceivable distance. Let two persons be placed 
one rod distant from each other, east and west. An object ten rods distant, 
which is due north from one, will easily be perceived not to be north of the 
other. But let the object be ten miles distant from these observers, and if 
it be north of one it will scarcely be perceived not to be north of the other ; 
the angle can be ascertained only by nice observation. Let this principle 
be applied to the iixed stars and the student will be sensible that their dis- 
tance is truly immense. We form very inadequate ideas of the Earth's 
distance from the Sun ; of course of twice that distance. But this immense 
distance, 190,000,000 miles, makes no perceptible difference in the situation 

* A small difference will be seen between the statement of Dr. Rees and that of Professor Vinoe re- 
speotmg the obliquity, as observed by some of these authors. But as the general principle is not 
affected, it may be useless to attempt a reconciliation. 



44 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

of the fixed stars, even when viewed with the nicest instruments. " From 
what we know," says Mr. Ferguson, " of the immense distance of the stars, 
the nearest may be computed at 32,000,000,000,000 of miles from us, which 
is farther than a cannon-ball would fly in Y,000,000 of years. 

From tlie distance of the stars it may be concluded that they shine by 
their own native light, and not by the reflected rays of the Sun. For those 
rays, decreasing in number in any given s^ace as the squares of the distances 
increase, cannot by reflected light make objects visible at a distance so incon- 
ceivably great. 

The iixed stars are, without doubt, suns to other systems. Thus they are 
now considered by the nnanimous consent of astronomers. They may be 
distinguished from the planets by the twinkling of their light. The diame- 
ter of a star appears much less viewed through a good telescope, than when 
seen without the aid of instruments. 

Not more than 1 ,000 stars are visible to the naked eye in either hemi- 
sphere. They seem, indeed, innumerable when in a clear evening we turn 
our eyes toward the heavens. But, in attentive observation, most of those 
bright spots which appeared to be stars vanish. They are probably reflec- 
tions from minute particles of various kinds continually noating in our 
atmosphere. The British catalogue contains not more than' about 3,000 
stars in both hemispheres, though it includes many not visible to the naked 
eye. • By improved reflecting telescopes the number is found to be great 
beyond all conception. Dr. Herscliel says, "that in the most crowded part 
of the milky-way, he has had fields of view that contained no less than 588 
stars, and these were continued for many minutes, so that in a quarter of an 
hour he has seen 116,0u0 stars pass through the field of view of a telescope 
of only 15' aperture ; and at another time, in 41 minutes he saw 258,000 
stars pass through the field of his telescope." 

Many stars appear single to the naked eye, which on being viewed with 
a good telescope, are found to consist of two, three, or more stars. Some 
are denominated by Dr. Ilerschel insulated stars, because they seem removed 
from the attractive force of other stars. Such are our Sun, Arcturus, Capella, 
Sirius, and many others. 

" A binary sidereal system, or double star, properly so called, is formed 
by two stars situated so near each other as to be kept together by their 
mutual attraction." It is, however, evident that stars may be situated 
one nearly behind the other, so as to appear binary though immensely 
distant. 

The double star Epsilon, Bootes, is beautiful, composed of two stars, one 
light red, the other a fine blue. 

The double star Zeta, in the constellation Hercules, is composed of two 
stars ; the greater a beautiful bluish white, the less a tine ash-color. 

The star Delta, of the Swan, is binary, composed of two stars very unequal 
in their apparent magnitude ; the larger white, the less reddish. 

The pole-star is binary, composed of two stars of very unequal magnitude ; 
the larger white, the less red. 

The treble star in the left fore-foot of the constellation Monoceros, is one 
of the most beautiful objects of the kind in the heavens. 

The Beta, in the constellation Lyra, or the Harp, is quadruple, white, but 
three of them inclined to red. 

The Lambda, in Orion, is quadruple. More properly it is a double star 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 45 

■with two stars at a small distance. The double star is unequal ; the largest 
white, the smallest a pale rose-color. 

A catalogue of the principal double stars may be seen in Dr. Brewster's 
supplement to Ferguson, its insertion here would far exceed the limits 
designed for this compend. 

Several stars have appeared for a time in the heavens and then disap- 
peared. In ancient catalogues stars are enumerated which are not now to 
be seen, even by the powerful instruments of modern astronomy. Others 
are now visible which seem not to have been noticed by the ancients. 

A new star was discovered by Cornelius Gemma, in 1672, in the cliairof 
Cassiopeia. It surpassed Sirius in brightness and magnitude. To some eyes 
it appeared larger than Jupiter, and might be seen at mid-day. It after- 
ward gradually decreased, and after sixteen months entirely disappeared. 

In 1696, the Stella Mi/ra, or wonderful star in the neck of the whale, was 
observed by Fabricius. It seemed alternately to vanish and reappear seven 
times in six years. During this time, however, it is said never to have been 
entirely extinct. 

In 1600, a changeable star in the neck of the Swan, was observed by 
Jansenius. The same was observed and its place 'determined by Eiciolus 
in 1616, 1621, and 1624. But from 1640 to 1650 it was invisible. It had 
several instances of appearing and again vanishing, prior to the year 1716, 
when it reappeared as a star of the sixth maOTitude, its present appearance. 

In 1604, a new star was discovered by Kepler and some of his friends 
near the head of Serpentarius. It exhibited a bright and sparkling appear- 
ance, beyond any they had before seen. Assuming the different colors of 
the rainbow, it appeared eveiy moment changing, except near the horizon, 
where it generally appeared white. It was near Jupiter in October of that 
year, and surpassed that planet in magnitude, but disappeared before the 
following February. 

Several other stars have appeared, vanished, and reappeared ; some of 
them in regular succession. Such changeable stars may be suns having ex- 
tensive spots. Stars of this kind, by a regular rotation on their axes, may 
alternately present their dark and luminous sides. " Maupertuis is of opin- 
ion that some stars, by their prodigious quick rotation on their axes, may 
not only assume the figure of oblate spheroids, but, by their great centrif- 
ugal force arising from such rotation, they may become of the figure of 
millstones, or reduced to flat circular plates, so as to be quite invisible when 
their edges are turned toward us ; as Saturn's ring is in such positions. But 
when any eccentric planets or comets go round any flat star in orbits much 
inclined to its equator, the attraction of the planets or comets in their 
perihelia, must alter the inclinations of that star, on which occasion it will 
appear more or less large and luminous, as its broad side is more or less 
turned toward us." — Ferguson. 

The propriety of the term Jlxed, as applied to the stars, seems rendered at 
least donbtful by the observations of modern astronomers. An advancement 
of the solar system, in absolute space, is now considered certain. It was 
observed by Halley and Cassini. The first explanation of it was given by 
Mayer. But to point out the region in the heavens to which the solar sys- 
tem is advancing, was reserved to Dr. Herschel. " He has examined this 
subject with his usual success, and has certainly discovered the direction 
in which our system is gradually advancing. He found that the apparent 



46 ASTBONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

proper motion of about forty-four stars out of fifty-six, is very nearly in the 
direction which would result from a motion of the Sun toward the consteljisv- 
tion Hercules, or more accurately, to a place in the heavens, whose right 
ascension is 250° 62 30", and whose north polar distance is 40° 22'." , 

The stars, according to their magnitude, have been arranged into sij^ 
classes or orders. The largest are called sta/rs of thefrst magmtttde .; next 
to these are those of the second magnitude / thus decreasing to the sixth. 
Of course, the least stars belong to the sixth magnitude. Sometimes, how- 
ever, in modern and even popular works, we find allusion to stars of the 
seventh or eighth magnitude. Considerable difference may be perceived in 
stars of the same class, some being much larger and more brilliant than 
others. 

The arrangement of stars into magnitudes, was made long before tbe inven- 
tion of telescopes. Stars unseen witbout the assistance of these, are called 
telescopic stars. 

... Another happy arrangement of the stars has been handed down to us 
from great antiquity. By a powerful imagination, the early cultivators of 
astronomy conceived companies of stars as having, the form, of certain ani- 
mals, or other sensible objects; and hence they divided the starry sphere 
into constellations, each including stars of different magnitudes. According 
as the. forms appeared to their imagination, they applied names to the dif- 
ferent constellations. Thus one constellation was called Zeo, another Bootes, 
and another Orion. Stars not included in'any constellation are called urv- 
formed stars. 

The animal, or other object of each constellation, is represented on the 
celestial globe, and the proportion of the stars belonging to each, denoted 
by the letters of the Greek alphabet, according to the plan adopted by 
Bayer, a German, in his JJranomebria., a large celestial atlas. Thus, the 
largest star of the constellation is denoted by AVpha, the second by Beta, 
the third by Oannma, and thus on in alphabetical order. 

The classing of stars, however chimerical, is of vast importance, as it 
enables the astronomer to designate the place of a star, a planet, or a comet, 
at any time, as easily as a geogi-apher can that of a hamlet or a town. 

From Cygnus, the Swan; Phenix, the Phenix; Piscis Australis, the 
Southern Fish ; Leo, the Lion ; and Crux, the Cross, as they are represented 
on a common celestial globe, the student may form some idea of that im- 
agination by which the stars were arranged into constellations. Probably 
in Leo, or any other constellation viewed in the heavens, he will discover 
but little similarity between the figure presented by the stars, and the ani- 
mal or other object by which they are represented. 

Forty-eight of tlie constellations are reckoned ancient. Of these, 12 are 
in the zodiac, 21 to the north, and 15 to the south of it. The whole num- 
ber of constellations has been reckoned 92. Of these, 12 are in the zodiac 
35 are north, and 45 south of that circle. ' 

In each part of, the following table the ancient constellations are placed 
first. 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 



47 



Aries, the Earn. 
Taurus, the BuU. 
Gemini, the Twins. 
Cancer, the Crab. 
Leo, the Lion. 
Virgo, the Virgin. 



CONSTELLATIONS IN THE ZODIAC. 



Libra, the Scales. 
Scorpio, the Scorpion. 
Sagittmius, the Archer, 
Oapricornus, the Goat. 
Aquarius, the Water-bearer. 
Pisces, the Pishes. 



CONSTELLATIONS NORTH OF THE ZODIAC. 



ZTrsa Minor, the Little Bear. 
ZTrsa Major, the Great Bear. 
Draco, the Dragon. 

Corona Borealis, the Northern Grown. 

Hercules. 

I/yra, the Harp. 

Gygnus, the Swan. 

Cassiopeia, the Lady in her Chair. 



Auriga, the Wagoner. 
Serpentwrius, the Serpent-bearer. 
Serpens, the Serpent. 
Sagitta, the An-ow. 
Aquila, the Eagle. 

DeJphinus, the Dolphin. 



jE'j'Mi Sectio, the Horse's Head. 
Fegasus, the Flying Horse. 
Andromeda, 

Triangulum, the Triangle. 
Can«s Venatici, the Greyhounds. 
Cor Caroli, the Heart of Charles. 
Triangulum Minv^, the Little Triangle. 
Musca, the Ply. 

ieo Minor, the Little Lion. 
Gam,elopardalis, the Oamelopard. 
Jfo?M Mmnalus, the Mountain Msenalus. 
Scutum SoieisM, Sobeiski's Shield. 
Hercules cum Ramo et Gerhero. 
Taurus Poniatowshi, Poniatowski's BuU. 
Fw^^ecMZa ei Anser, the Pox and the Goose. 
Lacerta, the Lizard. 



CONSTELLATIONS SOUTH OF THE ZODIAC. 



Cetiis, the Whale. 

Orj'oji. 

Bridanus. 

Lepus, the Hare. ^ 

Cbrais Major, the Great Dog. 

Cfl!?iis Minor, the Little Dog. 

Hydra, the Water-Serpent. 

Crater, the Cup. 

Corvus, the Raven. 

Centaurus, the Centaur. 

Lupiis, the Wolf. 

J.ra, the Altar. 

Corona Australis, the Southern Crown. 

PiscM AustraUs, the Southern Fish. 

Officina Seulptoria, the Engraver's Shop. 

Hy&rus, the Water-Snake. 

Fa/max Chemica, the Chemical Furnace. 

Horologiwm, the Time-Keeper. 

Setieulus Ehomboidalis. 

iorado vel Ziphias, the Sword-Pish. 

CeZfls Praxitelis, the Engraver's Tool. 



Columia Nbachi, Noah's Dove. 

Equuleus Piotorius, the Painted Colt. 

Monoceros, the Unicom. 

Chameleon. 

Pyxis NaUtica, the Mariner's Compass. 

Piscis Fofew, the PJying-Pish. 

Sextans, the Sextant. 

Rohur Ca/rolinum, the Royal Oak. 

MacMna Pneumatica, the Wind Instrument. 



4pw Musca, the Bee or Fly. 

jipiM «eZ Avis, the Bird of Paradise. 

Oircinus, the Compass. 

Quadra Euclidis, Euclid's Square. 

Triangulwm Australe, the Southern Triangle. 

Telescopium, the Telescope. 

Pavo, the Peacock. 

Indus, the Indian. 

Microseopium, the Microscope. 

Octans Hadleiarms, Hadley's Octant. 

GWm, the Crane. 

Toucan, the American Goose. 



48 ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

The Galaxy. 

The Galaxy, or Milky- Way, is a luminous zone in the heavens. The 
beautiful cloudy whiteness by which it is distinguished is found by modern 
astronomers to proceed from the collected rays of innumerable stars not 
discernible by the naked eye. "That the Milky- Way," e,&ys, Dr. Herschel, 
" is a most extensive stratum of stars of various sizes admits no longer of 
the least doubt." 

A group of stars is a collection of them of any figure, closely compressed 
together, like the trees in a crowded forest. 

Clusters of stars are regarded by Dr. Herschel among the most mag- 
nificent objects in the heavens. They differ from groups in their beautiful 
and seemingly artificial arrangement. 

Ncbulm are light spots in the heavens, sometimes denominated cloudy 
stars. Some of them are found to be clusters of telescopic stars. The most 
noted nebula was discovered by Huygens in 1656. It is between the two 
stars in the sword of Orion. In one part of it, a bright spot upon a dark 
ground seems -to be an opening into a brighter and more distant region. 
]S"ebula3 were discovered by Dr. Halley and others. " But to Dr. Herschel," 
says Enfield, " are we indebted for catalogues of two thousand nebulas and 
clusters of stars, which he himself Jias discovered." Dr. Brewster says, 
" two thousand five hmidred." 

What an astonishing view of the works of creation is opened upon us by 
the night! With wonder and delight we greet the return of day. The 
beauty, and even the sublimity of this world are lighted up to us by the 
splendor of the morning. But how surpassed are these by the infinite 
grandeur presented to our view by the noctwrnal heavens ! To the night 
we are indebted for the most exalted conceptions we can form of the im- 
mensity and sublimity of Jehovah's works. We cannot contemplate them 
without the most profound awe! We behold, not a solitary world, but a 
system of worlds, kept in perpetual harmony by the Sun ; not one Sun and 
one system only, but millions of Suns and of systems, ranged in endless 
perspective, all revolving in harmonious order ! How inconceivably great, 
and wise, and good must be the Author and Goveenoe of such a univeese. 

Latitude and Longitude. 

Latitude, as before stated, is the distance north or south from the equator. 
It is reckoned on the meridian in degrees ; which, like those of all other 
circles, are subdivided into minutes, and again into sexagesimal parts. The 
center of the meridian, like that of the equator and other great circles of 
the globe, is considered at the center of the Earth. 

The great circles of the globe, extended into the visible heavens, are con- 
sidered as celestial circles, always lying in the same plane with those on 
the Earth. The position of the heavenly bodies, therefore, in regard to 
these circles, may be used in determining the latitude and longitude of 
places. 

The latitude of a place may be determined by finding the distance of its 
zenith from the celestial equator. K, therefore, the zenith distance of a 
heavenly body and its declination be known, the latitude of the place of 
observation may be ascertained. 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 49 

The declination of a heavenly body, as before defined, is its distance north 
or south from the celestial equator. The zenith distance of a heavenly 
body may be obtained by observing its meridian altitude, or by two alti- 
tudes. Four corrections are required in finding the altitude of the Sun or 
Moon : semi-diameter, depression of the horizon, parallax, and refraction. 
The semi-diameter and parallax of a planet can be but a few seconds. They 
are impel-ceptible in a star. 

Suppose that on the -ith of July, 1831, the Sun's declination was found 
to be 22° 65' 39" north, when it passed the meridian of New York ; and at 
that time the Sun's true zenith distance was found to be 17° 46' 21" nortli, 
what is the latitude of that city ? 

Declination north, 22° 55' 39" 

Zenith distance, 1T° 46' 21" 

Answer, 40° 22' 00" 



If Arcturus, the noble star mentioned in the book of Job, be in 20° 20' 
north declination, as placed on the British celestial globe, and be observed 
to pass the meridian of Boston 22° 3' north of the zenith, what is the lati- 
tude of the city ? 

Declination north, 20° 20' 

Zenith distance, 22° 3' 

Answer, 42° 23' 

With a little attention the student may easily determine whether he ought 
to add or subtract in making these calculations. If, in the last example, 
the declination had been 20° 20' south, the zenith distance would have been 
62° 43', and the declination must have been subtracted to find the latitude 
of the place. 

The latitude of a place may be determined by observing the altitude of 
its elevated pole. The altitude is always equal to the latitude of the place 
of observation. At this time the north pole of the Earth points nearly to 
a particular star, well known as the north or pole sta/r. According to Dr. 
Flint, in his Survey, the declination of this star in 1810 was 88° 17' 28", 
with an annual increase of 19|-". Hence its declination on the 1st day of 
January, 1831, was 88° 24' 17", and its distance from the pole 1° 35' 43". 
Let the altitude of this star above and below the pole be taken. Half the 
sum of these altitudes added together is the altitude of the pole, and equal 
to the latitude of the place. 

Semi-diameter and depression of the horizon have been mentioned as 
necessary corrections in determining latitude, and not explained in separate 
articles. 

The semi-dAometerr of the heavenly body is the angle under which the 
semi-diameter of the body appears at the Earth. The distance of the limb 
being taken in ascertaining the altitude of the Sun or Moon, the semi-diame- 
ter is necessarily applied in order to reduce it to the center of the body. 

Depression of the horizon is caused by the eye of the observer being ele- 
vated. When a man stands uprightly, he looks down on the horizon which 
touches the Earth at his feet. It must be apparent, that the higher the eye 
4 



50 ASTKONOMT AND NAVIGATION. 

is elevated, the farther below the horizon, toaching the surface of the Earth 
beneath it, may a heavenly body be seen. 

Lohgitude on the Earth's surface is the distance east or west from some 
fixed meridian, assumed as first. Like latitude, it is reckoned in degrees, 
minutes, and sexagesimal parts. 

The best method of determining longitude has long been an object of 
inquiry by the mariner and the geographer, the mechanic, the statesman, 
and the philosopher. 

Philip III. of Spain, we are informed, offered a reward of a hundred 
thousand crowns for the discovery of longitude. The States of Holland, 
then the rival of Spain, soon after followed the example. During the 
minority of Lewis XY., the Eegent of France offered a great reward for 
the discovery of longitude at sea. About the year 1675, in the time of 
Charles II. of England, the royal observatory was built at Greenwich. 
Mr. Flamstead was appointed astronomer royal. Instructions were given 
to him and his successors, " that they should apply themselves with the 
litmost care and diligence to rectify the tables of the motions of the heavens, 
and the places of the fixed stars, in order to find out the so much desired 
longitude at sea for the perfecting of the art of navigation." 

In 1714, the British parliament offered £10,000 for the discovery of longi- 
tude if the method determined it to 1° ; £15,000 if it determined it to 40' ; 
and £20,000 if it determined it to 30', with a proviso, that if such method 
extended but to 80 miles adjoining the coast, the proposer should have but 
half the reward. On this act Mr. John Harrison received the premium of 
£20,000 for his time-keeper. Several acts were passed in the reign of 
George II. and George III. for the encouragement of finding longitude. 
An act passed in 1774, said to be the last of that government on the subject, 
repealing all the former acts. This act diminishes the premium to half the 
first great offer. 

The United States have not been inattentive to the subject of longitude ; 
so far, at least, as respects the establishment for themselves of a first merid- 
ian. In the year 1809, Mr. Lambert, of Virginia, presented to Congress a 
memorial on the subject of longitude. He commences by stating, " that 
the establishment of a first meridian for the United States of America, at 
the permanent seat of government, by which a further dependenoe on 
Great Britain, or any other foreign nation, for such a meridian, may be en- 
tirely removed, is deemed to be worthy the consideration and patronage of 
the national legislature." An interesting report on this memorial was made 
in March, 1810, by a select committee of the House of Representatives, of 
which Mr. Pitkin, gf Connecticut, was chairman. An extract from this re- 
port may deserve a place even in a compendium of astronomy : 

"The committee nave deemed the subject worthy the attention of Con- 
gress, and would, therefore, beg leave to observe, that the necessity of the 
establishment of a first meridian, or a meridian which should pass through 
some particular place on the globe from which geographers and navigators 
could compute their longitude, is too obvious to need elucidation. 

" The an cient Greek geographers' placed their first meridian to pass through 
one of the islands, which by them were called the Fortunate Islands, since 
called the Canaries. Those islands were situated as far west as any islands 
that had been discovered, or were known by ancient navigators in that part 
of the world. 



ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 51 

" They reckoned their longitude east from Hera, or Junonia, supposed to 
be the present island of Teneriffe. 

" The Arabians, it is said, fixed their first meridian at the most westerly- 
part of the continent of Africa. In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, 
when Europe was emerging from the dark ages, and a spirit of enterprise 
and discovery had risen in the south of Europe, and various plans were 
formed and attempts made, to find a new route to the East Indies, geogra- 
phers and navigators continued to calculate longitude from Ferro, one of the 
same islands, though some of them extended their first meridian as far west 
as the Azores, or Western Islands. 

"In more modern times, however, most of the European nations, and 
particularly England and France, have established a first meridian to pass 
through the capital, or some place in their respective countries, and to which 
they nave lately adapted their maps, charts, and astronomical tables. 

" It would, perhaps, have been fortunate for the science of geography and 
navigation, that all nations had agreed upon a first meridian, from which all 
geographers and navigators might have calculated longitude ; but as this 
has not been done, and, in all probability, never will take place, the com- 
mittee are of opinion that, situated as we are in this western hemisphere, 
more than three thousand miles from any fixed or known meridian, it would 
be proper, in a national point of view, to establish a first meridian for our- 
selves ; and that measures should be taken for the eventual establishment 
of such a meridian in the United States. 

" In examining the maps and charts of the United States, and the par- 
ticular states, or their sea-coasts, which have been published in this countiy, 
the committee find that the publishers have assumed different places in the 
United States as first meridian. This creates confusion, and renders it di£B- 
cult, without considerable calculation, to ascertain the relative situation of 
places in this country. This diflSculty is increased by the circumstance, that 
in Loi^isiana, our newly acquired territory, longitude has heretofore been 
reckoned from Paris, the capital of the French empire. 

" The exact longitude of any place in the United States being ascertained 
from the meridian of the observatory at Greenwich, in England, a meridian 
with which we have been conversant, it would not be difficult to adapt all 
our maps, charts, and astronomical tables, to the meridian of such place. 
And no place, perhaps, is more proper than the seat of government." 

The memorial, the report of the committee, and other papers were after- 
ward referred to Mr. Monroe, then Secretary of State, and late President 
of the United States. His opinion fully accorded with that of the commit- 
tee, in favor of establishing a first meridian for the United States, and that 
it should be at Washington, the seat of government. 

The subject was afterward referred to another committee of the House of 
Eepresentatives, of which Dr. Samuel L. Mitchill, of New York, was chair- 
man. The report of this committee was in full accordance with the preced- 
ing sentiment, and in favor of the establishment of a first meridian at the 
seat of government. 

To these high authorities, that of the illustrious "Washington may be 
added, as stated by Mr. Lambert, in 1821, in his address on the subject to 
the President of the United States. 

" The illustrious personage by whose name the metropolis of the Ameri- 
can Uniqn has been designated, unquestionably intended that the capital, 



52 ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

situated at or near the center of the District of Columbia, should be a first 
meridian for the United States, by causing,-during the first term of his presi- 
dency, the geographical position of that point, in longitude 0° 0', and its 
latitude 38° 63' north, as found by Mr. Andrew Ellicott, to the nearest 
minute of a degree, to be recorded in the original plan of the city of Wash- 
ington." 

Relative or apparent time differs four minutes for a degree, or one hour 
for every 15° of longitude. To the east, it is later; to the west, earlier. 
When it is noon with us, it is one P. M., 15° east ; eleven, A. M. 15'' west. 
Washington, according to Mr. Lambert, is 76° 65' 30" west of Greenwich. 
It is 6 h. 52 m. 18 s., A. M., at Washinsjton when it is noon at Greenwich. 
Boston is 159° 32' west of Calcutta. When it is noon at Boston it is lOh. 
38 m. 8 s., P. M., at Calcutta. If, therefore, by an exact time-keeper, or ob- 
servation on the heavenly bodies, the time of day at the meridian, from which 
longitude is reckoned, and also the time at the place of observation, can be 
known, the difference converted into motion will show the longitude. 

A good time-keeper, clock or watch, forms one method of computing lon- 
gitude. Such time-keeper, set for any meridian, will not, when carried east 
or west, correspond with the apparent time. But its difference from the 
time at the place of observation, turned into motion, would, if true, give the 
longitude. If a ship, sailing from London to Boston, should set a watch for 
the meridian of London 6' west of Greenwich, such watch, if perfectly accu- 
rate, would give the time 4 h. 43 m. 25 s., P. M., when the Sun is on the 
meridian at Boston. No clock or watch, however, yet invented, has been 
found entitled to perfect dependence. Even the time-keeper of Mr. William 
Harrison was found subject to considerable error when tried at the royal ob- 
servatory by Dr. Maskelyne ; though it had made a voyage from England 
to Barbadoes and back again, varying but 54 seconds in 156 days, or, as was 
thought, with proper allowance, only 16 seconds in that time. 

The eclipses of Jupiter's satellites, happening very often, form an excel- 
lent method of determining longitude on land. Like those of the Moon, they 
are seen at the same absolute time in all places where they are visible. The 
difference in relative time, then, will show the longitude. Suppose an eclipse 
of the 4th satellite of Jupiter be set in the Nautical Almanac published for 
Greenwich at 4h. 25 m., A. M., on a particular day, and the same is ob- 
served in the United States at 11 h. 17 m. 18 s., P. M., of the preceding day, 
what is the difference of longitude ? 

4h. 25m. Ob. 
— llh. 17 m. 18 s. 



6 7 42 

In making this subtraction, it will be perceived, from the .nature of the 
case, that 12 must be add^d to the hours of the minuend, or upper number. 
Convert 5 h. 7 m. 42 s. into motion, by allowing 15° for each hour, 1° for 
every 4 minutes, and 1 minute for every 4 seconds, and so on for thirds, you 
have the difference of longitude 76° 55' 30". 

It is said the difficulty of observation at sea renders eclipses of Jupiter's 
satellites of but little practical utility to the mariner in computing lon^tude. 

Lwna/r observations form another method of determining longitude. This 
method is a great modem improvement in navigation, [ifiie idea is not very 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 53 

modern. " M. de la Lande mentions certain astronomers, who, above two 
hundred years ago, proposed this method, and contended for the honor of 
the discovery ; but its present state of improvement and universal practice 
he very justly ascribes to Dr. Maskelyne." This last mentioned astronomer 
first j^roposed and superintended the construction of the Nautical Almanac. 
In this the angular distance of the Moon from the Sun and certain fixed stars 
is inserted for every third hour in the day, calculated for the meridian of 
Greenwich. "If, therefore, under any meridian, a lunar distance be ob- 
served, the difference between the time of observation and the time in the 
Almanac when the same distance was to take place at Greenwich, will show 
the longitude." The stars selected for the Almanac are nine, viz.: the 
Alpha, or first star of Aries, Aldebaran of Taurus, Pollux of Gemini, Kegu- 
lus of Leo, Spica of Yii-go, Antares of Scorpio, Altair of Aquila, Fomalhaut 
of Piscis Australis, and Markab of Pegasus. The Nautical Almanac is an- 
nually published in England by the commissioners of longitude. 

For practice in finding longitude, with the necessary tables, the student 
is referred to Dr. Bowditch's useful work, the "Practical Navigator." 

Except a small variation on account of the spheroidical figure of the 
Earth, degrees of latitude remain the same, or of equal length, on every part 
of the globe. But those of longitude decrease from the equator to the poles, 
where they become extinct. The number of degrees in a circle of longitude 
is the same in all latitudes ; but the number of miles in a degree continu- 
ally lessens each way from the equator. The student versed in trigonome- 
try may be informed that the proportion is — as radius is to the cosine of any 
given latitude, so is the number of miles in a degree of longitude at the 
equator to the number of miles in a degree of longitude at such latitude. 

JMeteoes. 

In some astronomical works are to be found accounts of lightning, thun- 
der, clouds, aurora borealis, and even of wind, rain, snow, and hail. These, 
though highly important, and deserving the attention of the chemist and 
the student in general philosophy, seem not connected with astronomy, nor 
deserving a place in a work intended to be exclusively astronomical. 

But aerolites, or falling stones, seem worthy of some notice, even in a 
compendium of astronomy. " It must be reckoned," says Rees's Cyclopaedia, 
" among the wonders of the age in which we live, that considerable portions 
of these heavenly bodies are now known to have descended to the Earth. So 
wonderful and unexpected an event was at first received with incredulity 
and ridicule ; but we may now venture to consider the fact as well estab- 
lished as any other hypothesis of natural philosophy, which does not actually 
admit of mathematical demonstration." 

One of the earliest accounts we have of these phenomena is given by 
Livy, in his History of Eomc. He tells us that, in the time of Tullus Hos- 
tilius, the successor of Numa, and third king of Rome, it was announced to 
the king and to the fathers, that it rained with stones on mount Albanus ; 
that these stones fell from heaven not otherwise than when the winds drive 
the hail thick to the Earth. 

Pliny mentions, that a large stone fell in Thrace, in the second year of 
the seventy-eighth Olympiad. 

Three large stones ai-e said to have fallen in Thrace, in the year before 
Christ 452. 



54 ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

It would be useless to dwell on the numerous accounts of these phenom- 
ena handed down to us from great antiquity. But it may be proper to give 
a few instances of the falling of these stones in modem times, received on 
the authority of different authors. 

A shower of falling stones, 1,200, one of 120 lbs., is related to have hap- 
pened near Fadua, in Italy, in 1510. 

April 5, 1804, a stone of this kind fell near Glasgow, in Scotland. Several 
gentlemen of the university well ascertained the particulars of this phe- 
nomenon. 

But New England affords one of the best authenticated accounts of these 
wonderful stones. Professors Silliman and Kingsley visited and carefully 
examined every spot where it was ascertained these stones had fallen. The 
principal fall was within the bounds of "Weston, in Connecticut ; though the 
most northerly was in Huntingdon, on the borders of Weston. Something 
of the original account deserves to be extracted : " The meteor which has so 
recently excited alarm in many, and astonishment in all, first made its ap- 
pearance in Weston, about a quarter or half-past six o'clock, on Monday, the 
14th of December, 1807. The morning was somewhat cloudy, mingled with 
spots of clear, a space of 15° along the northern horizon perfectly clear ; 
there was little or no light, except from the Moon, just setting. 

" Judge Wheeler was passing through the inclosure adjoining his house, 
with his face toward the north, and his eyes on the ground, when a sudden 
flash across the northern sky made him look up ; he immediately discovered 
a globe of fire passing behind the first cloud, which was very dark, and 
obscured the meteor. In this situation its appearance was distinct, like the 
Sun seen through a mist. Itsprogress was not so rapid as that of common 
meteors and shooting stars. When it passed the clear sky it flashed with a 
vivid light, not so intense as lightning in a thunder-storm, but like what is 
called heat lightning. Its surface was apparently convex. When not too 
much obscured by clouds, a conical train of paler light attended it waving, 
and in length about ten or twelve diameters of the body. In the clear sky, 
there was a brisk scintillation about it, like a -firebrand carried against the 
wind. It disappeared about 15° short of the zenith, and the same number 
west of the meridian. It did not vanish instantaneously, but grew fainter, 
as a red-hot cannon-ball would do, cooling in the dark, only much more 
rapidly. \ 

"About thirty or forty seconds after this, three loud and distinct reports, 
like those of a four-pounder, near at hand, were heard. They succeeded 
each other rapidly, and did not occupy above three seconds. Then followed 
a continual rumbling, like a cannon-ball rolling over a floor, sometimes 
louder and sometimes fainter." 

There were six places where stones fell on this occasion ; the most remote, 
nine or ten miles from each other. One fell on a rock of granite with a loud 
report. It was broken into fragments, thrown to the distance of thirty feet, 
and some part reduced to powder. One mass of this fall was found sunk 
two feet below the surface of the ground. Of the masses found, two weighed 
35 lbs. each ; one, 25 lbs. From the fragments found of one, it was thought 
it must have weighed nearly 200 lbs. 

A great similarity is found in these stones, when examined chemically, in 
different parts of the world where they had fallen. But they are very dif- 
ferent from the other stones on the sm-face of the Earth. 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 55 

Much speculation has been excited respecting the origin of the aerolites. 
Prior tells us, '^The most prevalent opinion among modern philosophers is, 
that they are concretions actually formed in the atmosphere itself." But 
that such solid and weighty bodies should be formed in the rare medium 
of the atmosphere, would be more wonderful than the falling stones them- 
selves. Some have supposed they originate in the asteroids. 

Perhaps the most probable opinion is that of La Place, " that the stones 
are projected by lunar volcanoes within the sphere of terrestrial attraction." 
The Moon is but 240,000 miles from the Earth. The force of attraction in 
different bodies is as the quantity of matter. Of this, that of the Earth is 
to that of the Moon as 1 to .025. Hence the neutral ground between the 
two bodies must be vastly nearer the Moon than the Earth. "Whenever 
matter thrown up by a volcano from the Moon, passes this ground, it must 
irresistibly be drawn to tlie Earth. 

The luminous meteors, usually denominated shooting sta/rs, seem different 
in their origin, and to be of species different from aerolites, or falling stones. 
In some instances in which these meteors have appeared in immense num- 
bers, for many hours in succession, and over an extensive region, no falling 
stones have been discovered, nor any traces been found where they have 
marked the Earth. 

Several noted instances of these meteors have occurred in modern times. 
An account of one is given by Humboldt, witnessed by himself and Eon- 
pland at Cumana, in South America. " The night of the 11th of November, 
17Y9, was cool and extremely beautiful. Toward the morning, from half 
after two, the most extraordinary luminous meteors were seen toward the 
east. Bonpland, who had risen to enjoy the freshness of the air in the gal- 
lery, perceived them first. Thousands of bolides, fireballs, and falling stars, 
succeeded each other during four hours.' Their direction was very regular 
from north to south. They filled a space in the sky extending from the 
true east 30° toward the north and south ; some of them attained a height 
of 40°, and all exceeded 35° or 30°. There was very little wind, and no 
trace of clouds to be seen." 

Phenomena similar to those seen by Humboldt were extensively observed 
on the Atlantic ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, on the 12th of iSTovember, 
1799. The following account of these has been extracted into our papers 
from the Newburyport Herald of that year. It was given by Captain 
"Woodman, of the brig Nymph : 

" On my passage home from the island of St. Domingo, being in lat. 29° 
Ion. 70°, on the 12th of November, at half-past one o'clock in the morning, 
the weather being very clear and pleasant, the wind to the eastward, the 
moon near the full, and shining very bright, observed the stars to shoot in 
great numbers from every point of the compass ; and at two o'clock the 
whole atmosphere appeared to be full of stars — ^1 may say thousands of 
thousands — shooting and blazing in all directions — in a most extraordinary 
and alarming manner, and so continued till daylight. On my arrival at the 
Vineyard, I met with several masters of vessels, who were on their passage 
at the same time, and said that the stars made the same appearance to them 
on the night above mentioned, though they were then several degrees to the 
northward of me. This account was dated Newburyport, December 20, 

1799. 
These phenomena of November 12th, 1799, were witnessed by Mr. Elli- 



56 ASTKONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

cott when a commissioner to settle the boundary line between the United 
States and the Spanish possessions in North America. He describes them 
as " grand and awful. The whole heavens appeared as if illuminated with 
sky-rockets, which disappeared only by the liglit of the sun after daybreak. 
Tlie meteors, which, at any one instant of time, appeared as numerous as 
the stars, flew in all possible directions, except from the Earth." 

Captain Hammond and his crew, when at Mocha in Arabia, on the 12th 
of November, 1832, witnessed a similar display of luminous meteors, and 
described them in similar language. 

The citizens of these United States will long remember the night of the 
12th, or the morning of the 13th of November, 1833. The brilliant exhibi- 
tion of luminous meteors which adorned the canopy from the St. Lawrence 
to the Gulf of Mexico, and from the Atlantic to the Eocky Mountains, 
perhaps has never been surpassed in the time of its continuance, or in the 
richness and grandeur of its appearance. 

The display seems to have commenced earlier as seen from the southern 
than from the northern sections of the Union. The following account is 
extracted from the Charleston Mercury of November 14th, 1833 : 

" Those -vtho were up before the dawn yesterday witnessed a most glorioiis 
sight, one glance at which were worth ten years of common life. The tem- 
perature of the daj' before had been oppressive, the mercury ranging as 
high as 78 degrees. At night the atmosphere became cooler, but not so 
much so as to make a fire necessary for comfort. About ten o'clock, P. M., 
shooting stars were observed to succeed each other with unusual frequency, 
and continued to appear at short intervals during the night. But at about 
three o'clock in the morning the wind, which had been from the west, hav- 
ing changed, and blowing with some freshness from the northeast, there was 
a burst of splendor throughout the firmament, and its entire concave was 
thronged with innumerable meteors streaming athwart each other toward 
the horizon in every quarter, leaving long trains of light as if millions of 
rockets were incessantly exploding. The literal shower of stars continued 
till daylight, exploding in glittering confusion as if the whole starry host 
were reeling madly from their spheres. 

"While this grand and beautiful spectacle lasted, a permanent light as 
strong as moonlight was thrown through the windows of our chambers, 
and, although the sky was without a cloud, there were flashes, from time to 
time, of the most vivid lightning. The unusual light roused many from 
their beds, some supposing that the city was on fire. While every spectator 
must have gazed with feelings of awe, some were astonished into the live- 
liest terror. ' 

There is a striking coincidence of expression in the description of these 
phenomena in difi'erent and distant parts of the counti-y. How far they 
were visible beyond the limits of the United States is not yet ascertainedf. 
They are described as having appeared splendid at St. George's Bank, three 
hundred miles from the coast. 

The astonishing displays of meteors seen at different times, 1T79, 1799, 
1832, and 1833, all appeared at the same time of the year, or within a single 
day of the same time. This is worthy of notice and philosophical inquiry. 

The cause of these phenomena, these showers of luminous meteors, evi- 
dently distinct from aerolites, seems now demanded from every quarter 
by the wise and the simple, the learned and the unlearned. Many hy- 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 67 

potheses have been formed on the subject. Dr. Halley conjectured " that a 
stratum or train of inflammable vapor, gradually raised from the Earth and 
accumulated in an elevated region, suddenly took fire, and, burning like a 
train of gunpowder, exhibited the meteoric phenomena." Tlie late Presi- 
dent Clap of New Haven, supposed fiery meteors to be terrestrial comets 
revolving about the Earth. But his attention must have been fixed on oth- 
ers, and not on these showers of meteors. A learned professor wishing for 
more information concerning them, thinks " it evident that the point from 
•which the fireballs emanated was beyond the limits of our atmosphere ; that 
the balls were projected obliquely into the atmosphere ; that they were not 
at first luminous, but became so, and more so, as they reached the denser 
parts of the atmosphere, until they exploded or burst asunder ; and that 
they consisted of luminous vapor, such as after explosion remained suspended 
in the air." 

The most probable conjecture seems to be, that the meteors of 1833 were 
electrical phenomena. 

The state of the atmosphere is to be considered. The weather was warm 
for some time previous to the display. On the day preceding, it was 
almost sultry. In the afternoon there were gusts of wind attended with 
sudden showers of rain and lightning. " The atmosphere seemed to be satu- 
rated with electricity." 

To account for these meteors on the principles of electricity is not new. 
Dr. Kees informs us that " Dr. Blagden proceeds to explain these meteors 
on the hypothesis that they are electrical phenomena. His arguments are, 
1st, from the great rapidity of their motion, which seems to exceed any 
other we are acquainted with besides electricity; 2dly, from certain electri- 
cal phenomena which sometimes accompany these meteors ; and 3dly, from 
the connection which they have with the aurora borealis. Dr. Blagden 
concludes that there are three regions of the atmosphere distinguished by 
electrical phenomena peculiar to each ; 1st, the lowest region, in which the 
thunder and lightning occur ; 2dly, the middle region, where the fireballs 
and shooting stars are observed ; and 3dly, the highest region, where the 
aiirora borealis displays a peculiar kind of electrical agency.^' It is worthy 
of remark, that many accounts mention flashes of lightning during the 
display of meteors. It is very probable that the great meteor which passed 
over England on the 18th of August, 1783, was an electrical phenomenon. 
It went with immense rapidity, more than one thousand miles in about half 
a minute. 



58 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 



SELECTIONS FROM RYAN'S ASTRONOMY. 



On Comets. 

1. Comets are planetary bodies moving about the Sun in elliptic orbits, 
and following the same laws as the planets ; so that the areas described by 
their radii vectores are equal in equal times. 

When a comet appears, the observations to be made for ascertaining its 
orbit are of its declinations and right ascensions, from which the geocentric 
latitudes and longitudes are obtained. These observations of right ascension 
and declination must be made with an equatorial instrument, or by measur- 
ing with a micrometer, the differences of the declination and right ascension 
of the comet and a neighboring fixed star. The observations, according to 
Dr. Brinkley, ought to be made with the utmost care, as a small error may 
occasion a considerable one in the orbit. 

From the beginning of the Christian era to the present time, there have 
appeared not less than 5D0 comets; but the elements of not more than 99 
have been computed, and of the latter number 22 passed between the Sun 
and Mercury in their perihelia; 40 between Mercury and Venus; 17 between 
Yenus and the Earth; 16 between the Earth and Mars; and 4 between Mars 
and Jupiter. 

The appearance of one comet has been several times recorded in history, 
viz., the comet of 1680. The period of this comet is 575 years. It exhibited 
at Paris a tail 62° long, and at Constantinople one of 90°. When nearest 
the Sun, it was only one-sixth part of the diameter of the sun distant from 
his surface ; when farthest, its distance exceeded 138 times the distance of 
the Sun from the Earth. 

2. As the orbits of the comets are very eccentric, the aphelion distance of 
a comet is so great, compared with its perihelion distance, that the small 
portion of the ellipse which it describes near its perihelion, or during its 
appearance, may, without any sensible error, be supposed to coincide with a 
parabola, and thus its motion during a short interval may be calculated as if 
that portion of the orbit was parabolical. 

Dr. Halley makes the perihelion distance of the comet of 1680 to be to 
its aphelion distance, nearly as 1 to 22412 ; so that this comet was twenty-two 
thousand four hundred and twelve times farther from the Sun in its aphelion 
than in its perihelion. 

According to the laws of Kepler, the sectors described in the same time 
by two planets, are to each other as the areas of their ellipses divided by the 
square of the times of the revolution, and these squares are as the cubes of 
their semi-major axes. It is easy to conclude, that if we imaguxe a planet 
moving in a circular orbit, of which the radius is equal to the perihelion dis- 
tance of a comet, the sector described by the radius vector of the comet, 
will be to the corresponding sector described by the radius vector of the 



A8TE0N0MY AND NAVIGATION. 59 

planet, as the square root of the aphelion distance of the comet is to the 
square root of the semi-major axis of its orbit, a relation which, when the 
ellipse changes to a parabola, becomes that of the bquare root of 2 to unity. 
The relation of the sector of the comet to that of the imaginary planet is 
thus obtained, and it is easy by what has been alreatjy said, to get the 
proportion of this last sector to that which the radius vector of the earth 
describes in the same time. The area described by the radius vector of the 
comet may then be determined for any instant whatever, setting out from 
the moment of its passage through the perihelion, and its position may be 
fixed in the parabola which it is supposed to describe. Nothing more is 
necessary, but to deduce from observation the elements of the parabolic 
motions. 

3. The elements of a comet are, the perihelion distance of the comet, the 
position of the permelion, the instant of its passage through the perihelioh, 
the inclination of its orbit to the plane of the ecliptic, and the position of its 
nodes. 

Elements of the Comet of 1811. 

Time of Comet's passage through its perihelion, September, . . . l^d. 9A. 48m. 

Place of the perihelion, 74° 12' OO" 

Distance of the perihelion, 1 .02241 

Place of the ascending node, 140° 13' 00" 

Inclination of the orbit to the plane of the ecliptic, . . . . Y2 12 00 

Its heliocentric motion retrograde. 

The investigation of these five elements presents much greater difficulties 
than that of the elements of the planets, which being always visible, and 
having been observed during a long succession of years, may be compared 
when in the most favorable position for determining these elements, instead 
of which comets appear only for a short time, and frequently in circum- 
stances where their apparent motion is rendered very complicated by the 
real motion of the Earth, which always carries us in a contrary direction. 

Notwithstanding aU these difficulties, it is possible to determine the 
elements of the orbits of comets by different methods. Three complete 
observations are sufficient for this object; others only serve to confirm the 
accuracy of these elements, and the truth of the theory which has been just 
explained. Above four-and-twenty comets, the numerous observations of 
which are exactly represented by this theory, have confirmed it beyond all 
doubt. It appears, therefore, that comets which have been considered as 
meteors for many years, are of the same nature as planets ; their motions 
and their returns are regulated by the same laws as planetary motions. 

4. Comets do not always move in the same direction like the planets. 
The real, or heliocentric motion of some is direct, or according to the order 
of the signs ; and of others, retrograde. But the geocentric motion of the 
same comet may be either retrograde or direct according to the position of 
the Earth with respect to the comet, and their relative velocities. 

The heliocentric motion of half the comets whose elements have been 
computed, is retrograde, and of the others, direct. The inclination of their 
orbits is not confined within a narrow zone like that of the planetary orbits; 
they present every variety of inclination, from an orbit nearly coincident 
with the plane of the ecliptic, to that pei-pendicular to it._ 

A comet is recognized when it reappears by the identity of the elements 
of its orbit with those of the orbit of a comet already observed. If its peri- 



60 



ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 



helion distance, the position of its perihelion, its nodefe, and the inclination 
of its orbit are very nearly the same, it is probable that the comet which 
appears is that which has been observed before, and which, having receded 
to such a distance as to be invisible, returns to that part of its orbit nearest 
to the Sun. The duration of the revolution of comets being very long, and 
having been observed with very little care till within about two centuries, 
the period of the revolution of one comet only is known with certainty, that 
of 1682, which had been already observed in 1607 and 1631, and which has 
reappeared in 1759. This comet takes about 76 years to return to its peri- 
helion ; therefore, taking the mean distance of the Sun from the Earth as 
unity, the greater axis of its orbit is 35.9, and as its perihelion distance is 
only 0.58, it recedes from the Sun at least 35 times more than the Earth, 
describing a very eccentric ellipse. Its return to the perihelion has been 
longer by thirteen months from 1531 to 1607, than from 1607 to 1682; it 
has been 18 months shorter from 1607 to 1682, than from 1682 to 1769. 

The real or heliocentric motion of this comet was retrograde, and the 
elements of the orbit deduced by Dr. Halley from the observations of Apian 
in 1631, of Kepler in 1607, and of himself in 1682, also the elements de- 
duced from the observations in 1759, were as follows : 



Passage through Perihelion. 


Per. dist. Earth's 
per dist. unity. 


Place of 
Perihelion. 


Place of 
Node. 


Inclination 
to ecliptic. 


A. h. 
1531 . . . Aug. 21 18 
1607 . . . Oct. 26 8 
1682 . . . Sept. 14 4 
1759 . . . Mar. 12 14 


.567 

.587 
.583 
.585 


10 1 39 
10 2 16 
10 2 52 
10 3 8 


1 19 30 
1 20 21 
1 21 16 
1 23 45 


o t 

17 61 
17 2 
17 58 
17 40 



This comet was retarded by the action of Jupiter, as Dr. Halley had fore- 
told. This retardation was more exactly computed by Clairaut, who also 
calculated the retardation by Saturn. The result of his computation pub- 
lished before the return of the comet, fixed April 15 for the time of the 
passage through perihelion : it happened on March 12. Dr. Halley's com- 
putation appears also very exact, when it is considered that he did not allow 
for the retardation by Saturn. As had been predicted by Dr. Halley, this 
comet reappeared in 1835. 

The return of some other comets has been suspected : the most probable 
of these returns was that of the comet of 1532, which has been believed to 
be the same with that of 1661, and the revolution of which was fixed at 129 
years ; but this comet not having reappeared in 1790, as was expected, there 
is g'eat reason to believe that these two comets were not the same. 

The preceding matter has been principally extracted from Lwplace^s Sys- 
tem of the World. 

An ingenious computation has been made by Laplace, from the doctrine 
of chances, to show the probability of two comets being the same, from a 
near agreement of the elements. It is unnecessary to detail at length the 
method here. It supposes that the number of different comets does not 
exceed one million, a limit probably sufiiciently extensive. The chance that 
two of these, differing in their periodic times, agree in each of the five ele- 
ments within certain limits, may be computed, by which it was found to be 



ASTEONOMT AND NAVIGATION. 61 

as 1200 to l._ that the comets of 1607 and 1682 were not different, and thus 
Halley was jnstly almost confident of its reappearance in 1759. As it did 
appear then, we may expect, with a decree of probability approaching 
almost without limit to certainty, that it will reappear again at the comple- 
tion of its period. 

But with respect to the comet predicted for 1789, from the supposition 
that those of 1661 and 1532 were the same, the case is widely different. 
From the discrepancy of the elements of these comets, the probability that 
they were the same is only 3 to 2, and we cease to be surprised that we did 
not see one in 1789. See Dr. Brinkley's Elements of Astronomy. 

Comets that appeared in 1264 and 1556 are supposed to haye been the 
same, whence this comet may again be expected in 1848. 

A comet appeared in 1770 very remarkable from the residt of the compu- 
tations of Lexell, which indicated a period of only 5^ years ; it has not been 
observed since. There can be no doubt that the periodic time of the orbit 
which it described in 1770, was justly determined ; for M. Burckhardt has 
since, with great care, recomputed the observations, and his result gives a 
periodic time of 5f years. 

Lexell has remarked, that this comet, moving in the orbit he had investi- 
gated, must have been near Jupiter ta 1767, and would also be very near it 
again in 1779 ; from whence he concluded that the former approach changed 
the perihelion distance of the orbit, by which the comet became visible to 
us, and that ra consequence of the latter approach, the perihelion distance 
was again increased, and so the comet again became invisible, even when 
near its perihelion. This explanation has been in a manner confirmed by 
the calculations of Burckhardt, from formulas of Laplace. He has found, 
that before the approach of Jupiter, in 1767, the perihelion distance might 
have been 5.08, and that after the approach in 1779, it may have become 
3.33, the Earth's distance being unity. With both these perihelion distances, 
the comet must have been invisible during its whole revolution. The peri- 
helion distance in 1770 was 0.67. 

This comet was also remarkable by having approached nearer the Earth 
than any other comet that has been observed, and by that approach having 
enabled us to ascertain a limit of its mass, or quantity of matter. Laplace 
has computed, that if it had been equal to the Earth, it would have short- 
ened the length of our year by one-ninth of a day. Now it has been ascer- 
tained, by the computations oi Delambre on the Greenwich observations of 
thte Sun, that the length of the year has not been changed, in consequence 
of the approach of that comet, by any perceptible quantity; and thence 
Laplace has concluded, that its mass is less than one five-thousandth of 
that of the earth. The smallness of its mass is also shown by its having 
traversed the orbits of the satellites of Jupiter without having occasioned 
an alteration in their motions. From those and other circumstances, it 
seems probable that the masses of the comets are in general very inconsid- 
erable; and therefore, as Dr. Brinkley remarks, that astronomers need not 
be under apprehensions of having their tables deranged in consequence of 
the near approach of a comet to the Earth or Moon, or to any bodies of the 

solar system. „ ■, . -, , , 

5. The motion of a comet, like that of a planet, is accelerated when mov- 
ing from its aphelion to its perihelion, and retarded from its perihelion to its 
amielion. On account of the great eccentricity of a comet's orbit, its motion 



62 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

in the perihelion is prodigiously swift, and in the aphelion proportionably 
slow. 

The velocity of this comet in its perihelion was so great, that, if continued, it 
would have carried it through 124 degrees in an hour. But its actual hourly 
motion during that interval, before and after it passed its perihelion, was 
81° 46' 52". 

From Dr. Halley's determination of the orbit of this comet, it cannot be 
less than 13,000 millions of miles from the Sun when in its aphelion. 

According to Pingre, the elements of the orbit of the comet of 1680 were 
as follows : this comet passed through its perihelion December 18th, at 1 
minute 2 seconds after 12 o'clock, at noon mean time at Greenwich ; place 
of the perihelion 8s. 22° 40' 10", or 22° 40' 10" of Sagittarius; and its dis- 
tance from the Sun when in the perihelion, .00603, the mean distance of the 
Earth from the Sun being considered as unity or 1 ; the longitude or place 
of the ascending nodes 9 signs, 1° 57' 13", or 1° 67' 13" of Capricornus; and 
the inclination of the orbit to the plane of the ecliptic 61° 22' 55". 

It appears from the great diurnal motion of some comets, that they must 
have come very near the earth. For, according to Eegiomontanus, the 
comet of 1472 moved over an arc of 120° in one day. And the comet of 
1759 described the apparent arc of 41° in the same interval of time. 

The comet of 1811 was first seen at Viviers, by Flaugergues, on the 25th 
of March, and was visible till the end of May ; it must have been very faint 
and near the horizon all the time, it having during that interval great 
southern latitude. The Earth was in about 5 degrees of Libra, on the 25th 
of March, and therefore the comet must be nearly in opposition to the Sun, 
which certainly was the most favorable position for seeing it. It was then 
moving toward its perihelion, but its motion being slow, and the Earth re- 
treating from it, it was lost sight of when the. Earth arrived at the beginning 
of Sagittarius. The comet passed the ascending node on July 11th, when the 
Earth was between Capricornus and Aquarius ; it was then approaching its 
conjunction with the Sun, and was invisible from the end of May till the 31st 
of August, when, between 3 and 4 o'clock that morning, it was observed by 
Bouvard, at the imperial observatory ; its right ascension was 147° 18', and 
declination 32° 53' north. The comet was first observed at Greenwich, on 
the 5th of September ; its geocentric longitude at that time was 145° 3' 10", 
and its geocentric latitude 28° 36' 39". The comet was at its perihelion at a 
distance of 97,128,950 miles from the Sun on the 12th of September. 

On October 2d, the comet was 26° 33' from the perihelion ; its heliocentric 
longitude was 41° 53' and latitude 72° 1'; having two days before passed the 
higher part of its orbit, or 90 degrees from the node. The Earth at the same 
time was in about 9° of Aries ; and the geocentric longitude of the comet 
was 174° 37', and its geocentric latitude 54° 5'. The comet's distance from 
the Sun was 102,532,550, and from the Earth 120,413,930 miles. The 
comet was nearest the Earth on the 11th of October, when its distance was 
113,630,450 miles, its apparent motion in longitude at this time was nearly 
four degrees in twenty-four hours. On the 12m, the comet was 37° 33' from 
the perihelion, having a rapid geocentric motion in longitude, the direction 
of the Earth and comet conspiring to produce that effect. Its geocentric 
longitude was 203° 46', and latitude 61° 39'; the Earth at the same time 
was 18° 40' in the sign Aries. The comet's distance from the Sun was 
108,342,464, and from the Earth 113,948,225 miles. On January Ist, 1812, 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 63 

the comet was 89° 11' from tlie perilielion ; its heliocentric longitude was 
328° 15', and latitude 23° 33'. The Earth was about 10° 21' in Cancer ; the 
greatest geocentric longitude of the comet was 312° 2', and latitude 17° 18'. 
Its distance from the Sun was 190,520,000, and from the Earth 259,614,500 
miles. See, for a delineation of a portion of this comet's orbit. Squire's 
Astronomy. 

Though the real or hehocentric motion of this comet was not within the 
sphere of the Earth's orbit, yet its geocentric track, when referred to the 
ecliptic, crossed the orbit of the Earth ; hence, the apparent place of the 
comet, during the greater part of the time it was visible, was toward the op- 
posite part of the heavens to its true place. 

Erom the true and apparent places of the comet given above, for partic- 
ular days, its real and visible path may be traced upon the celestial globe. 
Dr. Herschel makes the planetary body of this comet not more than 428 
miles in diameter ; but the real diameter of the head he makes to be about 
127,000 miles. 

The apparent motion of this comet was direct, yet very unequal, for when 
it first became visible after passing the ascending node, it was nearly station- 
ary, and the same about the time of its disappearance, but when nearest the 
Earth it equaled that of Mercury. 

This comet was visible a longer time than almost any other upon record, 
and therefore none has ever afforded such certain means of information with 
respect to its orbit. Had its heliocentric motion been direct, it would have 
been visible much longer, and would have passed within 44,485,850 miles 
of the Earth, had it crossed the line of its nodes at the same time. The 
comet would then have appeared a large nebulous body, but without a tail, 
as that appendage would have been projected in a direct line from behind its 
body. 

Ckeatioit a Peoof of DrviNE Existence. 

This is a conclusion which has been deduced by men of all nations, and in 
every period of the world. " There is no nation or people," says Cicero, " so 
barbarous and ignorant as not to acknowledge a powerful and Supreme Di- 
vinity." 

1. It is as natural for the human understanding, in its original and un- 
biassed state, when contemplating the frame of the universe, to infer the 
existence of a Deity, as it is the property of the eye to distinguish light and 
colors, and of the ear to distinguish sounds. The principle from which this 
conclusion is deduced is exactly the same as that by which, from the contem- 
plation of a building, we infer a builder, and from the elegance and utility of 
every part of the structure, we conclude that he was a wise and skillful archi- 
tect ; or that by which, from an inspection of a clock or watch, or any other 
piece of useful machinery, we infer not only the existence, but the qualities 
and attributes of the contriver and artificer. The man who is incapable of at 
once deducing such conclusions ought to be regarded as destitute of the rea- 
soning faculty; and if we thus necessarily infer the cause from the effect in 
the case of human art, can we for a moment hesitate to ascribe the produc- 
tion of this amazing universe which surrounds us, to a Being of infinite 
knowledge, wisdom, and power, adequate to bring into existence such an im- 
mense and wonderful machine, and to preserve it in harmony, from age to 
age, amidst aU its diversified and complicated movements? That ever a 



{i4 ASTRONOMY AI!T) NAVIGATION. 

doubt was entertained on this subject, is a plain proof that man haslost, in 
part, that light of reason and intelligence with which he was originally 
endued, or that he is sometimes urged on by depraved passions and a pride 
of singularity to utter sentiments which he does not sincerely believe. As 
Cicero long ago declared — "He who thinks the admirable order of the celes- 
tial orbs, and their constancy and regularity, on which the conservation and 
good of all things depend, to be void of a mind that governs them, he himself 
deserves to be accounted void of a miad." It is " the fool" alone, in the 
strictest sense of the word, whatever may be his pretended learning, who 
dares to declare " there is no God." 

And as the universe demonstrates the eodstenoe, so it displays the attri^tes 
of the Eternal. The manifestation of himself to numberless orders of intelli- 
gent beings must have been the great end intended in bringing the universe 
mto existence. This manifestation is made chiefly in actions — in actions 
which display greatness, wisdom and goodness, beyond all bounds. _ His 
g'eatness appears from the immensity of power which the universe exhibits. 
The power necessary to move a single planet in its course far transcends 
human conception. What, then, must be the energy and extent of that 
power which set in motion and still upholds all the planets, worlds, and sys- 
tems dispersed throughout the spaces of infinitude ! The highest created in- 
telligence must be utterly overwnelmed and confounded when it attempts to 
contemplate or to grasp an idea of omnipotence. His knowledge, wisdom 
and unceasing agency are no less conspicuous in the arrangement and direc- 
tion of every thing that exists in heaven and on earth. As his presence per- 
vades all space, so his agency is displayed in the minutest movement of every 
part of the vast whole. This great and incomprehensible Being moves every 
atom, expands every leaf of the forest, decks every flower, conveys the sap 
through the ramifications of every tree, conducts every particle of vapor to 
its appointed place, directs every ray of light from the sun and stars, every 
breath of wind, every flash of lightning, every movement of the meanest 
worm, and every motion of the smallest microscopic animalculum ; while at 
the same time he supports the planets in their courses, guides the comet in its 
eccentric career, regulates the movements of millions ol resplendent systems, 
and presides iu sovereign authority over unnumbered hosts of intelligent ex- 
istence ; directing all the mysterious powers of knowledge, virtue, and moral 
action to subserve the purposes of his will, and accomplish the ends of his 
moral government. In every department of this universe, likewise his good- 
ness is displayed to unnumbered orders of beings, sentient and intellectual ; 
for all the powers of intelligence and action possessed by every creature in 
heaven and on earth, from the archangel to the worm, and all the happiness 
they now or ever will enjoy, are derived from him as the uncreated source of 
all felicity. 

Under this glorious and stupendous Being we live and mote ; our comforts 
and enjoyments, while passing through this transitory scene, are wholly in his / 
hands, and all our prospects of enjoyment beyond the range of our earthly 
career are dependent on his mercy and favor. His omnipotent arm supports 
us every moment ; every breath we draw, every pulse that beats within us, 
every muscular power we exert, every sound that strikes our ears, and every 
ray of light that enters our eye-balls, is dependent on his sovereign will. All 
that we nope for beyond the limits of time and throughout the revolutions 
of eternity depends upon his power, his wisdom, bis' benevolence and his 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 65 

promises. "Were he to witlihold the powers and agencies under which we 
now live and act, we could neither think nor speak, hear nor see, feel nor 
move; the whole assemblage of living beings in our world would be changed 
into immovable statues, and this earth transformed into a barren waste and an 
eternal solitude. To the service of this glorious Being all the powers and 
faculties with which he has endowed us ought to be unreservedly conse- 
crated. As his highest glory and blessedness consist in bestowing benefits 
on his intelligent offspring, so we ought to be imitators of him in his bound- 
less beneficence, by endeavoring to communicate happiness to all around us. 
" To do good, and to communicate, forget not ; for with such sacrifices God 
is well pleased." To him, as the " Father of our spirits and the former of our 
bodies," is due the highest degree of our love and gratitude ; on him we 
ought to rely for every blessing, and humbly resign ourselves to his disposal 
imder every event; for "all things are of God," and all are conducted with 
supreme and unerring wisdom and goodness to an end immortal and divine. 

2. The immensity and magnificence of the universe and the attributes of 
Deity it displays are considerations which ought to be taken into account in 
all our views of religion. There is a class of men who, in prosecuting scien- 
tific pursuits, wish to discard every thing that has a bearing on religion when 
deduced from the investigations of science, and can scarcely refrain from a 
sneer, when the arrangements in the economy of nature are traced to the 
agency of their All- wise and Omnipotent Creator; as if the objects which 
science professes to investigate had no relation to the views we ought to en- 
tertain of the Divinity, and ought never to be traced to their great first cause. 
On the other hand, there are many professed religionists who, from mistaken 
notions of piety, would set aside the study of the works of God, as having no 
connection whatever with the exercises of piety and the business of religion. 
and as even injurious to their interests. Both these classes of men verge 
toward extremes which are equally inconsistent and dangerous. The amaz- 
ing fact, that creation consists of a countless number of magnificent systems 
and woi'lds beyond the comprehension of finite minds, ought not thus to be 
recklessly set aside in our views of God and of religion; for they are all the 
workmanship of one Being, and they are connected together as parts of one 
grand system, of which the God we profess to worship is the supreme and 
universal governor. They present to the view of all intelligences the most 
glorious displays of his character and perfections, and consequently demand 
from us a corresponding sentiment of admiration and reverence, and a cor- 
responding tribute of homage and adoration. Such enlarged prospects of tlie 
universe are therefore available for the loftiest purposes of religion and piety, 
and ought to enter as an element into all our views of the administration of 
the Almighty, and of that worship and obedience he requires from his rational 
offspring, unless we would be contented to render him a degree of homage far 
inferior to that which the manifestations of his attributes demand. 

God is known only by the manifestations which he makes of his character 
and perfections. The highest created intelligences can know nothing more 
of the Divinity than what is derived from the boundless universe he has pre- 
sented to their view, the dispensations of his providence to certain orders of 
beings, and the special revelations he may occasionally vouchsafe, on certaiu 
emergencies, to particular worlds. Had man continued in primeval inno- 
cence the contemplation of the vast creation around him, with all its diver- 
eified wonders and beneficent tendencies, would have led him to form correcl 



66 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

views of the attributes of his Almighty Maker, and of the moral laws by 
which his conduct should be regulated : but it does not follow, that because 
the study of nature is now of itself an insufficient guide to the knowledge of 
the Creator, and the enjoyment of eternal felicity, such studiesare either to 
be thrown aside, or considered as of no importance in a religious point of 
view. To overlook the astonishing scene of the universe, or to view it with 
indifference, is virtually to " disregard the works of Jehovah, and to refuse to 
consider the operations of his hands." It is a violation of Christian duty, a,nd 
implies a reflection on the character of the Deity, for any one to imagine 
that he has nothing to do with God considered as' manifested in the immen- 
sity of his works ; for his word is pointed and explicit in directing the mind 
to such contemplations. " Hearken unto this ; stand still, and consider the 
wonderful works of God." " Lift up thine eyes on hi^h, and behold who 
hath created these orbs." " Eemember that thou magnify his works which 
men behold." " Great and marvelous are thy works. Lord God Almighty ! 
Thy saints shall speak of the glory of thy kingdom and talk of thy power, to 
make known to the sons of men thy mighty operations and the glorious ma- 
jesty of thy kingdom." 

3. The Christian revelation, throughout all its departments, is not only 
consistent with the views we have taken of the universe, but aflFords direct 
evidence of the magnificence of creation, and of the myriads of beings with 
which it is peopled. Of this position we have exhibited some proofs in the 
remarks and illustrations which show at the same time the harmony which 
subsists between the discoveries of revelation and the discoveries which have 
been made in the system of nature. There is no other system of religion or 
pretended revelation that was ever propagated in the world to which such a 
characteristic belongs. K we examine the Mahomedan Koran, the Shasten 
of Bramah, the system of Confucius, the mythology of the Greeks and 
Romans, and every other Pagan code of religion, we shall find interspersed 
throughout the whole of them numerous sentiments, opinions, and pretended 
facts at utter variance with the true system of nature, and to what are known 
to be the established laws of the universe. This is strikingly exemplified in 
the extravagant stories and descriptions contained in the pretended revela- 
tions of Mahomet, and the absurd notions respecting the creation contained in 
the sacred books of the Hindoos, which assert that the universe consists of 
seven heavens and seven worlds, which are all at a future period to be ab- 
sorbed into God ; with many other absurdities. In opposition to all such 
foolish and absurd opinions, the inspired writings, when properly understood 
and rationally interpreted according to the rules of just criticism, are uni- 
formly found to be perfectly consistent with the discoveries of science, and 
the facts which are found to exist in the system of the universe ; and this cor- 
respondence and harmony ought to be considered as a strong presumptive 
evidence that the revelations of Scripture and the scenes of the material uni- 
verse proceed from the same All-wise and Omnipotent Author and Lawgiver, 
that all created matter is under the influence of a universal and unchange- 
able lano of a positive and a negative force. 

Beief History of somb; of the moee Remarkable Comets. 

The word comet literally signifies a hawy stwr ; because such bodies are 
generally accompanied with a nebulosity or train, which has the appearance 
of luminous hair. The luminous point near the center of a comet, which is 



ASTEOWOMY AND NAVIGATION. G7 

most brilliant, is called the nucleus. The haze or nebulosity which surrounds 
the nucleus is called the hair, and sometimes the envelope ; and the nucleus 
and hair combined constitute what is usually termed the head of the comet. 
The luminous train, extending sometimes to a great distance from the head, is 
called the tail of the comet. These bodies have occasionally appeared in the 
heavens in all ages. The ancients were divided in their opinions respecting 
them ; some considering them as wandering stars ; others as meteors kindled 
in the atmosphere of the earth, subsisting for a time, and then dissipated ; and 
others viewed them as prodigies indicating wars, famines, inundations, or 
pestilences. 

Aristotle, who believed that the heavens were incorruptible and unchange- 
able, maintained that comets were generated when they first made their 
appearance, and were destroyed when they ceased to be visible, and conse- 
quently that they could not be reckoned to belong to the heavenly bodies, 
but were only meteors or exhalations raised into the upper regions of the air, 
where they blazed for awhile, and disappeared when the matter of which 
they were formed was consumed. And as the opinions of this ancient sage 
had a powerful influence on the philosophers and astronomers of later times — 
as his assertions were frequently regarded as little short of demonstrations — 
few persons had the boldness and independency of rfmd to call in question 
the positions he maintained on any subject discussed in his writings. 

It was not before the time of the celebi-ated astronomer Tycho Erahe that 
the nature of comets began to be a little understood, and that they were con- 
sidered as moving in the planetary regions. This astronomer observed with 
great diligence the famous comet which appeared in 1677 ; and, from many 
acciirate observations during the time of its appearance, found that it had no 
sensible diurnal parallax, and therefore was not only far above the limits of 
our atmosphere, but beyond the orbit of the moon itself. Its motions were 
likewise particularly observed by Hagecius, at Prague, in Bohemia, at the 
same time that they were observed by Tycho, at Uraniburg. These two 
places dilfer six degrees in latitude, and are nearly under the same meridian, 
and both measured the distance of the comet from the same star, which was 
in the same vertical circle with the comet ; yet both observers found their 
distances the same, and consequently they both viewed the comet in the 
same ppint of the heavens, which could not have happened unless tlie comet 
had been in a higher region than the moon. After Tycho, Kepler had an 
opportunity of making observations on the comets whicli appeared in 1607 
and 1618, and from ail his observations he deduced this conclusion, " that 
comets move freely through the planetary orbs." From this period comets 
began to be more accurately observed, and to be considered as constituent 
parts of the solar system ; and at kaigth the illustrious Newton demonstrated 
that their motions are performed in long ellipses, having the san in one of 
their foci. 

Before proceeding to inquire into the nature and physical constitution of 
these bodies, I shall present the reader with a brief sketch of the history of 
the most remarkable comets which have appeared in modern times. 

One of the most remarkable comets which have appeared in modern times 
is that which made its appearance toward the close of the year 1680, and 
which was particularly observed by most of the astronomers of Europe. 
This comet, according to the accounts given by the astronomers of that 
period, appeared to descend from the distant regions of space with a prodig- 



68 ASTEONOMY AND NAVIGATION". 

ious velocity, almost perpendicular to tlie sun, and ascended again in the 
same manner from that luminary with a velocity retarded as it had before 
been accelerated. It was observed, particularly at Paris and Greenwich, by 
Cassini and Flamstead, by whom it was seen in the morning from the 4th to 
the 25th of November, 1680, in its descent toward the sun ; and after it had 
passed its perihelion,* in the evening, from the 12th of December to the 9th 
of March, 1681. The many exact observations made on this comet enabled 
Sir I. ISTewton to discover that so much of its orbit as could be traced by the 
motion of the comet, while it was visible, was, as to sense, a, pa/rdbola, having 
the sun in its focus, and that it was one and the same comet that was seen all 
that time. This comet was remarkable for its very near approach to the sun. 
At its perihelion, it was not above a sixth part of the sun's diameter from its 
surface ; that is, about 146,000 miles from the surface of that luminary, and 
584,000 from its center. According to Sir Isaac Newton, the velocity of this 
comet when nearest the sun was 880,000 miles an hour. On taking its peri- 
helion distance, as given by M. Pingre, Mr. Squire found, by two different 
calculations, that its velocity in its perihelion was no less than 1,240,000 
miles an hour ! This velocity was so great, that if continued, it would have 
carried it through 124 degrees in an hour ; but its actual hourly motion dur- 
ing that interval, before and after it passed the perihelion, was 81 degrees, 47 
minutes. At this period, the diameter of the sun, as seen from the comet, 
must have subtended an angle of more than a hundred degreesj which must 
nearly have filled its whole hemisphere. 

From Dr. Halley's determination of its orbit, it appears that when in its 
aphelion, or greatest distance from the sun, it cannot be less than 13,000,000,000, 
or thirteen thousand millions, of miles distant from that luminary ; that is, 
seven times the distance of Uranus. According to the same astronomer, this 
comet, in passing through its southern node, came within the length of the 
Sun's semi-diameter of the orbit of the Earth, that is within 440,000 miles ; 
and he remarks, " Had the earth been then in that part of its orbit nearest 
that node of the comet, their mutual gravitation must have caused a change 
in the plane of the Earth's orbit, and in the length of our year ; and if so 
large a body with so rapid a motion were to strike the Earth, a thing by no 
means impossible, the shock might reduce this beautiful frame to its original 
chaos." Modern observations, however, render such deductions somewhat 
improbable. The period of this comet is supposed to be about 5Y5 years. 
It is conjectured that it is the same comet which appeared in 1106, in the 
reign of Henry I., that was seen during the consulate of Lampadius and 
Orestes, about the year 531, and in the forty-fourth year before Christ, in 
which year Julius Cffisar was murdered. Its nucleus was computed to be 
about ten times as large as the moon. Its tail extended over a space of 
sevent)^ degrees in extent. 

This is the comet to the near approach of which to the Earth Mr. Whiston 
attributed the universal deluge in the time of Noah. His opinion was, that 
the Earth, passing through the atmosphere of the comet, attracted from it a 
gi-eat part of the water of the Hood ; that the nearness of the comet raised a 
great tide in the subterranean waters ; that this could not be done without 



* The perihelion is that point in the orbit of any planet or comet which is nearest to the 
sun. It is also called the hwer apais. The aphelion is that point in the orbit which is fur- 
thest from the sun ; called, also, the higher apm. 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 69 

making fissures or cracks in the outer crust of the Earth ; that through these 
fissures the subterraneous waters were forced; that along with the water 
much slime or mud would rise, which after the subsiding of the water partly 
into the fissures and partly into the lower parts of the Earth to form the sea, 
would cover over to a considerable depth tlie antediluvian Earth ; and thus 
he accounts for trees and bones of animals being found at very great depths 
in the Earth. The same comet, he supposed, when coming near the Earth 
after being heated to an immense degree in its perihelion, would be the 
instrumental cause of that great catastrophe, the general conflagration. 
Modern geological researches, however, render all such hypotheses utterly 
untenable. 

2. Another comet which has obtained a certain degree of celebrity is that 
which appeared in 1682, and is usually distinguished by the name of Halleyh 
comet. This comet appeared with considerable splendor, and exhibited a tail 
thirty degrees in length. On calculating its elements from its perihelion 
passage. Dr. Halley was led to conclude that it was identical with the gi'eat 
comets which appeared in 1456, 1531, and 1607, whose elements he had also 
ascertained. The intervals between these periods being about seventy-five 
or seventy-six years, he was led to conclude that this was the period of the 
revolution of the comet, and ventured to predict that it would again return 
about the latter part of the year 1758. As this was the first comet whose 
return had been predicted, when the time of its expected appearance ap- 
proached astronomers became anxious to ascertain whether the attraction of 
the larger planets, Jupiter and Saturn, might not interfere with its orbitual 
motion, and prevent it from ari'iving at its perihelion so soon as the time 
predicted. 

Clairaut, an eminent French mathematician, after a great many intricate 
and laborious calculations in reference to the subject, concluded that the 
attraction of Saturn would lengthen the period 100 days, and the action of 
Jupiter 518, making in all 618 days, by which the expected return would 
happen later than if no such influence had taken place; so that instead of the 
period being 74 years, 323 days, it ought to be 76 years, 211 days ; and as 
the comet passed its perihelion on September 14, 1682, it ought to reach the 
same point on April 13, 1759. These calculations were read before tlie 
Academy of Sciences on the 14th of ISTovember, 1758; but Clairaut gave 
notice that, being pressed for time, he had neglected in his calculations small 
values, which collectively might amount to about thirty days in die seventy-six 
years. These predictions were accordingly verified, for the comet appeared 
about the end of December, 1758, and arrived at its perihelion on the 13th 
of March, 1759, only thirty days before the time fixed by the calculations 
of Clairaut, who, upon repeating the process by which he had arrived at the 
result, reduced this error to nineteen days. The same comet again made its 
appearance, according to prediction, in 1835. 

3. Another remarkable comet made its appearance in 1744, which excited 
a considerable degree of attention. It was first seen at Lausanne, in Switzer- 
land, December 13, 1743; from that period it increased in brightness and 
magnitude as it approached nearer the Sun. On the evening of January 23, 
1744, it appeared exceedingly bright and distinct, and the diameter of its 
nucleus was nearly equal to that of Jupiter. Its tail then extended above 
16 degrees from it's body, and was supposed to be about 23 millions of miles 
in length. On the 11th of February, the nucleus, which had before been 



70 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

always round, appeared oblong in the direction of the tail, and seemed 
divided into two parts by a black stroke in the middle. One of the parts 
had a sort of beard, brighter than the tail ; this beard was surrounded by 
two uneqiial dark strokes, that separated the beard from the hair of the 
comet. These odd phenomena disappeared the next day, and nothing was 
seen but irregular obscure spaces, like smoke, in the middle of the tail, and 
the head resumed its natural form. On the 15th of February the tail was 
divided into two branches, the eastern about 8 degrees long, the western 24. 
On the 23d the tail began to be bent. It showed no tail till it was as near 
the Sim as the orbit of Mars, and it increased in length as it approached 
nearer that luminary. At its greatest length, it was computed to equal a 
third part of the distance of the Earth from the Sun.* This was one of the 
most brilliant comets that had appeared since that of 1680. Its tail was 
visible for a long time after its body was hid under the horizon : it extended 
20 or 30 degrees above the horizon two hours before sunrise. 

4. In the month of June, 1770, Messier discovered a comet, the motions of 
which appear to be involved in a considerable degree of mystery. The comet 
continued visible for a long time. Lexell ascertained, from observation, that 
it described an ellipse around the Sun, of which the greater axis was only 
three times the diameter of the Earth's orbit, which corresponds with a revo- 
lution of 5^ years. It was therefore expected that it would again frequently 
make its appearance; but it has never since been visible, altnough it made 
a pretty brilliant appearance in 17T0. The National Institute of France, not 
many years ago, requested M. Burckhardt to repeat all the calculations with 
the utmost care; and the result of his labor has been a complete confirma- 
tion of the elements obtained by Lexell. "What has become of this comet it 
is difficult to conjecture. Its aphelion, or greatest distance from the Sun, 
was reckoned to be not far beyond the orbit of Jupiter, and that it approach- 
ed as near to the Earth as the Moon, and ought to have appeared twelve 
times since the year 1770. M. Arago attempts to solve the diflSculty by 
affirming that its orbit was then totally diiferent from that which it has since 
pursued ; that its passage to the point of perihelion in 1776, when it was 
expected, took place by day, and before the following return the form of the 
orbit was so altered, that, had the comet been visible from the Earth, it would 
not have been recognized ; that before 1767, during the whole progress of 
its revolutions, its shortest distance from the Sun was 199,000,000 leagues, 
and that after 1779, the minimum distance became 131,000,000 leagues, 
which was still too far removed for the comet to be perceptible from the 
Earth. Sir David Brewster attempts to account for its disappearance by 
supposing that it must have been attracted by one of the planets whose orbit 
it crossed, and must have imparted to it its nebulous mass ; and that it is 
probable the comet passed near Ceres and Pallas, and imparted to them 
those immense atmospheres which distinguish them from all the other plan- 
ets. "Whether any ol these opinions be tenable and sufficient to solve the 
difficulty, is left entirely with the reader to determine. 

5. Another comet, which has engaged the particular attention of astrono- 
mers during the last twenty years, is distinguished from all preceding comets 
by the shortness of -its periodic revolution. It is usually denominated Enok^s 
comet, so called from Professor Encke, of Berlin, who first ascertained itt 



* Memoirs of the Academy of Sciences for 1744. 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. Yl 

periodical return. It was discovered at Marseilles on the 26tli November, 

1818, by M. Pons, and its parabolic elements were presented to the Boarcl 
of Longitude, at Paris, by M. Bouvard, on the 13tn of January, 1819. It 
was immediately remarked, that the result of Bouvard's calculations was too 
similar to the elements of a comet which appeared in 1805, not to consider 
that and the one of 1818 as the same body ; and M. Encke soon after estab- 
lished, by incontestable calculations, that this comet took only about 1200 
days, or three years and three-tenths, to travel through the whole extent of 
its elliptic orbit. This was considered as a very extraordinary result, as an 
opinion had previously prevailed that the period of a revolution of a comet 
must necessarily be long. It now appears that this comet was first seen by 
Messier and 'Mechain in 1786 ; afterward 'bj Miss Herschel, in 1795 ; and 
its subsequent returns were observed by different astronomers in 1805 and 

1819, all of whom, at those periods, supposed that the four comets were four 
different bodies. The elements of this comet, and the short period of its 
revolution, are now incontrovertibly established ; for its reappearance in the 
southern hemisphere in June, 1822, took place very nearly in the positions 
previously calculated. The agreement was not less remarkable in 1825 ; and 
in 18-28, the third period of its announced return, it occupied the places 
assigned to it by Encke the year preceding. It likewise appeared in 1832, 
1835, and 1838. 

Tliis comet is very small ; its light is feeble ; it has no tail ; it is invisible 
to the naked eye, except in very favorable circumstances, but may be seen 
with a small magnifying power. It revolves in an elliptical orbit of consid- 
erable eccentricity, having an inclination to the plane of the elliptic of 13-|- 
degrees. On comparing the intervals between the successive perihelion pas- 
sages of this comet, a singular fact has been elicited, namely, that its periods 
are continually diminishing, and its mean distance from the Sun shortening 
by slow but regular degrees. This is supposed by M. Encke to be produced 
by a resistance experienced by the comet from a very rare ethereal medium 
pervading the regions through which it moves; since such resistance, by 
diminishing its actual velocity, would diminish also its centrifugal force, and 
thus give the Sun more power over it to draw it nearer. It is therefore the 
opinion of Sir J. Herschel, that " it will probably fall ultimately into tlie 
Sun, should it not first be dissipated altogether^ — a thing no way improbable, 
when the lightness of its materials is considered, and which seems authorized 
by the observed fact of its having been less and less conspicuous at each 
reappearance." The acceleration of this comet is about two days in each 
revolution ; and the frequent opportunities of observation which will occur, 
in consequence of the shortness of its period, may lead to new and interest- 
ing conclusions in relation to the nature of these bodies. 

6. Besides the above, another periodical comet has lately been discovered, 
which is distinguished by the name oi Biela's, and sometimes Gambart^ 
comet. This comet was perceived at Johannisberg on the 27th Feb., 1826, by 
M. Biela; and by M. Gambart, at Marseilles, ten days afterward. Gam- 
bart, without delay, calculated its parabolic elements from his own observa- 
tions • and by inspecting a general table of comets, he recognized that it was 
not its first appearance, but that it had been already observed in 1789 and 
1795. Messrs. Clausen and Gambart undertook the computation of the 
comet's revolution, and found, each of them nearly at the same time, thai 
the new comet made its entire revolution round the Sun in a period of about 



72 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

seven years. It was afterward found, more accurately, to be 2460 days, or 
nearly 6f years. M. Damoiseau calculated the perturbations of this comet, 
and predicted that it would cross the plane of the Earth's orbit on the 29th 
of October, 1832, a little before midnight, at a point about 18,480 miles with- 
in the orbit of the Earth. According to this prediction, the comet actually 
made its appearance in 1832 about the time now specified. Its next appear- 
ance was calculated to happen in 1839, and it was reckoned that it would 
arrive at its perihelion on the 23d July of that year. 

The predicted appearance of this comet in 1832 seems to have produced 
considerable alarm, particularly in France. Some German journalists pre- 
dicted that it would cross the Earth's orbit near the point at which the Earth 
would be at the time, and cause the destruction of our globe. 'Such was the 

degree of alarm excited on this occasion, that M. G , a Professor in Paris, 

put the question to the Academy of Sciences, whether it did not feel itself 
bound in duty to refute, as speedily as possible, this assertion. " Popular 
terrors," he observed, " are productive of serious consequences. Several 
members of the Academy may still remember the accidents and disorders 
which followed a similar threat, imprudently communicated to the Academy 
by M. de Lalande, in May, 1Y73. Persons of weak mind died of fright, and 
women miscarried. There were not wanting people who knew too well the 
art of turning to their advantage the alarm inspired by the approaching 
comet, and places inpa/radise were sold at a very high rate. The announce- 
ment of the comet of 1832 may produce similar effects, unless the authority 
of the Academy apply a prompt remedy ; and this salutary intervention is 
at this moment implored by many benevolent persons." It was supposed 
by some, that if any disturbing cause should delay the arrival of the comet 
for one month, the Earth must pass directly through its head. 

In order to dispel such fears, and to illustrate the nature of these bodies, 
M. Arago published an excellent and popular treatise on comets in the 
^^Annuaire" of 1832. He showed that the result of the calculation, was, 
that the passage of the comet ought to proceed a little within our orbit, and 
at a distance from that curve, which is equal to fowp terrestrial radii and 
two-thirds, or about 37,000 miles; that on the 29th October, 1832, a portion 
of the Earth! s orbit might be included within the nebulosity of the comet ; 
but that the Earth would not arrive at the same point of its orbit till the 
morning of the 30th If ovember, or more than a month afterward ; and con- 
sequently that the Earth would be more than twenty millions of French 
leagues (or fifty millions of -British miles) distant from the comet. He adds, 
that " if the comet, instead of crossing the plane of the ecliptic on the 29th 
October, had not arrived there till the morning of the 3Gth November, it 
would have undoubtedly mingled its atmosphere with ours, and perhaps 
even have struck us !" The Earth is considered in more danger, if danger 
there be, from this comet and that of Encke, than from any other. Encke's 
comet crosses the orbit of the Earth sixty times in the course of a century, 
and there is certainly 2. possibility that it might come into collision with the 
Earth; but the probability of its doing so is very small, and, besides, this 
comet and that of Gambart are so extremely rare, that little danger is to be 
apprehended, even although a contact were to take place. Gambart's is a 
small, insignificant comet, without a tail, or any appearance whatever of a 
solid nucleus, and is not distinguishable by the naked eye. 

7. The comet of 1807. This was the first comet on which I had an oppor- 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 73 

. tunity of making observations. My first observation was on the evening of 
October the 8tli, 1807, a little after sunset, when it appeared in a northwest- 
erly direction, not far distant from Arcturus, which was then only a little 
above the horizon. To the naked eye it appeared somewhat like a dim 
nebulous star of the second magnitude, with a beam of light on one side of 
it. Through a telescope, its tail presented a pretty brilliant appearance, and 
occupied a space of considerably more than a degree in length. The coma 
seemed to have a roundish, but dim and undefined appearance, and appeared 
more indistinct as the magnifying power was increased. When viewed with 
an achromatic telescope of thirty-one inches focal distance, and a power of 
thirty, it presented a very distinct and beautiful appearance, and the nucleus, 
coma, and tail, nearly fi!lled the field of view, w hen a power of sixty was 
applied, it was much more indistinct than with the former power, and in all 
the subsequent observations the lower power was generally preferred. In 
the course of five or six weeks, or about the middle of November, it disap- 
peared to the naked eye. I traced it with the telescope, as often as the 
weather would permit, for two or three months after it had become invisible 
to the unassisted sight, and found that its apparent motion was pretty rapid, 
and toward the northeast. About the middle of January, 1808, at eleven 
p. M., it appeared in a direction northeast by north; and at this time it 
appeared through the telescope like a small nebulous star, or like that spe- 
cies of comets called hea/rded comets, having no trace of any thing similar to 
a tail. The last time I saw it was about the end of January, when it was 
still distinctly visible, like a nebulous star ; but cloudy weather for nearly a 
fortnight prevented any further observations, and I saw it no more. On the 
evening in which I had the last peep of it, I detected another comet within 
eight or ten degrees of it, which appeared like a star of the third magnitude, 
and exhibited a pretty brilliant appearance through the telescope. It had 
no tail, like the former comet, but appeared surrounded Mdth radiant hairs 
like the glory which painters represent around the head of our Saviour. It 
continued visible for several weeks; but I have not seen any particular 
notices of this second comet, or any special observations on it, which have 
been recorded by astronomers. 

This comet appears to have been first noticed by Herschel and Schroeter 
about the ith of October, 1807, who continued their observations upon it for 
several months. According to Schroeter's observations and estimates, the 
diameter of the nucleus of this comet was about 4,600 miles, or nearly the 
size of the planet Mars, and appeared to be of considerable density; the diam- 
eter of its coma, 120,000 miles, but liable at diiferent times to variations of 
increase and decrease ; and its rate of motion, at certain periods, 1,333,380 
milee a day, or 55,557 miles an hour. Its tail was divided in a very unusual 
manner into two separate branches ; the north side continued much brighter 
and better defined than the other, and was also invariably convex, while the 
other side was concave. But what was deemed most remarkable was the 
variation in length and the coruscations of the tail. Something like corusca- 
tion had been observed by the naked eye in the case of preceding comets, 
and such phenomena appear to have been confirmed by the observations of 
Schroeter. In less than one second, streamers shot forth to two and a half 
degrees in length ; they as rapidly disappeared and issued out again, some- 
times in portions and interrupted like our northern lights. Afterward the 
the tail varied both in length and breadth, and in some of the observations, 



74 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIG-ATION. 

the streamers shot from the whole expanded end of the tail, sometimes here, 
sometimes there, in an instant, two and a half degrees long, so that within a 
single second they must have shot out a distance of 4,600,000 miles. Their 
light was also sometimes whiter and clearer at the end than at the base, as is 
occasionally seen in the northern lights. Some have objected to the extreme 
rapidity of the streamers as here stated, but the fact of coruscations having 
been seen appears to be confirmed by the observations of this celebrated and 
accurate observer. The observations of Herschel on this comet differ in some 
respects from those of Schroeter, particularly in the estimate he makes of the 
size of the nucleus, which he reckons to be considerably smaller than what 
has been stated above. 

8. The most remarkable comet which has appeared in modern times, since 
that of 1680, was the ooTnet of 1811. About the beginning of September in 
that year, about eight or nine in the evening, as I was taking a random 
sweep with my telescope over the northwestern quarter of the heavens, an 
uncommon object appeared to pass rapidly across the field of view, which on 
examination appeared to be a splendid comet. Not having heard of the ap- 
pearance of any such body at that time, I was led to imagine that I had for- 
tunately got the first peep of this illustrious stranger ; but I afterward learned 
from the public prints that it had been seen a day or two before by Mr. 
Neitch, in the neighborhood of Kelso, who appears to have been the first that 
observed it in this country. This comet appeared with peculiar splendor, 
and was visible even to the naked eye, for more than three months in succes- 
sion, and excited universal attention. It afforded to astronomers more oppor- 
tunities for observation of its physical aspect and constitution, and for deter- 
mining the elements of its orbit, than almost any other comet that had 
previously appeared. Tlie two celebrated observers, Herschel and Schroe- 
ter, made numerous and very particular observations on the phenomena and 
motions of this comet, which were continued every clear evening for the 
space of nearly five months. Some of these observations, along with the 
remarks and deductions connected with them, are extremely interesting to 
the astronomical observer; but my limits will permit only a statement of the 
general results. 

Some of the results deduced by Schroeter are the following : — ^That the 
central globe of light, or what he calls the nucleus, was 50,000 miles in 
diameter, or nearly six and a half times the diameter of the Earth, which he 
deduced from the mean of twenty-seven measurements, which gave 1' 49" 
as the mean angular diameter of the body ; that this great body was in all 
probability chiefly fluid, though its central parts might consist of denser sub- 
stances ; and that there was reason to believe that it shone with its own 
native liglit. Tlic coma was extremely rarefled in comparison with the 
nucleus, resembling a very faint whitish light, scattered in separate portions. 
It was divided into two — one immediately encompassing tlie nucleus, the 
other of a more faint and grayish light, sweeping round it at a distance, and 
forming the double tail which the comet presented. The t/rain, or hiod veil, 
as he terms it, swept around the nucleus, at a distance equal to its breadth, 
and appeared as unconnected as the ring of Saturn with its body, and which 
sometimes appeared darker than the open sky. The diameter of this exte- 
rior part of the head was 34' 16", or about 947,000 miles, which is larger 
than the diameter of the Sun, and which he thinks must have formed a 
hoUow cone around the nucleus, and which he thought indicated a force of 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. Y5 

a repulsive nature residing in the nucleus. Between the 4th and 6th of De- 
cember a great revolution took place; the rarefied nebulous matter, which 
had for three months been so unusually repelled from the nucleus on every 
side to a distance of about one-fifth of the diameter of the head, or 190,000 
miles, was again attracted to it, aflTording an incontrovertible proof of physi- 
cal action upon a great scale, arising doubtless from the same causes which 
produce the other phenomena of nature. The double tail of this comet was 
exceeding faint compared with the nucleus and coma. On the 23d of Octo- 
ber it extended fully eighteen degrees, notwithstanding its oblique position, 
the angle at the Sun being then 61° 23'; at the Earth, 69°; and at the comet, 
49° 37'. Had it been viewed at right angles, it would have subtended an 
angle of 36° 36', equivalent to more than 60,000,000 of miles, which is more 
than half the distance from the Earth to the Sun. CorusoaUons, similar to 
those which appeared in the tail of the comet of 1807, were likewise per- 
ceived, particularly on October the 16th, when a small tail instantaneously 
appeared, then vanished, and reappeared, which was in length equal to three 
times the diameter of the comet's head, or 2,373,000 miles. Other displays 
of the same kiad took place on the 7th of November and the 18th of Decem- 
ber. These facts, of the reality of which Schroeter entertained not the least 
doubt, must be considered as very curious and extraordinary phenomena. 

Herschel's observations nearly agree with those of Schroeter, excepting 
that he estimates the diameter of the nucleus as very much smaller than 
what is stated above. He estimates the greatest length of the tail, as seen 
on the 15th of October, to have been 100,000,000, or a hundred millions of 
miles, which consequently extended over a space larger than that which 
intervenes between the Earth and the Sun ; and its ireadth, as deduced from 
the observations of October the 12th, nearly fifteen millions of miles. He 
calculated its distance, when nearest the Earth, to be about 113 millions of 
miles. He concluded that the solid matter of the comet was spherical, that 
it shone in part by its own native light, and that it probably had a rotation 
round its axis, irom the most accurate observations of the motion of this 
comet, its period of revolution has been calculated to exceed 3000 years. 
Bessel computes it at 3383 years ; and several other astronomers conceive its 
period to be considerably longer, even exceeding 4000 years. 

9. Rea/ppea/rcmce of JH.alley's comet in 1835. The retiu-n of this comet was 
calculated by Messrs. Damoiseau and Pontecoulant ; the former of whom 
calculated its return to the perihelion on the 4th, and the latter on the 7th 
of ISTovember, 1835, and it actually arrived at that point only a few days 
after these periods, namely, on the 16th of November. It was first seen on 
the continent in the month of August that year, but does not appear to have 
been noticed in the northern parts of Britain till more than a month after- 
ward. Its expected reappearance excited universal attention throughout 
Europe. Soon after the middle of September, as I was taking a sweep with 
a two-feet telescope over the northeastern quarter of the heavens, near the 
point where I expected its appearance, I happened to fix my eye on this long- 
expected visitor, which appeared very small and obscure. I immediately 
directed an excellent three-and-a-half-feet achromatic telescope, with a diag- 
onal eye-piece magnifying about thirty-four times, to the comet, when it was 
distinctly seen, and appeared of a considerable diameter, but still somewhat 
hazy and obscure, i afterward applied a power of forty-five, and another 
of ninety-five; but it was seen most distinctly with the lower power. With 



-g ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATIOK. 

ninety-ffve it appeared extremely obscure, and nearly of the apparent size of the 
moon * There appeared at this time nothing like a tail, but the central part 
was much more luminous than the other portions of the comet, and presented 
something like the appearance of a star of the third or fourth magnitude sur- 
rounded with a haze. In some of the views I took of this object, the lumm- 
ous part or nucleus appeared to be considerably nearer one side than an- 
other. At this period, and for a week or ten days afterward, the comet was 
altogether invisible to the naked eye. Many subsequent observations were 
made, and published in the provincial newspapers, but which my present 
limits prevent me from inserting. 

After the comet became visible to the naked eye, the tail began to appear, 
and increased in length as it approached its perihelion, and at its utmost ex- 
tent was estimated to be above thirty degrees in length. On the 13th of 
October, according to the observations of Arago, a luminous sector was vis- 
ible in its head ; on the day following, this sector had disappeared, and a 
more brilliant one and of greater longitudinal extent was formed in another 
place. This second sector was observed on the 17th, when it appeared less 
bright; and on the 18th its weakness had decidedly increased. The comet 
was- concealed till the 21st, but on that day three distinct sectors were visible 
in the nebulosity. On the 23d all traces of these sectors had disappeared, 
the nucleus, which had previously been brilliant and well-defined, having 
become so large and diffiise that the observer could scarcely believe in the 
reality of such a sudden and important alteration, till he satisfied himself 
that the appearance was not occasioned by moisture on the glasses of his in- 
strument. It appears, likewise, that one of these luminous fans or sectors 
was observed by Sir J. Herschel, at the Gape of Good Hope, after the comet 
had passed its perihelion. The nebulosity of this comet appears to have in- 
creased in magnitude as it approached the sun, but its changes were some- 
times unaccountably rapid. On one occasion it was observed to become 
obscure and enlarged in the course of a few hours, though a little before its 
nucleus was clear and well defined. On the 11th of October, the Kev. T. 
W. Webb, and two other observers, observed coruscations in the tail. On 
that evening, at 7 30', the tail was very conspicuous, in the constellation 
of Draconis, and evidently fluctuated, or rather coruscated in length, being 
occasionally short, and then stretching -in the twinkling of an eye to its 
full extent, which was at least equal to ten degrees. Its changes were ex- 
tremely similar to the kindling and fading of a very faint streamer of the 
Aurora Borealis. 

"The influence pf tAe ethereal medium on the motion of Halley's comet will 
be known after another revolution, and future astronomers will learn by the 
accuracy of its returns, whether it has met with any unknown cause of disturb- 
ance in its distant journey. Undiscovered planets beyond the visible bound- 
ary of our system may change its path and the period of its revolution, and 
thus may indirectly reveal to us their existence, and even their physical na- 
ture and orbit. The secrets of the yet more distant heavens may be disclosed 
to future generations by comets which penetrate still further into space, such 

* In viewing comets, telescopes with large apertures and comparatively low magnifying 
powers should generally be used, as the faint light emitted by comets, whether it be inherent 
or reflected, will not permit the use of so high magnifying powers as may be applied to the 
planets. 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 77 

as that of 1763, which, if any faith may be placed in the computation, goes 
nearly 43 times further from the Sun than Halley's does, and snows that the 
Sun's attraction is powerful enough at the distance of 144,600 millions of 
miles to recall the comet to its perihelion. The periods of some comets are 
said to be many thousand years, and even the average time of the revolution 
of comets generally is about a thousand years; which proves that the Sun's 
gravitating force extends very far. La Place estimates that the solar attrac- 
tion is felt throughout a sphere whose radius is a hundred millions of times 
greater than the distance of the Earth from the Sun." " The orbit of Halley's 
comet is four times longer than it is broad ; its length is about 3420 millions 
of miles, about 36 times the mean distance of the Earth from the Sun. At its 
perihelion it comes within 57 millions of miles of the Sun, and at its aphelion 
it is 60 times more distant. On account of this extensive range, it must experi- 
ence 3600 times more light when nearest to the sun than in the most remote 
point of its orbit. In the one position the Sun wiU seem to be four times 
larger than he appears to us, and at the other he will not be apparently larger 
than a star." 

The appearance of this comet, so near the time predicted by astronomers, 
and in positions so nearly agreeing with those which were previously calcu- 
lated, is a clear proof of the astonishing accuracy which has been introduced 
into astronomical calculations, and of the soundness of those principles on 
which the astronomy of comets is founded. It likewise shows, that comets in 
general are permanent bodies connected with the solar system, and that no 
very considerable change in their constitution takes place while traversing 
the distant parts of their orbits. 

From the preceding historical sketches and descriptions the reader will 
learn something of the general phenomena of comets; and I shall now briefly 
inquire into the opinions which have been formed respecting the 

PHYSicAi Constitution of Comets. 

On this subject our knowledge is very imperfect ; in fact, we may be said 
to know little or nothing of the physical construction of those mysterious 
bodies, or of the nature of the substances of which they are composed. In 
regard to the nelntlosity of comets, where there appears no nucleus, it has 
been conjectured to be composed of something analogous to globular masses 
of vapor, slightly condensed toward the center, and shining either by inherent 
light or by the reflected rays of the Sun. When there is a nucleus in the 
center of a comet, it seldom happens that the nebulosity extends to it with a 
gradually increasing intensity. On the contrary, the parts of the nebulosity 
near the nucleus are but slightly luminous, and seem to be extremely rarified 
and transparent. At some distance from their center, their shining quality 
is suddenly increased, so that it looks like a ring of invariable size resting in 
equilibrium around the center. Sometimes two, and even three of these con- 
centric rings have been perceived separated by intervals ; but what appears 
to be a ring must in reality be a spherical covering, an idea of which may be 
formed by imagining in our atmosphere, at three diiferent heights, three con- 
tinued layers of clouds entirely covering the globe. The matter of the nebu- 
losity is so rare and transparent that the smallest stars may frequently be seen 
through it. 

As to the nwleus, it is generally considered as the solid or densest part of 
the comet. The mudlei of comets are sometimes very similar to the disks of 



Y8 ASTEOKOMT AND NAVIGATION. 

planets, both in form and brightness. They are generally small compared 
with the whole size of the comet ; but in some cases they are of considerable 
magnitude, as we have already stated in respect to the comets of 1807 and 
1811. Some suppose that the nuclei of comets are transparent, as well as 
their nebulosities, and allege as a proof that stars have been seen through a 
nucleus. Thus, Montaigne is said to have seen a star of the sixth magnitude 
through the nucleus of a small comet, and Olbers saw a star of the seventh 
magnitude, although it was covered by a comet, and without its light being 
rendered less powerful; but the accuracy of such observations has been called 
in question. On the other hand, it has been concluded that the nucleus of a 
comet has on several occasions eclipsed a star which was in the same line of 
vision. Messier, when observing the small- comet of 1774, perceived a. star 
which was eclipsed by the opaque body of a comet, or at least aU the cir- 
cumstances attending it led to that conclusion. On the 28th of November, 
1828, at lO"" 30' -p. m., M. Wartman, at Geneva, perceived a star of the eighth 
magnitude completely eclipsed by Encke's comet. Comets have likewise 
been observed to transit the disk of the Sun like dark spots. M. Gambart, 
of Marseilles, calculated that a comet which he had observed would pass 
across the Sun on the morning of the 18th of November, 1826,_ and both he 
and M. Flaucerques were successful in obtaining a sight of it during its 
transit. Mr. Capel LloflPt, on the 6th June, 1818, at 11 a. m., saw a body 
passing over the sun's disk which appears to have been a comet. It was 
likewise seen on the same day by Mr. Acton, at 2'' 30', considerably advanced 
beyond the point in which it was seen at 11 a.m., and its progress over the 
disk seems to have exceeded that of "Venus in transit. These observations 
seem evidently to indicate that some comets at least have nuclei composed 
of solid and opaque materials. From all the observations in relation to this 
point, collected by M. Arago, he deduces the following conclusions : 1. That 
there exist some comets destitute of the nucleus. 2. That there are other 
comets, the nuclei of which are transparent. 3. That there are also comets, 
which are more brilliant than the planets, the nuclei of which are probably 
solid and opaque. 

La respect to the tml, or luminous train, which generally accompanies comets, 
it is found that it is generaUy in opposition to the Sun, or on the prolongation 
of the line which would join the Sun and the nucleus. But this is not 
always the case. Sometimes the direction of the tail has been found at right 
angles with this line ; and in some extraordinary instances the tails of comets 
have been observed to point directly toward the Sun. This was the case with 
a comet that appeared in 1824, which for about eight days exhibited an addi- 
tional luminous train in opposition to that which assumed the ordinary direc- 
tion. This anomalous tail, according to Olbers, was 7° long, while the other 
was only 3^°, and it was bright enough to be seen with an opera-glass. In 
general, however, it is found that the tail inclines constantly toward the 
the region last quitted by the comet, as if in its progress through an ethereal 
medium, the matter forming it experienced more resistance than that of the 
nucleus. The tail is generally enlarged in proportion to its distance from the 
head of the comet, and in certain cases it is divided into several branches, a^ 
already noticed of the comet of 1807. Some have supposed that the divided 
tail is nothing more than a perspective representation of the sides of a great 
hollow cone ; but there are certain observations which seem to prove that, in 
some cases, they have a separate existence as independent branches. The 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. Y9 

most remarkable instance of a diyided tail was in tlie comet of 1744. On the 
6t\i and 7tli of March, there were six branches in the tail, each of them about 
4° in breadth, and from 30° to 40° long. Their edges were pretty well de- 
fined and tolerably bright ; their middle emitted but a feeble light, and the 
intervening spaces were as dark as the rest of the firmament. The tails of 
comets, as already noticed, sometimes cover an immense space in the heavens. 
The comet of 1680 had a tail which extended to 68°, that of 1811 to 23°, and 
That of 1769 to 97° in length ; so that some of these tails must have reached 
from the zenith to the horizon. The length of the tail of the comet of 1680, 
estimated in miles, was 112,750,000 ; that of 1769, 44,000,000 ; and that of 
1744, 8,250,000 miles. A body moving at the rate of 20 miles every hour 
would not pass over the space occupied by the tail of the comet of 1680 in 
less than 643 years. It has been supposed by some astronomers that certain 
changes in the appearance of the tails of comets arise from the rotation of 
the cometary body ; as some comets have been supposed to rotate about an 
axis passing through the center of the tail, such as that of 1825, which was 
concluded, from certain appearances, to perform its rotation in 20 hours 30 
minutes. 

As to the nature of the immense tails of comets, their origin, or the sub- 
stances of which they are composed we are entirely ignorant ; and it would 
be wasting time to enter into any speculation on this subject as nothing 
could be presented to the view of the reader, but vague conjectures, gratui- 
tous hypotheses, and unfounded theories. 

MisoELLAUEOirs Remarks on Comets. 

1. Whether comets shine with their own natvoe lights or derive their light 
from the^ Stm f — This is a question about which there have been different 
opinions, and at the present moment it may be considered as still undeter- 
mined, though the probability is, that in general, they derive their light from 
the same source as the planets. It appears to have been the opinion of bol^i 
Schroeter and Herschel, that the comet of 1811 shone by inherent light ; 
and the rapid variations wliich have been observed in the brightness of the 
nucleus, and the coruscations of the tail, are considered by some as inex- 
plicable on any other hypothesis. It is likewise supposed that certain 
phenomena, which have been observed in the case of faint and rarefied com- 
ets, tend to corroborate the same position. For example. Sir J. Herschel, 
on September 23, 1832, saw a small group of stars of the 16th and l7th 
magnitude through the comet of Biela. Though this group could have been 
effaced by the most trifling fog, yet they were visible through a thickness of 
more than 50,000 miles of cometary matter ; and therefore it is supposed 
scarcely credible that so transparent a material, aff'ording a free passage to 
the light of such minute stars, could be capable of arresting and reflecting to 
us the solar rays. On the other hand, it has been objected to this opinion, 
that comets have appeared as dark spots on the disk of the Sun ; that their 
light exhibits traces oi pola/risation; and that they have be(3n occasionally 
observed to exhibit phases. M. Arago remarks, that " on the very day that 
any comet shall appear with a distinct phase, all doubts on this subject will 
have ceased." But it is considered doubtful whether any decided phase has 
yet been perceived, although some observers were led, from certain phe- 
nomena, to infer that something like a phase was presented to their view. 
It is found that all direct light constantly divides itself into two points of 



80 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

the same intensity, when it traverses a crystal possessing the power of double 
refraction; reflected light gives, on the contrary, in certain portions of the 
crystal through which it is made to pass, two images of unequal intensity, 
provided the angle of reflection is not 90°; in other words, it is polarized in 
the act of reflection. On this principle, M. Arago pointed out a photometric 
method of determining whether comets borrow their light from the Sun, or 
are luminous in themselves. On the 23d of October, 1835, having applied 
his new apparatus to the observation of Halley's comet, he immediately saw 
two images presenting the complementary colors, one of them red, the other 
green, aj turning the instrument half round, the red image became green, 
and vice, versa. He concluded therefore that the light of the comet, at least 
the whole of it, is not composed of rays possessing the property of direct 
light, but consists of that which \&^olarized or reflected specularly : that is, 
of light derived from the Sun. These experiments were repeated with the 
same result, by three other observers in the Observatory of Paris. 

2. It appears to be a remarkable fact in respect to comets, that the real 
diameter of the nebulosity increases proporUonaMy as the comet becomes dis- 
iKsifrom the Sun. Hevelius appears to have been the first who made this 
observation; but it seems to have been overlooked, and even an opposite 
position maintained. As the tails of comets increase in length as they 
approach their perihelia, so it was generally considered that the nebulosities 
followed the same law ; but the observations which have lately been made 
on Biela's comet have confirmed the observations of Hevelius. On the 28th 
of October, 1828, this comet was found to be nearly three times further from 
the Sun than on the 24:th of December, or in the proportion of 1.4617 to 
0.5419, yet in October its diameter was about twenty-six times greater than 
in December, or in the proportion of Y9.4 to 3.1 ; that is, its solid contents on 
the 28th of October were 16,800 times greater than on the 24th of Decem- 
ber, and the smallest size of the comet corresponded to its least distance from 
Iftie Sun. M. Yalz, of Nimes, and Sir John Herschel have attempted to 
account for this circumstance on very diflferent principles, but neither hypo- 
thesis appears to be satisfactory. 

3. Whether a comet may ever come in contact with the JEa/rth, amd produce 
a concussion ? — As comets move in orbits which form extremely elongated 
ellipses ; as they move in all imaginable directions ; as they traverse almost 
every part of the solar system in returning from the furthest verge of their 
excursions ; as they penetrate within the interior of the planetary orbits — 
even within the orbit of Mercury, and cross the orbits of the Earth and the 
other planets, it is not impossible that a comet may come in contact with 
our globe. An apprehension of such an event produced a considerable de- 
gree of alarm on the Continent at different periods, particularly in 1773 and 
1832, as formerly stated. But when we consider the immense cubical space 
occupied by the planetary system in which the comets move, and compare 
it with the small capacities of these bodies ; and when we take into view 
certain mathematical calculations in reference to the subject, the probability 
of a shock from a comet is extremely small. " Let us suppose," says Arago, 
" a comet, of which we only know, that at its perihelion, it is nearer the Sun 
than we are, and that its diameter is one-fov/rth of that of the Earth, the 
calculation of probabilities shows that of 281,000,000 of chances there is 
only one unfavorable; there exists but one which can produce a collision 
between the two bodies. As for the nebulosity, in its most general dimen- 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 81 

sions, the unfavorable chances will be from ten to twenty m the same number 
of two hundred and eighty-one millions. Admitting then, for a moment, 
that the comets which may strike the Earth with their nuclei would annihi- 
late the whole human race, then the danger of death to each individual, 
resulting from the appearance of an unknown comet, would be exactly equal 
to the risk he would run if in an urn there was only one single white ball of 
a total number of 281,000,000 balls, and that his condemnation to death 
would be the inevitable consequence of the white ball being produced at the 
first drawing." 

When we consider that a "Wise and Almighty Kuler superintends and 
directs the movements of all the great bodies in the universe, and the erratic 
motions of comets among the rest, and that no event can befall our world 
without his sovereign permission and appointment, we may repose ourselves 
in perfect security that no catastrophe from the impulse of celestial agents 
shall ever take place but in unison with his will, and for the accomplishment 
of the plans of nis universal providence. At the same time, the possibility,' 
of a shock from a large comet shows us that this Earth and all its inhabitants 
are dependent for their present existence and comforts on the will of an Al- 
mighty Agent, " in whom we live, and move, and have our being ;" and that, 
were it conformable to his all-wise and eternal designs, he could easily dis- 
arrange the structure of our globe, and reduce its inhabitants either to misery 
or to complete destruction; and that, too, without altering a single physical 
law which now operates throughout the universe. 

If we recognize the Scriptures as a revelation from God, we may rest 
assured that no danger from such a cause can happen to our world for ages 
yet to come ; for there are many important predictions contained in revela- 
tion which have not yet received their accomplishment, and must be fulfilled 
before any fatal catastrophe can happen to our globe. It is predicted that 
the Jews shall be brought into the Christian church " with the fullness of the 
Gentiles," — that " the idols of the nations shall be abolished," — ^that " wars 
shall cease to the ends of the earth," — that the kingdom of Messiali shall 
extend over all nations, — that " the knowledge of Jehovali shall cover the 
earth, and that all shall know him from the least to the greatest ;" that " thie 
earth shall yield its increase," and its desolate wastes be cultivated and 
inhabited, — that moral order shall prevail, and " righteousnoss and praise 
spring forth before all the nations," — and that this happy era of the world 
shall continue during a lapse of ages. These events have not yet been accom- 
plished, though at the present moment they appear either in a state of com- 
mencement or of progression; but they cannot be supposed to be fully 
realized till after a lapse of centuries. The believer in Divine revelation, 
therefore, has the fullest assurance that, whatever directions comets may take 
in their motions toward the center of our sj^stem, none of them shall be 
permitted to impinge upon our globe, or to effect its destruction, for at least 
a thousand years to come, or till the above and other predictions be com- 
pletely accomplished. 

4. Another question occurs on this subject— namely, whether amy comets 
have emer fallen into the simf It was the opinion of Sir Isaac Newton that 
one purpose for which comets are destined, is to recruit the Sun with fresh 
fuel, and repair the great consumption of his light by the streams continually 
emitted every way from that luminary ; and that such comets as come very 
near the Sun in their perihelions meet every time with so much resistance 



82 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

from his atmospliere as to abate their projectile force — ^by the constant dimi- 
nution of which, the centripetal power, or gravitation toward the Sun, would 
be so increased as to make them fall into his body. On a similar principle, 
Arago supposes that the comet of 1680, which approached so near the body 
of the Sun, must have passed nearer to his surface at that time than at its 
preceding apparitions ; that the decrease in the dimensions of the orbit wiU 
continue on each succeeding return to its point of perihelion; and that '■'■it 
will terminate its career hy falli/ng upon the Sum,.'''' But he acknowledges 
that, " from our ignorance of the densities of the various strata of the Sun's 
atmosphere, of that of the comet of 1680, and of the time of its revolution, 
it will be impossible to calculate after how many ages this extraordinary 
event is to happen ;" and he likewise admits that " the annals of astronomy 
do not afford any reason to suppose the previous occurrence of such an event 
since the origin of historical record ; so that we have no direct evidence that 
such an event has ever taken place, or that it ever will. "We know too little 
of the physical constitution of the Sun, and of the nature of comets, to be 
able to assert that the falling of a comet into the Snn would actually recruit 
the luminous matter of which his outer surface is composed ; for we have 
reason to believe that there is little or no analogy between the mode in which 
we supply our fires by means of fagots, and that by which the solar light is 
recruited and preserved in its pristine vigor ; and besides, it is found that 
bodies, particularly in certain electric states, may be rendered luminous with- 
out the addition of any extraneous body to their substances. 

Of the Influence of Comets on the Eaeth. 

In former times, the appearance of comets was supposed to be the forerun- 
ner of wars, revolutions, famine, pestilence, the deaths of great men, earth- 
quakes, inundations and other calamities. When the splendid comet of 1456 
appeared, (supposed to be the same as Halley's comet,) its tail extended at 
one time over more than 60 degrees. Three days before its perihelion, its 
nucleus was as bright as a fixed star, its tail of the color of -gold, and it 
appears to have exhibited coruscations. Pope Calixtns, believing it to be at 
once the sign and instrument of Divine wrath, was so frightened at its 
appearance that he ordered public prayers to be offered up in every town, 
and the bells to be tolled at the noon of each day, to warn the people to sup- 
plicate the mercy of Heaven. He at the same time excommunicated bom 
the comet and the Turks, whose arms had lately proved victorious against 
the Christians, and established the custom, which still exists in Catholic 
countries, of ringing the church bells at noon. In modern times, certain 
natural effects have likewise been attributed to the influence of comets — such 
as tempests, hurricanes, volcanic eruptions, cold or hot seasons, overflowing 
of rivers, fogs, dense clouds of flies or locusts, the plague, the dysentery, the 
cholera, and other disorders. 

Mr. T. Forster, a respectable writer on natural science, author of "Re- 
searches about Atmospherical Phenomena," &c., published in 1829 a work 
on the " Atmospherical Causes of Epidemic Diseases," in which he maintains 
that the most unhealthy periods are those during .which some great comet 
has been seen; that the appearance of these bodies has been accompanied by 
earthquakes, eruptions of volcanoes, and atmospheric commotions ; and that 
no comet has been seen during seasons of healthiness. For example, in the 
year 1665 a comet made its appearance, and soon after its disappearance the 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 83 

city of London was ravaged by the plague. In 1680, one of the most splen- 
did comets which have been observed in modern times made its appearance. 
Tlie atmospheric effect produced by its influence, according to Mr. Forster, 
was " a cold winter, followed by a hot and dry summer," and " meteors in 
Germany." As the influence of comets on our globe and its atmosphere (if 
such an influence exist) must have a respect to the whole Earth, and not 
merely to any particular portion of it, we might ask, in reference to the first 
example, why 'did not the comet of 1665 produce a similar effect in Amster- 
dam, Vienna, Paris and Madrid, and in the principal cities of Asia, Africa, 
and America ? But of such effects we never had the least intimation. In 
respect to the second example, we are warranted to inquire, whether the cold 
winter was followed by a hot summer in every other climate of the Earth? 
whether meteors were as common in other countries as in Germany ? and 
whether the comet produced opposite effects, at one time congealing the 
pools and rivers, and at another scorching the Earth with heat ? If such 
questions cannot be satisfactorily answered, we are not warranted in attribu- 
ting such eft^ects to the influence of comets. 

We err egi-egiously, in this as well as in many other respects, when we 
infer, from two contemporaneous events, that the one is either the sign or 
the cause of the other. It is on a principle of this kind that some persons 
are led to attribute the events to which we have alluded to the influence of 
comets. Because an inundation, a war, a political convulsion, or a volcanic 
eruption has taken place at the time of the approach of a comet to this part 
of our system, therefore they conclude that there must be a certain connection 
between such events, and that the one is the cause and the other the effect ; 
while the two events, in point of fact, may not have the slightest relation to 
each other, except their casual occurrence at the same period. We might, 
on the same grounds, infer that the rising of the star Sirius along with the 
Sun, which announced to the Egyptians the rise of the Nile, was the cause 
of the annual overflowing of that river. Before we can identify any event 
with the influence of a comet, we must not conflne our views to an event or 
two in our immediate neighborhood, but must endeavor to ascertain whether 
similar events or phenomena have happened on every pm't of the E(wtk at 
the same period. As comets, either large or small — either visible to the 
naked eye or through a telescope, make their appearance at an average 
almost every year, and as epidemics, political commotions, earthquakes, hur- 
ricanes, and similar events are always to be found occurring in some particu- 
lar portions of the globe, we should never be at a loss for a physical cause to 
account for every tiling that happens here below, if comets are to be supposed 
to have such an influence over ten-estrial affairs. Whatever takes place in 
any country of an uncommon nature, might then be attributed to a comet 
wliich is either approaching the center of our system or receding from it. 

It is remarkable that the announcement of a comet has generally been 
received with melancholy anticipations, and the effects attributed to its influ- 
ence have uniformly been of a calamitous nature. But why should it not be 
the precursor of prosperous events — of peace, plenty, social tranquillity, and 
genial seasons — as well- as of wars, famines, revolutions, cold winters, and 
parched summers ? It seems something like a reflection on the general be- 
nevolence of the Deity to imagine that he has created such a vast number 
of bodies, and directed their course through every part of the planetary 
regions, chiefly for the purpose of " shaking from their horrid hair" wars, 



84 ASTKONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

famine, and pestilence ; for if they produce such effects upon the Earth, we 
might with equal reason believe that they produce similar effects on the 
otlier planets of our system as they pass along in their course toward the 
Sun; and this would lead us to infer that the inhabitants of all the planetary 
orbs are liable to the same disasters and calamities as the inhabitants of the 
Earth, a position which seems scarcely consistent with the ^boundless benevo- 
lence of tlie Divine mind. 

But although I do not admit the conclusions and the comfitary influences 
to which I have alluded, I am far from asserting that comets have no influ- 
ence whatever on our globe or its surrounding atmosphere. The universe is 
one great whole, and all its parts, however remote, must be supposed to have 
a certain relation to one another; and they may produce an influence, how- 
ever small and imperceptible, on each other at the greatest distances. The 
remotest star perceptible to the eye may produce a certain physical influence 
on our globe, though so small and insensible as to be beyond the limits of 
the nicest calculation ; and therefore comets which sometimes approach pretty 
near the Earth may produce a certain sensible effect upon our globe, particu- 
larly should a portion of their immense tails at any time sweep along the 
higher regions of our atmosphere. But what special influence or effects they 
may produce on the physical economy of our terrestrial system it is impos- 
sible for us in the mean time distinctly to ascertain, from our ignorance of 
the constitution of those mysterious bodies, and of the substances of which 
they are composed. "While too much has doubtless been attributed to the 
influence of comets, it would be verging to an opposite extreme to maintain 
that they can produce no effect at all on our Earth and atmosphere. We 
know that certain celestial bodies produce a powerful influence on our globe. 
The Moon, in conjunction with the solar infl^ience, rules the ocean and per- 
petuates the regular returns of ebb and flow. Its light not only cheers our 
winter nights, but produces a variety of other influences both on the human 
constitution, the atmosphere, and on the productions of the earth ; and there 
may be many effects produced by its agency with which we are as yet unac- 
quainted. The Sun not only diffuses light over every region of the Earth 
for the purpose of vision, but rays or emanations invisible to our sight pro- 
ceed from his body, which promote evaporation, the growth of vegetables, 
and the various degrees of temperature which prevail tliroughout the globe. 
These emanations are likewise found to produce certain chemical effects, to 
dissolve certain combinations of oxygen, and to give polarity to the magnetic 
needle ; and many other effects of which we are ignorant may afterwards be 
found to proceed from those invisible irradiations. Tlie larger planets, Jupi- 
ter and Saturn, and those which are nearest to us, as Yenus and Mars, may 
likewise produce certain effects on our globe, both in virtue of their attrac- 
tive power and of the peculiar nature of the reflected rays they transmit to 
the region we occupy. 

We cannot therefore but conclude, that comets may exert a peculiar influ- 
ence on our terrestrial system in addition to that of other celestial bodies, 
and different from it, particularly those whose bulk and masses are consider- 
able, and which approach nearest to the Earth. Their light, whether native 
or reflected, appeai-s to be peculiar, and the margin of their immense tails 
may occasionally graze our atmosphere when we are not aware of it, and 
may produce a peculiar effect different from that produced by the other 
bodies of our system ; but what that special effect is has not hitherto been 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 86 

determined ; for the mere coincidences of certain events with the appearance 
of comets cannot be supposed to be owing to their peculiar influence, unless 
such events are found uniformly to happen on the apparition of a comet, and 
that too throughout a great portion of the Earth. This subject is worthy of 
some attention ; and perhaps future observers, by more accurate observations 
than have hitherto been made, may throw some light on an influence which 
on the one hand has been perhaps too rashly set aside, and on the other 
carried to a pitch of extravagance beyond the line of sober reason and obser- 
vation. 

Let it not be supposed that, in admitting that comets may have an influ- 
ence on our globe, I mean to give the least countenance to foolish supersti- 
tions, or to the absurdities of astrology, since all that I would be disposed 
to admit in the present case is purely a ^physical influence ; an influence 
which ■ may exist, although we have not yet been able to discriminate its 
specific effects. The most eminent philosophers have been disposed to admit 
such an influence. Sir Isaac Newton supposed that " the atmospheres and 
tails of comets may supply the planets with moisture, which is continually 
wasting by the growing of vegetables out of water and turning into earth ;" 
and that from the same source may be derived " the purest part of our air, 
which is requisite for the existence of living beings." These opinions, indeed, 
cannot be proved, and they are evidently untenable ; but they show that that 
great philosopher admitted the influence of comets. M. Arago, although he 
scouts the vulgar idea of comets being the cause of most calamitous events, 
yet he admits that, " not only cometary matter may fall into our atmosphere, 
but that this phenomenon is of a nature to occur frequently, and may possi- 
bly produce those epidemic diseases which have been attributed to it." 

A variety of questions has been started respecting cometary action and in- 
fluence, beside those to which we have now alluded. It has been a question 
whether we ought to have recourse to the action of a comet to account for 
the, rigor of the climate of North Amsrica? It is found that in the northern 
regions of America, the climate in the same latitude is much colder than in 
Europe. To account for this. Dr. Halley supposed that a comet had formerly 
struck the earth obliquely, and changed the position of its axis of rotation. 
In consequence of that event, the North Pole, which had been originally 
very near to Hudson's Bay, was changed to a more easterly position ; but the 
countries which it abandoned had been so long a time and so deeply frozen, 
that vestiges still remain of its ancient polar rigor, and that a long series of 
years would be required for the solar action to impart to the northern parts 
of the new continent the climate of their present geographical position. But 
we have no proof that a comet has ever struck the earth, or that its concus- 
sion would have the effect to change the direction of the terrestrial axis. Be- 
side, it is well known that the Asiatic coast is equally cold in the same lati- 
tudes as the Atlantic shores of North America. 

It has likewise been a subject of inquiry, whether the depression of the 
soil of a great part of Asia has been produced by the shock of a comet; 
and whether Siberia ever experienced a sudden change by a similar event? 
This latter inquiry has been suggested by the circumstance of the bones of 
elephants, rhinoceroses, and other animals peculiar to the torrid zone, having 
been found imbedded in the strata of that country, which has led to the sup- 
position that Siberia was, at some remote period, comprised within the 
tropics. But there is no proof, nor even probability, that the action of a 



86 ASTKONOMT AND NAVIGATION. 

comet was concerned in either case. It has also been supposed that the 
small planets, Yesta, Juno, Ceres, and Pallas, the supposed fragments of a 
large planet, may have been broken to pieces by the shock of a comet. The 
circumstance that two of these planets, Ceres and Pallas, are encompassed 
with an atmosphere of great density and elevation, has been brought forward 
as a presumptive proof of the reality of such a concussion, and that the com- 
etary atmosphere, not being liable to destruction by the percussion, was im- 
parted to these planets. But when we consider the very small density of 
comets, it appears not at all probable that even a direct concussion from such 
a body would have produced such an effect, although it might have caused 
a considerable derangement of the physical constitution of the planet. Be- 
sides, this hypothesis does not account for the remarkable fact that Vesta and 
Juno exhibit no traces of an atmosphere which, in consistency with the 
supposition, ought to have been imparted to them by the comet, as well as 
to Ceres and Pallas. On the whole, we have no direct or satisfactory proofs 
that comets have ever come in direct contact with our globe, or that they 
have produced any considerable derangements throughout the planetary- 
system ; and whatever specific influence they may produce on our earth and 
atmosphere must be deduced from future observations. 

All that can be said of comets which is reliable, more than can be seen, is 
that they are electric bodies moving in projectiles magnetically arranged 
with the positive pole forward. It may be said that the Sun moves in the 
same manner in its orbit. All the planets have reversed poles to the Sun, 
and revolve on their axes surrounded by atmosphere; while the aimiosphere 
of a comet constitutes its tail, through which the Sun's electric rays of light 
pass. This phenomena is the same as the Aurora, or northern lights, and is 
precisely from the same cause. Thus as magnetic bodies when approaching 
their nearest contact or perihelion, their motion is accelerated. This is the 
true law of magnetic bodies, and this constitutes their aerial splendor as they 
move through space. 

The Comet of Septembee 12th, 1858. 

This comet made its appearance in the northern hemisphere about the 
middle of September, near and directly under the bowl of the Dipper, or 
Great Bear, and about twenty-eight degrees below the plane of the pole star. 
It had the appearance of coming in and passing round the Sun at an angle of 
about forty-hve degrees west of and below the Sun, and went out at an angle 
of about forty degrees east of the Sun— as viewed from the Earth in Sep- 
tember and October. 

There were various opinions as to the size and diameter of its mass. From 
a close observation of this comet, it may be said that it passed its perihelion 
on the 9th of October. It passed one degree below Arcturus on the evening 
of the 7th of October, at which time it seemed to have attained its greatest 
brilliancy. On the 20th, at half-past six in the evening, it stood perpendic- 
ular to Venus, three and a half degrees above that planet, and eleven and a 
half above the horizon. At the same time it stood at an angle with its tail 
of forty-five degrees south-southeast from the Sun's Hne of the ecliptic. 
These few measurements prove that this comet passed a UUle outside of^the 
line of the Earth's orbit, and west about thirty-five days before the Earth 
arrived at that point. i 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 87 



GENERAL REMARKS 

ON THE 

ORIGIN OF THE EARTH'S MOTION TO THE SUN. 



Peobajblt the primeval order of the Earth's motion on its axis, and in its 
path around the Sun, was without obliquity, and consequently without 
change of seasons; unending summer and equal light spreading from pole to 
pole, and causing an undisturbed verdure and tropical fruits to exist far from 
the equator, both toward the north and south, where now the frigid zones 
forbid the existence of vegetable life to any extent. 

The history of the Earth is written in the volume of effects, which are 
undeniable ; it may be read also in nature and revelation combined, and by 
reference to causes and effects may be seen the laws and the order by which 
and in which each mighty revolution was effected, aifording indubitable 
evidence of the truth of the word of God, as well as of the durability of 
His works. 

It has been supposed that that dread sentence, " Cursed is the ground for 
thy sake," received its fulfillment when God caused the Flood to cover the 
Earth, changing at the same time the Earth's orbit, and causing the obliquity 
of the pole to the Sim's plane and pole or axis, whereby were produced all 
the present phenomena of the seasons. But whether or not those who thus 
specidate have any foundation in truth, it is confidently asserted that there 
is both reason and Scripture to sustain the belief that the present inclination 
of the Earth's axis will be perpetual ; the assurance given to Noah, that 
there should be summer and winter as long as the Earth endured, being sup- 
posed to be equivalent to the fiat that the Earth's axis should remain inclined. 
The passage referred to is found in Genesis viii. 20-22, and is as follows : 
"And Noah builded an altar unto the Lord, and took of every clean beast, 
and of every clean fowl, and offered burnt-offerings on the altar. And the 
Lord smelled a sweet savor ; and the Lord said in his heart, I will not again 
curse the ground any more, for man's sake; for the imagination of man's 
heart is evu from his youth : neither will I again smite any more every thing 
living, as I have done. While the earth remaineth, seed-time and harvest, 
and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not 
cease." 

The Mosaic account of the partial destruction of the Earth by the Deluge 
has been by some considered to be fully sustained by the organic remains of 
past ages, both vegetable and animal, which exist in abundance in a fossil or 
petrified state, proving incontestably that at some long past era most won- 
derful changes took place in the physical condition of the Earth. Not only 
does the presence of marine fossil shells, of species both known and unknown, 
at the tops of high mountains, and in other localities far remote from the sea 



88 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

— as for instance in the neighborhood of Cincinnati — prove that many parts 
of the Earth were once far beneath the surface of the ocean, but there is 
much evidence to show that our planet has undergone a very great change 
in temperature — such as whole forests of tropical trees found beneath the 
Earth's siirface in northern regions, and the remains of elephants in Siberia, 
in such quantities that the ivory turners of St. Petersburg use for their pur- 
poses chiefly what is so found. In the same inhospitable region are also found 
the gigantic remains of an extinct species of elephant, one of which was dis- 
covered a few years ago in a condition so perfect that even the hide and 
hair were undecayed, it having been imbedded in the ice probably for count- 
less ages in that climate of perpetual winter. These facts show that the 
climate of Siberia must at one time have been such as belongs to those 
countries in which the elephant is found at the present day ; that is to say, it 
must have had the climate of Africa or India, — from which it must be infer- 
red either that the regions now polar were once equatorial, or that the tem- 
perature of the Earth at large has been lowered from a degree in which the 
heat of the polar regions was equal to that of the equatorial regions now, 
and that the heat of the equatorial regions was so great that they could not 
haye been habitable by man as he is at present constituted. 

But though there can be only one opinion relative to the fact of the sub- 
mersion of the Earth at some remote period beneath the waters of an over- 
whelming flood, some of the best of men have doubted whether the Noachian 
Deluge is that to which the great changes which the Earth has undergone 
must be referred. But, at least, the possibility of that event must be admit- 
ted. The vastness of space teems with the traveling messengers of God, 
which we call comets ; one of these may have visited the Earth, causing it 
to leave its wonted plane, changing the direction of its axis, causing the 
ocean to rush over the continent — when literally the "fountains of the 
great deep were broken up" — and sweeping to destruction every living 
thing. 

But it must be admitted that the weight of evidence is in favor of a theory 
which refers the vast changes the surface of the Earth has undergone to 
other and much longer continued action than that of the Noachian Deluge, 
which it is contended was only partial in extent, and not lasting a single 
year; while there is a vast accumulation of geological facts tending to show 
that many successive submersions and upheavals of the Earth's surface, and 
a lapse o^ thousands of years, were necessary to produce the enormous masses 
of fossiliferous rocks that are found in all parts of the world. There is every 
reason, too, to believe that these changes took place chiefly before the exist- 
ence of man upon the Earth, though evidence is not wanting which tends to 
show that since the appearance of man geological changes have taken place 
to some extent. 

In examining these evidences, it may be stated, in a general way, that the 
ages of the different strata of rock indicate the age of the organic remains 
imbedded in them; and that in the strata of the present period, there are 
found, besides the existing races, many extinct species, including animals of 
an enormous size. The organic remains of man, with the monuments of his 
arts, are also found buried in this last common grave. 

(The remains of man, and old pottery, with other monuments of his arts, 
have been found buried in deep caves of rock, both in Europe and this coun- 
try; and his remains have also been found, buried with his rude stone house, 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 89 

in the peat bogs of Ireland, clad in skins, and in a perfect state of preserva- 
tion. 

About the year 1Y87, some workmen were occupied near Aix, ia Provence, 
France, ia quarrying stone for the rebuilding, upon a vast scale, of the Pal- 
ace of Justice. The stone was a limestone of a deep gray, and of that kind 
which is tender when it comes out of the quarry, but which hardens by ex- 
posure to the air. The strata were separated by a bed of sand mixed with 
clay, more or less calcareous. The first which were wrought presented no 
appearance of any foreign bodies ; but after the workmen had removed the 
first ten beds, they were astonished, when taking away the eleventh, to find 
its infeiior surface, at the depth of 40 or 50 feet, covered with shells. The 
stone of this bed having been removed, as they were taking away a stratum 
of argillaceous sand, which separated the eleventh bed from the twelfth, they 
found stumps of cohimns and pieces of stone half wrought, which were ex- 
actly similar to that of the quarry; they found, moreover, some coins, handles 
of hammers, and other tools, or fragments of tools, in wood. But that which 
principally commanded their attention, was a board about one inch thick 
and seven or eight feet long. It was broken into many pieces, of which 
none were missing, and it was possible to join them again one to another, 
and to restore to the board or plane its original form, which was that of the 
boards used by masons and quarrymen; it was worn in the same manner, 
rounded and waving upon the edges. The stones which were completely or 
partly wrought were not at all changed in their nature, but the fragments of 
the board, and the instruments and the pieces of instruments of wood, had 
been changed into agates, which were very fine and agreeably colored. Here, 
then, were traces of a work executed by the hand of man, placed at the depth 
of fifty feet, and covered with eleven beds of compact limestone : every thing 
tended to prove that this work had been executed upon the spot where the 
traces existed. The presence of man had preceded the formation of this 
stone, and that very considerably, since he was already arrived at such a 
degree of civilization that the arts were known to him, and that he wrought 
the stone and formed the columns out of it. 

The forests which covered the dry land at that period, many of which are 
now standing, and from which the board and handles of the tools of the 
workmen were made, are found buried all over Europe, beneath the surface 
of the present period. 

In all countries, in digging to certain depths, and in mining, the remains 
of fishes, vegetables, quadrupeds, and birds, are found in the soil, or imbed- 
ded in the rocks, except in those of primitive antiquity. The general regu- 
larity with which those that are marine are laid at one level, and those which 
are products of the land are laid at another, and in the alternations of these 
marine and land products, lead to the conclusion that the sea has repeatedly 
covered the land lor long periods of time, and that the land has, at interme- 
diate periods been dry. And the discoveries in the quarries near Aix, are one 
of the many evidences which lead irresistibly to such conclusions ; for there 
must have been a long period of submersion, in which that country was cov- 
ered with the ocean, between those periods in which the workmen at this 
quarry were succeeded by the workmen of another. 

We have on this continent the same evidences of a corresponding period 
of submersion since the creation of man. Immense forests are found buried 
here, portions of which are now standing like those found in Europe. 



90 ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 

A diminutive iron horse-shoe was dug up, at the depth of twenty-five 
feet below the surface, in graduating a street in Cincinnati. It was smaller 
than the kind of shoe required for the smallest kind of asses. A number of 
nails were in it, and the erosion by rust was such as might have been expected 
from the oxydation of 500 years. 

In digging a well in Cincinnati, the workmen came to the top of a stump 
a foot and a half in diameter, at the distance of 94 feet from the surface, on 
the top of which was found an iron wedge; and below this, near the roots of 
the stump, which had been evidently cut with an axe, a small silver coin. 

In blasting the thick and solid limestone rock, at a distance of 14 feet from 
the surface, when the workmen were constructing the steamboat canal at 
Louisville, Ky., they came to a brick hearth, covered in part with charcoal, 
and what appeared to be old ashes, the remains of the last fire built upon it 
by the hand of man. 

In digging wells all over the valleys of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, as 
well as their tributaries, it is necessary to sink them through beds of many 
difi"erent kinds of earth and sometimes of lime rock, to the ancient surface of 
the earth, on which are constantly found old logs, stumps, and sometimes 
standing trees, and the relics of human art. The soil on the old surface of 
the earth thus found, and once cultivated by man, which the farmers now call 
the old or ancient soil, is generally a rich blue clay. 

Little is known in regard to the changes in this hemisphere beyond the 
generally acknowledged fact that the ocean is rising in the low latitudes, or 
along the coasts from New Tork to the Mississippi. Among the evidences 
of the rise of the ocean, and of its encroachments upon the land along these 
coasts, is the submergence of the old walls of some of the houses erected by 
Captain Smith and his contemporaries, at Jamestown, Va., in 1600, latitude 
37", which are now some distance from the shore in James Kiver, and tha old 
town itself has long since become an island, from the encroachment of the 
water on the back part of it. The amount of the rise of the water there in 
230 years, is variously estimated at from five to seven feet, which has made it 
necessary to erect a bridge from the island to the main-land. 

At St. Augustine, Florida, latitude 26° 46' 30", an old dock and an old 
grave-yard have become submei'ged, and the government is now engaged in 
erecting a wall to protect the town from the further encroachment of the 
ocean ; which again corresponds with this theory, or that of the ancient east- 
ern nations. 

Some modem geologists, among whom is Mr. Lyell, have created in their 
imaginations the necessity of a new theory to account for the elevation of the 
land above the level of the sea, on the gratuitous assumption that the ocean 
" cannot be lowered in one place without a general subsidence throughout its 
whole extent," and attempt to account for the alternate changes in the eleva- 
tion of the land above the level of the ocean by volcanic convulsions. Their 
hypothesis is, however, based upon local causes, which are neither constant 
nor uniform in their action ; whereas the effect produced requires a general 
cause in constant operation. Aware of this objection, they acknowledge they 
" cannot, in all eases, understand the possibility of the elevation of the land 
out of the sea by the mere effect of local convulsive movements." 



ASTRONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 91 

Convex and Concatb Belts of the Eakth. 

The Earth has three great convex and two concave belts, and is flattened 
at the poles, so that the equatorial diameter is supposed to be about thirty- 
six miles greater than the polar diameter, while the fact is that the equa- 
torial diameter is at least two hundred and fifty miles greater. This con- 
figuration of the earth is the result of natural or physical and mechanical 
laws — the centrifugal and centripetal forces operating on the Earth revolv- 
ing on her axis together with the atmospheric pressure and the universal 
law of matter and of space — the positive and negative forces or law of at- 
traction. These forces thus combined cause an elongated equator or great 
ridge ; this being convex causes a sag, or concave, which concavity at its 
equilibrium, or at a distance proportionate to the diameter of a sphere of the 
Earth's magnitude, again causes another convexity and a flattened pole ; and 
thus is produced by a combination of the above laws and forces, an undu- 
lated or corrugated surface to the Earth. K proof Were required to establish 
this theory, it would be afforded by a geographical view of the gulfs and 
rivers which head on a line of about forty-three to forty-five degrees north 
latitude, and discharge each way, north and south, into the great gulfs at 
about thirty-three to thirty-five degrees north latitude — forty-three degrees 
north being about the center of the northern convex belt. See the line of 
thirty-five degrees north — the line of gulfs and bays from San Francisco to 
Mexico, and the Mediterranean and E.ed Seas. This great northern ridge is 
a winter barrier to protect commerce between the poles and equator. 

All steam and wind crafts bound to England or France should cross the 
Atlantic south of the forty-fifth degree of north latitude, in winter, through 
the concave zone. 

This corrugated form of the Earth's surface — ^no doubt causing an unequal 
temperature of the sea-water — has probably much to do with the winds and 
calms of the atmosphere, and the tides and currents of the ocean. So long 
as the atniosphere is unchanged in density, so long^it remains at rest ; but 
whatever tends to change this, operates to set it in motion ; so also with the 
ocean — ^heat and cold, operating both by evaporation and hj their contract- 
ile and expansive influence, produce motion in the waters of the sea. 
Thus, both the atmosphere and ocean are kept in perpetual motion, con- 
stantly seeking an equilibrium, but finding none. Thus are accounted for 
the Gulf Stream and under-currents from ocean to ocean, as well as the ex- 
istence of the winds both regular and otherwise. In both the ocean and the 
atmosphere, when the lower strata become heated from subterranean fires, they 
begin to rise, and in doing so, displace the strata above them, and thus con- 
tribute to that agitation of wind and wave which it would seem is destined 
never to cease. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



The Waters "Abote the Fiemament." 

Theee are some passages in Scripture which — to those who accept the 
revealed word of God as not only their guide in matters of religious belief, 
but as a sufficient source of spientific knowledge — tend to establish the theory 
that at some vast and unknown distance in the immeasurable regions of 
space, there exists a boundless concave of water. To such persons there 
seems nothing incredible or impossible in the idea that creative power should 
suspend " shoreless seas" in the remote ethereal regions, any more than that 
the same power should have formed and set bounds to the never-resting 
oceans beneath. It must be admitted, that a literal acceptation of the fol- 
lowing passages makes it almost necessary to adopt some such theory. They 
are sufficient, at any rate, to claim for the question a respectful consideration. 

" And God said. Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters : and 
let it divide the waters from the waters. And God made the firmament, and 
divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were 
above the firmament: and it was so. And God called the firmament heaven: 
and the evening and the morning were the second day." (Genesis i. 6-8.) 

" Praise Him, ye heavens of heavens, and ye waters that be above the 
heavens." (Psalm cxlviii. 4.) 

" In them hath he set a tabernacle for the sun .... his going forth 
is from the end of the heaven, and his circuit unto the end of it." ^saim 
xix. 4, 6.) 

Guided by the teachings of science, it would not be difficult for the 
literal reader of Scripture to suppose that our solar system moves within a 
vast hollow sphere of frozen waters, on the interior surface of which are 
reflected from innumerable points the rays of the Sixn, and that thus are 
accounted for the innumerable fixed stars. In short, that the heavens are 
but an immense mirror, in which our Sun and his planets are reflected from 
icy fields and mountain peaks ; that there are no other suns or solar systems 
— a doctrine which, it is worthy of remark, has not only the apparent testi- 
mony of Holy "Writ, but is in accordance with a physical law of the elements. 

Causes which have Peoduced a Change oe Climate. 

"With respect to the cause or causes which have effected so great a change 
in the temperature of the Earth's surface, there are a great variety of 
opinions. , 

Eurnet, as stated in the abstract we have given of his theory, accounted 
for this change by supposing that the Earth's axis took a new and different 
position at the time of Noah's flood ; but astronomy has shown the improba- 
bility of any such change in position. 

Most writers who admit a deterioration of climate, suppose with Burnet 

'that the change was sudden, and that it took place about the period of the 

deluge. Some, however, and among them Mr. Lyell, believe it to have been 

gradual, occupying thousands of years, and to have been caused by the 



MISCELLANEOUS. 93 

changes which have taken place in the relative positions of the sea and land. 
But in the first place, no such changes as this author supposes are proved to 
have happened with respect to the sea and land ; nor second, had such 
changes been proved, is it at all probable such local causes could have been 
adequate to effect a change so material and universal. 

Sir John F. "W. Herschel has recently made some calculations and inqui- 
ries, with the view of ascertaining whether there existed any astronomical 
causes which might account for the difference between the present and 
ancient heat of the Earth's suiface. "Geometers," he says, "have demon- 
strated the absolute invariability of the mean distance of the Earth from the 
Sun; whence it would at first seem to follow, that the mean annual supply 
of light and heat derived from that luminary would be alike invariable ; but 
a closer consideration of the subject will show that this would not be a legiti- 
mate conclusion, but that, on the contrary, the mean amount of solar radia- 
tion is dependent on the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit, and therefore liable 
to variations. 

" Now the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit," he continues, " is actually 
diminishing, and has been so for ages beyond the records of history. In 
consequence, the ellipsis is in a state of approach to a circle, and the annual 
average of solar heat radiated to the Earth is actually on the decrease. But 
whether this diminution of radiated heat is sufficient to account for the re- 
frigeration of climate, which geological facts appear to prove, is a question 
which has not been decided." 

Allowing that the Earth's orbit should become a perfect circle, we are at 
a loss to see how the mean annual radiation should thereby be diminished. 
It is the opinion of M. Arago, that the mean amount of solar radiation can 
never be materially affected by the irregularities of the Earth's annual motion. 

It would appear, therefore, that we cannot look to astronomy with much 
confidence for a solution of the problem in question. 

A recent and highly respectable author, Dr. Ure, of Glasgow, believes 
that the original heat of the Earth was dissipated in consequence of the 
evaporation of the waters of the deluge. 

liie effects of evaporation, together with the absence of a large heating 
surface, is stiikingly illustrated in the temperate climate of St. Helena. This 
island, though less than eighteen degrees from the equator, and on a parallel 
with the burning plains of continental Africa, enjoys one of the most com- 
fortable and sahibrious climates on the Earth. At Jamestown, the ther- 
mometer, in the warmest season, seldom rises above 80°. In the country the 
climate is still more mild, the thermometer in some seasons never rising 
higher than 72°. At Jamestown, the average temperature during the year 
is from 66° to 78°, the heat at this place being concentrated by the high 
rocks which rise above the town. At Plantation House, the average heat is 
only from 61' to 73°, and at Longwood, the last residence of Napoleon, from 
56° to 68°. 

The island of Sumatra, though directly under the equinox, presents a simi- 
lar exemption from the excessive heats with which the interior of continents 
situated on the same parallel are oppressed. The heat at this island seldom 
rises higher than 85° at any season, while at Bengal, which is situated in 22° 
north latitude, it is often above 100°. 

It is at a distance from the sea, and where the surface is dry, that the 
greatest accumulation of heat takes place. Mungo Park relates, that in 



94 MISCELLANEOUS. 

some districts in Africa the ground became so hot by the action of the Sun, 
that even the negroes, though accustomed to that ardent climate, could not 
bear to touch it with their naked feet ; and that he could not hold forth his 
hand against a current of air which entered the crevices of his hut, without 
feeling acute pain from its scorching effects. 

Dr. Ure supposes that a portion of the antediluvian land is now covered 
by the ocean, and that the heating surface, or dry land on the Earth, was 
twice as extensive before the deluge as it is now, and consequently, as a 
whole, that its heating effects were doubled. 

We cannot follow Dr. Ure through the detail of facts and arguments 
which he has brought forward on this subject ; but after many additional 
statements to those we have given, he concludes, " that the facts and obser- 
vations just detailed, seem adequate to prove that the events of the deluge 
involved such a change in the terraqueous constitution, as rendered the sur- 
face of the globe much colder and moister than it had previously been." 

The great and sudden fall of temperature which the Earth suffered at a 
former time, and which is supposed to have taken place at the period of the 
deluge, is indicated by the situation and number of fossil bones, belonging 
to species known to inhabit hot climates, found in northern latitudes. 

" The almost incredible number of bones of fossil elephants," says Dr. Ure, 
"found in northern Siberia, which betray no marks of having been rolled or 
transported from a distance, attest the existence on its plains of huge herbiv- 
orous animals at that distant epoch. These demonstrate that a vigorous 
vegetation clothed countries now covered with frost a great part of the year, 
where, even in summer, sterilizing cold and humidity perpetually reign, and 
where, at present, the reindeer can hardly pick up from beneath the snow its 
scanty mouthful of moss." 

ISTot only the bones of elephants, but those of the rhinoceros, the masto- 
don, and hippopotamus, are found in Siberia. All these animals living on 
vegetables, and, from their size, requiring large quantities for their suste- 
nance, it would seem impossible, as we have before stated, that, in the present 
state of the climate, there should have grown a sufiBcient quantity of nourish- 
ment for the support of these animals. 

That these animals died where they had lived, and where their remains 
are now found, is proved by the circumstances that their skeletons are entire, 
and that their bones show no scratches, or other marks of transportation or 
friction. That these bones have not lain for a long period in a hot climate, 
is proved by their state of preservation — many of the elephants' tusks being 
perfectly sound, and making the best of ivory, for which purpose vast num- 
bers have been dug up and sold. The change of climate must therefore have 
taken place at the deaths of these animals, or soon after. 

That these animals died suddenly, and remained in a cold climate after 
death — at least some of them — is proved by the circumstance that the body 
of an elephant was found* on the bank of the river Lena, in 1803. It was 
frozen in the ice, a large proportion of the flesh being still preserved, and 
serving as food for the white bears and dogs. Now, since there is no reason 
to believe that this animal could have lived in a cold climate, and as there is 
every reason to suppose that he died where his remains were found, perhaps 
the nature of such a case could not admit of stronger evidence, that there 
happened a great and sudden change from heat to cold in that country, and 
that this took place at the time when this animal perished, or soon after. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 95 

If it is certain that this animal could not have lived in a cold climate, and 
equally so that his body could not have been preserved more than a few 
days in a hot one, the conclusion is inevitable, that the climate must have 
changed at the time of his death, or immediately afterward. 

The opinion of Baron Cuvier entirely coincides with what here seems to 
he proved. " Every hypothesis," says he, " of a gradual cooling of the earth, 
or a slow variation in either the inclination or position of the axis of the 
globe, is inadmissible." 

There are many reasons for believing that the animals whose remains are 
thus found were destroyed at the time of the general deluge, and also that 
their bodies were, not transported to any considerable distance by that catas- 
trophe. Their bones are found on plains and the sides of valleys, where we 
should suppose their bodies would have been left by the retiring waters ; and 
in many instances they have been found covered by sand or gravel, sucli as 
are considered diluvial deposits, and under such circumstances, as to make 
it improbable that any ordinary flood would have produced similar effects. 

On reviewing the facts and circumstances above stated, it is thought that 
we may fairly come to the following conclusions : 

First. That the climate of Siberia was once similar to that of the tropics 
of the present day. 

Second. That at the epoch of the dehige, the climate of Siberia suffered a 
sudden and material change in its temperature, and that it then became 
similar to what it is now. 

Third. That the deluge was the most probable cause of the destruction of 
several ancient races of quadrupeds, which inhabited tliat country anterior 
to the flood, and among which were the elephant and rhinoceros, the bones 
of which still exist tiiere. And 

Pourth. That the most probable cause of the sudden change of climate in 
Siberia, and of the decrease of the superficial temperature of the Earth 
generally, was the cold produced by the evaporation of the waters of the 
deluge. 

It will be readily seen by the inserted matter or opinions of the past ages, 
that reason, without a proper respect to the laws of the universe or the Taw 
of matter — which is also the cause of form and motion — that facts and reiison 
are both stubborn things, not disposed to yield the point. But as facts for- 
ever stand secure, reason learns to go back and investigate. It is therefore 
self-evident, that the theory of the universal polarity of matter and of space 
were not known in the days of Burnet, Dr. Ure, Baron Cuvier, Sir John F. 
"W. Herschel, Kepler, and a host of ancients. The polar heavens, the milky- 
way — vast concave zone of the heavens, and heaven of heavens, and the 
waters above the heavens, are spoken of in the Psalms. Those worthies 
reasoned well, but without law. The evidence b^ the law of matter is con- 
firmed both in nature and revelation. St. Paul, in Kom. i. 20, said : " The 
invisible things of God from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being 
understood by the things that are made." ISTow, had proper care and respect 
been paid to the Scriptures by those who reasoned on the subject of created 
matter, they would not have been confused at the innumerable changes of 
matter and of climate. Every step that nature has taken, has been in per- 
fect conformity to the laws of matter and of space. 

The immortal Newton saw the whole volume of effects, and was so over- 



96 MISCELLANEOUS. 

awed by these, that tlie great cause or law which produced these effects to 
him was a mystery. Had Newton known the physical law of a comet, he 
would have set the world on fire ; in the eye of the age in which he lived. 
Sir Isaac Newton would have indorsed the idea of Burnet, that the deluge 
was caused by the attraction of a comet, and would have confirmed it from 
natural law and revelation. 

The law of a positive and negative force, or, in other words, atmospheric 
electricity — called atmospheric pressure — has not been properly applied in 
philosophy, as may be seen by the growth and trunk of a tree being round. 
To some, the cause of all this is a mystery, as is also the formation of- shot 
passing through space ; as the melted lead leaves the fine screen at the top 
of the tower, the simple law of equal pressure of the atmosphere on all 
sides causes the spherical form. Here, then, may be seen the upward tend- 
ency by attraction and the tenacity of atmmpherie electricity, that its equal 
pressure on all sides causes the circumference to be round. 

The Comet, Jlnd the Law of a Comet. 

The Sun is the great magnetic center of the universe of matter. All the 
heavenly bodies evidence the theory of the above in relation to their polar- 
ity ; and from the fact of the phenomena of the precession of the equinoxes, 
or the constant change of their nodes, prove the magnetic theory of the solar 
system and the still more important truth of the Sun's motion in the heavens 
and the vastness of its orbit. The time of one revolution of the Sun on its 
axis being over twenty-five days ten hours, and in its orbit not less than 
26,858 years. It must and will be conceded that the Comets come in to the 
Sun positively and go out negatively ; and as those heavenly messengers 
perform their revclutioris to and from the Sun, the law of God in the physical 
world is made to appear. On this theory is based the great fact of the crea- 
tion of matter; not one jot or tittle can pass out of the power of this wonder- 
ful law. All animate beings derive their physical action, and all bodies their 
motion from this law. Inanimate matter is held by its negative and positive 
affinity or its polarity, particle to particle. 

Not a seed germinates in the soil, or a drop of dew falls from heaven to 
moisten the earth withoiit this law. All that comes down is first attracted 
upward, and falls by the same law as its bulk increases. Water possesses 
a magnetic property of its own, its composition being oxygen and hydrogen. 
Thus move on by, unchangeable law all the created material universe of God. 

Beauty as a Law. 

Beauty is under the law of four cardinal heads, viz. : Form, Motion, Color, 
and Sound. From these emanate all that is beautiful in time and sense. 
Both the animal and vegetable kingdom prove the above. All the attri- 
butes of beauty are concentrated in woman; that most exquisite combina- 
tion of form, motion, colol- and sound— the person of a just-balanced woman 
— the mother of us all, and the angel to man. 

The cardinal »laws of the mind are governed by the four cardinal senses 
of the body. These are paraphrased in Ecolesiastes xii. 6 : — " Or ever 
the silver cord be loosed, or the golden bowl be broken, or the pitcher be 
broken at the fountain, or the wheel broken at the cistern." 

In this noted and memorable essay is described, in most beautiful language, 
the dissolution of the eye, the ear, the taste and feeling of man in death. 



DIYINE AGENCY. 



At the funeral obsequies of tlie Hon. Jolm C. Calhoun, M. C, who died 
March 31st, 1850, the speaker selected the 6th and 7th verses of the Ixxxii. 
Psalm, as adapted to the character of this eminent American statesman 
and scholar; viz., "I have said ye are gods; and all of you are children of 
the Most High. But ye shall die like men, and fall like one of the princes." 
Here the psalmist intimates or indorses this sentiment, " That man is diviue 
in his origin, and eternal in his duration." 

But more recently I was struck with the impressive address of the present 
Empeeoe Alexaitdee, of Etjssia, at his CoEOJiTATioN, whcu he said: — "Gen- 
tlemen, and House of Lords, — It has pleased God to call the Emperor, my 
father, to eternal life." This most profound sentiment of this young Christian 
monarch, will forever secure to him the respect due to such distinguished 
talent, seen in his choice of words and reverence for his father and for God. 
For God hath said, " By me kings reign and princes decree justice ; by me 
princes rule and nobles, &oen all the judges of the earth." God's eternal pur- 
poses of life and destiny of men and nations are clearly seen or revealed. 
7 



98 ASTBONOMY AND NAVIGATION. 



REMARKS ON THE PLATES ACCOMPANYING THIS WORK. 



The object of the preceding compend is to illustrate first principles in astronomy, a 
true knowledge of which, and of the Earth's motion on her axis and in her orbit, is 
almost indispensable to a correct method of finding a ship's latitude or longitude. To 
perfect this knowledge, and in order to simplify this subject as much as possible, I have 
introduced a series of plates or cards, relating to both astronomy and navigation, in 
which the Sun and its declination, the Moon and its changes, and the motions of the 
Earth, each and all, from an astronomical, nautical, and geographical point of view, are 
so far explained that the practical part of navigation is made extremely simple, and a 
mistake made almost impossible in finding the latitude or longitude on whatever part 
of the surface of the globe the navigator may be. 

On an inspection of these plates, it will be seen that the eclipses for the years 1859, 
1860, and 1861 are laid down in a new form or configuration, as is also the transit of 
Mercury on the 11th of November, 1861. In the plate illustrating this transit, the 
Earth will be seen to have passed the autumnal equinox, and will appear in the Sun's 
southern hemisphere, south of the Sun's equator,. 17° 44' 43"; the planet Mercury 
will be seen in its winter solstice, and in its return to a node with the Sun, or an equi- 
nox. The transit over 'the Sun's disk will be visible to that part of the Earth where 
the Sun can be seen. At Greenwich, it will be visible at about eight o'clock in the 
morning (20 h. 6 m.) Though the transit of Mercury takes place every eighty-eight 
days through all time, the position of the Earth forbids our seeing it except at much 
longer intervals. 

The process of finding a ship's latitude is fully worked out and explained on another 
of these cards ; on which, at the same time, are exhibited the various changes and 
declinations for a solar year. 

The plate intended to illustrate the method of ascertaining longitude by chronometer 
time will be found sufficient to give a true idea of the motions of the earth on her axis, 
and the rate of motion per hour, minute, and for every fifteen seconds. This motion 
of the Earth causes the apparent motion of all the heavenly bodies in a solar day. 

Another plate exhibits the Moon in its changes ; on which, also, the planets Mars, 
Jupiter, and Saturn are made to appear, for the purpose of showing their meridian 
passages, and their distances east and west of the Moon for lunar observations. This 
card also refers the navigator to the north polar star as an object of confidence in 
nautical science and_ practice ; as it is one of the safest objects in space for finding lati- 
tude by altitude, if it be measured where it stands, without horizon or zenith being 
forced. 

The altimeter measures the altitude of all bodies where it finds them, and gives the 
zenith distance at the same time. The day is coming when the accuracy of this in- 
strument, in finding correct altitudes, will give it the precedence of all others. 

The axis of the Earth is not supposed to be in an absolutely perfect line with the 
polar star, yet the Earth moves in her orbit from her summer solstice on the east side 
of the Sun to her winter solstice on the west side, one hundred and eighty millions of 



ASTRONOMY AND' NAVIGfATIOliT. 99 

miles, without producing any perceptible parallax — a fact from which may be inferred 
its enormous distance as well as that of all the fixed stars. 

The polar star is always on the meridian, and all surrounding objects make their 
meridian passages above or below it, so that, if these passages were recorded accurately, 
they would furnish to the navigator the best method for finding longitude. 

The axis motion of the earth will detect an error of less than thirty seconds with a 
proper instrument for this purpose. 

The card or engraving relating to longitude will require a little attention. At first 
sight it will appear simple, but by taking up each idea or position separately this device 
will be found usefiil and interesting. This table shows the method of taking lunar ob- 
servations and the distance of each planet from the Moon. It is practically operated 
by turning the wheel representing the Earth's motions on her axis, the hour, half-houiy 
and quarter-hour lines, degrees, &c. This operation with the ship-master soon becomes 
perfectly easy and natural. By this wheel any place on the globe may be brought to 
the Sun's meridian by the aid of a chronometer with the time of Greenwich. This 
time will be found slow by traveling west, so that when Greenwich noon is at New 
York city, the Sun will pass the meridian at four hours and fifty-six minutes P. M. ; 
this will show 74° west longitude from Greenwich. In like manner we may travel 
east or west with the correct time of any other place. 

The meridian passage of the Sun in the place of the observer gives the longitude 
either east or west, the rate of motion of the earth on her axis being regular and re- 
liable to a second of time in a solar year. 

Thus, by this simple method- of time and motion, the navigator can tell his precise 
locality, and his distance from London, St. Petersburg, San Francisco, or Canton iu 
China. East or west 180° brings him under Greenwich, if he is in latitude 51° north. 
This is mentioned merely as an illustration to the student or new beginner, who; by 
the study of this simple card, may come to understand the whole subject of longitude. 

The author hopes to be able, by close application, to introduce a better method of 
finding longitude by meridian passages of the fixed stars, which are alluded to in the 
card. He is confident that an accuracy within 30" may be attained by this rule, when 
carried out and tabled, or properly recorded. 

Plate v., on local attraction, exhibits the action of the magnetic needle, when 
brought under the forces of atmospheric electricity, which is perpendicular to the geo- 
centric line of the Earth's equator, on all sides of the earth, from pole to pole. The 
sides of an iron ship have the power of a strong battery ; the iron being made to stand 
perpendicular, becomes a positive and a negative force in proportion to its mass. The 
upper end of a bar or of a smoke-pipe becomes a negative pole, and, as can be clearly 
demortstrated, attracts the north pole of the compass, as seen in the engraving. The 
ship-master will readily see the necessity of fully testing the liability of his compass to 
vary under quarter headings. North and south headings . generally give a correct 
course. The compass is the most important instrument in the ship ; .it is, therefore, a 
matter of the first consideration to the navigator that he should have a good one. 
Probably the best is the " Improved Compass," invented by Hall Colby. This com- 
pass has proved its superior force as a binnacle compass, and being constructed with 
duplicate polar-line needles, as shown on the left of the engraving, the card has less 
oscillation and more directive force — its poles also being concentric, and there being 
four polar points in the line of two oscillating polar-line needles. 

The following testimonials as to the superiority of this compass make comment un- 
necessary : 

I certify that I liave used the Improved Patent Compass, invented by Hall Oolby, and find 
it a superior Marine Binnacle Compass, being accurate in calm weather, giving the ship's 
heading, and more steady in storms and rough seas than any Compass I have ever seen. I 
can recommend this Compass to all ship-owners. 

Jacob Lokman, Sandy Hook and New Tork Pilot. 



100 ASTKONOMT AITO NAVIGATION. 

I certify that in the month of March, 1847, hy request of myself, Mr. Hall Colby put on 
board the U. 8. Iron Steamer " Scourge," three of his patent Marine Compasses, and by 
these Compasses I cruised the Mexican coast, in the late war with Mexico, to my perfect 
satisfaction, without any artificial arrangement of Magnets. These Compasses gave my 
courses correctly, under the most severe trial of local attractive properties of the brig. I 
can safely recommend these Compasses to be superior to the common Compass, being quick 
in their directive force, and superior as a heavy weather and storm Compass. 

C. G. HuuTEE, Lt. Oom'dr., U. 8. Navy. 

New Yoek, April 12, 1847. 
Ship " Kensington :" I certify that the Compasses have been irregular and inaccurate, dif- 
fering from each other, in the wheel-house half a point, and binnacle outside one point and 
a half. Mr. H. Colby has furnished me with two of his improved Compasses for the wheel- 
house, which perfectly agree with each other, and has pointed out the causes of variation 
and local attraction, to our perfect satisfaction, on the subject of electricity and magnetic 
influences. I recommend all interested in sea-faring to see Mr. Colby on this subject, and 
his Compass. C. H. Cheistianson. 

IT. S. Sttbveting Stbamee " Coewiu," ) 
New Yobk, January 25, 1864. J 
I have used one of Mr. Hall Colby's Patent Improved Mariner's Compasses, for two years, 
on board of two U. S. vessels under my command, and have found it more perfect than any 
Mariner's Compass I have seen, being more steady and less affected by local attraction. I 
prefer it to any I have yet used. T. Augs. Oeaten, Lt. Oom'dr. 

TJ. S. Stbamee "PEDCOEToif," ) 
Navy Taed, New Yoek, May 9, 1854. j 
This is to certify, that there has been in use, on board of this ship, H. Colby's Mariner's 
Compass, and that we consider it a superior instrument, vibrating less in a seaway than the 
ordinaiy Compass, and can with confidence recommend it to general use. 

Henet Eagle, Commander. 
William W. Low, Act'g Master. 

New Yoek, November 13, 1855. 
Me. Hall Colby: My Bewr Sir— In April, 1853, you furnished me with one of your 
Patent Marine Compasses, which was placed in use in the binnacle of our ship, and to the 
best of my belief, the " Macedonian" was steered and navigated by that Compass entirely, 
during the outward passage to the East Indies, touching at Madeira, Canaries, Prince's Island, 
St. Helena, and at Anger Point. I noticed myself and recollect the master of the ship fre- 
quently remarking, its great accuracy and its superiority over the other Compass which stood 
in another binnacle. Yonr obedient servant, 

L. E. AvEEY, late 1st Lt. of TJ. S. Ship "Macedonian." 

Hall Colby, Esq. : Deiw iSir— Having had your "Binnacle Compass" twelve months in 
constant use, it gives me pleasure to say, that I consider it the hest Compass now in use, being 
less affected by heal attractions and the motion of the ship, in a seaway. 

Yours, &c., Chaeles S. Boggs, Commander, TJ. S. Navy, 

May 2, 1857. Commanding TJ. S. Mail Steamer "Illinois." 

New Yoek, March 1, 1858. 
•I hereby certify that Mr. Hall Colby's Patent Marine Compasses have been in constant use 
on board of the ship " New World," for the last eight years, and I am fully satisfied that they 
are more steady in heavy weather, and less subject to local attractions than any other Com- 
pass I have ever used. H. Knight, Master Ship "New World." 

I certify that having manufactured Hall Colby's Improved Compass, and investigated its 
principles as a Marine Binnacle Compass, I believe it possesses decided merit over the com- 
mon Compass for accuracy and directive force. 

Robert Meeeill, 
Manufacturer, and Mathematical Instrument Maker, 
No. 152 Front-street, New York. 



->M 



159 



NAUTICAL ALMANAC 

FOE THE YEAR 

1859. 



I'',iirth Hi a -Stufmief^ 
. ■^'iilsl u-p . Jill If 2/" 0- 
Da-i: ■l:i "■/7 '30 "Korth} 




Eclip.ie of Son 

July ^9.'^s.^^6:.s^ 

[Irfliimiirin IS "oOTai'JN'. 
Lang f>4 " 73 .? i'cut . 

Eclip'^i> iifMoon 
Auij. I.i'^l'- 20: 



Ecljp.ye of the Sj^fi^ 
AugJ>7!* ISl'SO!"' "^v 
Buhn atton 10 " 10 >.3 -Sof. 
Luriy 4^ ' 67 "'^ EfiJit. 

Ney-ili^'^ aiul pijshLvB ordwr of the 



]S^"6. 



EcHpsfs 
forl859. 



ITn g'lietic Poles . 



Partj'ai Eclipm of the Sun. Long 166° id: 
JTiutA. 4"^ S*" .3S '^PJIf. 



L(d>. a " Sir South 




Er.lifjsF. of the S'un . fjyng 5'i''.^:iT 




\Lat. .South 20° 59 
^Jl^thp!<r of thf JUoon 

^^nS. lU II Winter 
SoUha. Dtii.ZZr'. 
/MlmatlJjn 23° 27." 30" 
.South . 



I.Ttli r)l' J Rieti.60 Fulton Sn-pet K.T. 



161 
ECLIPSES OF. THE SM MD MOON FOR 1859. 

I. — A Partial Eclipse of the STUST, February 2, 1869, invisible at Greenwich. 

ELEMENTS. 

d. h, m. s. 

Greenwich Mean Time of 6 in R. A Feb. 2 12 6 31 

©'s and d's Right Ascension 21 4 37 

a's Declination S. 1°8 15 20 

©'s Declination S. 16 43 54 

Longitude 58° 53' W. of Greenwich. Latitude 66° 38' S. 

IL — A Total Eclipse of the MOON, February 16-17, 1859, invisible at Greenwich. 

ELEMENTS. dims 

Greenwich Mean Time of § in R. A Feb. 16 22 37 42 

d's Right Ascension 10 1 48 

®'s Declination N. 1°2 I'l 8 

©'s Declination S. 12 4 47 

Longitude 117° 57' W. of Greenwich. Latitude 12° 58' N. 

in. — A Partial Eclipse of the SUN, March 4, 1859, invisible at Greenwich. 

ELEMENTS. 

Greenwich Mean Time of c5 in R. A March 4 8 22 43 

©'s and (i's Right Ascension 23 11 

d's Declination S. 4 54 41 

©'s Declination S. 6 23 22 

Longitude 166° 46' W. of Greenwich. Latitude 36° 47' N. 

IV. — A Partial Eclipse of the SUN, July 29, 1859, invisible at Greenwich. 

ELEMENTS. 

Greenwich Mean Time of 6 in R. A July 29 9 9 15 

©'s and (K's Right Ascension 8 34 7 

d's Declination N. 20 7 5 

©'s Declination ' N. 18 45 6 

Longitude 94° 13' E. of Greenwich. Latitude 66° 26' N. 

V. — A Total Eclipse of the MOON, August 13, 1859, invisible at Greenwich. 

ELEMENTS. d h m 8 

Greenwich. Mean Time of d' in R. A Aug. 13 4 34 20 

(i's Right Ascension 21 30 59 

d's Declination S. 14 42 51 

©'s Declination N. 14 43 6 

Longitude 168° 12' E. of Greenwich. Latitude 15° 26' S. 

YI. ^ Partial Eclipse of the SUN, August 27, 1859, invisible at Greenwich. 

ELEMENTS. 

d. h. m, a. 

Greenwich Mean Time of 6 in R. A Aug. 27 18 6 50 

©'s and d's Right Ascension 10 25 

o / // 

d's Declination N. 8 28.51 

©'s Declination N. 9 54 49 

Longitude 42° 67' E. of Greenwich. Latitude 28° 3' S. 



II 



162 



PHASES OF THE 


MOON FOR 1859. 


JANTIAKY. 


JTJLT, 




d. h. m. 




d. h. m. 


# New Moon . . 


. 3 17 25-6 


© First Quarter . 


. . 6 17 53-9 


® Mrst Quarter . 


. 11 19 22-6 


© Full Moon , . 


. . 14 12 53-2 


© Full Moon . . 


. 18 11 48-6 


d Last Quarter , 


. . 22 15 25-7 


9 Last Quarter 


. 25 8 45-0 


# New Moon . . 


. . 29 9 43-6 


FEBBTTAKT. 


ATTGTJST. 




d. h. m. 




d. h. m. 


O New Moon . . . 


2 13 4-3 


© First Quarter . 


. . 5 3 21-6 


i) First Quarter . , 


. 10 Y 39-9 


© Full Moon . . 


. . 13 4 34-2 


© Full Moon . . . 


. 16 22 41-5 


d Last Quarter . 


. . 21 1 45-7 


d Zast Quarter . . 


. 24 2 21-2 


New Moon . . 


. . 27 17 13-5 


MABGE 


[. 


SEFTEMBEB. 




d. h. m. 




d. h. m. 


# New Moon . . . 


. 4 1 10-6 


© First Quarter . 


. . 3 16 4-7 


® First Quarter . . 


. 11 16 39-3 


© Full Moon . . 


. . 11 20 31-3 


© Full Moon . . . 


. 18 9 45-1 


d Last Quarter . 


. . 19 10 13-8 


d Last Quarter . . 


. 25 21 2V-4 


(9 New Moon . . 


. . 26 1 55-8 


AFBIL 




OCTOBEE. 




d. h. m. 




d. h. m. 


# New Moon . . . 


2 22 17-5 


© First Quarter . 


..38 31-9 


i) First Quarter . . 


. 9 23 20-7 


© Full Moon . . 


. . 11 11 51-2 


© Full Moon . . . 


. 16 21 5-9 


d Last Quarter . 


. . 18 17 42-7 


d Last Quarter . . 


. 24 16 45-2 


# New Moon . . 


. . 25 12 32-4 


WAY. 




NOVKWBEB. 




d. h. m. 




d. h. m. 


# New Moon . . . 


. 2 10 4-4 


© First Quarter . 


..24 18-6 


© First Quarter . . 


. 9 4 59-1 


© Full Moon . . 


. . 10 2 5-0 


© Full Moon . . . 


. 16 9 6-8 


d Last Quarter . 


. . 17 1 6-0 


d Last Quarter . . 


. 24 10 49-3 


(i New Moon . . 


. . 24 1 42-7 


# New Moon . . . 


. 31 19 10-0 






jmrc. 




DECEMBEB. 




d. h. m. 




d. h, m. 


1) First Quarter . . 


. 7 10 47-5 


© First Quarter . 


..21 49-9 


© Full Moon . . . 


. 14 22 17-8 


© Full Moon . . 


. . 9 15 12-6 


d Last Quarter . . 


. 23 2 31-9 


d Last Quarter . 


. . 16 9 15-3 


# New Moon . . . 


. 30 2 40-7 


# New Moon . . 


. . 23 17 47-2 






© First Quarter . 


. . 31 22 47-7 



163 



1859. 




AT GEEENWICH APPARENT NOON". 




1859. 


XAIVITARY, 1§59. 




FEBRUARY 


, 1859. 

1 


■i 


5 










•M 


^ 










0) 


§ 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Diff. 


>2 


a 



van SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Diff. 


^ 


g 








^ 


a 








■s 

o 


1 


A}>parent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


to be 
added to 
Apparent 

Time. 


for 
Ihr. 






Apparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


to ie 
added to 
Apparent 

Time. 


for 

Ihr. 


p 













p 


P 














/ n 


II 


m. s. 


s. 






y // 


IJ 


m. s. 


s. 


Sat. 


1 


S.23 2 Y 


12 


3 43 




Tues. 


1 


S.17 9 41 


42 


13 51 





Sun. 


2 


22 57 1 


13 


4 12 




Wed. 


2 


16 52 30 


43 


13 68 





Mod. 


3 


22 51 27 


15 


4 40 




Thur. 


3 


16 35 2 


44 


14 6 





Tues. 


4 


22 45 26 


16 


5 7 




Fri. 


4 


16 17 16 


46 


14 11 





Wed. 


5 


22 38 57 


17 


5 35 




Sat. 


5 


15 69 13 


45 


14 17 





Tliur. 


6 


22 32 2 


18 


6 1 




Sun. 


6 


15 40 64 


46 


14 21 





Fri. 


1 


22 24 40 


19 


6 28 




Mon. 


7 


15 22 19 


47 


14 26 





Sat. 


8 


22 16 51 


20 


6 54 




Tues. 


8 


16 3 28 


47 


14 27 





Sun. 


9 


22 8 37 


21 


7 19 




Wed. 


9 


14 44 22 


48 


14 29 





Mon. 


10 


21 59 56 


22 


7 44 


1 


Thur. 


10 


14 26 2 


48 


14 31 





Tues. 


11 


21 50 50 


23 


8 8 





Fri. 


11 


14 5 27 


49 


14 31 





Wed. 


12 


21 41 18 


24 


8 31 





Sat. 


12 


13 45 38 


50 


14 31 





Thur. 


13 


21 31 21 


25 


8 54 





Sun. 


13 


13 25 37 


50 


14 29 





J'l-i. 


14 


21 20 59 


26 


9 16 





Mon. 


14 


13 6 22 


51 


14 28 





Sat. 


15 


21 10 13 


27 


9 38 





Tues. 


15 


12 44 54 


61 


14 26 





Sun. 


16 


20 59 2 


28 


9 59 





Wed. 


16 


12 24 14 


62 


14 21 





Mon. 


17 


20 47 28 


29 


10 19 





Thur. 


17 


12 3 23 


62 


14 17 





Tues. 


18 


20 35 29 


30 


10 38 





Fri. 


18 


11 42 20 


63 


14 12 





Wed. 


19 


20 23 8 


31 


10 57 





Sat. 


19 


11 21 6 


63 


14 7 





Thur. 


20 


20 10 23 


32 


11 15 


,0 


Sun. 


20 


10 69 41 


53 


14 1 





Fri. 


21 


19 57 16 


33 


11 32 





Mon. 


21 


10 38 6 


54 


13 54 





Sat. 


22 


19 43 47 


34 


11 49 





Tues. 


22 


10 16 21 


54 


13 46 





Sun. 


23 


19 29 65 


35 


12 4 





Wed. 


23 


9 64 26 


66 


13 38 





Mon. 


24 


19 15 42 


36 


12 19 





Thur. 


24 


9 32 23 


55 


13 29 





Tues. 


25 


19 1 7 


37 


12 34 





Fri. 


25 


9 10 11 


65 


13 20 





Wed. 


26 


18 46 12 


38 


12 47 





Sat. 


26 


8 47 50 


56 


13 10 





Thur. 


27 


18 30 56 


39 


13 





Sun. 


27 


8 26 21 


56 


13 

















Mon. 


28 


8 2 45 


66 


12 49 





Fri. 


28 


18 15 20 


39 


13 11 

















Sat. 


29 


17 59 24 


40 


13 22 





Tues. 


29 


S. 7 40 2 




12 37 




Sun. 


30 


17 43 9 


41 


13 33 

















Mon. 


31 


17 26 34 


42 


13 42 

















Tues. 


32 


S.17 9 41 




13 51 








— ' 









164 



1859. 




AT GEEENWICH APPAEENT NOON". 




1859, 




MARCH, 


1§59. 




APRIIi, 1859. 


1 


1 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Diff. 


■i 

a> 


5 
g 


THE SUN'S 


Diff 


Equation 
of Time, , 

toie 
added to 


Diffi' 


o 

fe- 
ci 


O 

n 


Apparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


to be 

added to 

Apparent 

Time. 


for 
Ihr. 


■B 

O 

1 ' 


0) 

■3 

■s 

1 


Appareni 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


for 
Ihr. 


suU.from 

Apparent 

Time. 










m. s. 


s. 






o / // 




m. s. 


9. 


Tnes. 


1 


S. 7 40 2 


57 


12 37 





Fri. 


1 


N. 4 27 


67 


4 2 





Wed. 


2 


7 17 12 


57 


12 25 





Sat. 


2 


4 50 7 


57 


3 44 





Thur. 


3 


6 54 16 


57 


12 13 





Sun. 


3 


6 18 10 


57 


3 26 





Fri. 


4 


6 31 14 


57 


12 





Mon. 


4 


5 36 7 


67 


3 8 





Sat. 


5 


6 8 7 


58 


11 47 





Tues. 


5 


5 58 58 


56 


2 51 





Sun. 


6 


6 44 65 


58 


11 33 





Wed. 


6 


6 21 42 


56 


2 33 





Mon. 


7 


5 21 38 


58 


11 19 





Thur. 


7 


6 44 20 


66 


2 16 





Tues. 


8 


4 58 17 


58 


11 4 





Fri. 


8 


7 6 51 


55 


1 59 





Wed. 


9 


4 34 52 


58 


10 49 





Sat. 


9 


7 29 16 


65 


1 42 





Thur. 


10 


4 11 24 


58 


10 33 





Sun. 


10 


7 61 31 


55 


1 25 





Fri. 


H 


3 47 53 


58 


10 18 





Mon. 


11 


8 13 39 


54 


1 9 





Sat. 


12 


3 24 19 


59 


10 1 





Tues. 


12 


8 35 39 


54 


53 





Sun. 


13 


3 44 


59 


9 46 





Wed. 


13 


8 57 SO 


54 


37 





Moil. 


14 


2 37 6 


59 


9 28 





Thur. 


14 


9 19 11 


53 


21 





Tues. 
Wed. 


15 
16 


2 13 27 
1 49 46 


59 
59 


9 11 
8 54 






Fri. 

Sat. 


15 
16 


9 40 44 
10 2 7 


53 
53 


6 




% 



8 


Thur. 


IT 


1 26 5 


59 


8 36 





Sun. 


17 


10 23 20 


52. 


23 





Fri. 


18 


1 2 23 


59 


8 19 





Mon. 


18 


10 44 23 


52 


37 





Sat. 


19 


38 41 


59 


8 1 





Tues. 


19 


11 5 15 


51 


51 





Sun. 


20 


S. 15 


59 


7 43 





Wed. 


20 


11 25 57 


51 


1 4 





Mon. 


21 


N. 8 40 


59 


7 25 





Thur. 


21 


11 46 27 


50 


1 17 





Tues. 


22 


32 21 


59 


7 6 





Fri. 


22 


12 6 46 


60 


1 29 





Wed. 


23 


56 


59 


6 48 





Sat. 


23 


12 26 54 


49 


1 41 





Thur. 


24 


1 19 37 


58 


6 29 





Sun. 


24 


12 46 49 


49 


1 53 





Fri. 


25 


1 43 13 


58 


6 n 





Mon. 


25 


13 6 31 


48 


2 4 





Sat. 


26 


2 6 46 


68 


5 52 





Tues. 


26 


13 26 1 


48 


2 15 





Sun. 


27 


2 30 17 


58 


5 34 





Wed. 


27 


13 46 18 


47 


2 26 





Mon. 


28 


2 53 45 


58 


5 15 





Thur. 


28 


14 4 21 


47 


2 34 





Tues. 


29 


3 17 lo' 


58 


4 67 





Fri. 


29 


14 23 10 


46 


2 43 





Wed. 


30 


3 40 30 


58 


4 39 





Sat. 


30 


14 41 45 


46 


2 52 





Thur. 


31 


4 3 47 


58 


4 20 





Sun. 


31 


N.16 6 




3 




Fri. 


32 


N. 4 27 




4 2 


J 















165 



1859. 




AT GEEENWICH APPAEENT NOON. 




1859. 


OTAT, 1§59. 


JUWE, 1859. 


4. 


1 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Diff. 


■i 
1 


§ 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Diff. 


n 


1 

Cm 

O 

a 


Apparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


to be 
subt.from 
Apparent 


for 
Ihr. 


o 


■B 
P 


Apparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


subt.from 


for 
llir. 


added, to 

Apparent 

Time. 






o / // 


H 


m. s. 


s. 






o / // 


II 


m. s. 


s. 


(S^MW. 


1 


N.IS 6 


45 


3 





Wed. 


1 


N.22 1 43 


20 


2 33 





Mon. 


2 


15 18 12 


44 


3 7 





Thur. 


2 


22 9 48 


19 


2 24 





Tues. 


3 


15 36 3 


43 


3 14 





Fri. 


3 


22 17 30 


18 


2 14 





Wed. 


4 


15 53 38 


43 


3 20 





Sat. 


4 


22 24 48 


17 


2 4 





Thur. 


5 


16 10 58 


42 


3 26 





Sun. 


5 


22 31 43 


16 


1 54 





Fri. 


6 


16 28 1 


41 


3 31 





Mon. 


6 


22 38 14 


16 


1 43 





Sat. 


1 


16 44 48 


41 


3 36 





Tues. 


7 


22 44 22 


14 


1 33 





/Swra. 


8 


11 1 18 


40 


3 40 





Wed. 


8 


22 50 5 


13 


1 22 





Mon. 


9 


17 17 31 


39 


3 43 





Thur. 


9 


22 55 25 


12 


1 10 





Tues. 


10 


17 33 27 


39 


3 46 





Fri. 


10 


23 20 


11 


69 





Wed. 


11 


17 49 5 


38 


3 49 





Sat. 


11 


23 4 51 


10 


47 





Thur. 


12 


18 4 25 


37 


3 51 





Siin. 


12 


23 8 57 


9 


35 





Fri. 


13 


18 19 27 


36 


3 52 





Mon. 


13 


23 12 40 


8 


23 





Sat. 
Sun. 


14 
15 


18 34 10 
18 48 35 


36 
35 


3 53 
3 53 






Tues. 
Wed. 


14 
15 


23 15 57 
23 18 50 


7 
6 


10 


p 




1 


Mon. 


16 


19 2 40 


34 


3 63 





Thur. 


16 


23 21 19 


5 


14 





Tues. 


lY 


19 16 27 


33 


3 62 





Fri. 


17 


23 23 23 


4 


27 





Wed. 


18 


19 29 54 


32 


3 50 





Sat. 


18 


23 25 2 


3 


40 





Thur. 


19 


19 43 1 


31 


3 48 





Sun. 


19 


23 26 17 


2 


52 





Fri. 


20 


19 55 48 


31 


3 45 





Mon. 


20 


23 27 6 


1 


1 6 





Sat. 


21 


20 8 15 


30 


3 42 





Tues. 


21 


23 27 31 





1 18 





Sun. 


22 


20 20 21 


29 


3 38 





Wed. 


22 


23 27 81 


1 


1 31 





Mon. 


23 


20 32 7 


28 


3 34 





Thur. 


23 


23 27 6 


2 


1 44 





Tues. 


24 


20 43 32 


27 


3 29 





Fri. 


24 


23 26 17 


3 


1 67 





Wed. 


25 


20 54 35 


26 


3 24 





Sat. 


25 


23 25 2 


4 


2 10 





Thur. 


26 


21 5 17 


25 


3 18 





Sun. 


26 


23 23 23 


5 


2 23 





Fri. 


2Y 


21 15 37 


24 


3 12 





Mon. 


27 


23 21 19 


6 


2 35 





Sat. 


28 


21 25 35 


24 


3 5 





Tues. 


28 


23 18 51 


7 


2 48 





Sun. 


29 


21 35 11 


23 


2 57 





Wed. 


29 


23 15 67 


8 


3 





Mon. 


30 


21 44 24 


22 


2 50 





Thur. 


30 


23 12 40 


9 


3 12 





Tues. 


31 


21 53 15 


21 


2 41 





Fri. 


31 


N.23 8 57 




•3 24 




Wed. 


32 


N.22 1 43 




2 33 

















166 



1859 




AT GKEENWICH APPARENT NOON. 




1859. 






JUIY, 1859 








AUeUST, 


1859. 1 


a 

1 a; 


1 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Diff. 




1 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 

to ie 
added to 


Diff. 


o 

n 


O 

a 


Ajrparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


to he 
added to 
Apparent 


for 
Ihr. 


.a 

■s 
n 


0) 


A;pparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


for 

Ihr.l 

i 
1 


subt.from 

Apparent 

Time. 






o / II 


It 


m. s. 


s. 






O 1 II 


// 


m. s. 


s. 


Fri. 


1 


N.23 8 57 


10 


3 24 





Mon. 


1 


N.18 6 42 


37 


6 4 





Sat. 


2 


23 4 51 


11 


3 36 





Tues. 


2 


17 51 31 


38 


6 1 


'0 


Sun. 


3 


23 20 


12 


3 47 





Wed. 


3 


17 36 3 


39 


6 56 





Mon. 


4 


22 55 25 


13 


3 59 





Thur. 


4 


17 20 18 


40 


6 52 





Tues. 


5 


22 50 1 


14 


4 9 





Fri. 


5 


17 4 16 


40 


5 46 





Wed. 


6 


22 44 24 


15 


4 20 





Sat. 


6 


16 47 57 


41 


5 40 





Thur. 


1 


22 38 18 


16 


4 30 





Sun. 


7 


16 31 23 


42 


5 34 





Fvi. 


8 


22 31 48 


17 


4 39 





Mon. 


8 


16 14 32 


42 


5 26 





Sat. 


9 


22 24 55 


18 


4 49 





Tues. 


9 


15 57 26 


43 


6 19 





Sun. 


10 


22 17 39 


19 


4 58 





Wed. 


10 


15 40 4 


44 


5 10 





Mon. 


11 


22 10 


20 


5 6 





Thur. 


11 


15 22 28 


44 


5 1 





Tues. 


12 


22 1 58 


21 


5 14 





Fri. 


12 


15 4 37 


45 


4 52 





Wed. 


13 


21 53 33 


21 


5 21 





Sat. 


13 


14 46 31 


45 


4 42 





Thur. 


14 


21 44 46 


22 


5 28 





Sun. 


14 


14 28 11 


46 


4 31 





Fri. 


15 


21 35 37 


23 


5 35 





Mon. 


15 


14 9 38 


46 


4 20 





Sat. 


16 


21 26 5 


24 


5 41 





Tues. 


16 


13 50 50 


47 


4 8 





Sun. 


17 


21 16 12 


25 


5 46 





Wed.' 


17 


13 31 50 


48 


3 56 





Mon. 


18 


21 6 57 


26 


5 51 





Thur. 


18 


13 12 36 


48 


3 43 





Tues. 


19 


20 55 20 


27 


5 56 





Fri. 


19 


12 53 10 


49 


3 30 





Wed. 


20 


20 44 23 


28 


6 





Sat. 


20 


12 33 32 


49 


3 16 





Thur. 


21 


20 33 4 


29 


6 3 





Sun. 


21 


12 13 41 


50 


3 2 





Fri. 


22 


20 21 25 


30 


6 6 





Mon. 


22 


11 53 39 


50 


2 47 





Sat. 


23 


20 9 25 


30 


6 9 





Tues. 


23 


11 33 25 


51 


2 32 





Sun. 


24 


19 57 4 


31 


6 11 





Wed. 


24 


11 13 


51 


2 17 





Mon. 


25 


19 44 24 


32 


6 12 





Thur. 


25 


10 52 24 


51 


2 1 





Tues. 


26 


19 31 23 


33 


6 12 





Fri. 


26 


10 31 38 


52 


1 44 





Wed. 


27 


19 18 4 


34 


6 13 





Sat. 


27 


10 10 42 


52 


1 28 





Thur. 


28 


19 4 25 


34 


6 12 





Sun. 


28 


9 49 36 


63 


1 11 





Fri. 


29 


18 50 27 


35 


6 11 





Mon. 


29 


9 28 21 


53 


53 





Sat. 


30 


18 36 10 


36 


6 9 





Tues. 


30 


9 6 56 


53 


35 





Sun. 

Mon. 

1 


31 
32 


18 21 35 

ISr.l8 6 42 


37 


6 7 
6 4 





Wed. 
Thur. 


31 
32 


8 45 23 
N. 8 23 42 


54 


17 









167 



1859. 




AT GEEENWIOH APPARENT NOON. 




1869. 


SEPTEMBER, 1859. 




OCTOBER, 


1§59.^ 


4 


4 










^ 


A 










i 


§ 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Eqnation 
of Time, 


Diff. 


% 


O 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Diff. 


^ 


s 








^ 


a 








■3 


1 


Apparent 


for 


to be 
subt.from 


for 




1 


Apparent 


for 


to be 
subt.from 


for 


o 


•3 


Declination. 


Ihr. 


Apparent 


Ihr. 






Declination. 


Ihr. 


Apparent 
Time. 


Ihr. 


p 


Pi 










fi 


n 
















n 


m. s. 


s. 






o / // 


// 


m. s. 


s. 


Thiir. 


1 


N. 8 23 42 


54 








Sat. 


1 


S. 3 5 1 


58 


10 12 





Fri. 


2 


8 1 52 


54 


19 





Sun. 


2 


3 28 19 


68 


10 31 





Sat. 


3 


7 39 55 


55 


38 





Mon. 


3 


3 51 36 


58 


10 50 





Sun. 


4 


7 17 51 


55 


57 





Tues. 


4 


4 14 49 


57 


11 8 





Mon. 


5 


6 55 40 


55 


1 17 





Wed. 


5 


4 38 


57 


11 26 





Tues. 


6 


6 33 21 


56 


1 37 





Thur. 


6 


5 1 7 


67 


11 44 





Wed. 


1 


6 10 57 


56 


1 57 





Fri. 


7 


5 24 10 


67 


12 2 





Thur. 


8 


5 48 27 


56 


2 17 





Sat. 


8 


5 47 8 


57 


12 19 





Fri. 


9 


5 25 50 


56 


2 38 





Sun. 


9 


6 10 3 


57 


12 35 


' 


Sat. 


10 


5 3 9 


56 


2 58 





Mon. 


10 


6 32 52 


56 


12 51 





Sun. 


11 


4 40 22 


57 


3 19 





Tues. 


11 


6 55 36 


66 


13 7 





Mon. 


12 


4 17 30 


57 


3 40 





Wed. 


12 


7 18 15 


56 


13 22 





Tues. 


13 


3 54 34 


57 


4 1 





Thur. 


13 


7 40 47 


56 


13 37 





Wed. 


14 


3 31 34 


57 


4 22 





Fri. 


14 


8 3 14 


55 


13 51 





Thur. 


15 


3 8 30 


57 


4 43 





Sat. 


15 


8 25 83 


65 


14 6 





Fri. 


16 


2 45 22 


57 


5 5 





Sun. 


16 


8 47 46 


55 


14 18 





Sat. 


IV 


2 22 11 


58 


5 26 


Mon. 


17 


9 9 51 


64 


14 30 





Sun. 


18 


1 58 66 


58 


5 47 





Tues. 


18 


9 31 49 


54 


14 42 





Mon. 


19 


1 35 39 


58 


6 8 





Wed. 


19 


9 53 38 


54 


14 53 





Tues. 


20 


1 12 20 


58 


6 29 





Thur. 


20 


10 15 19 


53 


15 4 





Wed. 


21 


48 59 


58 


6 60 





Fri. 


21 


10 36 51 


53 


15 14 





Thur. 


22 


25 36 


58 


7 11 





Sat. 


22 


10 58 14 


53 


15 23 





Fri. 


23 


N. 2 12 


58 


7 32 





Sun. 


23 


11 19 26 


52 


15 32 





Sat. 


24 


S. 21 12 


58 


7 53 





Mon. 


24 


11 40 29 


52 


15 39 





Sun. 


25 


44 37 


58 


8 13 





Tues. 


25 


12 1 21 


51 


15 47 





Mon. 


26 


1 8 3 


58 


8 34 





Wed. 


26 


12 22 2 


51 


15 53 





Tues. 


27 


1 31 28 


58 


8 64 





Thur. 


27 


12 42 31 


50 


15 59 





Wed. 


28 


1 54 53 


58 


9 14 





Fri. 


28 


13 2 49 


50 


16 4 





Thur. 


29 


2 18 17 


58 


9 33 





Sat. 


29 


13 22 54 


49 


16 8 





Fri. 


30 


2 41 40 


58 


9 53 





Sun. 


30 


13 42 47 


49 


16 11 

















Mon. 


31 


14 2 26 


48 


16 U 





Sat. 


31 


S. 3 5 1 




10 12 




Tues. 


32 


S.14 21 62 




16 16 





168 



1859. 




AT GKEENWICH . 


A.PPARENT NOOK 




1859. 




JVOTSMBXIR, 1§59. 




DECEMBER 


, 1§59. 




a) 


1 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Difif. 


1 


4 
1 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 

to be 
subt.from 


Diff. 




CD 

•s 
p 


O 

p 


Apparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


to he 
subt.from 
Apparent 

Time. 


for 
Ihr. 


1 

o 


1 

Cm 

O 

p 


Appaa'CTii 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


for 
Ihr. 




added to 

Apparent 

Ttime. 








O / It 


II 


m. s. 


s. 






O 1 II 


;/ 


m. s. 


s. 




Tues. 


1 


S.14 21 62 


48 


16 16 





Thur. 


1 


s.21 47 17 


23 


10 52 







Wed. 


2 


14 41 4 


47 


16 17 





Fri. 


2 


21 56 30 


22 


10 29 







Thur. 


>3 


15 1 


46 


16 18 





Sat. 


3 


22 6 18 


20 


10 6 







Fri. 


4 


15 18 44 


46 


16 17 





Sun. 


4 


22 13 41 


19 


9 42 






Sat. 


5 


15 37 11 


45 


16 16 





Mon. 


5 


22 21 37 


18 


9 18 






Sun. 


6 


15 55 23 


44 


16 14 





Tues. • 


6 


22 29 8 


17 


8 62 






Mob. 


7 


16 13 19 


44 


16 11 





Wed. 


7 


22 36 12 


16 


8 27 






Tues. 


8 


16 30 59 


43 


16 7 





Thur. 


8 


22 42 49 


15 


8 1 






Wed. 


9 


16 48 22 


42 


16 3 





Fri. 


9 


22 49 


14 


7 34 






Thur. 


10 


17 5 28 


42 


15 68 





Sat. 


10 


22 54 44 


13 


7 7 






Fri. 


11 


17 22 16 


41 


15 51 





Sun. 


11 


23 1 


12 


6 40 






Sat. 


12' 


17 38 46 


40 


15 44 





Mon. 


12 


23 4 60 


10 


6 12 






Sun. 


13 


17 54 59 


39 


15 36 





Tues. 


13 


23 9 12 


9 


5 44 






Mon. 


14 


18 10 52 


38 


15 28 





Wed. 


14 


23 13 7 


8 


5 16 






Tues. 


15 


18 26 27 


38 


15 18 





Thur. 


15 


23 16 33 


7 


4 46 






Wed. 


16 


18 41 42 


37 


15 7 





Fri. 


16 


23 19 32 


6 


4 17 






Thur. 


17 


18 56 37 


36 


14 56 





Sat. 


17 


23 22 3 


5 


3 48 






Fri. 


18 


19 11 12 


35 


14 44 





Sun. 


18 


23 24 5 


3 


3 18 






Sat. 


19 


19 25 27 


34 


14 31 





Mon. 


19 


23 25 40 


2 


2 49 






Sun. 


20 


19 39 20 


33 


14 17 





Tues. 


20 


23 26 46 


1 


2 19 






Mon. 


21 


19 52 52 


32 


14 2 





Wed. 


21 


23 27 24 





1 49 






Tues. 


22 


20 6 3 


32 


13 47 





Thur. 


22 


23 27 33 





1 19 






Wed. 


23 


20 18 51 


31 


13 30 





Fri. 


23 


23 27 14 


1 


49 






Thur. 
Fri. 


24 
25 


20 31 17 
20 43 19 


30 
29 


13 13 
12 56 






Sat. 
Sun. 


24 
25 


23 26 27 
23 25 11 


3 

4 


18 






11 




Sat. 


26 


20 54 59 


28 


12 36 





Mon. 


26 


23 23 27 


5 


41 






Stm. 


27 


21 6 15 


27 


12 17 





Tues. 


27 


23 21 15 


6 


1 10 


1 




Mou. 


2£ 


21 17 7 


26 


11 57 





Wed. 


28 


23 18 35 


7 


1 40 






Tues. 


29 


21 27 35 


25 


11 36 





Thur. 


29 


23 15 26 


9 


2 10 






Wed. 


30 


21 37 38 


24 


11 14 





Fri. 

Sat. 


30 
31 


23 11 50 
23 7 46 


10 
11 


2 39 

3 8 






Thur. 


31 


S.21 47 17 




10 52 




Sun. 


32 


S.23 3 14 




3 37 







169 



THF, MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 


JANUARY, 1859. 




FEBRUARY, 1859 






MEAN TIME 


MEAN TIME. 


KISHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 




h. m. s. 


o / // 


o / // 




h. m. S. 


o / // 


o 


/ 


11 


1 


17 1 


S.27 4 13 


s.27 41 22 


1 


20 16 33 


S.23 58 8 


S.22 


17 


53 


2 


17 54 48 


27 59 


27 66 66 


2 


21 4 25 


20 23 33 


18 


16 


33 


3 


18 48 1 


27 35 19 


26 54 41 


3 


21 50 16 


15 58 21 


13 


30 


24 


4 


19 39 38 


25 55 49 


24 39 46 


4 


22 34 39 


10 54 12 


8 


11 


9 


5 


20 29 4 


23 7 44 


21 21 9 


5 


23 18 20 


S. 6 22 42 


8. 2 


30 


16 


6 


21 16 12 


19 21 23 


17 9 56 


6 


2 13 


N. 24 42 


N. 3 


20 


44 


1 


22 1 23 


14 48 13 


12 17 36 


7 


47 21 


6 16 18 


9 


9 


47 


8 


22 45 17 


9 39 28 


6 56 7 


8 


1 34 50 


11 69 24 


14 


43 


14 


9 


23 28 47 


S. 4 5 48 


S. 1 12 50 


9 


2 26 47 


17 19 8 


19 


44 


44 


10 


12 58 


N. 1 42 30 


N. 4 38 49 


10 


3 21 6 


21 67 25 


23 


54 


20 


11 


58 59 


7 34 35 


10 28 10 


11 


4 21 2 


25 32 33 


26 


49 


2 


12 


1 48 7 


13 17 38 


16 48 


12 


5 24 53 


27 41 


28 


8 


59 


13 


2 41 35 


18 35 9 


20 67 48 


13 


6 30 42 


28 2 16 


27 


28 


53 


14 


3 40 13 


23 5 34 


24 54 57 


14 


7 35 56 


26 26 


24 


54 


45 


15 


4 43 57 


26 22 24 


27 24 29 


16 


8 38 22 


22 57 15 


20 


36 


22 


16 


5 51 16 


27 58 13 


28 1 23 


16 


9 37 2 


17 55 31 


14 


58 


26 


17 


6 59 19 


27 32 55 


26 33 3 


17 


10 32 3 


11 48 69 


8 


30 


54 


18 


8 6 5 


25 3 14 


23 6 8 


18 


11 24 13 


N. 6 7 49 


N. 1 


43 


6 


19 


9 6 37 


20 45 15 


18 4 33 


19 


12 14 40 


S. 1 40 13 


8. 4 


69 


19 


20 


10 3 30 


15 8 15 


12 28 


20 


13 4 29 


8 11 45 


11 


15 


19 


21 


10 56 26 


8 45 6 


N. 6 26 41 


21 


13 64 38 


14 8 3 


16 


48 


12 


22 


11 46 35 


N. 2 5 22 


8. 1 13 6 


22 


14 46 46 


19 14 14 


21 


24 


44 


23 


12 35 13 


S. 4 27 18 


7 35 9 


23 


15 38 12 


23 18 29 


24 


64 


28 


24 


13 23 32 


10 34 49 


13 24 39 


24 


16 31 46 


26 11 47 


27 


9 


45 


25 


14 12 28 


16 3 10 


18 29 


25 


17 26 50 


27 47 58 


28 


6 


13 


26 


15 2 41 


20 40 51 


22 37 33 


26 


18 19 34 


28 4 35 


27 


43 


22 


27 


15 54 26 


24 17 58 


26 41 5 


27 


19 12 2 


27 3 10 


26 


4 


46 


28 


16 47 29 


26 46 


27 32 2 


28 


20 2 38 


S.24 49 8 


8.23 


17 


24 


29 


17 41 9 


27 68 42 


28 6 45 














30 


18 34 29 


27 63 13 


27 21 28 














31 


19 26 30 


S.26 31 5 


S.25 22 57 















170 



THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 




MARCH, 1S59. 


APRIL,, 1859. 




MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




EI6HT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATIOK. 


RIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 




Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


:' 


1 
2 
3 


h. m. s. 

20 51 6 

21 37 36 

22 22 37 


o / // 

S.21 30 47 
17 18 14 
12 22 22 


/ // 

S.19 30 37 

14 55 1 

9 41 44 


1 
2 
3 


h. m. s. 
23 37 12 

22 38 

1 10 1 


o / // 

S. 2 57 16 

N. 2 69 17 

8 66 53 


o / // 

N. 6 

6 58 31 

11 49 17 




4 
5 
6 


23 6 50 

23 51 1 

36 24 


6 54 32 
S. 1 6 27 

N. 4 49 26 


S. 4 2 16 

N. 1 61 20 

7 46 4 


4 
5 
6 


2 19 

2 54 18 

3 52 14 


14 36 26 
19 41 55 
23 50 50 


17 14 52 
21 64 51 
25 27 6 




1 
8 
9 


1 23 40 

2 13 56 

3 7 56 


10 39 23 
16 7 53 
20 56 59 


13 27 23 
18 38 34 
23 31 


7 
8 
9 


4 63 34 

5 56 47 

6 59 46 


26 41 6 

27 64 11 
27 19 53 


27 30 41 
27 50 39 
26 22 31 




10 
11 
12 


4 6 

5 7 34 

6 11 8 


24 46 31 

27 15 26 

28 5 33 


26 12 19 

27 53 44 
27 49 52 


10 
11 
12 


8 36 

8 68 16 

9 52 37 


24 69 50 
21 6 40 
16 3 


23 13 46 
18 41 10 
13 6 13 




13 
14 
15 


7 14 34 

8 15 57 

9 14 13 


27 6 28 
24 19 38 
19 58 21 


25 55 56 
22 19 35 
17 18 50 


13 
14 

15 


10 44 21 

11 34 25 

12 23 64 


10 2 29 
N. 3 36 23 
S. 2 56 44 


6 61 37 
N. 19 25 
S. 6 9 33 




16 
18 


10 9 16 

11 1 45 
11 52 36 


14 24 12 

8 2 36 

N. 1 19 19 


11 17 42 
N. 4 42 6 
S. 2 2 49 


16 
17 
18 


13 13 48 

14 4 57 
14 67 46 


9 16 36 
16 4 10 
20 1 67 


12 15 34 
17 40 18 
22 7 17 




19 
20 
21 


12 42 54 

13 33 34 

14 25 17 


S. 5 21 29 
11 88 7 
17 11 52 


8 34 4 
14 31 24 
19 37 41 


19 
20 
21 


15 62 12 

16 47 39 

17 43 6 


23 54 46 

26 31 6 

27 44 34 


25 23 2 
27 18 22 
27 49 49 




22 
23 
24 


15 18 23 

16 12 43 

17 7 38 


21 47 11 
25 11 55 
27 17 58 


23 38 59 

26 25 6 

27 50 12 


22 
23 

24 


18 37 26 

19 29 42 

20 19 31 


27 34 38 
26 6 21 
23 28 36 


26 59 48 
24 55 31 
21 46 59 




25 
26 

2V 


18 2 14 

18 55 31 

19 46 50 


28 1 51 
27 25 1 
25 33 4 


^7 63 16 
26 37 56 
24 11 31 


25 
26 
27 


21 6 67 

21 52 30 

22 36 53 


19 51 59 
16 27 12 
10 24 21 


17 44 68 

12 69 56 

7 41 41 




28 
29 
30 


20 35 53 

21 22 51 

22 8 13 


22 34 32 
18 39 21 
13 57 47 


20 43 23 
16 23 43 
11 22 50 


28 
29 
30 


23 21 2 
6 57 
62 44 


S. 4 63 8 
N. 66 19 
N. 6 62 16 


S. 2 1 

N. 3 54 18 
N. 48 18 




31 


22 52 43 


S. 8 40 11 


S. 5 51 11 













171 



THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 


MAY, 1S59. 


jijive:, 


1§59. 




MEAN TIME. 


MEAN 


TIME. 




EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DEOLDTATION. 


Eiam ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


1 
2 
3 


h. m. s. 

1 42 28 

2 36 4 

3 34 2 


o / // 

N.12 40 11 
18 1 33 
22 33 62 


K15 26 30 
20 25 22 
24 23 63 


1 
2 
3 


h. m. 8. 

5 IV 10 

6 23 30 
V 28 20 


N.2°V 
2V 
26 


6 23 

34 45 

6 36 


N.2'v 
2V 
24 


/ // 

34 42 

6 8 

40 51 


4 
5 
6 


4 35 57 

5 40 IV 

6 44 40 


25 62 22 
2V 34 29 
2V 26 23 


26 56 3V 
2V 44 34 
26 40 23 


4 
5 
6 


8 29 36 

9 26 34 
10 19 40 


22 
18 
12 


60 32 

8 66 

28 60 


20 

15 

9 


38 46 

24 29 

25 6 


n 

8 
9 


V 46 50 

8 45 25 

9 40 12 


25 2V 63 
21 52 11 
IV 38 


23 60 59 
19 34 25 
14 13 50 


V 
8 
9 


11 9 55 

11 58 35 

12 46 52 


N. 6 

S. 

6 


16 V 

V -11 

22 33 


N. 3 

S. 3 

9 


4 33 
16 54 
22 12 


10 
11 
12 


10 31 48 

11 21 18 

12 9 60 


11 16 52 
N. 5 3 16 
S. 1 20 4 


8 12 30 
N. 1 61 39 
S. 4 29 40 


10 
11 
12 


13 36 50 

14 26 19 

15 18 43 


12 
IV 
21 


13 58 
26 42 
46 46 


14 
19 
23 


56 4 
44 9 
32 66 


13 
14 
15 


12 58 34 

13 48 26 

14 40 3 


V 34 58 
13 24 21 
18 31 50 


10 33 64 
16 4 20 
20 44 69 


13 
14 
16 


16 12 62 
IV 8 4 
18 3 8 


26 

2V 
2V 


1 IV 


37 V 


26 

2V 
2V 


10 3V 
28 64 
24 65 


16 
IV 
18 


15 33 36 

16 28 42 
IV 24 22 


22 41 58 
25 41 25 
2V 20 46 


24 21 14 
26 41 28 
2V 39 3 


16 
IV 
18 


18 56 51 

19 48 IV 

20 3V 5 


26 
24 
21 


52 55 

53 30 
49 10 


26 
23 
19 


2 2 
28 42 
66 26 


19 
20 
21 


18 19 23 

19 12 34 

20 3 16 


2V 36 30 
26 31 24 
24 13 34 


2V 13 39 
26 30 56 

22 40 4V 


19 
20 
21 


21 23 22 

22 V 43 
22 50 65 


IV 

13 

8 


52 

13 51 

6 33 


15 
10 

S. 5 


3V 20 
42 61 
23 8 


22 
23 
24 


20 51 21 

21 3V 10 

22 21 25 


20 54 1 
16 44 23 
11 55 34 


18 54 45 

14 24 14 

9 19 35 


22 
23 
24 


23 33 65 

IV 60 

1 3 60 


S. 2 

N. 3 

8 


36 46 

3 9 

44 2 


N. 

6 

11 


12 24 
54 11 
31 6 


25 
26 

27 


23 4 58 

23 48 53 

34 16 


6 3V 25 
S. 69 12 
N. 4 49 10 


S. 3 60 14 

N. 1 54 23 

V 43 35 


26 
26 

2V 


• 1 63 8 

2 46 51 

3 45 3V 


14 
19 
23 


13 24 

14 44 
26 24 


16 

21 
26 


48 48 

28 19 

6 36 


28 
29 
30 


1 22 20 

2 14 13 

3 10 4V 


10 35 49 
16 5 11 
20 66 52 


13 23 49 
18 3V 13 
23 51 


28 
29 
30 


4 49 9 

5 66 43 
V 2 32 


26 

2V 
N,26 


22 32 
3V 34 
54 40 


2V 

2V 

N.25 


14 3 
31 19 

48 12 


31 


4 12 8 


N.24 46 46 


N.26 8 IV 















172 



THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 


JUI.Y, 1§59. 


AVOITST, 1§59. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 


RISHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. | 




h. m. 8. 


o / // 


o / // 




h. m. s. 


O 1 11 


o 


/ // 


1 


8 6 52 


N.24 13 38 


N.22 13 38 


1 


11 27 58 


N. 3 47 12 


N. 


23 16 


2 


9 7 7 


19 51 37 


17 11 18 


2 


12 18 66 


S. 2 58 6 


8. 6 


14 16 


3 


10 3 6 


14 16 35 


11 11 14 


3 


13 9 29 


9 22 47 


12 


21 36 


4 


10 55 36 


7 58 46 


N. 4 27 28 


4 


14 35 


16 8 46 


17 


42 35 


5 


11 45 46 


N. 1 25 12 


S. 1 50 24 


5 


14 52 50 


20 1 31 


22 


4 8 


6 


12 34 55 


S. 5 2 1 


8 7 32 


6 


16 46 26 


23 49 14 


25 


16 46 


1 


13 24 9 


11k 5 3 


13 52 46 


7 


16 41 2 


26 22 53 


27 


9 59 


8 


14 14 23 


16 29 1 


18 52 13 


8 


17 35 52 


27 36 46 


27 


43 14 


9 


15 6 12 


21 52 


22 53 32 


9 


18 29 52 


27 29 39 


26 


56 38 


10 


15 59 40 


24 28 56 


25 45 56 


10 


19 22 7 


26 5 4 


24 


56 3 


11 


16 54 16 


26 43 37 


27 21 19 


11 


20 12" 3 


23 30 61 


21 


50 51 


12 


17 49 5 


27 38 44 


27 35 51 


12 


20 69 31 


19 57 33 


17 


52 24 


13 


18 42 56 


27 13 4 


26 31 6 


13 


21 44 48 


15 36 54 


13 


12 31 


14 


19 34 50 


25 30 57 


24 13 62 


14 


22 28 29 


10 40 41 


8 


2 47 


15 


20 24 15 


22 41 13 


20 64 33 


16 


23 11 19 


S. 5 20 9 


S. 2 


34 7 


16 


21 11 8 


18 55 23 


16 46 16 


16 


23 54 9 


N. 14 1 


N. 3 


2 52 


17 


21 55 53 


14 25 39 


11 58 


17 


37 69 


6 51 8 


8 


37 21 


18 


22 39 9 


9 23 41 


6 43 59 


18 


1 23 47 


11 20 6 


13 


57 25 


19 


23 21 48 


S. 4 8 


S. 1 13 23 


19 


2 12 36 


16 27 48 


18 


49 9 


20 


4 49 


N. 1 35 3 


N. 4 23 57 


20 


3 5 18 


20 69 15 


22 


66 43 


21 


P 49 16 


7 11 68 


9 57 40 


21 


4 2 20 


24 36 58 


25 


67 21 


22 


1 36 17 


12 39 28 


15 16 36 


22 


5 3 23 


26 57 14 


27 


33 11 


23 


2 27 1 


17 43 57 


20 2 16 


23 


6 7 7 


27 43 9 


27 


26 42 


24 


3 22 21 


22 7 54 


23 57 69 


24 


7 11 26 


26 40 8 


26 


26 38 


25 


4 22 34 


25 29 28 


26 39 14 


26 


8 14 13 


23 46 20 


21 


41 9 


26 


5 26 60 


27 24 22 


27 42 22 


26 


9 14 9 


19 13 42 


16 


27 10 


27 


6 33 6 


27 31 24 


26 60 38 


27 


10 10 69 


13 25 4 


10 


11 4 


28 


7 38 40 


26 40 19 


24 1 48 


28 


11 5 13 


N. 6 48 66 


N. 3 


22 17 


29 


8 41 22 


21 57 25 


19 30 21 


29 


11 57 49 


S. 5 22 


S. 3 


30 44 


30 


9 40 13 


16 44 12 


13 42 56 


30 


12 49 50 


6 60 48 


10 


2 48 


31 


10 35 27 


N.IO 30 29 


N. 7 10 43 


31 


13 42 12 


S.13 4 14 


S.15 


62 53 



173 



THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 


SEPTEMBER, 1S59. 


OCTOBER, 1S59. 


MEAN TTMK 


MEAN TIME. 


EISHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


RIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. ■ 




h. m. s. 


o / // 


o / 


II 




h. m. 9. 


O 1 II 


o 


/ // 


1 


■14 35 32 


S.18 26 46 


S.20 44 


12 


1 


17 2 36 


S.26 49 23 


S.27 


21 43 


2 


15 30 4 


22 43 41 


24 24 


3 


2 


17 58 35 


27 32 22 


27 


21 58 


3 


16 25 29 


25 44 22 


26 44 


1 


3 


18 62 41 


26 51 28 


26 


2 2 


4 


17 21 2 


27 22 42 


27 40 


27 


4 


19 44 16 


24 54 69 


23 


31 47 


5 


18 15 43 


27 37 34 


27 14 


43 


5 


20 33 7 


21 6'3 54 


20 


2 47 


6 


19 8 36 


26 32 45 


25 32 


47 


6 


21 19 33 


17 59 63 


15 


46 36 


7 


19 59 9 


24 16 3 


22 43 


54 


7 


22 4 7 


13 24 12 


10 


64 1 


8 


20 47 12 


20 57 44 


18 58 


59 


8 


22 47 36 


8 17 19 


5 


36 20 


9 


21 33 3 


16 49 3 


14 29 


23 


9 


23 30 51 


S. 2 49 22 


S. 


43 


10 


22 17 13 


12 1 20 


9 26 


17 


10 


14 48 


N. 2 49 14 


N. 6 


38 58 


11 


23 26 


6 45 33 


S. 4 


30 


11 


1 23 


8 26 53 


11 


11 15 


12 


23 43 31 


S. 1 12 30 


N. 1 37 


4 


12 


1 48 30 


13 50 9 


16 


21 31 


13 


27 23 


N. 4 26 45 


7 15 


3 


13 


2 39 54 


18 43 9 


20 


52 40 


14 


1 12 57 


10 21 


12 40 


58 


14 


3 35 


22 47 41 


24 


26 43 


15 


2 17 


15 15 2 


17 40 


37 


15 


4 33 32 


25 44 24 


26 


41 36 


16 


2 52 41 


19 55 35 


21 57 


43 


16 


5 34 27 


27 15 30 


27 


24 47 


17 


3 48 2 


23 44 40 


25 14 


3 


17 


6 36 4 


27 8 43 


26 


27 12 


18 


4 46 58 


26 23 34 


27 11 


2 


18 


7 36 35 


26 20 60 


23 


50 47 


19 


5 48 26 


27 34 38 


27 32 


57 


19 


8 34 47 


21 68 44 


19 


46 46 


,20 


6 50 45 


27 5 12 


26 11 


14 


20 


9 SO 18 


17 17 15 


14 


32 43 


'21 


7 52 6 


24 51 36 


23 7 


33 


21 


10 23 29 


11 35 60 


8 


29 18 


22 


8 51 13 


21 54 


18 33 


58 


22 


11 15 10 


N. 6 16 64 


N. 1 


68 22 


23 


9 47 42 


15 49 27 


12 50 


18 


23 


12 6 24 


S. 1 20 30 


S. 4 


37 66 


24 


10 41 57 


9 39 41 


N. 6 20 


49 


24 


12 58 12- 


7 61 6 


10 


57 17 


25 


11 34 45 


N. 2 56 59 


8. 28 


33 


25 


13 51 24 


13 63 46 


16 


37 59 


26 


12 27 6 


S. 3 52 34 


7 12 


1 


26 


14 46 26 


19 7 28 


21 


19 68 


27 


13 19 55 


10 23 56 


13 25 


33 


27 


16 43 10 


23 13 34 


24 


46 40 


28 


14 13 54 


16 14 18 


18 47 


54 


28 


16 40 50 


26 68 7 


26 


47 15 


29 


15 9 17 


21 4 19 


23 1 


50 


29 


17 38 11 


27 13 64 


27 


18 23 


30 


16 5 47 


S.24 39 5 


S. 25 65 


7 


30 


18 33 52 


27 1 30 


26 


24 20 












31 


19 26 57 


S.25 28 19 


8.24 


15 



174 



THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 


IVOTEmBER, 1§59. 


DSCEmBER, 1S59. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 


EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 

; 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 1 


1 

2 
3 


h. m. s. 

20 17 1 

21 4 17 
21 49 17 


o / // 

S.22 46 2 
19 7 34 
14 45 13 


/ // 

S.21 3 1 
17 1 10 
12 21 2 


1 
2 
3 


h. m. s. 

22 17 37 

23 24 
23 43 10 


o / // 

S.ll 18 20 

6 8 59 

S. 44 25 


1 II 

S. 8 46 7 
8. 3 28 3 
N. 2 49 


4 
5 
6 


22 32 52 

23 15 56 
23 59 28 


9 49 50 
S. 4 31 7 

N. 1 1 36 


7 12 49 
S. 1 45 54 
N. 3 50 6 


4 
5 
6 


27 2 

1 13 5 

2 2 25 


N. 4 46 27 
10 13 37 
15 24 29 


7 31 12 
12 52 
17 48 52 


1 
8 
9 


44 30 

1 32 4 

2 23 3 


6 38 10 
12 6 29 
17 11 25 


9 24 13 
14 42 57 
19 29 27 


7 
8 
9 


2 56 54 

3 53 63 

4 55 46 


20 2 43 
23 47 49 
26 16 49 


22 3 20 

25 13 16 

26 56 1 


10 
11 
12 


3 18 1 

4 16 52 

5 18 35 


21 34 26 
24 54 24 
26 50 36 


23 23 39 

26 4 8 

27 12 8 


10 
11 
12 


5 69 62 

7 3 46 

8 6 18 


27 8 58 
26 12 34 
23 29 53 


26 64 33 
26 3 48 
21 33 8 


13 
14 
15 


6 21 16 

7 22 52 
•8 21 49 


27 7 41 
25 40 34 
22 36 10 


26 36 59 
24 19 41 
20 32 20 


13 
14 
15 


9 3 22 

9 57 64 

10 49 41 


19 16 26 

13 65 31 

7 52 15 


16 42 49 

10 57 39 

N. 4 42 5 


16 
17 
18 


9 17 35 

10 10 28 

11 1 20 


18 10 44 

12 44 59 

6 40 25 


16 34 2 

9 46 15 

N. 3 30 4 


16 

17 
18 


11 39 49 

12 29 31 

13 19 63 


N. 1 29 49 

S. 4 61 23 

10 53 13 


S. 1 42 6 

7 56 47 

13 41 36 


19 
20 
21 


11 51 19 

12 41 32 

13 33 


N. 17 36 

S. 6 3 57 

12 5 13 


S. 2 64 32 

9 8 19 

14 52 19 


19 
20 
21 


14 11 48 
16 5 43 
16 1 33 


16 18 55 
20 52 30 
24 19 8 


18 43 12 
22 46 1 
26 33 27 


22 
23 
24 


14 26 25 

15 21 57 

16 19 10 


17 27 17 
21 51 49 
25 2 47 


19 47 49 
23 37 21 
26 6 52 


22 
23 
24 


16 58 28 

17 55 12 

18 50 21 


26 26 53 

27 9 
26 25 51 


26 58 48 
26 57 47 
25 34 22 


25 
26 

2Y 


17 16 53 

18 13 40 

19 8 11 


26 48 52 

27 6 4 
25 58 26 


27 8 30 
26 42 19 
24 55 53 


25 
26 

27 


19 42 64 

20 32 24 

21 19 2 


24 24 47 
21 17 58 
17 19 29 


22 68 43 
19 24 19 
16 5 10 


28 
29 
30 


19 59 42 

20 48 6 

21 33 50 


23 36 21 

20 13 22 

S. 16 3 16 


22 1 35 

18 13 24 

8.13 44 27 


28 
29 
30 


22 3 21 

22 46 9 

23 28 26 


12 42 54 

7 40 7 
S. 2 21 19 


10 14 7 
8. 6 2 8 
N. 21 14 










31 


11 9 


N. 3 4 26 


N. 5 47 7 



175 



1859. 


AT geee:nwioh mkat^i" nook 






1859. 


JANUARY. 


FEBRUARY. 


ISARCH. 


4 


4 




4 


■3 






■i 


■3 






^ 


1 


THE MOON'S 


$ 




THi; MOON'S 




a 
o 


THE MOON'S 11 


0} 

■s 
a 


1 

Cm 

o 

a 




1 

Cm 
O 

a 


■S 

Cm 

o 






o 

a 


■3 
n 






Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Xboa. 


Noon. 


Mon. 






d. 


h. m. 






d. 


h. m. 






d. 


h. m. 


Sat. 


1 


27-1 


22 38-7 


Tues. 


1 


28-3 


23 51-9 


Tues. 


1 


26-5 


22 33-0 


Sun. 


2 


28-1 


23 30-2 


Wed. 


2 


29-3 


6 


Wed. 


2 


27-5 


23 16-1 


Mon. 


3 


29-1 


6 


Thur. 


3 


0-5 


36-1 


Thur. 


3 


28-5 


23 57-8 


Tues. 


4 


0-3 


20-5 


Fri. 


4 


1-5 


1 18-3 


Fri. 


4 


29-5 


6 


Wed. 


5 


1-3 


1 8-6 


Sat. 


5 


2-5 


1 69-4 


Sat. 


5 


0-7 


39 


o 


Thar. 


6 


2-3 


1 54-2 


SUTI. 


6 


3-5 


2 40-3 


Sun. 


6 


1-7 


1 21 


1 


Fri. 


1 


3-3 


2 37-4 


Mon. 


7 


4-5 


3 22-0 


Mon. 


7 


2-7 


2 4 


8 


Sat. 


8 


4-3 


3 18-9 


Tues. 


8 


5-5 


4 6-0 


Tues. 


8 


3-7 


2 51 


3 


Sun. 


9 


5-3 


3 59-6 


Wed. 


9 


6-5 


4 53-3 


Wed. 


9 


4-7 


3 41 


6 


Mon. 


10 


6-3 


4 40-7 


Thur. 


10 


7-5 


5 45-2 


Thur. 


10 


5-7 


4 36 


4 


Tues. 


11 


7-3 


5 23-3 


Fri. 


11 


8-5 


6 42-2 


Fri. 


11 


6-7 


5 35 


5 


Wed. 


12 


' 8-3 


6 9-0 


Sat. 


12 


9-5 


7 44-0 


Sat. 


12 


7-7 


6 37 


3 


Thur. 


13 


9-3 


6 59-1 


Sim. 


13 


10-5 


8 48-5 


Sun. 


13 


8-7 


7 39 


6 


Fri. 


14 


10-3 


7 54-9 


Mon. 


14 


11-5 


9 52-7 


Mon. 


14 


9-7 


8 39 


9 


Sat. 


15 


11-3 


8 56-5 


Tues. 


15 


12-5 


10 53-9 


Tues. 


15 


10-7 


9 36 


7 


Sun. 


16 


12-8 


10 2-6 


Wed. 


16 


13-5 


11 50-9 


Wed. 


16 


11-7 


10 30 





Mon. 


17 


13-3 


11 9-6 


Thur. 


17 


14-5 


12 43-8 


Thur. 


17 


12-7 


11 20 


3 


Tues. 


18 


14:3 


12 14-2 


Fri. 


18 


15-5 


13 33-6 


Fri. 


18 


13-7 


12 8 


9 


Wed. 


19 


15-3 


13 14-1 


Sat. 


19 


16-5 


14 21-6 


Sat. 


19 


14-7 


12 56 


7 


Thur. 


20 


16-3 


14 8-7 


Sun. 


20 


17-5 


15 9-0 


Siin. 


20 


15-7 


13 45 


1 


Fri. 


21 


17-3 


14 59-0 


Mon. 


21 


18-5 


15 56-8 


Mon. 


21 


16-7 


14 34 


6 


Sat. 


22 


18-3 


15 46-5 


Tues. 


22 


19-5 


16 45-9 


Tues. 


22 


17-7 


15 25 


7 


Sun. 


23 


19-3 


16 32-5 


Wed. 


23 


20-5 


17 36-3 


Wed. 


23 


18-7 


16 18 


1 


Mon. 


24 


20-3 


17 18-3 


Thur. 


24 


21-5 


18 27-9 


Thur. 


24 


19-7 


17 10 


9 


Tues. 


25 


21-3 


18 6-0 


Fri. 


25 


22-5 


19 19-9 


Fri. 


25 


20-7 


18 3 


2 


Wed. 


26 


22-3 


18 53-3 


Sat. 


26 


23-5 


20 11-1 


Sat. 


26 


21-7 


18 53 


8 


Thur. 


27 


23-3 


19 43-2 


Sun. 
Mon. 


27 
28 


24-5 
25-5 


21 0-7 
21 48-0 


Sun. 


27 


22-7 


19 42 





Fri. 


28 


24-3 


20 34-4 










Mon. 


28 


23-7 


20 27 


8 


Sat. 


29 


25-3 


21 25-9 


Tues. 


29 


26-5 


22 33-0 


Tues. 


29 


24-7 


21 11 


5 


Sun. 


30 


26-3 


22 16-6 










Wed. 


30 


25-7 


21 53 


6 


Mon. 


31 


27-3 


23 6-4 










Thur. 


31 


26-7 


22 35-3 


Tues. 


32 


28-3 


23 61-9 










Fri. 


32 


27-7 


23 17-3 



176 



1859. 


AT GREENWICH IVTEATiT E"OON. 




1859. 




APRIIi. 


MAY. 


3VNE. 




■i 


■3 




4 


i 




4 


4 










§ 


THE MOON'S 


! 


1 


THE MOOK'S 




Pi 

i 


THE MOON'S 




CD 

<^ 
o 


o 

a 




1=1 


1- 

o 

a 




1 


1 

o 








Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 




Mon. 


Sbcm. 


JVoon. 








d. 


h. m. 






A. 


h. m. 






d. 


h. m. 




Fri. 


1 


27-7 


23 17-3 


Sun. 


1 


28-1 


23 28-2 


Wed. 


1 


0-2 


6 


8 




Sat. 


2 


28-7 


6 


Mon. 


2 


29-i 


6 


Thur. 


2 


1-2 


1 11 


8 




Sun. 


3 


0-1 


0-9 


Tues. 


3 


0-6 


21-9 


Fri. 


3 


2-2 


2 16 


4 




Mon. 


4 


1-1 


47-2 


Wed. 


4 


1-6 


1 20-4 


Sat. 


4 


3-2 


3 17 


7 




Tues. 


5 


2-] 


1 37-2 


Thur. 


5 


2-6 


2 22-6 


Sun. 


5 


4-2 


4 14 


4 




Wed. 


6 


3-1 


2 31-5 


Fri. 


6 


3-6 


3 26-0 


Mon. 


6 


5-2 


5 6 


4 




Thur. 


1 


4-1 


3 30-0 


Sat. 


7 


4-6 


4 27-7 


Tues. 


7 


6-2 


5 55 







Fri. 


8 


5-1 


4 31-4 


Sun. 


8 


5-6 


5 25-7 


Wed. 


8 


7-2 


6 41 


4 




Sat. 


9 


6-1 


5 33-3 


Mon. 


9 


6-6 


6 19-4 


Thur. 


9 


8-2 


7 27 


2 




Sun. 


10 


7-1 


6 33-2 


Tues. 


10 


7-6 


7 9-4 


Fri. 


10 


9-2 


8 13 


5 




Mon. 


11 


8-1 


7 29-8 


Wed. 


11 


8-6 


7 56-8 


Sat. 


11 


10-2 


9 1 


3 




Tues. 


12 


9-1 


8 22-6 


Thur. 


12 


9-6 


8 42-9 


Sun. 


12 


11-2 


9 51 


2 




Wed. 


13 


10-1 


9 12-3 


Fri. 


13 


10-6 


9 29-0 


Mon. 


13 


12-2 


10 43 


1 




Thur. 


14 


11-1 


10 0-1 


Sat. 


14 


11-6 


10 16-3 


Tues. 


14 


13-2 


11 36 


2 




Fri. 


15 


12-1 


10 47-2 


Sun. 


15 


12-6 


11 6-5 


Wed. 


15 


14-2 


12 29 


2 




Sat. 


16 


13-1 


11 34-6 


Mon. 


16 


13-6 


11 56-8 


Thur. 


16 


15-2 


13 20 


7 


, 


Sun. 


17 


14-] 


12 23-4 


Tues. 


17 


14-6 


12 49-9 


Fri. 


17 


16-2 


14 9 


6 




Mon. 


18 


15-] 


13 14-1 


Wed. 


18 


15-6 


13 43-5 


Sat. 


18 


17-2 


14 55 


6 




Tues. 


19 


16-1 


14 6-5 


Thur. 


19 


16-6 


14 36-3 


Sun. 


19 


18-2 


15 38 


9 




Wed. 


20 


17-1 


15 0-0 


Fri. 


20 


17-6 


15 27-0 


Mon. 


20 


19-2 


16 20 


2 




Thur. 


21 


18-1 


15 53-3 


Sat. 


21 


18-6 


16 14-9 


Tues. 


21 


20-2 


17 


5 




Fri. 


22 


19-1 


16 45-1 


Sun. 


22 


19-6 


16 59-9 


Wed. 


22 


21-2 


17 40 


7 




Sat. 


23 


20-1 


17 34-6 


Mon. 


23 


20-6 


17 42-6 


Thur. 


23 


22-2 


18 22 


3 




Sun. 


24 


21-1 


18 21-3 


Tues. 


24 


21-6 


18 23-8 


Fri. 


24 


23-2 


19 6 


5 : 




Mon. 


25 


22-1 


19 5-6 


Wed. 


25 


22-6 


19 4-5 


Sat. 


25 


24-2 


19 54 


6 




Tues. 


26 


23-1 


19 47-9 


Thur. 


26 


23-6 


19 46-0 


Sun, 


26 


25-2 


20 48 


1 




Wed. 


27 


24-1 


20 29-3 


Fri. 


27 


24-6 


20 29-6 


Mon. 


27 


26-2 


21 47 


2 




Thur. 


28 


25-1 


21 10-9 


Sat. 


28 


25-6 


21 16-4 


Tues. 


28 


27-2 


22 51 


1 




Fri. 


29 


26-1 


21 63-7 


Sun. 


29 


26-6 


22 7-9 


Wed. 


29 


28-2 


23 57 


1 




Sat. 


30 


27-1 


22 39-1 


Mon. 
Tues. 


30 
31 


27-6 
28-6 


23 4-9 

6 


Thur. 


30 


29-2 


6 




Sun. 


31 


28-1 


23 28-2 










Fri. 


31 


0-9 


1 1-7 










Wed. 32 


0-2 


6-8 













177 



1859. 


AT GEEENWiCH MEAlf NOOIT. 






1859. 


JUI.Y. 


AUGUST. 


SEPTEMBER. 


i 


4 
i 


THE MOON'S 


4 

1) 


i 

1 


THE MOON'S 


i 
^ 




THE MOON'S 


1 

o 

1 


1 

o 






=3 






i 

o 

n 


1 

O 

a 






Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Noon. 


Jfoon. 


Mon. 


Fri. 

Sat. 
Sun. 


1 
2 
3 


d. 

0-9 
1-9 
2-9 


h. m. 

1 1-7 

2 2-3 
2 58-1 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 


1 
2 
3 


d. 

2-6 
3-6 
4-6 


h. m. 

2 28-7 

3 17-8 

4 6-0 


Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 


1 
2 
3 


d. 

4-3 
5-3 
6-3 


h. m. 

3 35-6 

4 27-7 

5 20-8 


Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 


4 
5 
6 


3-9 
4-9 
5-9 


3 49-6^ 

4 38-0 

5 24-8 


Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 


4 
5 
6 


5-6 

6-6 
7-6 


4 54-5 

5 44-1 

6 35-2 


Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 


4 
5 
6 


7-3 
8-3 
9-3 


6 14-4 

7 7-3 
7 68-4 


Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 


1 
8 
9 


6-9 
7-9 
8-9 


6 11-4 

6 59-0 

7 48-2 


Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 


7 
8 
9 


8-6 

9-6 

10-6 


7 27-5 

8 20-3 

9 12-3 


Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 


7 
8 
9 


10-3 
11-3 
12-3 


8 46-9 

9 32-7 
10 16-1 


Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 


10 
11 

12 


9-9 
10-9 
11-9 


8 39-2 

9 31-6 
10 24-3 


Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 


10 
11 
12 


11-6 
12-6 
13-6 


10 2-5 

10 50-2 

11 35-2 


Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 


10 
11 
12 


13-3 
14-3 
15-3 


10 67-6 

11 37-9 

12 18-2 


Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 


13 
14 
15 


12-9 
13-9 
14-9 


11 16-1 

12 5-8 
■12 52-7 


Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 


13 
14 
15 


14-6 
15-6 
16-6 


12 77-8 

12 58-6 

13 38-6 


Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 


13 
14 
15 


16-3 
17-3 
18-3 


12 59-3 

13 42-3 

14 28-2 


Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 


16 
17 
18 


15-9 
16-9 
17-9 


13 36-8 

14 18-6 
14 68-9 


Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 


16 

17 
18 


17-6 
18-6 
19-6 


14 18-6 

14 59-8 

15 43-3 


Fri. 

Sat. 
Sun. 


16 

17 
18 


19-3 
20-3 
21-3 


15 17-9 

16 11-9 

17 9-7 


Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 


19 
20 
21 


18-9 
19-9 
20-9 


15 38-7 

16 19-0 

17 1-2 


Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 


19 
20 
21 


20-6 
21-6 
22-6 


16 30-2 

17 21-6 

18 17-9 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 


19 

20 
21 


22-3 
23-3 
24-3 


18 10-0 

19 10-7 

20 9-8 


Fri. 

Sat. 
Sun. 


22 
23 
24 


21-9 
22-9 
23-9 


17 46-4 

18 35-9 

19 30-8 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 


22 
23 

24 


23-6 
24-6 
25-6 


19 18-4 

20 21-2 

21 23-8 


Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 


22 
23 
24 


25-3 
26-3 
27-3 


21 6-2 

21 59-7 

22 51-0 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 


25 
26 

27 


24-9 
26-9 
26-9 


20 31-0 

21 36-1 

22 40-2 


Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 


25 
26 
27 


26-6 
27-6 
28-6 


22 24-0 

23 20-7 
6 


Sun. ' 

Mon. 

Tues. 


25 
26 
27 


28-3 

29-3 

0-9 


23 41-2 

6 
31-5 


Thur. 
Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


27-9 

28-9 

0-6 

1-6 

2-6 


23 43-3 
6 

42-5 

1 37-4 

2 28-7 


Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


0-3 
1-3 
2-3 
3-3 

4-3 


14-1 

1 5-2 

1 55-1 

2 44-9 

3 35-6 


Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 


28 
29 
30 

31 


1-9 

2-9 
3-9 

4-9 


1 22-7 

2 15-4 

3 9-5 

4 4-4 




12 























178 



1859. 



AT GKEEISTWICH MEAJS" NOON. 



1869. 



OCTOBER. 



IVOTEMBER. 



DECEMBER. 



J3 



THE MOON'S 



^ 



Age. 



Noon. 



Meridian 



THE MOON'S 



Age. 



Noon. 



Meridian 






THE MOON'S 



Age. 



Noon. 



Meridian 



Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 
Mon. 

Tues. 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 
31 



32 6-5 



h. m. 
4 4-4' 
4 58-8 
6 51-6 

6 41-4 
1 28-3 
8 12-5 

8 54-6 

9 35-3 
10 15-'7 

10 56-8 

11 39-6 

12 25-2 

13 14-4 

14 1-1 

15 4-8 

16 4-4 

17 4-3 

18 2-7 

18 58-3 

19 51-0 

20 41-3 

21 30-4 

22 19-4 

23 9-6 

' 6 
1-4 

55-4 

1 50-9 

2 46-7 

3 41-1 

4 33-0 

5 21-6 



Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 

Fri. 
Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 

31 



d. 

6-5 
7-5 
8-5 

9-5 
10-5 
11-5 

12-5 
13-5 
14-6 

15-5 
16-5 
17-5 

18-5 
19-5 
20-5 

21-5 
22-5 
23-5 

24-5 
25-5 
26-5 

27-5 
28-5 
29-5 

0-9 
1-9 
2-9 

3-9 
4-9 
5-9 

6-9 



ii. m. 

5 21-6 

6 7-0 

6 49-8 

7 30-7 

8 11-0 

8 Sl-6 

9 33-6 

10 18-3 

11 6-8 

11 59-6 

12 56-7 

13 57-0 

14 58-2 

15 58-0 

16 54-5 

17 47-5 

18 37-5 

19 25-6 

20 13-2 

21 1-3 

21 5l'-2 

22 43-5 

23 37-9 
6 

33-7 

1 29-2 

2 22-8 

3 13-3 

4 0-3 

4 44-1 

5 25-6 



Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 

Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 
Sat. 
S^in. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 

26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 

32 



d. 

6-9 

7-9 



9-9 
10-9 
11-9 

12-9 
13-9 
14-9 

15-9 
16-9 
17-9 

18-9 
19-9 
20-9 

21-9 
22-9 
23-9 

24-9 
25-9 
26-9 

27-9 

28-9 

0-3 

1-3 
2-3 
3-3 

4-3 
5-3 
6-3 
7-3 

8-3 



h. m. 

5 25-6 

6 5-7 

6 45-5 

7 26-3 

8 9-1 

8 55-4 

9 46-2 

10 42-0 

11 42-3 

12 45-0 

13 47-5 

14 47-2 

15 42-9 

16 34-7 

17 23-7 

18 11-2 

18 68-6 

19 47-0 

20 37-3 

21 29-9 

22 24-4 

23 19-5 

6 

13-6 

1 5-3 

1 53-8 

2 39-0 



6 1-7 



JANUARY, 1859. 



179 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


IIP'. 


Vlk. 


IXh. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Spica 


W. 


/ // 

49 2 21 


o / // 

50 31 59 


52 1 31 


O / // 

63 30 69 




Son 


E. 


30 3 48 


28 42 28 


27 21 18 


26 17 


6 


Sun 


W. 


24 8'7 31 


25 58 3 


27 18 43 


28 39 32 




a Pegasi 


E. 


45 40 30 


44 19 48 


42 59 29 


41 39 35 




a Arietis 


E. 


85 4V 36 


84 18 52 


82 50 4 


81 21 13 


1 


Sun 


W. 


35 25 30 


36 47 4 


38 8 46 


39 30 36 




a Pegasi 


E. 


35 8 19 


33 52 12 


32 37 1 


31 22 52 




a Arietis 


E. 


13 55 54 


72 26 37 


70 57 13 


69 27 45 




Aldebaran 


E. 


105 32 8 


104 4 4 


102 35 53 


101 7 34 




Jupiter 


E. 


110 46 30 


109 16 34 


107 46 33 


106 16 25 


8 


SUN_ 


W. 


46 21 49 


47 44 30 


49 7 21 


50 30 22 




a Arietis 


E. 


61 58 45 


60 28 36 


58 58 19 


57 27 54 




Aldebaran 


E. 


93 44 9 


92 15 4 


90 45 50 


89 16 27 




Jupiter 


E. 


98 43 59 


97 13 6 


95 42 5 


94 10 56 


9 


Sun 


W. 


51 28 6 


58 52 13 


60 16 33 


61 41 7 




a Arietis 


E. 


49 53 38 


48 22 19 


46 50 50 


46 19 10 




Aldebaran 


E. 


81 4V 1 


80 16 45 


78 46 11 


77 15 26 




Jupiter 


E. 


86 32 35 


85 23 


83 27 59 


81 55 22 


10 


Sun 


W. 


68 41 21 


70 13 21 


71 39 38 


73 6 10 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


35 12 27 


36 26 13 


37 41 28 


38 58 6 




a Arietis 


E. 


37 38 13 


36 5 29 


34 32 35 


32 69 30 




Aldebaran 


E. 


69 38 44 


68 6 46 


66 34 35 


65 2 11 ; 




Jupiter 


E. 


74 9 5 


72 35 8 


71 55 


69 26 27 


11 


Sun 


W. 


80 23 18 


81 51 39 


83 20 21 


84 49 22 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


45 39 7 


47 2 24 


48 26 34 


49 51 36 




Mars 


W. 


26 47 10 


28 17 24 


29 48 


31 18 66 




a Pegasi 


W. 


24 58 29 


26 7 37 


27 19 33 


28 33 58 




Aldebaran 


E. 


57 16 46 


55 43 


54 9 


52 34 47 




Jupiter 


E. 


61 29 59 


59 53 50 


68 17 22 


56 40 37 




Saturn 


E. 


119 57 


117 24 16 


115 47 15 


114 9 53 


12 


Sun 


W. 


92 19 48 


93 51 


96 22 36 


96 54 34 




Fomalbaut 


W. 


57 8 24 


58 37 54 


60 8 3 


61 38 51 




Mars 


w. 


38 59 7 


40 32 18 


42 5 51 


43 39 49 




a Pegasi 


w. 


35 15 44 


36 40 51 


38 7 16 


39 34 64 




Aldebaran 


E. 


44 40 32 


43 5 8 


41 29 35 


39 63 64 




Jupiter 
Pollux 


E. 


48 32 1 


46 53 19 


45 14 18 


43 34 56 




E. 


86 39 23 


85 35 


83 21 25 


81 41 51 




Saturn 


E. 


105 57 50 


104 18 19 


102 38 24 


100 58 7 


13 


Sun 


W. 


104 40 29 


106 14 55 


107 49 46 


109 25 2 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


69 21 57 


70 56 18 


72 31 11 


74 6 36 




Mars 


w. 


61 35 45 


53 12 12 


54 49 4 


56 26 22 




a Pegasi 

Jupiter 

Pollux 


w. 


47 8 41 


48 42 11 


50 16 30 


51 51 36 




E. 


35 13 20 


33 32 7 


31 50 37 


30 8 62 




E. 


73 18 


71 36 


69 53 36 


68 10 45 




Saturn 


E. 


92 30 34 


90 47 49 


89 4 38 


87 21 2 




Regulus 


E. 


110 11 31 


108 29 20 


106 46 42 


105 3 40 



180 



JANUARY, 1859. 





GEEENWICH MEAN TIME. 








LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 








Day of 
the 


Star's Name 












and 




Midnight. 


XVI. 


XVIHi". 


xxp.. 




Month. 


Position. 














1 


Spica 


W. 


55 23 


O / // 

66 29 42 


o / t/ 

57 58 67 


o / // 

69 28 9 






Sun 


E. 


24 39 26 


23 18 46 


21 68 16 


20 37 69 




6 


Sun 


W. 


30 28 


31 21 32 


32 42 44 


34 4 8 






a Pegasi 


E. 


40 20 9 


39 1 15 


37 42 66 


36 25 15 






a Arietis 


E. 


19 52 18 


78 23 19 


76 64 15 


75 26 7 




1 


Sun 


W. 


40 52 34 


42 14 40 


43 36 54 


44 69 17 






a Pegasi 


E. 


30 9 55 


28 58 20 


27 48 17 


26 40 






a Arietis 


E. 


67 58 10 


66 28 29 


64 68 41 


63 28 46 






Aldebaran 


E. 


99 39 9 


98 10 36 


96 41 55 


96 13 6 






Jupiter 


E. 


104 46 11 


103 15 49 


101 45 20 


100 14 44 




8 


Sun 


W. 


51 53 32 


53 16 64 


64 40 26 


66 4 10 






a Arietis 


E. 


55 67 21 


54 26 39 


62 55 48 


51 24 48 






Aldebaran 


E. 


87 46 55 


86 17 13 


84 47 21 


83 17 19 






Jupiter 


E. 


92 39 35 


91 8 6 


89 36 26 


88 4 36 




9 


SUN_ 


W. 


63 5 53 


64 30 53 


66 56 8 


67 21 37 ' 






a Arietis 


E. 


43 47 20 


42 15 19 


40 43 8 


39 10 46 






Aldebaran 


E. 


75 44 30 


74 13 22 


72 42 2 


71 10 29 






Jupiter 


E. 


80 22 34 


78 49 32 


77 16 17 


75 42 48 




10 


Sun 


W. 


74 33 


76 7 


77 27 32 


78 56 15 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


40 16 3 


41 36 11 


42 55 27 


44 16 47 






a Arietis 


E. 


31 26 15 


29 62 51 


28 19 19 


26 45 41 






Aldebaran 


E. 


63 29 33 


61 66 42 


60 23 37 


58 60 18 






Jupiter 


E. 


67 51 42 


66 16 42 


64 41 25 


63 6 51 




11 


Sun 


W. 


86 18 44 


87 48 28 


89 18 33 


90 48 59 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


51 17 27 


52 44 6 


64 11 28 


65 39 35 






Mars 


w. 


32 50 14 


34 21 54 


36 53 65 


37 26 20 






a Pegasi 


w. 


29 60 37 


31 9 18 


32 29 49 


33 62 1 






Aldebaran 


E. 


51 21 


49 25 41 


47 60 60 


46 16 46 






Jupiter 


E. 


55 3 32 


53 26 8 


61 48 26 


50 10 23 






Saturn 


E. 


112 32 12 


110 54 9 


109 16 45 


107 36 58 




12 


Sun 


W. 


98 26 56 


99 69 43 


101 32 53 


103 6 29 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


63 10 17 


64 42 19 


66 14 58 


67 48 10 






Mars 


w. 


46 14 11 


46 48 68 


48 24 9 


49 69 44 






a Pegasi 


w. 


41 3 39 


42 33 28 


44 4 17 


45 36 2 






Aldebaran 


E. 


38 18 8 


36 42 19 


.36 6 29 


33 30 42 






Jupiter 


E. 


41 66 15 


40 16 14 


38 34 65 


36 54 17 






Pollux 


E. 


80 1 53 


78 21 31 


76 40 45 


74 59 35 






Saturn 


E. 


99 17 25 


97 36 19 


95 54 49 


94 12 64 




13 


Sun 


W. 


111 44 


112 36 62 


114 13 26 


115 50 26 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


75 42 33 


77 19 


78 65 58 


80 38 24 ; 






Mars 


w. 


58 4 6 


59 42 16 


61 20 61 


62 69 53 






a Pegasi 


w. 


53 27 26 


55 4 1 


66 41 17 


58 19 13 






Jupiter 


E. 


28 26 54 


26 44 46 


25 2 31 


23 20 12 






Pollux 


E. 


66 27 30 


64 43 48 


62 59 41 


61 15 9 






Saturn 


E. 


85 37 


83 52 32 


82 7 38 


80 22 19 






Eegulus 


E. 


108 20 11 


101 36 17 


99 51 56 


98 7 10 . 



JANUARY, 1859. 



181 









GEEENWICH 


MEAN" TIME. 






LUNAE DISTANCES. 




Day of 

the 


Star's Kame 


! 












and 




Noon. 


IIP'. 


VP". 


IXi. 




Month. 


Position. 














14 


Sun 


w. 


^ 1 " 
im 27 50 


O i II 

119 5 41 


O / II 

120 43 58 


O / II 

122 22 40 


• 




Fomalliaiit 


w. 


82 11 19 


83 49 42 


85 28 31 


87 7 47 






Mars 


w. 


64 39 21 


66 19 16 


67 59 36 


69 40 22 






a Pegasi 


w. 


59 67 49 


61 37 3 


63 16 53 


64 57 19 






Pollux 


E. 


59 30 12 


57 44 49 


55 59 


54 12 47 






Saturn 


E. 


78 36 33 


76 50 21 


75 3 43 


73 16 39 






Eegulus 


E. 


96 21 57 


94 36 19 


92 50 14 


91 3 44 




15 


Mars 


W. 


78 10 35 


79 53 52 


81 37 33 


83 21 37 






a Pegasi 


W. 


73 27 44 


75 11 20 


76 55 25 


78 39 57 






a Arietis 


w. 


30 11 53 


31 59 12 


33 47 4 


35 35 28 






Pollux 


E. 


45 15 33 


43 26 56 


41 37 57 


39 48 36 






Saturn 


E. 


64 14 58 


62 25 23 


60 35 25 


58 45 3 






Eegulus 


E. 


82 4 51 


80 15 50 


78 26 26 


76 36 38 




16 


Mars 


W. 


92 7 29 


93 53 41 


95 40 12 


97 27 






a Arietis 


w. 


44 44 25 


46 35 27 


48 26 51 


50 18 35 






Aldebaran 


w. 


16 23 2 


17 50 12 


19 21 45 


20 56 48 






Pollux 


E. 


30 37 5 


28 45 58 


26 54 38 


25 3 9 






Saturn 


E. 


49 27 43 


47 35 13 


45 42 25 


43 49 19 






Regulus 


E. 


67 22 5 


65 30 9 


63 37 54 


61 45 21 




17 


a Arietis 


W. 


59 41 44 


61 35 6 


63 28 40 


65 22 25 






Aldebaran 


W. 


29 25 31 


31 n 37 


32 58 40 


34 46 33 






Jupiter 


W. 


23 56 45 


25 48 6 


27 40 2 


29 32 26 






Saturn 


E. 


34 19 58 


32 25 27 


30 30 45 


28 35 55 






Regulus 


E. 


52 18 44 


50 24 44 


48 30 35 


46 36 15 






Spica 


E. 


106 20 4 


104 26 10 


102 32 5 


100 37 50 




18 


a Arietis 


W. 


74 52 59 


76 47 19 


78 41 39 


80 35 59 






Aldebaran 


w. 


43 54 41 


45 45 31 


47 36 36 


49 27 53 






Jupiter 


w. 


38 59 10 


40 53 6 


42 47 9 


44 41 16 






Reerulus 


E. 


37 3 2 


35 8 13 


33 13 23 


31 18 34 






• 
Spica 


E. 


91 4 58 


89 10 13 


87 15 28 


85 20 43 




19 


a Arietis 


W. 


90 6 46 


92 36 


93 54 15 


95 47 43 






Aldebaran 


W. 


58 45 53 


60 37 31 


62 29 6 


64 20 35 






Jupiter 


W. 


54 11 50 


56 5 44 


57 59 30 


59 53 8 






Pollux 


W. 


15 32 37 


17 24 19 


19 16 22 


21 8 35 






Spica 


E. 


75 47 57 


73 53 45 


71 59 43 


70 5 51 




20 


Aldebaran 


W. 


73 35 37 


75 25 58 


77 16 3 


79 5 51 






Jupiter 
Pollux 


W. 


69 18 7 


71 10 21 


73 2 18 


74 53 55 






W. 


30 29 18 


32 21 


34 12 28 


36 3 39 






Spica 
Antares 


E. 


60 40 4 


58 47 43 


56 55 42 


55 4 






E. 


106 32 11 


104 39 45 


102 47 38 


100 55 50 






Venus 


E. 


117 58 23 


116 12 22 


114 26 36 


112 41 7 




21 


Aldebaran 


W. 


88 9 50 


89 57 31 


91 44 48 


93 31 40 ! 






Jupiter 
Pollux 


W. 


84 6 47 


85 56 12 


87 45 13 


89 33 49 






W. 


45 14 58 


47 4 10 


48 52 59 


50 41 24 






Saturn 


W. 


26 32 56 


28 23 1 


30 12 43 


32 2 1 






Spica 


E. 


45 50 58 


44 1 33 


42 12 32 


40.23 58 



182 



JANUARY, 1859. 



, 


GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. ' 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of- 
the 


Star's Name 








• 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


XVIII''. 


XXIi. 


Month. 


Position. 


















1 It 


o / // 


o / // 


o / // 


14 


Sun 


W. 


124 1 48 


125 41 21 


127 21 20 


129 1 42 1 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


88 47 28 


90 27 33 


92 8 2 


93 48 53 




Mars 


w. 


11 21 34 


73 3 11 


74 46 14 


76 27 42 




a Pegasi 


w. 


66 38 19 


68 19 63 


70 1 59 


71 44 36 




Pollux 


E. 


52 26 8 


50 39 5 


48 51 38 


47 3 47 




Saturn 


E. 


11 29 9 


'69 41 14 


67 62 53 


66 4 8 




Regulus 


E. 


89 16 48 


87 29 27 


85 41 40 


83 63 28 


15 


Mars 


W. 


85 6 4 


86 50 64 


88 36 5 


90 21 37 




a Pegasi 


W. 


80 24 64 


82 10 16 


83 56 1 


85 42 9 




a Arietis 


W. 


31 24 21 


39 13 43 


41 3 32 


42 63 46 




Pollux 


E. 


37 58 55 


36 8 54 


34 18 34 


32 27 58 




Saturn 


E. 


56 54 18 


65 3 11 


53 11 42 


61 19 53 




Regulus 


E. 


74 46 27 


72 55 63 


71 4 58 


69 13 42 


16 


Mars 


W. 


99 14 6 


101 1 27 


102 49 2 


104 36 52 




a Arietis 


W. 


52 10 39 


64 3 1 


66 55 40 


57 48 35 




Aldebaran 


W. 


22 34 40 


24 14 50 


25 66 53 


27 40 32 


j 


Pollux 


E. 


23 11 32 


21 19 51 


19 28 11 


17 36 39 




Saturn 


E. 


41 55 57 


40 2 18 


38 8 25 


36 14 18 




Regulus 


E. 


59 52 32 


67 69 26 


56 6 6 


54 12 31 


11 


a Arietis 


W. 


67 16 19 


69 10 20 


71 4 28 


72 58 42 




Aldebaran 


W. 


36 35 9 


38 24 20 


40 14 2 


42 4 10 




Jupiter 


W. 


31 25 13 


33 18 20 


36 11 44 


37 5 21 




Saturn 


E. 


26 40 57 


24 45 63 


32 50 44 


20 56 31 




Regulus 


E. 


44 41 48 


42 47 14 


40 52 34 


38 67 49 




Spica 


E. 


98 43 27 


96 48 67 


94 64 21 


92 59 41 


18 


a Arietis 


W. 


82 30 18 


84 24 33 


86 18 44 


88 12 49 




Aldebaran 


W. 


51 19 20 


53 10 53 


66 2 32 


56 54 12 




Jupiter 


W. 


46 35 26 


48 29 36 


50 23 44 


52 17 49 




Regulus 


E. 


29 23 47 


27 29 3 


26 34 25 


23 39 52 




Spioa 


E. 


83 26 


81 31 21 


79 36 46 


77 42 18 


19 


a Arietis 


W. 


97 40 59 


99 34 1 


101 26 49 


103 19 20 




Aldebaran 


W. 


66 11 56 


68 3 9 


69 64 11 


71 45 1 




Jupiter 


W. 


61 46 34 


63 39 48 


65 32 50 


67 25 36 




Pollux 


W. 


23 51 


24 63 8 


26 45 20 


28 37 24 




Spica 


^E. 


68 12 13 


66 18 47 


64 25 37 


62 32 42 


20 


Aldebaran 


W. 


80 55 20 


82 44 29 


84 33 18 


86 21 45 




Jupiter 


W. 


76 45 13 


78 36 9 


80 26 44 


82 16 57 




Pollux 


W. 


37 54 34 


39 46 11 


41 35 28 


43 26 24 




Spica 


E. 


53 12 39 


51 21 40 


49 31 2 


47 40 49 




Antares 


E. 


99 4 23 


97 13 16 


95 22 32 


93 32 11 




Venus 


E. 


110 55 66 


109 11 4 


107 26 32 


105 42 22 


21 


Aldebaran 


W. 


95 18 7 


97 4 7 


98 49 41 


100 34 47 




Jupiter 


W. 


91 22 


93 9 44 


94 67 2 


96 43 53 




Pollux 


W. 


52 29 24 


54 17 


56 4 10 


57 50 54 




Saturn 


W. 


33 50 53 


35 39 19 


37 27 20 


39 14 54 




Spica 


E. 


38 35 49 


36 48 7 


35 53 


33 14 7 



JANUARY, 185&. 



183 







GKEENWICH 


MEA¥ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


and 




Noon. 


IIP'. 


YIi>. 


IXK 


Month. 


Position. 












21 


Antares 


E. 


o / // 

91 42 12 


o / y/ 

89 62 38 


88 3 29 


o / // 

86 14 44 




Venus 


E. 


103 58 35 


102 15 10 


100 32 8 


98 49 32 


22 


Jupiter 


W. 


98 30 16 


100 16 12 


102 1 41 


103 46 42 




Pollux 


w. 


59 37 12 


61 23 3 


63 8 28 


64 53 25 




Saturn 


w. 


41 2 1 


42 48 41 


44 34 54 


46 20 40 




Regulus 


w. 


22 38 8 


24 24 14 


26 9 52 


27 55 3 




Antares 


E. 


77 17 33 


■75 31 27 


73 45 49 


72 38 




Venus 


E. 


90 23 


88 43 4 


87 3 35 


86 24 34 




Sun 


E. 


131 34 33 


129 56 14 


128 18 21 


126 40 55 


23 


Pollux 


W. 


73 31 26 


75 13 41 


76 56 29 


78 36 50 




Saturn 


W. 


55 2 38 


56 45 40 


58 28 14 


60 10 22 




Eegulus 


W. 


36 34 6 


38 16 32 


39 58 31 


41 40 4 




Antares 


E. 


63 21 36 


61 39 10 


59 57 11 


58 15 39 




Venus 


E. 


77 16 43 


75 40 36 


74 4 57 


72 29 48 




Sun 


E. 


118 40 33 


117 5 49 


115 31 33 


113 57 43 


24 


Pollux 


W. 


86 67 2 


88 35 48 


90 14 9 


91 52 5 




Saturn 


w. 


68 34 24 


70 13 56 


71 53 3 


73 31 45 




Eegulus 


w. 


50 1 9 


51 40 5 


53 18 36 


54 56 43 




Antares 


E. 


49 54 36 


48 15 41 


46 37 10 


44 59 4 




Venus 


E. 


64 41 12 


63 8 55 


61 37 5 


60 6 43 




Sun 


E. 


106 15 6 


104 43 51 


103 13 


101 42 34 


25 


Pollux 


W. 


S9 55 56 


101 31 35 


103 6 53 


104 41 61 




Saturn 


W. 


81 39 26 


83 16 52 


84 51 66 


86 27 40 




Eegulus 


W. 


63 1 26 


64 37 15 


66 12 44 


67 47 51 




Antares 


E. 


36 64 25 


35 18 37 


33 43 9 


32 8 2 




Venus 


E. 


62 35 49 


61 7 11 


49 39 1 


48 11 17 




Sun 


E. 


94 16 12 


92 48 3 


91 20 14 


89 52 46 


26 


Saturn 


W. 


94 21 27 


95 55 18 


97 28 52 


99 2 10 




Eegulus 


W. 


75 38 39 


77 11 55 


78 44 53 


80 17 35 




Spica 


W. 


21 42 28 


23 15 17 


24 47 63 


26 20 15 




Venus 


E. 


40 59 25 


39 34 24 


38 9 53 


36 45 50 




Sun 


E. 


82 40 15 


81 14 39 


79 49 19 


78 24 16 


27 


Saturn 


W. 


106 44 55 


108 16 48 


109 48 27 


111 19 55 




Eegulus 

Spica 

Venus 


W. 


87 57 21 


89 28 38 


90 59 41 


92 30 33 




W. 


33 58 46 


36 29 51 


37 44 


38 31 26 




E. 


29 53 30 


28 32 48 


27 12 48 


25 53 32 




Sun 


E. 


71 22 44 


69 59 6 


68 36 41 


67 12 27 


28 


Eegulus 
Spica 

Sun 


W. 


100 2 16 


101 32 7 


103 1 51 


104 31 28 




w. 


46 2 28 


47 32 13 


49 1 51 


50 31 21 




E. 


60 18 58 


68 66 45 


57 34 39 


56 12 41 


29 


Spica 
Son 


W. 


67 67 17 


69 26 13 


60 55 4 


62 23 51 




E. 


49 24 30 


48 3 8 


46 41 51 


45 20 38 


30 


Spica 
Antares 


W. 


69 47 4 


71 IS 36 


72 44 7 


74 12 38 




W. 


23 63 12 


25 21 46 


26 SO 19 


28 18 52 




Sun 


E. 


38 35 20 


37 14 23 


35 63 27 


34 32 33 

1 



184 



JANUARY, 1859. 







GREENWICH MEAN TIME. 










LUNAE 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVK 


XVIIP. 


XXTi. 


Month. 


Position 












21 


Antares 


E. 


O 1 It 

84 26 25 


82° 38 32 


o / // 

80 51 6 


^0 / // 

79 4 6 




Venus 


E. 


97 7 21 


96 25 36 


93 44 17 


92 3 25 


22 


Jupiter 


W. 


105 31 14 


107 15 19 


108 68 66 


110 42 3 




Pollux 


W. 


66 37 56 


68 21 59 


70 6 35 


71 48 44 




Saturn 


W. 


48 5 59 


49 60 60 


61 35 13 


53 19 9 




Eegulus 


W. 


29 39 47 


31 24 3 


33 7 52 


34 61 13 




Antares 


E. 


70 15 54 


68 31 38 


66 47 60 


65 4 29 




Venus 


E. 


83 46 2 


82 7 69 


80 30 25 


78 53 20 




8VN 


E. 


125 3 56 


123 27 26 


121 61 20 


120 15 43 


23 


Pollux 


W. 


80 17 45 


81 58 13 


83 38 15 


85 17 51 




Saturn 


w. 


61 52 2 


63 33 17 


66 14 6 


66 54 28 




Regulus 


w. 


43 21 9 


46 1 48 


46 42 1 


48 21 48 




Antares 


E. 


56 34 34 


54 53 66 


63 13 43 


51 33 57 




Venus 


E. 


70 55 7 


69 20 56 


67 47 13 


66 13 58 




Son 


E. 


112 24 19 


110 51 22 


109 18 51 


107 46 46 


24 


Pollux 


W. 


93 29 38 


95 6 47 


96 43 32 


98 19 56 




Saturn 


W. 


75 10 3 


76 47 58 


78 25 30 


80 2 39 




Regulus 


W. 


56 34 26 


58 11 45 


69 48 41 


61 25 14 




Antares 


E. 


43 21 22 


41 44 3 


40 7 8 


38 30 36 




Venus 


E. 


58 34 49 


57 4 23 


65 34 25 


64 4 63 




Sun 


E. 


100 12 32 


98 42 53 


97 13 37 


95 44 44 


26 


Pollux 


W. 


106 16 28 


107 50 46 


109 24 43 


110 68 22 




Saturn 


w. 


88 3 3 


89 38 7 


91 12 62 


92 47 18 




Eegulus 


w. 


' 69 22 39 


70 67 7 


72 31 16 


74 5 7 




Aaitares 


E. 


30 33 16 


28 58 49 


27 24 42 


25 50 53 




Venus 


E. 


46 44 1 


45 17 11 


43 50 48 


42 24 53 




Sun 


E. 


88 25 38 


86 58 49 


85 32 19 


84 6 8 


26 


Saturn 


W. 


100 35 12 


102 8 


103 40 32 


106 12 60 




Regulus 


W. 


81 50 1 


83 22 13 


84 54 9 


86 25 52 




Spica 


W. 


27 52 23 


29 24 18 


30 66 


32 27 29 




Venus 


E. 


35 22 17 


33 69 15 


32 36 46 


31 14 SO 




Sun 


E. 


76 59 28 


75 34 56 


74 10 38 


72 46 34 


27 


Saturn 


W. 


112 51 11 


114 22 17 


115 63 13 


117 23 69 




Regulus 


W. 


94 1 14 


95 31 44 


97 2 4 


98 32 14 




Spica 


W. 


40 1 58 


41 32 20 


43 2 31 


44 32 34 




Venus 


E. 


24 35 6 


23 17 36 


22 1 8 


20 46 51 




Sun 


E. 


65 49 25 


64 26 34 


63 3 62 


61 41 21 


28 


Regulus 


W. 


106 57 


107 30 19 


108 59 36 


110 28 46 




Spica 


W. 


62 44 


53 30 1 


54 59 12 


56 28 17 




Sun 


E. 


64 50 50 


53 29 6 


52 7 28 


50 45 57 


29 


Spica 


W. 


63 62 35 


65 21 16 


66 49 54 


68 18 30 




Sun 


E. 


43 59 28 


42 38 22 


41 17 19 


39 56 18 


30 


Spica 


W. 


75 41 7 


77 9 37 


78 38 6 


80 6 87 




Antares 


W. 


29 47 25 


31 15 57 


32 44 29 


34 13 2 




Sun 


E. 


33 11 40 


31 50 47 


30 29 54 


29 9 2 







FEBRUARY, 1859. 


185 




GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 


1 


, LUNAE DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










tte 


and 




Noon. 


IIP'. 


VP". 


IXi. 


Month. 


Position. 


















O 1 u 


o / // 


O / // 


o / // 


5 


Sun 


w. 


21 1 43 


28 32 4 


29 66 36 


31 21 15 




a Arietis 


E. 


62 46 26 


51 14 69 


49 43 26 


48 11 -46 




Aldebaran 


E. 


84 39 31 


83 9 7 


81 38 34 


80 7 53 




Jupiter* 


E. 


88 14 3 


86 42 27 


85 10 43 


83 38 61 


6 


•Sun 


W. 


38 27 2 


39 52 42 


41 18 84 


42 44 36 




a Arietis 


E. 


40 31 34 


38 59 11 


37 26 41 


35 54 6 




Aldebaran 


E. 


72 32 27 


71 58 


69 29 20 


67 67 33 




Jupiter 


E. 


75 57 14 


74 24 26 


72 51 29 


71 18 21 




PoUux 


E. 


116 8 69 


113 35 64 


112 2 38 


110 29 10 


Y 


StJN * 


W. 


49 57 40 


61 24 53 


52 62 19 


64 19 68 




a Pegasi 


W. 


22 50 33 


23 63 3 


24 68 54 


26 7 43 




Aldebaran 


E. 


60 16 39 


58 44 4 


67 11 21 


66 38 30 




Jupiter 


E. 


63 30 7 


61 55 55 


60 21 32 


58 46 58 




Pollux 


E. 


102 38 59 


101 4 20 


99 29 29 


97 54 26 


8 


Sun 


W. 


61 41 39 


63 10 43 


64 40 2 


66 9 37 




a Pegasi 


W. 


32 26 4 


33 47 3 


36 9 24 


36 33 1 




Mars 


W. 


15 47 9 


17 16 13 


18 46 61 


20 16 68 




Aldebaran 


E. 


47 52 33 


46 19 4 


44 46 31 


43 11 54 




Jupiter 


E. 


50 51 6 


49 16 19 


47 39 20 


46 3 8 




Pollux 


E. 


89 56 38 


88 19 10 


86 42 26 


85 5 27 




Saturn 


E. 


107 6 9 


105 27 66 


103 60 28 


102 12 44 


9 


Sun 


W. 


73 41 32 


75 12 46 


76 44 18 


78 16 7 




a Pegasi 


W. 


43 46 52 


45 16 17 


46 46 29 


48 17 23 




Mars 


w. 


27 62 50 


29 25 20 


30 58 12 


32 31 26 




Aldebaran 


E. 


35 23 63 


33 50 31 


32 17 21 


30 44 27 




Jupiter 


E. 


37 69 3 


36 21 39 


34 44 3 


33 6 17 




Pollux 


E. 


76 56 33 


76 17 56 


73 39 2 


71 59 49 




Saturn 


E. 


94 5 


92 20 42 


90 41 2 


89 1 5 




Eegulus 


E. 


113 50 57 


112 12 9 


110 33 3 


108 63 40 


10 


Sun 


W. 


85 69 53 


87 33 36 


89 7 39 


90 42 1 




a Pegasi 


W. 


56 1 41 


57 36 19 


59 11 30 


60 47 12 




Mars 


w. 


40 22 43 


41 58 2 


43 33 41 


46 9 41 




Pollux 


E. 


63 39 16 


61 68 12 


60 16 60 


68 36 9 




Saturn 


E. 


80 36 39 


78 54 48 


77 12 38 


75 30 8 




Eegulus 


E. 


100 32 6 


98 60 48 


97 9 12 


96 27 16 


11 


Sun 


W. 


98 39 


100 15 26 


101 52 12 


103 29 19 




a Pegasi 


W. 


68 53 9 


70 31 44 


72 10 46 


73 50 13 




Mars 


W. 


53 15 2 


54 53 11 


56 31 40 


58 10 31 




a Arietis 


W. 


25 28 44 


27 10 36 


28 63 2 


30 36 1 




Pollux 


E. 


50 1 46 


48 18 6 


46 34 7 


44 49 48 




Saturn 


E. 


66 52 35 


65 8 2 


63 23 9 


61 37 56 




Eegulus 


E. 


86 52 31 


85 8 33 


83 24 13 


81 39 32 


12 


Sun 


W. 


111 40 12 


113 19 25 


114 68 58 


116 38 51 




a Pegasi 
Mars 


W. 


82 13 39 


83 66 29 


85 37 41 


87 20 13 




w. 


66 30 7 


68 11 5 


69 52 24 


71 84 3 




a Arietis 


w. 


39 18 7 


41 3 61 


42 50 


44 86 33 




Pollux 


E. 


36 3 24 


34 17 12 


32 30 43 


30 43 68 



186 






FEBRUARY, 1859. 






GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAB DISTANCES. , 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XV". 


XTIII''. 


XXTi. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


o / // 


/ // 


O / // 


6 


Sun 


W. 


32 46 4 


34 11 4 


35 36 13 


37 1 32 




a Arietis 


E. 


46 39 57 


45 8 2 


43 35 59 


42 3 SO 




Aldebaran 


E. 


78 37 4 


77 6 7 


75 35 2 


74 3 49 




Jupiter 


E. 


82 6 50 


80 34 39 


79 2 20 


77 29 52 


6 


Sun 


W. 


44 10 49 


45 37 14 


47 3 50 


48' 30 39 




a Arietis 


E. 


34 21 23 


32 48 35 


31 15 43 


29 42 46 




Aldebaran 


E. 


66 25 39 


64 53 36 


63 21 25 


61 49 6 




Jupiter 


E. 


69 45 4 


68 11 35 


66 37 67 


65 4 7 




Pollux 


E. 


108 55 31 


107 21 41 


105 47 39 


104 13 26 


V 


Sun 


W. 


55 47 50 


67 15 56 


68 44 1« 


60 12 50 




a Pegasi 


W. 


27 19 10 


28 32 58 


29 48 51 


31 6 37 




Aldebaran 


E. 


64 5 32 


52 32 27 


50 69 15 


49 25 67 




Jupiter 


E. 


57 12 12 


65 37 14 


54 2 4 


62 26 41 




Pollux 


E. 


96 19 7 


94 43 36 


93 7 61 


91 31 52 


8 


Sun 


W. 


67 39 27 


69 9 33 


70 39 56 


72 10 35 


" 


a Pegasi 


W. 


37 57 48 


39 23 39 


40 50 29 


42 18 15 




Mars 


W. 


21 46 32 


23 17 31 


24 48 56 


26 20 41 




Aldebaran 


E. 


41 38 16 


40 4 36 


38 30 58 


36 67 23 




Jupiter 


E. 


44 26 44 


42 50 7 


41 13 18 


39 36 16 




Pollux 


E. 


83 28 13 


81 50 43 


80 12 56 


78 34 53 




Saturn 


E. 


100 34 45 


98 56 30 


97 17 58 


95 39 10 


9 


Sun 


W. 


79 48 15 


81 20 41 


82 53 26 


84 26 30 




a Pegasi 


W. 


49 48 59 


51 21 14 


52 54 7 


54 27 37 




Mars 


W. 


34 4 59 


35 38 53 


37 13 9 


38 47 46 




Aldebaran 


E. 


29 11 55 


27 39 51 


26 8 24 


24 37 44 




Jupiter 


E. 


31 28 22 


29 50 19 


28 12 10 


26 33 56 




Pollux 


E. 


70 20 19 


68 40 31 


67 25 


65 19 59 




Saturn 


E. 


87 20 49 


85 40 14 


83 59 21 


82 18 10 




Regulus 


E. 


107 13 58 


106 33 58 


103 53 39 


102 13 2 


10 


Sun 


W. 


92 16 44 


93 51 47 


95 27 11 


97 2 55 




a Pegasi 


W. 


62 23 25 


64 8 


65 37 20 


67 15 




Mars 


W. 


46 46 3 


48 22 46 


49 59 50 


61 37 16 




Pollux 


E. 


56 53 7 


65 10 47 


53 28 6 


51 45 6 




Saturn 


E. 


73 47 18 


72 4 8 


70 20 37 


68 36 46 




Eegulus 


E. 


93 45 


92 2 24 


90 19 27 


88 36 9 


11 


Sun 


W. 


105 6 48 


106 44 38 


108 22 48 


110 1 20 




a Pegasi 


W. 


75 30 6 


77 10 24 


78 51 6 


80 32 11 




Mars 


w. 


59 49 44 


61 29 18 


63 9 13 


64 49 29 




a Arietis 


w. 


, 32 19 30 


34 3 28 


35 47 55 


37 32 48 




PoUux 


E. 


43 5 9 


41 20 11 


39 34 54 


37 49 18 




Saturn 


E. 


59 52 21 


58 6 25 


56 20 8 


54 33 31 




Regulus 


E. -^ 


79 64 31 


78 9 8 


76 23 25 


74 37 21 


12 


Sun 


W. 


118 19 6 


119 59 38 


121 40 31 


123 21 43 




a Pegasi 


W. 


89 3 5 


90 46 16 


92 29 45 


94 13 32 




Mars 


W. 


73 16 3 


74 58 22 


76 41 1 


78 23 69 




a Arietis 


W. 


46 23 28 


48 10 47 


40 58 27 


51 46 28 




Pollux 


E. 


28 56 58 


27 9 44 


26 22 17 


23 34 40 



FEBRUARY, 1859. 



187 





• 


GEEENWICH 


MEAi^ timt:. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


nil'. 


Vli. 


IXb. 


Month. 


Position. 












12 


Saturn 


E. 


/ // 

62 46 33 


o / // 

60 59 15 


O / // 

49 11 37 


o / // 

47 23 38 




Regulus 


E. 


12 50 56 


71 4 10 


69 17 4 


67 29 38 


13 


Sun 


W. 


125 3 13 


126 45 2 


128 27 9 


130 9 33 




Mars 


W. 


80 1 16 


81 50 51 


83 34 44 


85 18 54 




a Arietis 


W. 


53 34 50 


55 23 32 


57 12 33 


59 1 64 




Aldebaran 


W. 


23 51 38 


25 29 34 


27 9 6 


28 50 2 




Jupiter 


W. 


18 30 30 


20 14 51 


22 14 


23 46 28 




Saturn 


E. 


38 18 55 


36 29 3 


34 38 54 


32 48 27 




Regulus 


E. 


58 27 33 


56 38 12 


54 48 33 


52 68 37 




Spica 


E. 


112 28 3*7 


110 39 21 


108 49 47 


106 59 66 


14 


Mars 


W. 


94 3 43 


95 49 24 


97 35 16 


99 21 21 




a Arietis 


W. 


68 12 49 


70 3 46 


71 54 56 


73 46 18 




Aldebaran 


w. 


37 30 12 


39 16 32 


41 3 28 


42 60 54 




Jupiter 


w. 


32 47 


34 36 30 


36 26 21 


38 16 32 




Regulus 


E. 


43 44 58 


41 63 31 


40 1 51 


38 10 




Spica 


E. 


97 46 41 


95 55 18 


94 3 44 


92 11 57 


15 


Mars 


W. 


108 14 6 


110 1 1 


111 48 


113 35 3 




a Arietis 


w. 


83 5 41 


84 57 57 


86 50 19 


88 42 44 




Aldebaran 


w. 


51 54 16 


53 43 52 


55 33 42 


57 23 44 




Jupiter 


w. 


47 31 13 


49 22 44 


51 14 23 


53 6 8 




Regulus 


E. 


28 48 19 


26 65 36 


25 2 49 


23 9 67 




Spica 


E. 


82 50 38 


80 58 


79 5 17 


77 12 30 


16 


a Arietis 


W. 


98 5 13 


99 57 40 


101 50 2 


103 42 19 




Aldebaran 


W. 


66 35 46 


68 26 22 


70 16 57 


72 7 30 


« 


Jupiter 


W. 


62 25 47 


64 17 44 


66 9 38 


68 1 29 




Pollux 


W. 


23 24 50 


25 16 33 


27 8 22 


29 13 




Spica 


E. 


67 48 12 


65 55 24 


64 2 40 


62 10 1 




Antares 


E. 


113 40 39 


111 47 46 


109 54 56 


108 2 12 


11 


Aldebaran 


W. 


81 19 4 


83 8 58 


84 68 40 


86 48 10 




Jupiter 


W. 


77 19 2 


79 10 4 


81 64 


82 51 30 




Pollux 


W. 


38 18 52 


40 10 16 


42 1 29 


43 52 31 




Saturn 


W. 


21 44 32 


23 36 49 


25 28 54 


27 20 47 




Spica 


E. 


52 48 39 


50 56 54 


49 5 22 


47 14 3 




Antares 


E. 


98 40 19 


96 48 27 


94 66 47 


93 5 20 


18 


Aldebaran 


W. 


-95 51 53 


97 39 44 


99 27 14 


101 14 24 




Jupiter 


W. 


92 41 


93 49 38 


95 38 14 


97 26 31 




Pollux 


W. 


- 63 4 8 


54 53 38 


56 42 48 


58 31 40 




Saturn 


W. 


36 36 28 


38 26 45 


40 16 41 


42 6 18 




Regulus 

Spica 

Antares 


W. 


16 3 54 


17 63 40 


19 43 7 


21 32 13 




E. 


38 1 33 


36 11 58 


34 22 45 


32 33 53 




E. 


83 62 


82 2 13 


80 12 46 


78 23 39 




Venus 


E. 


118 64 48 


117 13 25 


115 32 21 


113 51 34 


19 


Jupiter 
Pollux 


W. 


106 22 17 


■108 8 15 


109 53 47 


111 38 55 




W. 


67 30 35 


69 17 14 


71 3 29 


72 49 19 




Saturn 


w. 


51 8 54 


62 56 16 


54 43 13 


56 29 46 




Regulus 
Spica 


w. 


30 32 18 


32 19 9 


34 6 36 


35 51 38 




E. 


23 35 32 


21 49 11 


20 3 20 


18 17 69 



188 



FEBRUARY, 1859. 





GREENWICH 


MEAT^ TIME. 


• 






LDNAK ] 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVh. 


XTIIP". 


XXii. 


Month. 


Position. 


















Q 1 It 


o / // 


o ./ // 


/ // 


12 


Saturn 


E. 


45 35 20 


43 46 42 


41 57 45 


40 8 29 




Regulus 


E. 


65 41 52 


63 53 46 


62 5 21 


60 16 36 


13 


Sun- 


W. 


131 52 13 


133 35 10 


135 18 23 


137 1 50 




Mars 


W. 


87 3 21 


88 48 4 


90 33 2 


92 18 16 




a Arietis 


W. 


60 51 32 


62 41 27 


64 31 39 


66 22 7 




Aldebaran 


W. 


30 32 12 


32 15 24 


33 59 32 


35 44 30 




Jupiter 


W. 


25 33 27 


27 21 4 


29 9 14 


30 57 53 




Saturn 


E. 


30 57 45 


29 6 47 


27 15 34 


25 24 7 




Regulus 


E. 


51 8 24 


49 17 55 


47 27 11 


45 36 11 




Spica 


E. 


105 9 48 


103 19 24 


101 28 44 


99 37 50 


14 


Mars 


W. 


101 7 36 


102 54 2 


104 40 35 


106 27 17 




a Arietis 


W. 


75 37 52 


77 29 36 


79 21 30 


81 13 32 




Aldebaran 


W. 


44 38 49 


46 27 10 


48 15 52 


60 4 55 




Jupiter 


W. 


40 7 


41 57 44 


43 48 42 


46 39 52 




Regulus 


E. 


36 17 58 


34 25 46 


32 33 25 


30 40 55 




Spica 


E. 


90 19 59 


88 27 52 


86 35 35 


84 43 10 


16 


Mars 


W. 


115 22 8 


117 9 15 


118 56 22 


120 43 28 




a Arietis 


W. 


90 35 12 


92 27 43 


94 20 14 


96 12 44 




Aldebaran 


w. 


59 13 56 


61 4 16 


62 54 42 


64 45 13 




Jupiter 


w. 


54 57 59 


56 49 53 


58 41 50 


60 33 49 




Regulus 


E. 


21 17 3 


19 24 6 


17 31 9 


15 38 13 




•Spica 


E. 


75 19 40 


73 26 48 


71 33 55 


69 41 3 


16 


a Arietis 


W. 


105 34 30 


107 26 33 


109 18 27 


111 10 12 




Aldebaran 


W. 


73 58 1 


75 48 27 


77 38 47 


79 29 




Jupiter 


w. 


69 53 15 


71 44 54 


73 36 26 


75 27 49 




Pollux 


w. 


30 52 5 


32 43 54 


34 35 39 


36 27 19 




Spica 


E. 


60 17 28 


58 25 2 


56 32 45 


54 40 37 




Antares 


E. 


106 9 33 


104 17 1 


102 24 38 


100 32 23 


17 


Aldebaran 


W. 


88 37 27 


90 26 28 


92 15 14 


94 3 43 




Jupiter 


W. 


84 41 52 


86 32 


88 21 51 


90 11 25 




Pollux 


W. 


45 43 20 


47 33 55 


49 24 16 


51 14 21 


- 


Saturn 


W. 


29 12 27 


31 3 52 


32 55 1 


34 45 54 




Spica 


E. 


45 23 


43 32 11 


41 41 40 


39 51 27 




Antares 


E. 


91 14 8 


89 23 10 


87 32 29 


85 42 6 


18 


Aldebaran 


W. 


103 1 11 


104 47 35 


106 33 35 


108 19 10 




Jupiter 


W. 


99 14 26 


101 1 58 


102 49 8 


104 35 55 




Pollux 


w. 


60 20 10 


62 8 20 


63 56 8 


65 43 33 




Saturn 


w. 


43 55 33 


45 44 27 


47 32 59 


49 21 8 




Regulus 


w. 


23 20 59 


25 9 22 


26 57 24 


28 45 3 




Spica 


E. 


30 45 24 


28 57 18 


27 9 37 


25 22 21 




Antares 


E. 


76 34 54 


74 46 30 


72 58 28 


71 10 50 




Venus 


E. 


112 11 7 


110 30 59 


108 51 12 


107 11 47 


19 


Jupiter 


W. 


113 23 36 . 


115 7 51 


116 51 39 


118 35 




Pollux 


W. 


74 34 44 


76 19 44 


78 4 19 


79 48 28 




Saturn 


W. 


58 15 53 


60 1 35 


61 46 52 


63 31 42 




Regulus 


W. 


37 37 16 


39 22 27 


41 7 14 


42 51 34 


Spica 


E. 


16 33 12 


14 49 2 


13 5 33 


11 22 53 



FEBRUARY, 1859. 



189 





• 


GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAK DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


IIP'. 


VP. 


IXi-. 


Month. 


Position. 


















O i tl 


o / /i 


/ // 


O / // 


19 


Antares 


E. 


69 23 35 


67 36 44 


65 50 17 


64 4 15 




Venus 


E. 


105 32 44 


103 54 4 


102 15 47 


100 37 54 


20 


Pollux 


W. 


81 32 12 


83 15 29 


84 58 20 


86 40 45 




Saturn 


W. 


65 16 7 


67 6 


68 43 38 


70 26 44 




Eegulus 


w. 


44 35 28 


46 18 57 


48 1 59 


49 44 34 




• Antares 


E. 


55 20 27 


53 36 59 


51 53 57 


50 11 22 




Venus 


E. 


92 34 40 


90 59 18 


89 24 21 


87 49 51 




a Aquite 


E. 


106 59 19 


105 32 49 


104 6 27 


102 40 13 




Sun 


E. 


138 55 23 


137 19 26 


135 43 55 


134 8 50 


21 


Pollux 


W. 


95 6 18 


96 46 7 


98 25 29 


100 4 27 




Saturn 


W. 


78 55 40 


80 36 9 


82 16 13 


83 56 51 




Regulus 


w. 


68 11 


59 50 69 


61 30 32 


63 9 40 




Antares 


E. 


41 45 1 


40 5 3 


38 25 30 


36 46 23 




Venus 


E. 


80 3 50 


78 53 56 


77 28 


76 29 25 




a Aquilse 


E. 


95 32 6 


94 7 14 


92 42 41 


91 18 27 




Sun 


E. 


126 19 58 


124 47 30 


123 16 27 


121 43 60 


22 


Saturn 


W. 


92 7 51 


93 45 3 


95 21 52 


96 58 19 




Eegulus 


w. 


71 19 11 


72 55 64 


74 32 14 


76 8 11 




Spica 


w. 


17 24 50 


19 51 


20 36 35 


22 12 1 




Antares 


E. 


28 36 59 


27 18 


25 24 1 


23 48 6 




Venus 


E. 


68 26 


66 31 51 


65 3 40 


63 35 52 




a Aquilse 


E. 


84 22 38 


83 38 


81 39 3 


80 17 54 




Sun 


E. 


114 11 52 


112 42 40 


111 13 51 


109 45 25 


23 


Saturn 


W. 


104 55 10 


106 29 31 


108 3 34 


109 37 17 




Regulus 


w. 


84 2 35 


85 36 28 


87 10 1 


88 43 16 




Spica 


w. 


30 4 39 


31 38 16 


33 11 36 


34 44 38 




Venus 


E. 


56 22 26 


54 56 49 


53 31 32 


52 6 36 




a Aquilse 


E. 


73 39 


7^ 20 40 


71 2 51 


69 46 34 




Sun 


E. 


102 28 33 


101 2 11 


99 36 8 


98 10 24 


24 


Eegulus 


W. 


96 25 12 


97 56 48 


99 28 10 


100 59 17 




Spica 


W. 


42 25 44 


43 57 11 


45 28 25 


46 59 25 




Venus 


E. 


45 6 35 


43 43 29 


42 20 39 


40 68 7 




a Aquilae 


E. 


63 27 32 


62 13 44 


61 35 


59 48 6 




Sun 


E. 


91 6 1 


89 41 65 


88 18 4 


86 54 27 


25 


Spica 


W. 


54 31 25 


56 1 16 


67 30 59 


59 32 




Venus 


E. 


34 9 27 


32 48 31 


31 27 50 


30 7 25 




Sun 


E. 


79 59 28 


78 37 1 


77 14 44 


75 62 36 


26 


Spica 


W. 


66 26 27 


67 55 19 


69 24 6 


70 62 60 




Ajitares 


W. 


20 32 28 


22 1 22 


23 30 11 


24 68 66 




Sun 


E. 


69 3 51 


67 42 26 


66 21 4 


64 59 47 


27 


Spica 


W. 


78 15 38 


79 44 7 


81 12 34 


82 41 1 




Antares 


W. 


32 21 57 


33 50 28 


35 18 58 


36 47 28 




Sun 


E. 


58 14 13 


56 53 12 


56 32 11 


54 11 11 


28 


Spica 


W. 


90 3 30 


91 32 6 


93 44 


94 29 26 




Antares 


W. 


44 10 12 


45 38 50 


47 7 32 


48 36 16 


1- 


Sun 


E. 


47 26 


46 4 52 


44 43 42 


43 22 28 



190 



FEBRUARY, 1859. 







GEEENWIOH 


WF,M^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 








1 


and 




Midnight. 


xv. 


XVIIP'. 


XXP-. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o t It 


a 1 Jt 


/ // 


/ // 


19 


Antares 


E. 


62 18 38 


60 33 26 


58 48 41 


57 4 21 




Venus 


E. 


99 25 


97 23 21 


96 46 42 


94 10 28 


20 


Pollux 


W. 


88 22 44 


90 4 17 


91 45 23 


93 26 4 




Saturn 


W. 


11 9 24 


73 51 37 


75 33 24 


77 14 45 




Regulus 


w. 


51 26 44 


53 8 27 


54 49 44 


56 30 35 




Antares 


E. 


48 29 13 


46 47 31 


45 6 15 


43 25 25 




Venus 


E. 


86 15 46 


84 42 8 


83 8 56 


81 36 10 




a Aquilse 


E. 


101 14 9 


99 48 17 


98 22 38 


96 57 13 




Sun 


E. 


132 34 11 


130 59 69 


129 26 13 


127 62 52 


21 


Pollux 


W. 


101 42 59 


103 21 7 


104 58 50 


106 36 9 




Saturn 


W. 


85 35 4 


87 13 52 


88 62 16 


90 30 15 




Regulus 


w. 


64 48 23 


66 26 42 


68 4 36 


69 42 5 




Antares 


E. 


35 1 41 


33 29 24 


31 51 32 


30 14 3 




Venus 


E. 


V3 58 47 


72 28 35 


70 58 47 


69 29 24 




a Aquilse 


E. 


89 64 33 


88 31 


87 7 50 


86 45 2 




Sun 


E. 


120 12 37 


118 41 49 


117 11 26 


116 41.27 


22 


Saturn 


W. 


98 34 23 


100 10 6 


101 46 28 


103 20 29 




Regulus 


W. 


77 43 46 


79 18 59 


80 63 52 


82 28 24 




Spica 


w. 


23 47 9 


25 21 59 


26 66 31 


28 30 44 




Antares 


E. 


22 12 33 


20 37 23 


19 2 34 


17 28 6 




Venus 


E. 


62 8 27 


60 41 24 


59 14 44 


57 48 24 




a Aquilae 


E. 


78 57 12 


77 36 67 


76 17 9 


74 57 50 




Sun 


E. 


108 17 20 


106 49 37 


106 22 15 


103 65 14 


23 


Saturn 


W. 


111 10 43 


112 43 51 


114 16 42 


115 49 17 




Regulus 


W. 


90 16 13 


91 48 62 


93 21 16 


94 53 21 




Spica 


W. 


36 17 23 


37 49 62 


39 22 4 


40 54 1 




Venus 


E. 


60 41 68 


49 17 40 


47 53 40 


46 29 69 




a Aquilse 


E. 


68 28 49 


67 12 37 


66 57 


64 41 58 




Sun 


E. 


96 44 58 


95 19 49 


93 54 57 


92 30 21 


24 


Regulus 


W. 


102 30 12 


104 53 


105 31 23 


107 1 42 




Spica 


W. 


48 30 12 


50 47 


61 31 11 


63 1 23 




Venus 


E. 


39 36 51 


38 13 61 


36 52 8 


35 30 39 




a Aquilse 


E. 


58 36 19 


57 25 15 


56 14 56 


65 5 24 




Sun 


E. 


85 31 3 


84 7 52 


82 44 63 


81 22 5 


25 


Spica 


W. 


60 29 57 


61 69 16 


63 28 25 


64 57 29 




Venus 


E. 


28 47 17 


27 27 26 


26 7 52 


24 48 38 




Sun 


E. 


74 30 37 


73 8 45 


71 47 


70 26 22 


26 


Spica 


W. 


72 21 29 


73 50 5 


75 18 38 


76 47 9 




Antares 


W. 


26 27 38 


27 56 16 


29 24 62 


30 63 25 




Sun 


E. 


63 38 36 


62 17 26 


60 56 19 


59 35 15 


2-7 


Spica 


W. 


84 9 29 


86 37 57 


87 6 26 


88 34 57 




Antares 


W. 


38 16 69 


39 44 30 


41 13 2 


42 41 36 




Sun 


E. 


52 50 11 


51 29 10 


60 8 8 


48 47 5 


28 


Spica 


W. 


96 58 11 


97 27 1 


98 65 56 


100 24 54 




Antares 


w. 


50 5 5 


61 33 68 


63 2 56 


64 31 57 




Sun 


E. 


42 1 10 


40 39 49 


39 18 23 


37 66 53 



MARCH, 1859. 



191 







GEEEE^WICH 


MEAIST TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


nil'. 


VP. 


IX>. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Spica 


W. 


o / // 

101 53 58 


103° 23 7 


O / // 

,104 62 22 


106° 21 44 




Antares 


W. 


56 1 4 


57 30 17 


58 69 36 


60 29 1 




Son 


E. 


36 35 18 


35 13 37 


33 51 51 


32 29 68 


6 


Sun 


W. 


19 50 30 


21 18 26 


22 46 31 


24 14 50 




Aldebaran 


E. 


63 17 64 


61 44 26 


60 10 52 


58 37 10 




Jupiter 


E. 


67 56 4 


66 21 41 


64 47 9 


63 12 26 




Saturn 


E. 


121 8 32 


119 32 36 


117 56 28 


116 20 10 


7 


Sun 


W. 


31 39 26 


33 8 66 


34 38 38 


36 8 32 




Aldebaran 


E. 


50 47 18 


49 13 7 . 


47 38 64 


46 4 39 




Jupiter 


E. 


55 16 22 


53 40 40 


62 4 48 


50 28 47 




Pollux 


E. 


92 55 59 


91 19 6 


89 42 1 


88 4 44 




Saturn 


E. 


108 15 49 


106 38 23 


105 46 


103 22 57 


8 


Sun 


W. 


43 40 58 


45 12 3 


46 43 19 


48 14 48 




Aldebaran 


E. 


38 13 43 


36 39 48 


35 6 4 


33 32 35 




Jupiter 


E. 


42 26 29 


40 49 36 


39 12 36 


37 35 29 




Pollux 


E. 


79 55 30 


78 17 5 


76 38 28 


74 59 40 




Saturn 


E. 


95 11 3 


93 32 5 


91 52 56 


90 13 35 


9 


Sun 


W. 


55 55 11 


57 27 62 


69 46 


60 33 52 




Mars 


W. 


17 52 12 


19 24 16 


20 66 64 


22 30 3 




Jupiter 


E. 


29"28 38 


27 51 8 


26 13 39 


24 36 15 




Pollux 


E. 


66 42 41 


65 2 42 


63 22 31 


61 42 8 




Saturn 


E. 


81 53 52 


80 13 20 


78 32 35 


76 51 38 




Kegulus 


E. 


103 35 63 


101 55 41 


100 16 16 


98 34 40 


10 


Sun 


W. 


68 22 31 


69 56 54 


71 31 29 


73 6 17 




Mars 


W. 


30 21 63 


31 67 17 


33 32 58 


36 8 68 




a Arietis 


w. 


22 18 14 


23 57 26 


25 37 10 


27 17 23 




Pollux 


E. 


53 17 12 


51 35 37 


49 63 50 


48 11 51 




Saturn 


E. 


68 23 46 


66 41 33 


64 59 8 


63 16 30 




Regulus 


E. 


90 8 28 


88 26 35 


86 44 30 


85 2 11 


11 


Sun 


W. 


81 3 36 


82 39 42 


84 16 2 


86 52 36 




Mars 


W. 


43 13 1 


44 50 37 


46 28 28 


48 6 34 




a Arietis 


W. 


35 44 30 


37 26 67 


39 9 42 


40 62 46 




Pollux 


E. 


39 38 56 


37 55 47 


36 12 27 


34 28 56 




Saturn 


E. 


54 40 6 


62 56 9 


51 12 


49 27 38 




Eegulus 


E. 


76 27 22 


74 43 44 


72 59 53 


71 15 49 


12 


Sun 


W. 


93 58 43 


96 36 36 


97 14 42 


98 53 1 




Mars 


w. 


56 20 44 


58 17 


59 40 4 


61 20 4 




a Arietis 


w. 


49 32 14 


51 16 55 


63 1 61 


54 47 2 




Aldebaran 


w. 


20 18 7 


21 48 24 


23 20 64 


24 55 14 




Saturn 


E. 


40 42 31 


38 56 61 


37 10 58 


35 24 63 




Eegulus 


E. 


62 32 9 


60 46 46 


59 1 8 


57 15 19 


13 


Sun 


W. 


107 7 42 


108 47 15 


110 26 59 


112 6 54 




Mars 


w. 


69 43 24 


71 24 42 


73 6 12 


74 47 64 




a Arietis 


w. 


63 36 26 


65 22 58 


67 9 43 


68 56 41 




Aldebaran 


w. 


33 6 18 


34 47 18 


36 29 


38 11 20 




Jupiter 


w. 


26 17 57 


28 1 63 


29 46 16 


31 31 3 



192 



MARCH, 1859. 







GEEENWICH 


MEAJSr TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Midnight. 


XVi-. 


xvnp. 


XXTi. 


1 


Spica 


w. 


107 61 12 


O I II 

109 20 47 


O 1 II 

110 50 2.8 


O / II 

112 20 17 




Antares 


w. 


61 58 32 


63 28 11 


64 57 57 


66 27 60 




Sun 


E. 


31 8 


29 45 55 


28 23 44 


27 1 25 


6 


Sun 


W. 


25 43 22 


27 12 5 


28 41 


30 10 7 




Aldebaran 


E. 


57 3 22 


55 29 29 


53 55 30 


52 21 26 




Jupiter 


E. 


61 37 33 


60 2 30 


58 27 17 


56 51 54 




Saturn 


E. 


114 43 40 


113 6 59 


111 30 7 


109 53 4 


7 


Sun 


W. 


37 38 38 


39 8 55 


40 39 24 


42 10 5 




Aldebaran 


E. 


44 30 23 


42 56 8 


41 21 55 


39 47 46 




Jupiter 


E. 


48 52 37 


47 16 18 


45 39 50 


44 3 14 




Pollux 


E. 


86 27 16 


84 49 37 


83 11 46 


81 33 44 




Saturn 


E. 


101 44 57 


100 6 46 


98 28 23 


96 49 49 


8 


Sun 


W. 


49 46 28 


51 18 21 


52 50 25 


64 22 42 




Aldebaran 


E. 


31 59 22 


30 26 32 


28 64 11 


27 22 25 




Jupiter 


E. 


35 58 16 


34 20 57 


32 43 34 


31 6 7 




Pollux 


E. 


73 20 39 


71 41 28 


70 2 4 


68 22 29 




Saturn 


E. 


88 34 2 


86 54 18 


85 14 21 


83 34 13 


9 


Sun 


W. 


62 7 11 


63 40 42 


65 14 26 


66 48 22 




Mars 


W. 


24 3 39 


25 37 40 


27 12 4 


28 46 49 




Jupiter 


E. 


22 58 58 


21 21 54 


19 46 7 


18 8 46 




Pollux 


E. 


60 1 33 


58 20 46 


56 39 47 


54 58 36 




Saturn 


E. 


75 10 29 


73 29 7 


71 47 32 


70 5 45 




Eegulus 


E. 


96 53 51 


95 12 49 


93 31 35 


91 60 8 


10 


Sun 


W. 


74 41 18 


76 16 33 


77 52 


79 27 41 




Mars 


W. 


36 45 14 


38 21 47 


. 39 58 35 


41 35 40 




a Arietis 


W. 


28 58 3 


30 39 7 


32 20 34 


34 2 22 




Pollux 


E. 


46 29 39 


44 47 16 


43 4 41 


41 21 54 




Saturn 


E. 


61 33 39 


69 50 35 


58 7 19 


56 23 49 




Eegulus 


E. 


83 19 40 


81 36 55 


79 63 57 


78 10 46 


11 


Sun 


W. 


87 29 23 


89 6 23 


90 43 37 


92 21 4 




Mars 


w. 


49 44 55 


51 23 31 


53 2 21 


54 41 26 




a Arietis 


w. 


42 36 7 


44 19 46 


46 3 39 


47 47 49 




Pollux 


E. 


32 45 15 


31 1 25 


29 17 26 


27 33 18 




Saturn 


E. 


47 43 3 


45 58 14 


44 13 13 


42 27 58 




Regulus 


E. 


69 31 31 


67 47 1 


66 2 16 


64 17 19 


12 


Sun 


W. 


100 31 32 


102 10 16 


103 49 13 


105 28 21 




Mars 


W. 


63 18 


64 40 45 


66 21 25 


68 2 18 




a Arietis 


W. 


56 32 27 


58 18 6 


60 3 69 


61 50 6 




Aldebaran 


w. 


26 31 7 


28 8 21 


29 46 42 


31 26 4 




Saturn 


E. 


33 38 35 


31 52 6 


30 6 24 


28 18 31 




Regulus 


E. 


55 29 17 


63 43 1 


51 56 34 


50 9 54 


IS 


Sun 


W. 


113 47 


115 27 17 


117 7 46 


118 48 22 




Mars 


W. 


76 29 48 


78 11 52 


79 54 7 


81 36 33 




a Arietis 


W. 


70 43 50 


72 31 11 


74 18 42 


76 6 24 




Aldebaran 


W. 


39 54 13 


41 37 37 


43 21 29 


45 6 46 




Jupiter 


W. 


33 16 11 


35 1 38 


36 47 24 


38 33 26 



MARCH, 1859. 



193 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIM"E. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


Illk. 


Vli. 


IXh. 


Month. 


Position. 


















/ // 


o J n 


o / // 


O / // 


13 


Regains 


E. 


48 23 1 


46 35 57 


44 48 42 


43 1 14 




Spica 


E. 


102 24 45 


100 37 46 


98 50 35 


97 3 12 


U 


Sun 


W. 


120 29 8 


122 10 4 


123 61 8 


125 32 20 




Mars 


W. 


83 19 8 


85 1 53 


86 44 47 


88 27 49 




o Arietis 


w. 


11 54 16 


79 42 18 


81 30 29 


83 18 49 




Aldebaran 


w. 


46 50 26 


48 35 28 


50 20 50 


52 6 29 




Jupiter 


w. 


40 19 43 


42 6 15 


43 53 


45 39 57 




Eegulus 


E. 


84 1 18 


32 12 49 


30 24 12 


28 36 26 




Spica 


E. 


88 3 36 


86 15 12 


84 26 39 


82 37 57 


15 


Mars 


W. 


91 4 49 


98 48 30 


100 32 16 


102 16 5 




Aldebaran 


w. 


60 58 31 


62 45 30 


64 32 39 


66 19 66 




Jupiter 


w. 


54 31 12 


56 26 4 


58 13 1 


60 1 3 




Pollux 


w. 


\1 45 43 


19 33 12 


21 21 5 


23 9 17 




Spica 


E. 


73 32 40 


71 43 19 


69 53 53 


68 4 24 


16 


Mars 


W. 


110 55 40 


112 39 36 


114 23 29 


116 7 21 




Aldebaran 


W. 


15 17 42 


77 5 25 


78 53 8 


80 40 60 




Jupiter 


w. 


69 2 7 


70 50 24 


72 38 40 


74 26 55 




Pollux 


w. 


32 13 1 


34 2 4 


35 51 9 


37 40 16 




Spica 


E. 


58 56 27 


57 6 60 


66 17 16 


53 27 43 




Antares 


E. 


104 48 30 


102 58 47 


101 9 6 


99 19 27 


11 


Aldebaran 


W. 


89 38 40 


91 25 68 


93 13 9 


95 11 




Jupiter 


w. 


83 27 17 


85 16 5 


87 2 46 


88 50 18 




Pollux 


w. 


46 45 24 


48 37 14 


50 22 57 


52 11 33 




Saturn 


w. 


31 47 41 


33 32 3 


35 26 18 


37 15 25 




Spica 


E. 


44 21 2 


42 32 


40 43 7 


38 64 22 




Antares 


E. 


90 12 8 


88 22 57 


86 33 54 


84 44 69 


18 


Jupiter 


W. 


97 45 25 


99 31 49 


101 18 


103 3 66 




Pollux 


W. 


61 12 13 


62 59 47 


64 47 7 


66 34 14 




Saturn 


W. 


46 18 30 


48 6 32 


49 54 20 


61 41 53 




Eegulus 


W. 


24 13 5 


26 64 


27 48 28 


29 36 49 




Antares 


E. 


75 42 57 


73 55 9 


72 7 34 


70 20 14 


19 


Pollux 


W. 


75 25 55 


77 11 24 


78 56 35 


80 41 27 




Saturn 


W. 


60 35 43 


62 21 38 


64 7 13 


66 52 30 




Eegulus 


W. 


38 28 33 


40 14 14 


41 59 36 


43 44 40 




Antares 


E. 


61 27 31 


59 41 50 


67 56 28 


66 11 25 




a Aquilse 


E. 


112 2 31 


110 36 19 


109 7 59 


107 40 34 


20 


Pollux 


W. 


89 20 48 


91 3 37 


92 46 6 


94 28 12 




Saturn 


W. 


74 33 62 


76 17 6 


77 59 57 


79 42 27 




Eegulus 
Antares 


W. 


52 24 57 


54 7 58 


55 50 37 


57 32 55 




E. 


47 31 9 


45 48 9 


44 5 30 


42 23 13 




a Aquilse 


E. 


100 23 36 


98 56 29 


97 29 32 


96 2 47 




Venus 


E. 


114 10 18 


112 35 38 


111 1 20 


109 27 23 

1 


21 


Saturn 


W. 


88 9 22 


89 49 37 


91 29 30 


93 9 




Eegulus 
Antares 


w. 


66 58 49 


67 38 52 


69 18 33 


70 57 52 




E. 


33 57 23 


32 17 21 


30 37 41 


28 68 24 




a Aquilse 


E. 


88 52 48 


87 27 43 


86 3 


84 38 39 




13 













194 



MARCH, 1859. 



GREENWICH MEAlf Tl^rF,. 










LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 








Day of 

the 


Star's I^ame 












and 




Midnight. 


XVi-. 


XTIIP. 


XXT*. 




Month. 


Position. 




















O / // 


O J /I 


O / // 


O / // 




13 


Eegulus 


E. 


41 13 36 


39 26 47 


37 37 47 


35 49 37 






Spica 


E. 


95 16 38 


93 27 63 


91 39 57 


89 61 62 




14 


Sun 


W. 


127 13 40 


128 65 7 


130 36 40 


132 18 19 






Mars 


W. 


90 10 69 


91 54 17 


93 37 41 


96 21 12 






a Arietis 


W. 


85 1 17 


86 65 63 


88 44 35 


90 33 24 






Aldebaran 


w. 


53 52 26 


65 38 37 


57 25 3 


59 11 41 






Jupiter 


w. 


47 27 5 


49 14 23 


61 1 61 


52 49 28 






Regulus 


E. 


26 46 32 


24 57 31 


23 8 22 


2119 8 






Spica 


E, 


80 49 7 


79 10 


77 11 6 


75 21 56 




15 


Mars 


W. 


103 59 67 


105 48 52 


107 27 47 


109 11 44 






Aldebaran 


W. 


68 7 20 


69 54 49 


71 42 24 


73 30 2 






Jupiter 


W. 


61 49 10 


63 37 21 


66 26 35 


67 13 50 






Pollux 


W. 


24 57 43 


26 46 21 


28 35 ,1 


30 24 1 






Spica 


E. 


66 14 62 


64 25 17 


62 35 41 


60 46 4 




16 


Mars 


W. 


117 51 8 


119 34 52 


121 18 30 


123 2 2 






Aldebaran 


W. 


82 28 31 


84 16 10 


86 3 44 


87 61 15 






Jupiter 


w. 


76 16 7 


78 3 17 


79 61 22 


81 39 22 






Pollux 


w. 


39 29 22 


41 18 28 


43 7 30 


44 66 29 






Spica 


E. 


61 38 13 


49 48 47 


47 59 26 


46 10 11 






Antares 


E. 


97 29 60 


96 40 17 


93 50 49 


92 1 25 




17 


Aldebaran 


W. 


96 47 3 


98 33 46 


100 20 16 


102 6 34 






Jupiter 


W. 


90 37 41 


92 24 64 


94 11 56 


95 58 47 






Pollux 


w. 


64 1 


66 48 20 


57 36 29 


59 24 26 






Saturn 


w. 


39 4 23 


40 53 12 


42 41 49 


44 30 16 






Spica 


E. 


37 6 48 


35 17 24 


33 29 12 


31 41 14 






Antares 


E. 


82 56 13 


81 7 37 


79 19 12 


77 30 59 




18 


Jupiter 


W. 


104 49 37 


106 36 1 


108 20 9 


110 4 59 






Pollux 


W. 


68 21 6 


70 4 43 


71 54 4 


73 40 8 






Saturn 


W. 


53 29 12 


55 16 16 


57 3 1 


58 49 31 






Eegulus 


w. 


31 22 64 


33 9 44 


34 56 17 


36 42 34 






Antares 


E. 


68 33 9 


66 46 19 


64 59 46 


63 13 30 




19 


Pollux 


W. 


82 25 69 


84 10 12 


86 64 5 


87 37 37 






Saturn 


W. 


67 37 27 


69 22 4 


71 6 21 


72 60 17 






Regulus 


W. 


46 29 24 


47 13 48 


48 67 52 


60 41 36 






Antares 


E. 


54 26 41 


62 42 17 


50 68 13 


49 14 31 






a AquUsB 


E. 


106 13 6 


104 46 38 


103 18 13 


101 50 61 




20 


Pollux 


W. 


96 9 56 


97 51 18 


99 32 18 


101 12 65 






Saturn 


W. 


81 24 35 


83 6 20 


84 47 43 


86 28 44 






Regulus 


w. 


59 14 60 


60 66 23 


62 37 34 


64 18 23 






Antares 


E. 


40 41 19 


38 59 46 


37 18 36 


35 37 48 






a Aquilae 


E. 


94 36 16 


93 9 58 


91 43 67 


90 18 13 






Venus 


E. 


107 53 49 


106 20 36 


104 47 45 


103 15 17 




21 


Saturn 


W. 


94 48 8 


96 26 53 


98 5 16 


99 43 16 






Regulus 


W. 


72 36 47 


74 15 21 


76 53 32 


77 31 22 






Antares 


E. 


27 19 29 


25 40 67 


24 2 48 


22 25 






a Aquilae 


E. 


83 14 41 


81 61 8 


80 28 1 


79 6 20 











MARCH, 1859. 




195 






GKEENWIOH 


MEATiT TIME. 




LtlNAB DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


nil". 


VIi. 


VL\ 


Month. 


Position. 












21 


Venus 


E. 


101 43 li' 


o / // 

100 11 28 


o / // 

98 40 7 


/ // 

97 9 9 


22 


Saturn 


W. 


101 20 55 


102 58 12 


104 36 7 


106 11 41 




Eegulus 


W. 


79 8 49 


80 45 55 


82 22 39 


83 59 2 




Spica 


W. 


25 11 20 


26 48 5 


28 24 31 


30 88 




a Aquilse 


E. 


11 43 1 


76 21 22 


76 7 


73 39 23 




Venus 


E. 


89 39 51 


88 11 6 


86 42 40 


85 14 37 




Sun ' 


E. 


134 11 16 


132 41 46 


131 12 37 


129 43 49 


23 


Eegulus 


W. 


91 55 49 


93 30 11 


95 4 16 


96 38 




Spica 


W. 


37 56 22 


39 30 34 


41 4 29 


42 38 5 




a Aquilse 


E. 


67 3 59 


65 46 42 


64 30 3 


63 14 3 




Venus 


E. 


77 69 30 


76 83 28 


75 7 44 


73 42 20 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


90 4 39 


88 36 44 


87 9 6 


86 41 47 




Sun 


E. 


122 24 50 


120 58 1 


119 31 30 


118 5 18 


24 


Eegulus 


W. 


104 22 24 


105 64 29 


107 26 18 


108 57 63 




Spica 


w. 


50 21 54 


51 63 62 


53 25 35 


54 57 5 




a Aquilse 


E. 


57 4 57 


65 53 30 


54 42 54 


63 33 12 




Venus 


E. 


66 39 36 


65 15 58 


63 62 24 


62 29 10 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


78 29 48 


77 4 20 


76 39 10 


74 14 19 




Sun 


E. 


110 58 33 


109 34 1 


108 9 43 


106 45 40 


25 


Spica 


W. 


62 31 15 


64 1 30 


65 31 36 


67 1 29 




Antares 


W. 


16 37 11 


18 7 27 


19 37 34 


21 7 81 




Venus 


E. 


55 36 18 


54 14 20 


62 62 32 


61 30 64 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


67 14 49 


65 51 62 


64 29 16 


63 7 




Sun 


E. 


99 48 42 


98 25 53 


97 3 16 


95 40 48 


26 


Spica 


W. 


74 28 56 


75 58 4 


77 27 6 


78 56 4 




Antares 


W. 


28 35 9 


30 4 20 


31 33 26 


33 2 26 




Venus 


E. 


44 44 55 


43 24 6 


42 3 21 


40 42 42 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


56 20 54 


65 48 


63 41 7 


52 21 50 




Sun 


E. 


88 50 39 


87 28 59 


86 7 25 


84 45 66 


27 


Spica 


W. 


86 19 54 


87 48 33 


89 17 11 


90 46 49 




Antares 


W. 


40 '26 30 


41 65 12 


48 23 53 


44 62 34 




Venus 


E. 


34 25 


32 40 5 


31 19 46 


29 69 28 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


45 52 37 


44 36 24 


43 20 49 


42 5 66 




Sun 


E. 


77 69 28 


76 38 18 


75 17 9 


78 66 


28 


Spica 


W. 


98 9 12 


99 38 


101 6 51 


102 36 46 




Antares 


W. 


52 16 18 


63 45 4 


65 13 58 


66 42 57 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


36 4 1 


34 54 44 


33 46 44 


32 40 9 




Sun 


E. 


87 10 6 


65 48 49 


64 27 29 


63 6 6 


29 


Antares 


W, 


64 9 8 


66 38 42 


67 8 23 


68 88 13 




Sun 


E. 


56 17 62 


64 66 66 


63 33 51 


62 11 39 


30 


Antares 


W. 


76 9 36 


77 40 22 


79 11 20 


80 42 29 




Sun 


E. 


45 18 38 


43 65 34 


42 32 21 


41 8 67 


31 


Antares 


W. 


88 21 13 


89 53 36 


91 26 12 


92 69 2 




a Aquilse 


W. 


44 64 14 


46 56 34 


47 21 


48 6 30 




Sun 


E. 


34 9 23 


32 44 66 


31 20 19 


29 56 81 



196 



MARCH, 1859. 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 




Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Midnight. 


XVi. 


XVIIP-. 


XXR 


21 


Venus 


E. 


O / // 

95 38 33 


o / n 

94 8 19 


o / // 

92 88 27 


o / // 

91 8 58 


22 


Satum 


W. 


107 47 64 


109 23 46 


110 59 18 


112 34 29 




Eegulus 


W. 


85 35 4 


87 10 46 


88 46 7 


90 21 8 




Spica 


W. 


31 36 25 


38 11 53 


84 47 1 


86 21 51 




a Aquilse 


E. 


72 19 11 


70 59 81 


69 40 25 


68 21 54 




Venus 


E. 


83 46 55 


82 19 84 


80 52 83 


79 25 61 




Sun 


E. 


128 15 21 


126 47 13 


125 19 26 


128 51 58 


23 


Eegulus 


W. 


98 11 27 


99 44 36 


101 17 29 


102 50 5 




Spica 


W. 


44 11 24 


45 44 26 


47 17 11 


48 49 40 




a Aquilse 


E. 


61 58 45 


60 44 10 


69 30 19 


58 17 14 




Venus 


E. 


72 17 13 


70 52 24 


69 27 61 


68 8 36 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


84 14 47 


82 48 4 


81 21 40 


79 65 35 




SnN 


E. 


116 39 23 


115 13 46 


113 48 25 


112 23 21 


24 


Regulus 


W. 


110 29 14 


112 21 


118 81 16 


115 1 58 




Spica 


W. 


56 28 20 


57 59 22 


59 30 12 


61 49 




a Aquilae 


E. 


52 24 27 


51 16 42 


50 9 59 


49 4 20 




Venus 


E. 


61 6 9 


59 43 28 


68 20 49 


56 68 28 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


72 49 47 


71 25 84 


70 1 39 


68 38 4 




Sun 


E. 


105 21 51 


103 58 15 


102 34 52 


101 11 41 : 


25 


Spica 


W. 


68 31 15 


70 52 


71 80 20 


72 59 41 




Antares 


W. 


22 37 18 


24 6 57 


25 86 28 


27 5 52 




■ Venus 


E. 


50 9 26 


48 48 6 


47 26 55 


46 6 52 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


61 45 4 


60 28 29 


59 2 15 


57 41 23 




Sun 


E. 


94 18 30 


92 56 21 


91 84 20 


90 12 26 


26 


Spica 


W. 


80 24 56 


81 53 45 


88 22 31 


84 51 13 




Antares 


W. 


84 31 21 


86 12 


87 29 1 


38 67 47 




Venus 


E. 


39 22 7 


88 1 37 


86 41 10 


35 20 47 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


51 3 


49 44 38 


48 26 46 


47 9 25 




Sun 


E. 


83 24 31 


82 3 11 


80 41 64 


79 20 40 


27 


Spica 


W. 


92 14 27 


98 43 6 


95 11 46 


96 40 28 




Antares 


w. 


46 21 15 


47 49 57 


49 18 41 


50 47 26 




Venus 


E. 


28 89 9 


27 18 50 


25 58 29 


24 38 7 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


40 51 47 


39 38 26 


88 25 58 


37 14 28 




Sun 


E. 


72 34 52 


71 13 43 


69 62 32 


68 81 20 


28 


Spica 


W. 


104 4 45 


105 33 50 


107 3 


108 32 17 




Antares 


W. 


58 12 


59 41 8 


61 10 22 


62 39 42 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


31 35 8 


30 31 52 


29 30 38 


28 31 23 




Sdn 


E. 


61 44 87 


60 28 4 


59 1 26 


67 39 42 


29 


Antares 


W. 


70 8 11 


71 38 18 


78 8 34 


74 39 




Sun 


E. 


50 49 20 


49 26 58 


48 4 17 


46 41 32 


30 


Antares 


W. 


82 13 49 


83 45 21 


85 17 6 


86 49 3 




Sun 


E. 


89 45 28 


38 21 39 


36 67 44 


36 33 39 


81 


Antares 


W. 


94 32 5 


96 5 28 


97 88 65 


99 12 41 




a Aquilse 


w. 


49 11 57 


50 19 36 


61 28 26 


52 88 20 




Sun 


E. 


28 30 38 


27 5 26 


25 40 9 


24 14 44 



APRIL, 1859. 



197 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TiiiE. 






LUNAE DISTANCES. 


i 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


III''. 


VIK 


IXK 




Month. 


Position. 














6 


Sun 


W. 


26 6 23 


o / // 

27 33 43 


O / // 

29 7 18 


O / // 

30 41 9 






Jupiter 


E. 


36 20 30 


34 41 16 


33 1 58 


31 22 36 






Pollux 


E. 


70 8 6 


68 26 41 


66 45 6 


65 3 21 






Saturn 


E. 


84 36 17 


82 54 40 


81 12 51 


79 30 52 






Regulus 


E. 


lOV 1 25 


106 19 48 


103 37 59 


101 55 59 




6 


Sun 


W. 


38 33 44 


40 8 51 


41 44 9 


43 19 37 






Pollux 


E. 


56 32 9 


54 49 27 


53 6 38 


51 23 40 






Saturn 


E. 


10 58 24 


69 15 26 


67 32 19 


65 49 4 






Eegulus 


E. 


93 23 29 


91 40 30 


89 57 23 


88 14 6 




Y 


Sun 


W. 


51 19 21 


52 55 44 


54 32 15 


56 8 53 






Mars 


W. 


21 3 44 


22 40 10 


24 17 1 


25 54 13 






Pollux 


E. 


42 47 6 


41 3 28 


39 19 45 


37 35 57 






Saturn 


E. 


57 10 44 


55 26 41 


53 42 31 


51 58 15 






Regulus 


E. 


79 35 38 


77 51 33 


76 7 21 


74 23 2 




8 


Sun 


W. 


64 13 53 


65 51 13 


67 28 39 


69 6 11 






Mars 


W. 


34 4 22 


35 43 2 


37 21 53 


39 53 






Aldebaran 


W. 


17 38 20 


19 3 46 


20 32 12 


22 3 2 






Pollux 


E. 


28 56 9 


27 12 7 


25 28 7 


23 44 9 






Saturn 


E. 


43 15 14 


41 30 20 


39 45 21 


38 16 






Kegulus 


E. 


65 39 46 


63 54 48 


62 9 45 


60 24 36 




9 


Sun 


W. 


77 15 10 


78 53 13 


80 31 20 


82 9 32 






Mars 


W. 


47 17 58 


48 57 44 


50 37 37 


52 17 36 






Aldebaran 


W. 


30 52 


31 39 35 


33 19 


84 59 2 






Jupiter 


W. 


19 21 47 


21 2 39 


22 44 7 


24 26 2 






Saturn 


E. 


29 13 42 


27 28 10 


25 42 35 


23 56 66 






Regulus 


E. 


51 37 33 


49 51 54 


48 6 11 


46 20 23 






Spica 


E. 


105 39 34 


103 54 


102 8 20 


100 22 37 




10 


Sun 


W. 


90 21 28 


92 2 


93 38 39 


95 17 18 






Mars 


W. 


60 38 46 


62 19 14 


63 59 45 


65 40 21 






Aldebaran 


w. 


43 26 7 


45 8 35 


46 51 19 


48 34 18 






Jupiter 


w. 


33 25 


34 43 59 


36 27 42 


38 11 33 






Regulus 


E. 


37 30 26 


35 44 17 


33 58 4 


32 11 48 






Spica 


E. 


91 33 


89 46 54 


88 45 


86 14 33 




11 


Sun 


W. 


103 31 10 


105 10 1 


106 48 54 


108 27 47 






Mars 


w. 


74 4 3 


75 44 65 


77 25 48 


79 6 43 






Aldebaran 


w. 


57 12 1 


58 56 1 


60 40 7 


62 24 20 






Jupiter 
Pollux 


w. 


46 62 30 


48 36 57 


50 21 28 


52 6 1 






w. 


14 3 41 


15 46 58 


17 30 54 


19 15 18 






Spica 


E. 


77 22 57 


75 36 32 


73 50 6 


72 3 38 




12 


Sun 


W. 


116 42 17 


118 21 9 


120 


121 38 49 






Mars 


W. 


87 31 32 


89 12 30 


90 53 28 


92 34 24 






Aldebaran 


W. 


71 6 31 


72 51 6 


74 36 42 


76 20 20 






Jupiter 
Pollux 


W. 


60 49 24 


62 34 7 


64 18 62 


66 3 36 






W. 


28 1 22 


29 47 2 


31 32 47 


33 18 36 






Spica 
Antares 


E. 


63 11 12 


61 24 44 


59 38 16 


57 61 50 






E. 


109 3 19 


107 16 45 


105 30 12 


103 43 40 



198 






APR] 


L, 1859. 






GEEENWICH MEAN TIME. 








LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVb. 


XVIIIi. ■ 


XXTi. 


Month. 


Position 


















O / II 


o / // 


I il 


o / y/ 


5 


Sun 


W. 


32 16 14 


33 49 33 


35 24 4 


36 58 48 




Jupiter 


E. 


29 43 12 


28 3 49 


26 24 28 


24 45 11 




Pollux 


E. 


63 21 25 


61 39 20 


69 67 5 


58 14 41 




Saturn 


E. 


11 48- 42 


76 6 22 


74 23 53 


72 41 13 




Regulus 


E. 


100 13 49 


98 31 29 


96 48 59 


95 6 19 


6 


Susr 


W. 


44 55 16 


46 31 4 


48 7 1 


49 43 7 




Pollux 


E. 


49 40 35 


47 57 22 


46 14 3 


44 30 37 




Saturn 


E. 


64 5 40 


62 22 8 


60 38 27 


58 54 39 




Eegulus 


E. 


86 30 40 


84 47 7 


83 3 25 


81 19 35 


1 


SXTN 


W. 


57 45 39 


59 22 33 


60 69 33 


62 36 40 




Mars 


W. 


27 31 45 


29 9 33 


30 47 36 


32 26 53 




Pollux 


E. 


35 52 5 


34 8 10 


32 24 11 


30 40 10 




Saturn 


E. 


50 13 51 


48 29 21 


46 44 45 


45 3 




Regulus 


E. 


72 38 35 


70 54 2 


69 9 23 


67 24 37 


8 


Sun 


W. 


70 43 48 


72 21 31 


73 69 19 


75 37 12 




Mars 


W. 


40 40 2 


42 19 20 


43 68 45 


46 38 18 




Aldebaran 


w. 


23 35 51 


25 10 18 


26 46 5 


28 23 




Pollux 


E. 


22 17 


20 16 34 


18 33 3 


16 49 49 




Saturn 


E. 


36 15 7 


34 29 52 


32 44 33 


30 59 10 




Regulus 


E. 


58 39 21 


56 54 2 


65 8 37 


63 23 7 


9 


Sun 


W. 


83 47 48 


85 26 7 


87 4 31 


88 42 68 




Mars 


w. 


53 57 40 


56 37 49 


67 18 3 


58 58 23 




Aldebaran 


w. 


36 39 36 


38 20 39 


40 2 7 


41 43 57 




Jupiter 


w. 


26 8 21 


27 50 59 


29 33 54 


31 17 3 




Saturn 


E. 


22 11 15 


20 25 30 


18 39 44 


16 53 67 




Regulus 


E. 


44 34 31 


42 48 35 


41 2 36 


39 16 33 




Spica 


E. 


98 36 49 


96 60 57 


95 6 2 


93 19 3 


10 


Sun 


W. 


96 56 


,98 34 45 


100 13 31 


101 52 20 




Mars 


W. 


67 21 


69 1 41 


70 42 26 


72 23 13 




Aldebaran 


w. 


50 17 29 


52 52 


53 44 26 


65 28 10 




Jupiter 


w. 


39 55 32 


41 39 38 


43 23 61 


45 8 8 




Regulus 


E. 


30 26 30 


28 39 9 


26 52 46 


26 6 21 




Spica 


E. 


84 28 18 


82 42 1 


80 55 42 


79 9 20 


11 


Sun 


W. 


110 6 41 


111 45 35 


113 24 30 


115 3 24 1 




Mars 


W. 


80 47 40 


82 28 37 


84 9 36 


85 60 34 




Aldebaran 


W. 


64 8 38 


65 53 1 


67 37 28 


69 21 58 




Jupiter 


w. 


53 50 38 


55 36 17 


57 19 68 


59 4 40 




Pollux 


w. 


21 4 


22 45 7 


24 30 23 


26 15 49 




Spica 


E. 


70 17 10 


68 30 41 


66 44 11 


64 57 42 


12 


Sun 


W. 


123 17 35 


124 66 20 


126 35 1 


128 13 38 




Mars 


W. 


94 15 20 


95 66 13 


97 37 5 


99 17 54 




Aldebaran 


W. 


78 4 68 


79 49 35 


81 34 12 


83 18 48 




Jupiter 


W. 


67 48 19 


69 33 2 


71 17 43 


73 2 22 




Pollux 


w. 


35 4 27 


36 50 19 


38 36 13 


40 22 7 




Spica 


E. 


56 5 25 


64 19 2 


52 32 41 


50 46 23 




Antares 


E. 


101 57 10 


100 10 41 


98 24 14- 


96 37 49 



APRIL, 1859. 



199 







GEEEWWiCH 


MEAN" TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the- 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


Illk. 


VIi". 


IXi. 


Month. 


Position. 












13 


Mars 


W. 


/ // 

100 58 39 


o / // 

102 39 22 


O / // 

104 20 1 


O / // 

106 36 




Aldebaran 


W. 


85 3 22 


86 47 53 


88 32 21 


90 16 46 




Jupiter 


W. 


74 46 58 


76 31 32 


78 16 3 


80 31 




Pollux 


W. 


42 8 


43 53 52 


45 39 42 


47 25 30 




Saturn 


W. 


2V 28 54 


29 15 2 


31 1 7 


32 47 9 




Spica 


E. 


49 8 


47 13 57 


46 27 49 


43 41 46 




Antares 


E. 


94 51 27 


93 5 8 


91 18 53 


89 32 42 


14 


Aldebaran 


W. 


98 57 33 


100 41 22 


102 25 4 


104 8 37 




Jupiter 


W. 


88 41 36 


90 25 32 


92 9 21 


93 53 2 




Pollux 


w. 


56 13 32 


57 58 54 


59 44 9 


61 29 18 




Saturn 


w. 


41 36 7 


43 21 38 


45 7 1 


46 52 18 




Regulus 


w. 


19 13 27 


20 59 5 


22 44 36 


24 30 




Spica 


E. 


34 52 55 


33 7 29 


31 22 11 


29 37 2 




Antares 


E. 


80 42 69 


78 57 20 


77 11 47 


75 26 22 


15 


Jupite-r 


W. 


102 29 21 


104 12 8 


105 54 44 


107 37 9 




Pollux 


w. 


70 13 3 


71 57 21 


73 41 39 


75 25 26 




Saturn 


w. 


55 36 35 


57 20 59 


59 5 11 


60 49 14 




Eegulus 


w. 


33 14 56 


34 59 28 


36 43 49 


38 27 59 




Antares 


E. 


66 41 23 


64 56 51 


63 12 30 


61 28 19 




a Aquilse 


E, 


116 19 49 


114 54 45 


113 29 20 


112 3 37 


16 


Pollux 


W. 


84 2 18 


85 45 3 


87 27 33 


89 9 60 




Saturn 


W. 


69 26 25 


71 9 13 


72 51 47 


74 34 7 




Eegulus 


w. 


47 5 53 


48 48 50 


50 31 33 


52 14 2 




Antares 


E. 


52 50 25 


51 7 28 


49 24 45 


47 42 17 




a Aquilse 


E. 


104 52 2 


103 25 24 


101 68 44 


100 32 5 


11 


Pollux 


W. 


97 37 32 


99 ;8 17 


100 68 47 


102 39 




Saturn 


w. 


83 2 4 


84 42 52- 


86 23 26 


88 3 40 




Eegulus 


w. 


60 42 44 


62 23 42 


64 4 24 


65 44 49 




Antares 


E. 


39 13 35 


37 32 37 


35 61 56 


34 11 31 




a Aquilse 


E. 


93 20 1 


91 54 2 


90 28 15 


89 2 41 


18 


Saturn 


W. 


96 20 44 


97 59 17 


99 37 32 


101 16 29 




Eegulus 


w. 


74 2 42 


75 41 25 


77 19 51 


78 67 58 




Spica 


w. 


20 5 56 


21 44 9 


23 22 8 


24 59 63 




a Aquilse 


E. 


81 59 2 


80 35 17 


79 11 55 


77 48 57 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


106 44 36 


105 13 17 


103 42 7 


102 11 9 


19 


Saturn 


W. 


109 20 49 


110 57 


112 32 53 


114 8 28 




Eegulus 
Spica _ 
a Aquilae 


W. 


87 4 12 


88 40 34 


90 16 38 


91 52 25 




W. 


33 4 44 


34 40 53 


36 16 46 


37 52 23 




E. 


71- 49 


69 40 41 


68 21 6 


67 2 6 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


94 39 20 


93 9 41 


91 40 16 


90 11 7 




Venus, 


E. 


113 27 25 


111 59 51 


110 32 35 


109 5 36 


20 


Eegulus 
Spica 
a Aquilse 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


99 47 2 


101 21 7 


102 54 56 


104 28 29 




W. 


45 46 18 


47 20 16 


48 53 59 


50 27 26 




E. 


60 36 37 


59 21 37 


58 7 24 


56 53 59 




E. 


82 49 31 


81 22 4 


79 54 66 


78 28 6 




Venus 


E. 


101 55 


100 29 44 


99 4 44 


97 39 59 




a Pegasi 


E. 


104 42 51 


103 13 16 


101 43 63 


100 14 42 



200 



APRIL, 1859. 





GREENWICH MEAN TIME. 








LUNAE 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVh. 


XTIHi". 


XXH. 


Month. 


Position 












13 


Mars 


W. 


o / // 

107 41 6 


O / // 

109 21 32 


O 1 f/ 

111 1 51 


o / // 

112 42 5 




Aldebaran 


W. 


92 1 6 


93 45 22 


95 29 32 


97 13 36 




Jupiter 


W. 


81 44 54 


83 29 13 


85 13 26 


86 57 34 




Pollux 


W. 


49 11 15 


50 56 56 


52 42 33 


64 28 5 




Saturn 


W. 


34 33 Y 


36 19 


38 4 48 


39 50 31 




Spica 


E. 


41 55 48 


40 9 55 


38 24 9 


36 38 28 




Antares 


E. 


87 46 35 


86 32 


84 14 35 


82 28 44 


14 


Aldebaran 


W. 


105 52 1 


107 35 15 


109 18 18 


111 1 10 




Jupiter 


W. 


95 36 35 


97 20 1 


99 3 17 


100 46 24 




Pollux 


W. 


63 14 19 


64 59 13 


66 43 68 


68 28 35 




Saturn' 


W. 


48 37 27 


50 22 27 


52 7 19 


63 52 2 




Regulus 


W. 


26 15 16 


28 25 


29 45 24 


31 30 15 




Spica 


E. 


27 52 3 


26 7 14 


24 22 36 


22 38 11 




Antares 


E. 


73 41 6 


71 65 56 


70 10 66 


68 26 5 


15 


Jupiter 


W. 


109 19 22 


111 1 23 


112 43 11 


114 24 46 




Pollux 


W. 


77 9 12 


78 52 47 


80 36 10 


82 19 20 




Saturn 


w. 


62 33 4 


64 16 43 


66 10 


67 43 24 




Kegulus 


w. 


40 11 58 


41 55 46 


43 39 21 


45 22 44 




Antares 


E. 


59 44 20 


58 33 


56 16 58 


54 33 35 




a Aquilae 


E. 


110 37 39 


109 11 27 


107 45 6 


106 18 37 


16 


Pollux 


W. 


90 51 53 


92 33 40 


94 15 13 


95 56 30 




Saturn 


W. 


76 16 13 


77 58 4 


79 39 39 


81 21 




Regulus 


W. 


53 56 16 


55 38 16 


67 20 1 


59 1 30 




Antares 


E. 


46 2 


44 18 2 


42 36 18 


40 54 49 




a Aquilse 


E. 


99 5 29 


97 38 57 


96 12 30 


94 46 11 


IT 


Pollux 


W. 


104 18 56 


105 58 35 


107 37 56 


109 17 1 




Saturn 


W. 


89 43 39 


91 23 21 


93 2 46 


94 41 54 




Regulus 


W. 


67 24 58 


69 4 50 


70 44 25 


72 23 42 




Antares 


E. 


32 31 23 


30 61 31 


29 11 57 


27 32 40 




a Aquilse 


E. 


87 37 22 


86 12 19 


84 47 34 


83 23 8 


18 


Saturn 


W. 


102 53 9 


104 30 31 


106 7 34 


107 44 21 




Regulus 


w. 


80 36 48 


82 13 21 


83 60 36 


85 27 33 




Spica 


w. 


26 37 22 


28 14 37 


29 51 35 


31 28 18 




a Aquilse 


E. 


76 26 24 


75 4 17 


73 42 38 


72 21 28 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


100 40 21 


99 9 46 


97 39 24 


96 9 15 


19 


Saturn 


W. 


115 43 46 


117 18 47 


118 53 30 


120 27 67 




Regulus 


W. 


93 27 54 


95 3 6 


96 38 2 


98 12 40 




Spica 


w. 


39 27 43 


41 2 46 


42 37 33 


44 12 3 




a Aquilse 


E. 


65 43 42 


64 25 65 


63 8 48 


61 62 21 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


88 42 14 


87 13 37 


85 45 17 


84 17 15 




Venus 


E. 


107 38 55 


106 12 31 


104 46 24 


103 20 34 


20 


Regulus 


W. 


106 1 47 


107 34 49 


109 7 36 


110 40 9 




Spica 


W. 


52 37 


53 33 34 


65 6 16 


66 38 43 




a Aquilse 


E. 


55 41 25 


54 29 44 


53 19 


52 9 14 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


77 1 35 


75 35 23 


74 9 31 


72 43 58 




Venus 


E. 


96 15 31 


94 61 18 


93 27 21 


92 3 38 


i a X^egasi 


E. 


98 45 43 


97 16 66 


95 48 23 


94 20 2 



APRIL, 1859. 



201 





GEEENWICH 


MEA-N" TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 
the 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


IIP'. 


Vli. 


IXk. 


Month. 


Position. 


















t II 


/ u 


o / // 


o / // 


21 


Spica 


w. 


58 10 56 


59 42 56 


61 14 42 


62 46 15 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


Tl 18 46 


69 53 64 


68 29 23 


67 5 13 




Venus 


E. 


90 40 10 


89 16 56 


87 53 56 


86 31 9 




a Pearasi 


E. 


92 51 53 


91 23 57 


89 56 14 


88 28 43 




Sun 


E. 


130 32 58 


129 8 39 


127 44 33 


126 20 39 


22 


Spica 


W. 


no 20 68 


71 61 22 


73 21 36 


74 51 40 




Antares 


"W. 


24 27 11 


25 57 38 


27 27 55 


28 58 2 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


60 9 56 


58 48 2 


57 26 34 


56 5 31 




Venus 


E. 


79 40 23 


78 18 48 


76 57 24 


75 36 9 




a Pegasi 


E. 


81 14 16 


79 47 58 


78 21 63 


76 56 




Sun 


E. 


119 24 


118 1 12 


116 38 33 


115 16 4 


23 


Spica 


W. 


82 19 56 


83 49 14 


85 18 26 


86 47 33 




Antares 


W. 


36 26 34 


37 65 56 


39 25 11 


40 54 21 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


49 27 21 


48 9 17 


46 51 48 


45 34 57 




Venus 


E. 


68 52 8 


67 31 42 


66 11 23 


64 61 9 




a Pegasi 


E. 


69 49 24 


68 24 39 


67 5 


66 35 42 




Sun 


E. 


108 25 36 


107 3 51 


105 42 11 


104 20 36 


24 


Spica 


W. 


94 12 9 


95 40 56 


97 9 42 


98 38 28 




Antares 


w. 


48 19 14 


49 48 5 


51 16 54 


62 45 43 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


39 21 37 


38 9 33 


36 58 32 


36 48 39 




Venus 


E. 


58 11 9 


56 51 19 


55 31 31 


54 11 44 




a Pegasi 


E. 


58 36 33 


57 13 18 


55 50 16 


54 27 26 




Sun 


E. 


97 33 41 


96 12 25 


94 61 11 


93 29 67 


25 


Spica 


W. 


106 2 27 


107 31 22 


109 20 


110 29 22 




Antares 


W. 


60 10 1 


61 38 59 


63 8 


64 37 6 




Venus 


E. 


47 32 52 


46 13 3 


44 63 11 


43 33 17 




a Pegasi 


E. 


47 36 42 


46 15 22 


44 64 21 


43 33 40 




Sun 


E. 


86 43 35 


85 22 13 


84 47 


82 39 17 


26 


Antares 


W. 


72 3 59 


73 33 42 


75 3 33 


76 33 34 




Venus 


E. 


36 52 50 


35 32 30 


34 12 6 


32 61 36 




a Pegasi 


E. 


36 56 48 


35 39 7 


34 22 9 


33 6 




Sun 


E. 


75 50 25 


74 28 19 


73 6 5 


71 43 42 


2Y 


Antares 


W. 


84 6 6 


85 37 11 


87 8 28 


88 39 58 




a Aquilae 


W. 


42. 1 30 


42 69 13 


43 58 36 


44 59 34 




Venus 


E. 


26 7 42 


24 46 40 


23 25 34 


22 4 26 




Sun 


E. 


64 49 24 


63 26 


62 2 24 


60 38 35 


28 


Antares 


W. 


96 20 59 


97 53 57 


99 27 11 


101 41 




a Aquilffi 

Sun 


w. 


50 26 10 


51 33 58 


52 43 62 


53 64 49 




E. 


63 36 15. 


52 11 5 


50 45 39 


49 19 59 


29 


a Aquilse 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


60 3 32 


61 19 49 


62 36 62 


63 54 38 




w. 


33 47 34 


36 6 


36 14 23 


37 30 19 




Sun 


E. 


42 7 46 


40 40 32 


39 13 3 


37 45 18 


30 


a Aquilae 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


70 33 30 


71 65 5 


73 17 13 


74 39 53 




w. 


44 10 40 


45 34 15 


46 58 49 


48 24 20 




Sun 


E. 


30 22 52 


28 53 42 


27 24 21 


25 64 51 



202 



APRIL, 1859. 



1 




GEEENIVICH 


MEAN" TIME. 




■ 


LUNAE DISTAJfCES. 




Day of 


Star's Name 












tte 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi-. 


XVIIIi. 


XX Ik. 




Month. 


Position. 




















o / // 


o / // 


o / // 


O / // 




21 


Spica 


W. 


64 IT 35 


65 48 43 


67 19 39 


68 60 24 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


65 41 25 


64 17 68 


62 64 64 


61 32 13 






Venus 


E. 


85 8 36 


83 46 14 


82 24 6 


81 2 9 






a Pegasi 


E. 


87 1 25 


85 34 19 


84 7 26 


82 40 45 






Sdn 


E. 


124 56 57 


123 33 26 


122 10 7 


120 46 68 




22 


Spica 


W. 


76 21 35 


77 51 22 


79 21 


80 50 31 






Antarea 


W. 


30 28 


31 57 50 


33 27 32 


34 57 7 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


54 44 55 


63 24 47 


62 5 8 


50 45 59 






Venus 


E. 


74 15 4 


72 54 8 


71 33 20 


70 12 40 






a Pegasi 


E. 


76 30 18 


74 4 47 


72 39 29 


71 14 21 






Sun 


E. 


113 53 43 


112 31 30 


111 9 25 


109 47 27 




23 


Spica 


W. 


88 16 35 


89 45 33 


91 14 28 


92 43 20 






Antares 


W. 


42 23 27 


43 52 29 


45 21 27 


46 60 22 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


44 18 45 


43 3 16 


41 48 32 


40 34 38 






Venus 


E. 


63 31 1 


62 10 57 


60 60 68 


69 31 2 






a Pegasi 


E. ' 


64 11 30 


62 47 29 


61 23 39 


60 






Sun 


E. 


102 59 7 


101 37 41 


100 16 18 


98 64 58 




24 


Spica 


W. 


100 7 13 


101 36 


103 ' 4 47 


104 33 36 






Antares 


W. 


54 14 32 


55 43 22 


57 12 13 


68 41 6 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


34 40 1 


33 32 45 


32 27 


31 22 54 






Venus 


E. 


52 51 58 


51 32 12 


60 12 27 


48 52 40 






a Pegasi 


E. 


53 4 48 


51 42 24 


60 20 14 


48 58 20 






Sun 


E. 


92 8 43 


90 47 28 


89 26 13 


88 4 55 




23 


Spica 


W. 


111 58 28 


113 27 40 


114 66 57 


116 26 21 






Antares 


W. 


66 6 17 


67 35 33 


69 4 55 


70 34 23 






Venus 


E. 


42 13 19 


40 53 18 


39 33 13 


38 13 4 






a Pegasi 


E. 


42 13 22 


40 63 29 


39 34 3 


38 16 8 






Sun 


E. 


81 17 42 


79 66 2 


78 34 16 


77 12 24 




26 


Antares 


W. 


78 3 43 


79 34 3 


81 4 33 


82 35 14 






Venus 


E. 


31 31 


30 10 19 


28 49 32 


27 28 40 






a Pegasi 


E. 


31 50 47 


30 36 38 


29 23 43 


28 12 12 






Sun 


E. 


70 21 11 


68 68 29 


67 35 38 


66 12 36 




27 


Antares 


W. 


90 11 41 


91 43 39 


93 15 50 


94 48 17 






a Aquilae 


W.~ 


46 2 


47 6 51 


48 11 2 


49 17 30 






Venus 


E. 


20 43 16 


19 22 8 


18 1 4 


16 40 8 






Sun 


E. 


69 14 34 


67 50 20 


56 25 52 


55 1 11 




28 


Antares 


W. 


102 34 27 


104 8 31 


105 42 63' 


107 17 32 






a Aquilae 


w. 


65 6 45 


56 19 37 


67 33 24 


58 48 3 






Sun 


E. 


47 54 4 


•46 27 63 


45 1 26 


43 34 44 




29 


a Aquilse 


W. 


65 13 7 


66 32 16 


67 62 3 


69 12 29 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


38 47 46 


40 6 37 


41 26 46 


42 48 9 






Sun 


E. 


36 17 18 


34 49 2 


33 20 33 


31 51 49 




30 


a Aquilse 


W. 


76 3 3 


77 26 42 


78 50 49 


80 15 21 






Fomalhaut 


w. 


49 50 45 


51 17 59 


52 46 1 


54 14 48 






Sun 


E. 


24 26 13 


22 55 28 


21 25 42 


19 56 58 





MAY, 1859. 



203 





GKEENWIOH 


IVnRATq- TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


nik. 


VR 


IX". 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


o / // 


o / // 


i II 


4 


Sun 


W. 


21 16 8 


22 51 39 


24 28 39 


26 6 2 




Pollux 


E. 


46 63 26 


46 7 29 


43 21 26 


41 35 17 




Saturn 


E. 


61 67 37 


60 11 37 


68 25 27 


66 39 10 




Regulus 


E. 


83 42 20 


81 65 57 


80 9 26 


78 22 45 


5 


Sun 


W. 


34 17 24 


35 66 18 


37 36 22 


39 14 34 




Pollux 


E. 


32 43 28 


30 57 1 


29 10 36 


27 24 13 




Saturn 


E. 


47 45 59 


46 69 4 


44 12 6 


42 25 3 




Regulus 


E. 


69 27 41 


67 40 23 


65 63 1 


64 6 35 


6 


Sun 


W. 


47 32 2 


49 11 43 


60 51 26 


52 31 10 




Mars 


W. 


25 11 25 


26 62 24 


28 33 33 


30 14 51 




Jupiter 


W. 


11 7 30 


12 44 66 


14 24 22 


16 5 11 




Saturn 


E. 


33 29 18 


31 42 6 


29 54 53 


28 7 42 




Reeulus 


E. 


56 7 49 


63 20 12 


51 32 34 


49 44 68 




Spica 


E. 


109 10 8 


107 22 35 


105 35 3 


103 47 30 


Y 


Sun 


W. 


60 49 52 


62 29 33 


64 9 11 


65 48 47 




Mars 


W. 


38 42 24 


40 24 


42 6 36 


43 47 10 




Jupiter 


W. 


24 39 46 


26 23 44 


28 7 63 


29 62 9 




Regulus 


E. 


40 47 16 


' 38 59 60 


37 12 28 


36 25 10 




Spica 


E. 


94 50 7 


93 2 45 


91 15 26 


89 28 11 


8 


Sun 


W. 


74 5 50 


76 45 1 


77 24 6 


79 3 7 




Mars 


W. 


62 14 30 


53 65 47 


55 37 


57 18 9 




Jupiter 


W. 


38 34 17 


40 18 43 


42 3 7 


43 47 29 




Pollux 


W. 


11 7 6 


12 48 15 


14 30 39 


16 13 52- 




Regulus 


E. 


26 29 44 


24 42 65 


22 56 12 


21 9 34 




Spica 


E. 


80 33 1 


78 46 14 


76 69 32 


76 12 67 


9 


Sun 


W. 


87 16 36 


88 54 59 


90 33 14 


92 11 22 




Mars 


W. 


65 42 30 


67 23 4 


69 3 31 


70 43 62 




Jupiter 


W. 


52 28 18 


64 12 13 


55 66 3 


57 39 46 




Pollux 


W. 


24 56 34 


26 40 20 


28 26 7 


30 9 64 




Spica 


E. 


66 21 36 


,64 36 40 


62 49 52 


61 4 11 




Antares 


E. 


112 13 31 


110 27 31 


108 41 37 


106 56 50 


10 


Sun 


W. 


100 20 6 


101 57 25 


103 34 37 


105 11 41 




Mars 


W. 


79 3 47 


80 43 24 


82 22 62 


84 2 12 




Jupiter 


W. 


66 16 42 


67 59 44 


69 42 38 


71 25 26 




Pollux 


W. 


38 53 10 


40 37 36 


42 21 65 


44 6 9 




Saturn 


W. 


23 14 6 


24 58 36 


26 42 69 


28 27 13 




Spica' 


E. 


52 17 46 


60 32 62 


48 48 8 


47 3 33 




Antares 


E. 


98 8 53 


96 23 63 


94 39 2 


92 64 18 


11 


Sun 


W. 


113 14 4* 


114 50 63 


116 26 52 


118 2 41 




Mars 


W. 


92 16 49 


93 55 18 


95 33 38 


97 11 50 




Jupiter 
Pollux 


W. 


79 57 15 


81 39 11 


83 20 59 


85 2 38 




W. 


62 45 33 


54 29 3 


56 12 26 


67 56 38 




Saturn 


W. 


37 6 20 


38 49 4? 


40 32 67 


42 16 2 




Regulus 

Spica 

Antares 


W. 


15 44 23 


17 28 9 


19 11 48 


20 55 17 




E. 


38 22 52 


36 39 13 


34 55 43 


33 12 24 




E. 


84 12 50 


82 28 59 


80 45 17 


79 1 43 



204 



MAY, 1859. 





GEEENWICH 


IVTEAT^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










tte 


and 




Midnight. 


XY*. 


XVIII''. 


XXP". 


Month. 


Position. 












4 


Sun 


W. 


o / // 

27 43 47 


c / // 

29 21 49 


o / // 

31 7 


/ // 

32 38 39 




Pollux 


E. 


39 49 2 


38 2 43 


36 16 20 


34 29 66 




Saturn 


E. 


54 52 45 


53 6 12 


61 19 34 


49 32 49 




Eegulus 


E. 


76 35 58 


74 49 3 


73 2 1 


71 14 64 


5 


Sun 


W. 


40 53 64 


42 33 19 


44 12 49 


45 62 24 




Pollux 


E. 


25 37 56 


23 61 46 


22 6 47 


20 20 1 




Saturn 


E. 


40 37 58 


38 60 50 


37 3 41 


35 16 30 




Eegulus 


E. 


62 18 6 


60 30 34 


68 43 1 


56 56 25 


6 


Sun 


W. 


54 10 55 


55 60 41 


67 30 26 


59 10 10 




Mars 


W. 


31 56 14 


33 37 43 


36 19 14 


37 49 




Jupiter 


W. 


17 47 


19 29 31 


21 12 34 


22 56 1 




Saturn 


E. 


26 20 32 


24 33 24 


22 46 18 


20 69 14 




Regulus 


E. 


47 57 22 


46 9 47 


44 22 14 


42 34 44 




Spica 


E. 


101 59 58 


100 12 27 


98 24 68 


96 37 31 


1 


Sun 


W. 


67 28 19 


69 7 48 


70 47 13 


72 26 34 




Mars 


W. 


45 28 44 


47 10 16 


48 61 43 


50 33 8 




Jupiter 


w. 


31 36 30 


33 20 65 


35 6 22 


36 49 49 




Regulus 


E. 


33 37 55 


* 31 50 45 


30 3 40 


28 16 39 




Spica 


E. 


87 41 


86 53 53 


84 6 61 


82 19 53 


8 


Sun 


W. 


80 4-2 1 


82 20 60 


83 69 32 


86 38 8 • 




Mars 


W. 


58 59 12 


60 40 10 


62 21 3 


64 1 49 




Jupiter 


W. 


45 31 47 


47 16 2 


49 12 


60 44 18 


- 


Pollux 


w. 


17 67 40 


19 41 50 


21 26 16 


23 10 61 




Regulus 


E. 


19 23 4 


17 36 40 


15 60 24 


14 4 15 




Spica 


E. 


73 26 27 


71 40 4 


69 63 48 


68 7 38 


9 


Sun 


W. 


93 49 22 


96 27 14 


97 4 59 


98 42 36 




Mars 


w. 


72 24 6 


74 4 12 


75 44 12 


77 24 3 




Jupiter 


w. 


69 23 23 


61 6 53 


62 50 16 


64 33 33 




Pollux 


w. 


31 64 40 


33 39 23 


36 24 3 


37 8 39 




Spica 


E. 


69 18 38 


67 33 12 


65 47 56 


64 2 46 




Antares 


E. 


105 10 11 


103 24 40 


101 39 17 


99 64 1 


10 


Sun 


W. 


106 48 35 


108 25 21 


110 1 68 


111 38 25 




Mars 


w. 


85 41 25 


87 20 28 


88 69 24 


90 38 11 




Jupiter 


w. 


73 8 3 


74 50 34 


76 32 66 


78 15 10 




Pollux 


w. 


45 60 16 


47 34 16 


49 18 9 


51 1 56 




Saturn 


w. 


30 11 19 


31 66 17 


33 39 7 


35 22 48 




Spica 


E. 


45 19 6 


43 34 49 


41 50 41 


40 6 42 




Antares 


E. 


91 9 44 


89 25 17 


87 40 69 


85 56 50 


11 


Sun 


W. 


119 38 21 


t21 13 50 


122 49 9 


124 24 17 




Mars 


W. 


98 49 52 


100 27 44 


102 5 28 


103 43 2 




Jupiter 


W. 


86 44 8 


88 25 28 


90 6 39 


91 47 41 




Pollux 


w. 


59 38 43 


61 21 40 


63 4 28 


64 47 7 




Saturn 


w. 


43 58 68 


46 41 45 


47 24 23 


49 6 50 




Regulus 


w. 


22 38 38 


24 21 51 


26 4 54 


27 47 48 




Spica 


E. 


31 29 15 


29 46 17 


28 3 30 


26 20 55 




Antares 


E. 


77 18 19 


75 36 6 


73 51 69 


72 9 3 



MAY, 1859. 



205 







GEEENWIOH 


¥EAT^^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










tte 


and 




Noon. 


iir'. 


Vli. 


IX'. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


/ // 


O i if 


o / tl 


12 


Sun 


w. 


125 59 15 


127 34 1 


129 8 37 


130 43 1 




Mars 


w. 


105 20 26 


106 57 40 


108 34 44 


110 11 88 




Jupiter 


w. 


93 28 33 


95 9 15 


96 49 48 


98 30 10 




Pollux 


w. 


66 29 37 


68 11 57 


69 54 8 


71 36 10 




Saturn 


w. 


50 49 8 


52 31 17 


54 13 15 


55 55 4 




Regulus 


w. 


29 30 32 


31 13 7 


32 55 32 


34 37 48 




Spica 


E. 


24 38 32 


22 56 22 


21 14 26 


19 32 44 




Antares 


E. 


70 26 17 


68 43 41 


67 1 14 


65 18 57 


13 


Jupiter 


W. 


106 49 26 


108 28 45 


110 7 55 


111 46 50 




Pollux 


W. 


80 3 49 


81 44 50 


83 25 40 


85 6 20 




Saturn 


w. 


64 21 34 


66 2 20 


67 42 56 


69 23 21 




Regulus 


w. 


43 6 35 


44 47 49 


46 28 5S 


48 9 46 




Antares 


E. 


56 50 6 


55 8 51 


53 27 47 


51 46 53 




a Aquilse 


E. 


108 16 28 


106 51 38 


105 26 41 


104 1 39 


14 


Pollux 


W. 


93 26 53 


95 6 25 


96 45 46 


98 24 55 




Saturn 


W. 


77 42 37 


79 21 54 


81 59 


82 39 52 




Regulus 


W. 


56 31 23 


58 11 9 


59 50 42 


61 30 4 




Antares 


E. 


43 25 14 


41 45 28 


40 5 54 


38 26 32 




a Aquilse 


E. 


96 56 6 


95 31 5 


94 6 10 


92 41 21 


15 


Pollux 


W. 


106 37 35 


108 15 30 


109 53 12 


111 30.40 




Saturn 


w. 


90 51 16 


92 28 56 


94 6 23 


95 43 37 




Regulus 


w. 


69 43 53 


71 22 2 


72 59 59 


74 37 43 




Spica 


w. 


15 48 54 


17 26 13 


19 3 28 


20 40 36 




Antares 


E. 


30 12 42 


28 34 33 


26 56 36 


25 18 53 




a Aquilse 


E. 


85 39 40 


84 15 57 


82 52 29 


81 29 17 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


110 43 27 


109 13 10 


107 42 55 


106 12 44 


16 


Saturn 


W. 


103 46 35 


105 22 32 


106 58 15 


108 33 45 




Regulus 


W. 


82 43 9 


84 19 35 


85 55 48 


87 31 48 




Spica 


W. 


28 44 4 


30 20 14 


31 56 12 


33 31 59 




a Aquilse 


E. 


74 38 8 


73 17 1 


71 56 18 


70 36 3 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


98 43 17 


97 13 47 


95 44 26 


94 15 15 


11 


Regulus 


W. 


95 28 31 


97 3 12 


98 37 40 


100 11 55 




Spica 


W. 


41 27 48 


43 2 21 


44 36 41 


46 10 49 




a Aquilae 


E. 


64 2 16 


62 45 11 


61 28 45 


60 12 59 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


86 52 13 


85 24 15 


83 56 31 


82 29 1 




a Pegasi 


E. 


108 47 9 


107 17 5 


105 47 9 


104 17 21 


18 


Regulus 
Spica 
a Aquilse 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


107 59 59 


109 32 57 


111 5 44 


112 38 18 




w. 


53 58 20 


55 31 13 


57 3 54 


58 36 23 




E. 


54 5 23 


52 54 24 


51 44 23 


50 35 23 




E. 


75 15 2& 


73 49 32 


72 23 57 


70 58 40 




a Pegasi 


E. 


96 50 40 


95 21 49 


93 53 9 


92 24 39 


19 


Spica 
Antares 


W. 


66 15 56 


67 47 17 


69 18 28 


70 49 28 




W. 


20 22 6 


21 53 32 


23 24 46 


24 55 51 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


63 57 14 


62 34 1 


61 11 10 


59 48 43 




a Pegasi 
Venus 


E. 


85 4 57 


83 37 35 


82 10 24 


80 43 25 




E. 


115 25 36 


114 3 41 


112 41 56 


111 20 20 



206 



MAY, 1859. 







GEEEITWIOH 


¥F,AT^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Midnight. 


XSTK 


XVIIP'. 


XXTi'. 


12 


Sun 


W. 


O 1 II 

132 17 13 


O 1 II 

133 61 13 


O 1 II 

135 25 1 


/ // 

136 58 36 




Mars 


W. 


111 48 22 


113 24 66 


115 1 19 


116 37 31 




Jupiter 


W. 


100 10 22 


101 60 24 


103 30 15 


106 9 56 




Pollux 


W. 


73 18 1 


74 69 43 


76 41 15 


78 22 37 




Satum 


W. 


67 36 42 


59 18 11 


60 59 29 


62 40 37 




Regulus 


W. 


36 19 54 


38 1 50 


39 43 35 


41 25 10 




Spica 


E. 


17 51 20 


16 10 13 


14 29 29 


12 49 10 




Antares 


E. 


63 36 61 


61 54 64 


60 13 8 


68 31 32 


13 


Jupiter 


W. 


113 26 35 


115 4 9 


116 42 31 


118 20 41 




Pollux 


W. 


86 46 49 


88 27 7 


90 7 14 


91 47 9 




Saturn 


W. 


71 3 35 


72 43 37 


74 23 29 


76 3 9 




Regulus 


W. 


49 50 28 


51 30 68 


53 11 18 


54 51 26 




Antares 


E. 


60 6 11 


48 25 40 


46 45 20 


46 5 11 




a Aquilae 


E. 


102 36 33 


101 11 26 


99 46 18 


98 21 11 


14 


Pollux 


W. 


100 3 61 


101 42 36 


103 21 8 


104 59 28 




Satum 


W. 


84 18 33 


85 57 3 


87 35 20 


89 13 24 




Eegulus 


W, 


63 9 14 


64 48 13 


66 26 59 


68 5 32 




Antares 


E. 


36 47 21 


36 8 23 


33 29 37 


31 51 3 




a Aqnilfp, 


E. 


91 16 40 


89 62 8 


88 27 47 


87 3 37 


15 


Pollux 


W. 


113 7 66 


114 44 59 


116 21 48 


117 58 24 




Satum 


W. 


97 20 39 


98 57 28 


100 34 3 


102 10 26 




Eegulus 


W. 


76 15 IJj 


77 52 32 


79 29 37 


81 6 29 




Spica 


W. 


22 17 37 


23 54 29 


25 31 11 


27 7 43 




Antares 


E. 


23 41 22 


22 4 4 


20 26 59 


18 50 7 




a Aquilae 


E. 


80 6 23 


78 43 48 


77 21 33 


76 69 39 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


104 42 38 


103 12 37 


101 42 43 


100 12 56 


16 


Satum 


W. 


110 9 2 


111 44 5 


113 18 56 


114 53 83 




Regulus 


W. 


89 7 35 


90 43 9 


92 18 30 


93 63 37 




Spica 


W. 


35 7 33 


36 42 55 


38 18 6 


39 53 3 




a Aquilae 


E. 


69 16 15 


67 56 57 


66 38 10 


65 19 56 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


92 46 16 


91 17 26 


89 48 49 


88 20 26 


17 


Regulus 


W. 


101 45 68 


103 19 47 


104 53 24 


106 26 48 




Spica 


W. 


47 44 44 


49 18 26 


50 61 56 


52 25 14 




a Aquilae 


E. 


58 57 55 


57 43 35 


66 30 1 


65 17 16 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


81 1 46 


79 34 46 


78 8 3 


76 41 35 




a Pegasi 


E. 


102 47 42 


101 18 12 


99 48 52 


98 19 41 


18 


Regulus 


W. 


114 10 40 


115 42 61 


117 14 60 


118 46 37 




Spica 


W. 


60 8 41 


61 40 46 


63 12 41 


64 44 24 




a Aquilae 


E. 


49 27 26 


48 20 38 


47 15 1 


46 10 40 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


69 33 43 


,68 9 6 


66 44 47 


65 20 50 




a Pegasi 


E. 


90 66 21 


89 28 13 


88 16 


86 32 31 


19 


Spica 


W. 


72 20 19 


73 50 59 


75 21 30 


76 51 62 




Antares 


W. 


26 26 45 


27 57 30 


29 28 6 


30 58 31 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


58 26 41 


57 5 4 


55 43 54 


54 23 12 




a Pegasi 


E. 


79 16 37 


77 50 1 


76 23 37 


74 57 25 




Venus 


E. 


109 68 64 


108 37 38 


107 16 31 


106 55 33 



MAY, 1859. 



207 







GEEENWIOH 


IVTEAif TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 
the 


Star's Nam( 


! 










and 




Noon. 


III''. 


VII'. 


IXk. 


Month. 


Position. 












20 


Spica 


w. 


/ II 

78 22 6 


o 1 II 

79 52 10 


O i // 

81 22 7 


/ // 

82 51 56 




Antares 


w. 


82 28 48 


33 58 56 


36 28 67 


36 68 50 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


S3 2 59 


51 43 16 


50 24 6 


49 5 29 




a Pegasi 


E. 


73 31 24 


72 5 36 


70 40 


69 14 36 




Venus 


E. 


104 34 43 


103 14 2 


101 68 28 


100 33 2 




Sun 


E. 


138 25 44 


137 3 32 


136 41 26 


184 19 25 


21 


Spica 


W. 


90 19 17 


91 48 28 


93 17 34 


94 46 35 




Antares 


W. 


44 26 30 


46 55 45 


47 24 54 


48 54 




Fomalhant 


E. 


42 42 11 


41 27 47 


40 14 16 


89 1 44 




a Pegasi 


E. 


62 10 40 


60 46 32 


59 22 36 


57 58 54 




Venus 


E. 


93 52 35 


92 32 48 


91 13 5 


89 58 27 




Sun 


E. 


127 30 41 


126 9 10 


124 47 43 


123 26 20 


22 


Spica 


W. 


102 10 51 


103 39 36 


105 8 19 


106 37 8 




Antares 


W. 


56 18 35 


57 47 24 


59 16 12 


60 44 59 




a Pegasi 


E. 


51 4 5 


49 41 56 


48 20 4 


46 58 32 




Venus 


E. 


83 16 9 


81 56 48 


80 37 29 


79 18 11 




Sun 


E. 


116 39 59 


115 18 48 


113 57 36 


112 36 26 


23 


Antares 


W. 


68 9 9 


69 38 5 


71 7 5 


72 36 9 




a Pegasi 


E. 


40 16 30 


38 57 28 


87 89 


86 21 10 




Venus 


E. 


72 41 35 


71 22 11 


70 2 45 


68 48 15 




Sun 


E. 


106 50 10 


104 28 48 


103 7 21 


101 45 51 


24 


Antares 


W. 


80 2 48 


81 32 28 


83 2 16 


84 32 13 




Venus 


E. 


62, 4 39 


60 44 38 


59 24 31 


68 4 17 




Sun 


E. 


94 56 56 


93 34 48 


92 12 32 


90 50 8 


25 


Antares 


W. 


92 4 29 


93 35 81 


96 6 45 


96 38 13 




a Aquilae 


W. 


47 10 8 


48 14 58 


49 21 1 


50 28 12 




Venus 


E. 


51 20 59 


49 59 51 


48 38 33 


47 17 4 




Sun 


E. 


83 65 34 


82 32 5 


81 8 23 


79 44 28 


26 


Antares 


W. 


104 19 11 


105 52 11 


107 25 28 


108 69 2 




a Aquilae 


W. 


56 19 30 


57 32 31 


68 46 23 


60 1 2 




Fomalliaut 


w. 


30 39 26 


31 44 26 


32 51 40 


34 67 




Venus 


E. 


40 26 61 


89 4 14 


37 41 25 


86 18 24 




Sun 


E. 


72 41 18 


71 15 52 


69 50 10 


68 24 11 


27 


a Aquilae 


W. 


66 26 21 


67 44 15 


69 3 47 


70 28 56^ 
44 12 4# 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


40 12 59 


41 81 43 


42 51 40 




Venus 


E. 


29 20 44 


27 66 46 


26 82 44 


25 8 39 




Sun 


E. 


61 9 43 


59 41 52 


58 13 41 


66 45 10 


28 


a Aquilae 
Fomalliaut 


W. 


77 13 11 


78 36 36 


80 31 


81 24 54 




W. 


51 13 28 


62 40 18 


64 7 57 


55 36 22 




a Pegasi 
Sun 


W. 


29 32 49 


30 52 66 


82 14 51 


33 38 29 




E. 


49 17 23 


47 46 46 


46 15 48 


44 44 30 


29 


a Aquilae 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


88 33 15 


90 4 


91 27 14 


92 54 42 




W. 


63 9 5 


64 41 34 


66 14 39 


67 48 19 




a Pegasi 

Sun 


W. 


40 57 20 


42 28 33 


44 44 


45 33 51 




E. 


87 2 43 


36 29 21 


33 55 41 


32 21 48 



208 






MAY, 1859. 


















-- ^ 






GEEENWIOH 


: MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVK 


XVIIP. 


XXTk. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


/ II 


o / // 


O 1 II 


20 


Spica 


w. 


84 21 87 


85 51 12 


87 20 40 


88 60 2 




Antares 


w. 


38 28 35 


39 58 13 


41 27 45 


42 57 10 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


i1 47 28 


46 30 6 


45 13 23 


43 67 24 




a Pegasi 


E. 


67 49 24 


66 24 24 


64 59 37 


63 36 2 




Venus 


E. 


99 12 44 


97 62 32 


96 32 27 


96 12 28 




Sun 


E. 


132 57 30 


131 35 41 


130 13 66 


128 62 17 


21 


Spica 


W. 


96 15 32 


97 44 26 


99 13 17 


100 42 5 




Antares 


W. 


50 23 1 


51 61 58 


53 20 63 


64 49 46 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


37 60 13 


36 39 50 


36 30 41 


34 22 63 




a Pegasi 


E. 


56 35 27 


55 12 13 


53 49 16 


62 26 32 




Venus 


E. 


88 33 53 


87 14 22 


85 54 55 


84 35 31 




Sun 


E. 


122 4 59 


120 43 41 


119 22 26 


118 1 12 


22 


Spica 


W. 


108 5 46 


109 34 29 


111 3 14 


112 32 1 




Antares 


W. 


62 13 46 


63 42 35 


66 11 24 


66 40 15 




a Pegasi 


E. 


45 37 20 


44 16 30 


42 66 4 


41 36 3 ; 




Venus 


E. 


77 58 54 


76 39 36 


75 20 17 


74 57 i 




Sun 


E. 


111 15 13 


109 64 1 


108 32 46 


107 11 29 


23 


Antares 


W. 


74 5 17 


75 34 30 


77 3 49 


78 33 15 




a Pegasi 


E. 


35 4 2 


33 47 40 


32 32 11 


31 17 41 




Venus 


E. 


67 23 41 


66 4 3 


64 44 21 


63 24 33 




Sun 


E. 


100 24 16 


99 2 35 


97 40 49 


96 18 66 


24 


Antares 


W. 


86 2 20 


87 32 36 


89 3 2 


90 33 40 




Venus 


E. 


56 43 55 


65 23 24 


64 2 45 


62 41 57 




Sun 


E. 


89 27 34 


88 4 60 


86 41 56 


86 18 51 


25 


Antares 


W. 


98 9 65 


99 41 61 


101 14 2 


102 46 29 




a Aqniljfi 


W. 


61 36 29 


52 45 48 


63 66 6 


55 7 21 




Venus 


E. 


45 65 25 


44 33 34 


43 11 31 


41 49 17 




Sun 


E. 


78 20 20 


76 55 67 


75. 31 19 


74 6 26 


26 


Antares 


W. 


110 32 54 


112 7 6 


113 41 35 


116 16 25 




a Aquilse 


W. 


61 16 27 


62 32 37 


63 49 31 


65 7 6 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


35 12 7 


36 26 2 


37 39 33 


38 66 34 




Venus 


E. 


34 66 12 


33 31 49 


32 8 17 


30 44 34 




Sun 


E. 


66 67 56 


66 31 20 


64 4 27 


62 37 14 


W^ 


a Aquilae 


W. 


71 44 41 


73 5 59 


74 27 51 


75 60 15 




Fomalliaut 


W. 


45 34 67 


46 58 10 


48 22 21 


49 47 28 




Venus 


E. 


23 44 34 


22 20 33 


20 66 42 


19 33 7 




Sun 


E. 


56 16 18 


63 47 6 


52 17 32 


50 47 38 


28 


a Aquilse 


W. 


82 49 45 


84 15 1 


85 40 42 


87 6 47 




Fomalliaut 


W. 


67 5 32 


58 35 25 


60 5 69 


61 37 13 




a Pegasi 


w. 


36 3 39 


36 30 13 


37 68 5 


39 27 9 


\ 


Sun 


E. 


43 12 60 


41 40 48 


40 8 27 


38 35 45 \ 


29 


a Aquilae 


W. 


94 22 28 


95 50 30 


97 18 47 


98 47 16 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


69 22 32 


70 67 17 


72 32 32 


74 8 18 




a Pegasi 


W. 


47 7 48 


48 42 34 


50 18 7 


51 54 23 




Sun 


E. 


30 47 28 


29 12 57 

•*- 


27 38 12 


26 3 15 



JUNE, 1859. 



209 







GREENWICH 


MEATq" TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


Illi. 


VI". 


IS>. 


Month. 


Position. 












3 


Sun 


W. 


/ // 

30 27 5 


o / // 

32 9 19 


o / // 

33 51 37 


1 II 

35 33 59 




Eegulus 


E. 


45 18 32 


43 27 46 


41 37 3 


39 46 23 




Spica 


E. 


99 21 30 


97 30 48 


95 40 8 


93 49 32 


4 


Sun 


W. 


44 5 48 


45 48 1 


47 30 7 


49 12 8 




Eegulus 


E. 


30 34 18 


28 44 14 


26 54 18 


25 4 31 




Spica 


E. 


84 37 41 


82 47 38 


80 57 44 


79 7 59 


5 


Sun 


W. 


57 40 3 


59 21 8 


61 2 2 


62 42 44 




Pollux 


W. 


21 21 39 


23 8 32 


24 55 29 


26 42 25 




Spica 


E. 


70 1 46 


68 13 6 


66 24 38 


64 36 24 




Antares 


E. 


115 53 30 


114 4 44 


112 16 10 


110 27 60 


6 


Sun 


W. 


71 3 


72 42 22 


74 21 29 


76 22 




Pollux 


W. 


35 35 40 


37 21 52 


39 7 52 


40 53 40 




Saturn 


w. 


17 49 32 


19 35 44 


21 21 42 


23 7 25 




Spica 


E. 


65 38 42 


53 51 53 


52 5 21 


60 19 3 




Antares 


E. 


101 29 33 


99 42 37 


97 55 56 


96 9 30 


T 


Sun 


W. 


84 11 


85 48 22 


87 25 27 


89 2 18 




Pollux 


W. 


49 39 23 


51 23 50 


53 8 2 


54 51 59 




Saturn 


W. 


31 52 8 


33 36 18 


35 20 11 


37 3 49 




Eegulus 


W. 


12 37 24 


14 22 2 


16 6 27 


17 50 38 




Spica 


E. 


41 31 36 


39 46 55 


38 2 32 


' 36 18 25 




Antares 


E. 


87 21 13 


85 36 20 


83 51 44 


82 7 23 


8 


Sun 


W. 


97 2 32 


98 37 48 


100 12 49 


101 47 34 




Pollux 


w. 


63 28 1 


65 10 29 


66 52 41 


68 34 38 




Saturn 


w. 


45 37 59 


47 20 2 


49 1 49 


60 43 21 




Eegulus 


w. 


26 27 55 


28 10 37 


29 53 4 


31 35 16 




Spica 


E. 


27 42 11 


25 59 51 


24 17 48 


22 36 5 




Antares 


E. 


73 29 38 


71 46 53 


70 4 23 


68 22 8 




a Aquilae 


E. 


122 1 4 


120 39 20 


119 17 8 


117 54 38 


9 


Sun 


W. 


109 37 24 


111 10 37 


112 43 35 


114 16 18 




Pollux 


W. 


77 41 


78 41 10 


80 21 24 


82 1 23 




Saturn 


W. 


59 7 8 


60 47 9 


62 26 55 


64 6 26 




Eegulus 


W. 


40 2 29 


41 43 12 


43 23 39 


45 3 52 




Antares 


E. 


59 54 44 


58 14 


56 33 31 


54 53 17 




a Aquilae 


E. 


110 57 21 


109 33 20 


108 9 12 


106 44 59 


10 


Sun 


W. 


121 56 14 


123 27 30 


124 58 32 


126 29 20 




Pollux 


W. 


90 17 49 


91 56 25 


93 34 48 


95 12 57 




Saturn 


w. 


72 20 27 


73 58 33 


75 36 26 


77 14 6 




Eegulus 
Antares 


w. 


53 21 25 


55 15 


56 38 51 


58 17 14 




E. 


46 35 37 


44 56 47 


43 18 10 


41 39 47 




a Aquilse 
Fomalhant 


E. 


99 43 36 


98 19 25 


96 65 18 


95 31 17 




E. 


125 30 41 


124 2 34 


122 34 16 


121 6 49 


11 


Pollux 


W. 


103 20 25 


104 57 17 


106 33 56 


108 10 22 




Saturn 


W. 


85 19 8 


86 55 30 


88 31 40 


90 7 38 




Eegulus 

Spica 

Antares 


W. 


66 25 52 


68 2 57 


69 39 51 


71 16 32 




W. 


12 34 29 


14 10 6 


15 45 48 


17 21 31 




E. 


33 31 5 


31 53 59 


30 17 5 


28 40 24 



14 



210 



JUNE, 1859. 





GREEN WIOH 


MEAN TIME. 






LUNAE DISTANCES. 




Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVk. 


XVIIIi>. 


XXIi. 




Month. 


Position. 




















D / // 


/ // 


o / // 


Oil/ 




3 


Sun 


w. 


37 16 23 


38 68 48 


40 41 11 


42 23 31 






Regulus 


E. 


37 55 47 


36 5 16 


34 14 50 


32 24 30 






Spica 


E. 


91 58 59 


90 8 30 


88 18 7 


86 27 51 




4 


Sun 


W. 


50 54 


52 36 45 


64 17 21 


65 58 47 






Regulus 


E. 


23 14 55 


21 26 29 


19 36 16 


17 47 14 






Spica 


E. 


77 18 23 


75 28 57 


73 39 42 


71 50 38 




5 


Sun 


W. 


64 23 13 


66 3 30 


67 43 34 


69 23 24 






Pollux 


W. 


28 29 18 


30 16 6 


32 2 46 


33 49 18 






Spica 


E. 


62 48 23 


61 36 


69 13 3 


57 25 45 






Antares 


E. 


108 39 43 


106 51 49 


105 4 9 


103 16 44 




6 


Sun 


W. 


77 39 1 


79 17 23 


80 55 31 


82 33 24 






Pollux 


W. 


42 39 16 


44 24 38 


46 9 47 


47 54 43 






Saturn 


W. 


24 52 53 


26 38 5 


28 23 2 


30 7 43 






Spica 


E. 


48 33 1 


46 47 15 


45 1 46 


43 16 32 






Ajitares 


E. 


94 23 20 


92 37 26 


90 51 45 


89 6 21 




Y 


Sun 


W. 


90 38 62 


92 15 10 


93 51 13 


96 27 






Pollux 


W. 


56 35 42 


58 19 9 


60 2 22 


61 45 19 






Saturn 


W. 


38 47 11 


40 30 17 


42 13 7 


43 55 41 






Regulus 


W. 


19 34 35 


21 18 18 


23 1 46 


24 44 68 






Spica 


E. 


34 34 36 


32 61 3 


31 7 48 


29 24 51 






Antares 


E. 


80 23 19 


78 39 30 


76 55 67 


76 12 40 




8 


Sun 


W. 


103 22 3 


104 56 17 


106 30 14 


108 3 57 






Pollux 


W. 


70 16 21 


71 57 48 


73 39 


76 19 58 






Saturn 


W. 


62 24 37 


54 6 37 


55 46 23 


67 26 53 






Regulus 


W. 


33 17 13 


34 68 54 


36 40 21 


38 21 32 






Spica 


E. 


20 64 42 


19 13 41 


17 33 3 


15 52 50 






Antares 


E. 


66 40 9 


64 58 25 


63 16 56 


61 35 43 , 






a AquilsB 


E. 


116 31 37 


115 8 24 


113 44 55 


112 21 13 




9 


Sun 


W. 


115 48 47 


117 21 


118 52 59 


120 24 44 






Pollux 


W. 


88 41 8 


85 20 40 


86 59 67 


88 39 






Saturn 


W. 


65 45 42 


67 24 46 


69 3 33 


70 42 7 






Regulus 


W. 


46 43 51 


48 23 36 


50 3 6 


61 42 23 ; 






Antares 


E. 


53 13 16 


51 33 31 


49 63 59 


48 14 41 






a Aquilse 


E. 


105 20 44 


103 66 26 


102 32 8 


101 7 51 




10 


Sun 


W. 


127 69 54 


129 30 14 


131 19 


132 30 12 






Pollux 


W. 


96 50 52 


98 28 35 


100 6 5 


101 43 21 






Saturn 


W. 


78 61 32 


80 28 46 


82 5 46 


83 42 33 






Regulus 


W. 


69 55 23 


61 33 20 


63 11 3 


64 48 34 






Antares 


E. 


40 1 37 


38 23 40 


36 45 66 


35 8 24 






a Aquilse 


E. 


94 7 23 


92 43 37 


91 19 59 


89 56 32 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


119 37 15 


118 8 36 


116 39 52 


116 11 5 




11 


Pollux 


W. 


109 46 36 


111 22 37 


112 58 27 


114 34 6 






Saturn 


W. 


91 43 23 


93 18 67 


94 54 18 


96 29 29 






Regulus 


W. 


72 53 1 


74 29 19 


76 5 24 


77 41 18 






Spica 


W. 


18 57 12 


20 32 49 


22 8 20 


23 43 43 




Antares 


E, 


27 3 54 


26 27 36 


23 51 31 


22 15 36 

1 





JUNE, 1859. 



211 









GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 






LUNAR DISTANCES. 




Day of 
the 


Star's Name 














and 




Noon. 


III''. 


Vlk. 


IXi-. 




Month. 


Position. 




















o ; // 


o / // 


o / // 


o / // 




11 


a Aquilse 


E. 


88 33 15 


87 10 10 


86 47 17 


84 24 38 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


113 42 11 


112 13 28 


110 44 39 


109 16 52 




12 


Pollux 


W. 


116 9 30 


117 44 44 


119 19 46 


120 64 36 






Saturn 


W. 


98 4 27 


99 39 14 


101 13 49 


102 48 13 






Kegulus 


W. 


79 17 


80 62 31 


82 27 61 


84 2 69 






Spica 


W. 


25 18 59 


26 54 6 


28 29 5 


30 3 54 






a Aquilae 


E. 


77 35 21 


76 14 24 


74 5*3 47 


73 33 32 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


101 52 46 


100 24 23 


98 56 7 


97 27 58 






a Pegasi 


E. 


124 6 29 


122 36 55 


121 7 20 


119 37 44 




13 


Saturn 


W. 


110 37 30 


112 10 49 


113 48 58 


115 16 56 






Eegulus 


W. 


91 55 57 


93 30 1 


95 3 64 


96 37 37 






Spica 


W. 


37 55 40 


39 29 33 


41 3 16 


42 36 49 






a Aquilae 


E. 


66 58 23 


65 40 43 


64 23 35 


63 6 59 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


90 9 13 


88 41 56 


87 14 48 


85 47 51 






a Pegasi 


E. 


112 10 4 


110 40 41 


109 11 22 


107 42 8 




14 


Eegulus 


W. 


104 23 40 


105 56 23 


107 28 56 


109 1 20 






Spica 


W. 


50 22 11 


51 64 48 


63 27 15 


54 59 32 






a Aquilae 


E. 


56 53 12 


65 40 32 


54 28 40 


53 17 37 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


78 36 4 


77 10 21 


75 44 52 


74 19 37 






a Pegasi 


E. 


100 17 22 


98 48 44 


97 20 13 


95 51 49 




15 


Kegulus 


W. 


116 41 2 


118 12 32 


119 43 63 


121 16 5 






Spica 


W. 


62 38 47 


64 10 12 


65 41 28 


67 12 36 






Antares 


W. 


16 44 47 


18 16 17 


19 47 37 


21 18 60 






a Aquilae 


E. 


47 36 49 


46 31 57 


46 28 22 


44 26 8 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


67 17 20 


66 53 44 


64 30 27 


63 7 30 






a Pegasi 


E. 


88 31 50 


87 4 15 


85 36 49 


84 9 32 




16 


Spica 


W. 


74 46 16 


76 16 37 


77 46 51 


79 16 58 






Antares 


W. 


28 62 54 


30 23 19 


31 63 38 


33 23 49 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


66 18 10 


54 67 31 


63 37 20 


62 17 38 






a Pegasi 


E. 


76 55 28 


75 29 9 


74 3 


72 37 1 






a Arietis 


E. 


119 7 8 


117 37 9 


116 7 17 


114 37 32 




17 


Spica 


W. 


86 45 64 


88 15 23 


89 44 46 


91 14 4 






Antares 


W. 


40 53 7 


42 22 40 


43 62 8 


45 21 31 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


45 47 25 


44 31 18 


43 16 57 


42 1 24 






a Pegasi 


E. 


65 29 49 


64 4 57 


62 40 18 


61 15 51 






a Arietis 


E. 


107 10 13 


105 41 2 


104 11 56 


102 42 66 




18 


Spica 
Antares 


W. 


98 39 27 


100 8 20 


101 37 9 


103 6 66 






W. 


62 47 16 


64 16 13 


56 45 7 


57 13 59 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


36 3 19 


34 56 16 


33 48 40 


32 43 38 






a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


E. 


54 16 59 


62 53 57 


61 31 12 


60 8 44 






E. 


95 18 56 


93 50 19 


92 21 46 


90 63 14 






Venus 


E. 


119 4 23 


117 46 10 


116 26 69 


116 6 50 




19 


Spica 
Antares 


W. 


110 29 21 


111 57 58 


113 26 36 


114 56 13 






W. 


64 37 49 


66 6 31 


67 36 14 


69 3 67 






a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


E. 


43 21 28 


42 1 12 


40 41 24 


39 22 7 






E. 


83 31 7 


82 2 46 


80 34 24 


79 6 2 



212 



JUNE, 1859. 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVI. 


XVIIP'. 


XXR 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


/ // 


o / // 


, O f II 


11 


a Aquilae 


E. 


83 2 14 


81 40 5 


80 18 13 


78 56 37 ; 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


107 47 7 


106 18 25 


104 49 48 


103 21 14 


12 


Pollux 


W. 


122 29 14 


124 3 41 


125 37 56 


127 12 ' 




Saturn 


W. 


104 22 26 


105 56 29 


107 30 20 


109 4 




Regulus 


W. 


85 37 56 


87 12 43 


88 47 18 


90 21 43 ! 




Spica 


W. 


31 38 34 


33 13 5 


34 47 26 


36 21 38 \ 




a Aquilse 


E. 


72 13 40 


70 54 11 


69 35 8 


68 16 31 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


95 69 56 


94 32 2 


93 4 17 


91 36 41 




a Pegasi 


E. 


118 8 8 


116 38 33 


115 9 1 


113 39 31 1 


13 


Saturn 


W. 


116 49 44 


118 22 22 


119 54 60 


121 27 8 




Kegulus 


W. 


98 11 9 


99 44 32 


101 17 45 


102 60 47 : 




Spica 


W. 


44 10 12 


45 43 2,6 


47 16 31 


48 49 26 




a Aquilse 


E. 


61 50 58 


60 35 32 


59 20 44 


58 6 37 i 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


84 21 6 


82 54 32 


81 28 10 


80 2 




a Pegasi 


E. 


106 12 59 


104 43 56 


103 14 58 


101 46 7 


14 


Regulus 


W. 


110 33 35 


112 5 40 


113 37 37 


115 9 24 j 




Spica 


W. 


56 31 41 


58 3 41 


59 35 32 


61 7 14 ! 




a Aquilae 


E. 


52 7 28 


50 58 15 


49 50 2 


48 42 52 i 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


72 54 37 


71 29 53 


70 5 25 


68 41 14 




a Pegasi 


E. 


94 23 34 


92 55 26 


91 27 26 


89 59 34 i 


15 


Regulus 


W. 


122 46 9 


124 17 6 


125 47 53 


127 18 33 i 




Spica 


W. 


68 43 36 


70 14 28 


71 45 12 


73 15 48 ', 




Antares 


w. 


22 49 55 


24 20 51 


25 51 40 


27 22 21 




a AquilsB 


E. 


43 25 19 


42 26 2 


41 28 23 


40 32 27 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


61 44 53 


60 22 37 


59 44 


57 39 15 




a Pegasi 


E. 


82 42 25 


81 15 26 


79 48 37 


78 21 58 , 


16 


Spica 


W. 


80 46 58 


82 16 51 


83 46 38 


85 16 19 




Antares 


W. 


34 53 53 


, 36 23 51 


37 53 42 


39 23 27 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


50 58 26 


49 39 47 


48 21 42 


47 4 14 




a Pegasi 


E. 


71 11 12 


69 45 35 


68 20 8 


66 64 53 




a Arietis 


E. 


113 7 52 


111 38 19 


110 8 51 


108 39 29 '■ 


17 


Spica 


W. 


92 43 18 


94 12 26 


95 41 31 


97 10 31 




Antares 


W. 


46 50 49 


48 20 2 


49 49 10 


61 18 15 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


40 47 44 


39 35 


38 23 18 


37 12 42 




a Pegasi 


E. 


59 51 37 


58 27 36 


57 3 49 


56 40 16 




a Arietis 


E. 


101 13 59 


99 45 8 


98 16 20 


96 47 36 


18 


Spica 


W. 


104 34 41 


106 3 23 


107 32 3 


109 43 




Antares 


W. 


58 42 48 


60 11 36 


61 40 21 


63 9 5 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


31 40 21 


30 38 59 


29 39 43 


28 42 46 




a Pegasi 


E. 


48 46 35 


47 24 45 


46 3 16 


44 42 10 




a Arietis 


E. 


89 24 46 


87 66 19 


86 27 54 


84 59 SO 




Venus 


E. 


113 47 42 


112 28 35 


111 9 80 


109 50 25 . 


19 


Spica 


W. 


116 23 51 


117 52 30 


119 21 11 


120 49 53 




Antares 


W. 


70 32 41 


72 1 26 


73 30 12 


74 59 1 




o Pegasi 


E. 


38 3 25 


36 45 20 


35 27 56 


34 11 18 




a Arietis 


E. 


77 37 39 


76 9 15 


74 40 51 


73 12 24 , 



JUNE, 1859. 



213 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


IIP. 


VIi". 


IX''. 


Month. 


Position. 


















O / il 


/ II 


o / n 


O / // 


19 


Venus 


E. 


108 31 20 


107 12 15 


105 53 10 


104 34 4 




Sun 


E. 


135 11 26 


133 50 20 


132 29 12 


131 8 3 


20 


Antares 


W. 


76 27 52 


77 56 46 


79 26 44 


80 64 46 




a Pegasi 


E. 


32 65 32 


31 40 44 


30 27 * 


29 14 28 




a Arietis 


E. 


71 43 55 


70 15 24 


68 46 49 


67 18 11 




Venus 


E. 


97 58 7 


96 38 48 


95 19 25 


93 59 57 




Sun 


E. 


124 21 44 


123 18 


121 38 49 


120 17 15 


21 


Antares 


W. 


88 21 11 


89 60 48 


91 20 31 


92 50 23 




a Aquilse 


W. 


44 25 43 


45 26 51 


46 29 16 


47 32 56 




a Arietis 


E. 


59 53 53 


58 24 45 


56 55 29 


55 26 7 




Venus 


E. 


87 21 21 


86 1 19 


84 41 9 


83 20 51 




Sun 


E. 


113 27 59 


112 5 47 


110 43 28 


109 21 


22 


Antares 


W. 


100 22 4 


101 52 67 


103 24 1 


104 55 IS 




a Aquilae 


W. 


53 7 21 


64 17 7 


65 27 44 


66 39 10 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


28 15 19 


29 12 24 


30 12 9 


31 14 21 




a Arietis 


E. 


47 57 14 


46 27 


44 56 37 


43 26 3 




Venus 


E. 


76 37 1 


75 15 44 


73 54 16 


72 32 34 




Sun 


E. 


102 26 15 


101 2 46 


99 39 3 


98 16 8 


23 


Antares 


W. 


112. 35 11 


114 7 56 


115 40 67 


117 14 15 




a Aquilse 


W. 


62 47 30 


64 3 13 


66 19 33 


66 36 30 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


36 55 25 


38 8 38 


39 23 16 


40 39 9 




a Arietis 


E. 


35 50 30 


34 18 50 


32 46 59 


31 14 67 




Venus 


E. 


65 40 46 


64 17 41 


62 54 20 


61 30 43 




Sun 


E. 


91 12 4 


89 46 41 


88 21 2 


86 56 5 


24 


o Aquilse 


W. 


73 9 47 


74 30 2 


75 50 48 


77 12 3 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


47 15 32 


48 37 47 


60 64 


51 24 61 




a Pegasi 


w. 


25 46 43 


26 59 4 


28 13 49 


29 30 41 




a Arietis 


E. 


23 32 34 


21 69 49 


20 27 6 


18 54 29 




Venus 


E. 


54 28 19 


53 2 55 


51 37 13 


50 11 11 




Sun 


E. 


79 40 48 


78 12 58 


76 44 48 


75 16 16 


25 


a Aquilae 


W. 


84 5 13 


85 29 9 


86 63 30 


88 18 13 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


68 36 11 


60 4 35 


61 33 39 


63 3 21 




a Pegasi 


w. 


36 20 39 


37 46 50 


39 14 10 


40 42 36 




Venus 


E. 


42 56 5 


41 28 3 


39 69 41 


38 30 59 




Sun 


E. 


67 48 7 


66 17 20 


64 46 9 


63 14 34 


26 


a Aquilse 


W. 


95 27 11 


96 63 56 


98 20 57 


99 48 12 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


70 41 3 


72 14 19 


73 48 8 


76 22 29 




a Pegasi 
Venus 


w. 


48 19 


49 62 49 


51 27 24 


63 2 42 




E. 


31 2 44 


29 32 13 


28 1 28 


26 30 30 




Sun 


E. 


55 30 31 


53 66 27 


62 21 68 


60 47 4 


21 


a Aquilse 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


107 7 23 


108 35 34 


110 3 48 


111 32 2 




W. 


83 21 45 


84 59 1 


86 36 43 


88 14 60 




a Pegasi 

Sun 


w. 


61 9 25 


62 48 38 


64 28 26 


66 8 46 




E. 


42 46 16 


41 8 52 


39 31 4 


37 62 53 



214 



JUNE, 1859. 



1 




GKEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR ] 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XV". 


XTnit. 


WR 


1 Month. 


Position. 












19 


Venus 


E. 


103 14 57 


O / // 

101 55 48 


o / n • 

100 36 37 


o / // 

99 17 23 




Sun 


E. 


129 46 52 


128 25 40 


127 4 24 


125 43 6 


20 


Antares 


W. 


82 23 52 


83 53 3 


85 22 19 


86 51 42 




a Pegasi 


E. 


28 3 20 


26 53 46 


25 46 59 


24 40 16 




a Arietis 


E. 


65 49 29 


64 20 43 


62 61 52 


61 22 66 




Venus 


E. 


92 40 25 


91 20 48 


90 1 5 


88 41 16 




Sun 


E. 


118 55 36 


117 33 51 


116 12 


114 60 3 


21 


Antares 


W. 


94 20 24 


95 50 34 


97 20 63 


98 61 23 




a Aquilse 


W. 


48 37 43 


49 43 37 


60 50 33 


51 68 29 




a Arietis 


E. 


53 56 37 


52 27 


50 57 14 


49 27 19 




Venus 


E. 


82 24 


80 39 48 


79 19 3 


77 58 7 




Sun 


E. 


107 58 23 


106 35 37 


105 12 40 


103 49 33 


22 


Antares 


W. 


106 26 48 


107 58 32 


109 30 30 


111 2 43 




a Aquilse 


W. 


57 51 23 


59 4 21 


60 18 3 


61 32 26 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


32 18 46 


33 25 14 


34 33 36 


35 43 42 




a Arietis 


E. 


41 55 18 


40 24 23 


38 53 17 


37 21 59 




Venus 


E. 


71 10 40 


69 48 33 


68 26 12 


67 3 36 




Sun 


E. 


96 51 


95 26 38 


94 2 2 


92 37 11 


23 


Antares 


W. 


118 47 50 


120 21.44 


121 55 56 


123 30 27 




a Aquilse 


W. 


67 54 2 


69 12 9 


70 30 49 


71 50 2 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


41 56 16 


43 14 32 


44 33 52 


46 54 13 




a Arietis 


E. 


29 42 45 


28 10 23 


26 37 53 


25 5 16 




Venus 


E. 


60 6 49 


68 42 38 


67 18 10 


55 53 23 




Sun 


E. 


85 28 51 


84 2 19 


82 35 28 


81 8 18 


24 


a Aquilse 


W. 


78 33 47 


79 55 58 


81 18 37 


82 41 42 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


52 49 37 


54 15 9 


66 41 27 


57 8 27 




a Pegasi 


W. 


30 49 28 


32 10 


33 32 8 


34 56 43 




a Arietis 


E. 


17 22 5 


16 50 4 


14 18 43 


12 48 21 




Venus 


E. 


48 44 50 


47 18 9 


45 51 8 


44 23 46 




Sun 


E. 


73 47 23 


72 18 8 


70 48 30 


69 18 30 


25 


a Aquilse 


W. 


89 43 20 


91 8 47 


92 34 36 


94 44 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


64 33 42 


66 4 39 


67 36 12 


69 8 21 




a Pegasi 


w. 


42 12 3 


43 42 27 


45 13 47 


46 45 58 




Venus 


E. 


37 1 57 


35 32 36 


34 2 56 


32 32 58 




Sun 


E. 


61 42 36 


60 10 12 


58 37 23 


57 4 10 


26 


a Aquilse 


W. 


101 15 42 


102 43 23 


104 11 16 


105 39 16 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


76 67 21 


78 32 43 


80 8 36 


81 44 66 




a Pegasi 


W. 


54 38 44 


56 15 26 


57 62 48 


69 30 48 




Venus 


E. 


24 59 23 


23 28 10 


21 66 54 


20 26 42 




Sun 


E. 


49 11 45 


47 36 


45 59 60 


44 23 16 


27 


a Aquilse 


W. 


113 13 


114 28 18 


115 66 14 


117 23 58 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


89 53 21 


91 32 15 


93 11 32 


94 51 9 




a Pegasi 


w. 


67 49 40 


69 31 6 


71 13 1 


72 56 26 




Sun 


E. 


36 14 19 


34 35 23 


32 66 6 


31 16 27 



.lULY, 1859. 



215 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 






LUNAR DISTANCES. 




Day of 


Star's Name 














and 




Noon. 


iiib. 


VIi". 


IXt. 




Month. 


Position. 




















o / // 


o / // 


O / // 


/ // 




2 


Sun 


W. 


26 39 45 


28 24 27 


30 9 6 


31 53 40 






Spica 


E. 


75 17 41 


73 25 2 


71 32 32 


69 40 12 






Antares 


E. 


121 9 30 


119 16 44 


117 24 7 


115 31 41 




3 


Sun 


W. 


40 34 19 


42 17 52 


44 1 10 


45 44 14 






Spica 


E. 


60 21 40 


58 30 41 


56 39 59 


54 49 33 






Antares 


E. 


106 12 31 


104 21 24 


102 30 33 


100 39 58 




4 


Sun 


W. 


54 15 19 


65 56 37 


57 37 36 


59 18 15 






Saturn 


W. 


24 49 5 


26 36 56 


28 24 26 


30 11 35 






Spica 


E. 


45 42 3 


43 53 33 


42 5 24 


40 17 36 






Antares 


E. 


91 31 36 


89 42 53 


87 54 31 


86 '6 29 




5 


Sun 


W. 


67 36 19 


69 14 52 


70 53 3 


72 30 53 






Saturn 


W. 


39 2 2 


40 47 2 


42 31 40 


44 15 56 






Eegulus 


W. 


22 46 45 


24 32 31 


26 17 56 


28 3 






Spica 


E. 


31 24 16 


29 38 46 


27 53 41 


26 9 2 






Antares 


E. 


77 11 39 


75 25 47 


73 40 16 


71 55 7 




6 


Sun 


W. 


80 34 35 


82 10 14 


83 45 32 


85 20 28 






Saturn 


W. 


52 51 44 


54 33 48 


56 15 30 


57 56 50 






Regulus 


w. 


36 42 53 


38 25 47 


40 8 20 


41 50 31 






Spica 


E. 


17 32 31 


15 50 47 


14 9 40 


12 29 18 






Antares 


E. 


63 14 54 


61 31 58 


59 49 23 


58 7 9 






a Aquilffl 


E. 


113 50 4 


112 24 50 


110 59 31 


109 34 9 




7 


Sun 


W. 


93 9 56 


94 42 49 


96 15 21 


97 47 34 






Saturn 


w. 


66 18 16 


67 57 31 


69 36 26 


71 15 2 






Regulus 


w. 


50 16 12 


51 56 19 


53 36 6 


55 15 33 






Antares 


E. 


49 41 19 


48 1 11 


46 21 22 


44 41 53 






a Aquilae 


E. 


102 27 29 


101 2 23 


99 37 24 


98 12 33 




8 


Sun 


W. 


105 23 55 


106 54 17 


108 24 21 


109 54 8 






Saturn 


W. 


79 23 15 


80 59 59 


82 36 26 


84 12 35 






Regulus 


W. 


63 28 7 


65 5 44 


66 43 2 


68 20 4 






Antares 


E. 


36 29 14 


34 51 37 


33 14 17 


31 37 15 






a Aquilae 


E. 


91 11 7 


89 47 29 


88 24 6 


87 59 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


116 20 24 


114 51 37 


113 22 53 


111 54 12 




9 


Sun 


W. 


117 18 59 


118 47 11 


120 15 8 


121 42 50 






Saturn 


W. 


92 9 17 


93 43 51 


95 18 11 


96 52 16 






Regulus 


w. 


76 21 10 


77 56 37 


79 31 49 


81 6 47 






Spica 
Antares 


w. 


22 24 51 


23 59 43 


25 34 25 


27 8 56 






E. 


23 36 7 


22 40 


20 25 28 


18 50 31 






a Aquilae 
Fomalhaut 


E. 


80 9 49 


78 48 33 


77 27 37 


76 7 4 






E. 


104 32 10 


103 4 7 


101 36 11 


100 8 24 




10 


Sun 


W. 


128 57 57 


130 24 20 


131 50 30 


133 16 29 






Saturn 


W. 


104 39 17 


106 12 4 


107 44 38 


109 17 






Regulus 
Spica 
a Aquilae 
Fomalhaut 


w. 


88 58 13 


90 31 53 


92 5 20 


93 38 36 






w. 


34 58 45 


36 32 10 


38 5 24 


39 38 27 






E. 


69 30 18 


68 12 15 


66 54 41 


65 37 37 






E. 


92 51 49 


91 24 59 


89 58 21 


88 31 53 






a Pegasi 


E. 


115 1 21 


113 32 27 


112 3 38 


110 34 54 



216 



JULY, 1859. 



GREENWICH MEAl^ TIME. 








LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XV". 


XVIIP-. 


XXTi. 


Month. 


Position. 


















O 1 II 


a I 11 


o / // 


O / II 


2 


Sun 


W. 


33 38 7 


35 22 26 


37 6 36 


38 50 33 




Spica 


E. 


67 48 3 


66 56 7 


64 4 24 


62 12 66 




Antares 


E. 


113 39 25 


111 47 21 


109 65 31 


108 3 54 


3 


Sun 


W. 


47 27 1 


49 9 32 


50 51 46 


52 33 42 




Spica 


E. 


52 59 25 


51 9 36 


49 20 6 


47 30 54 




Antares 


E. 


98 49 41 


96 69 41 


95 10 


93 20 38 


4 


Sun 


W. 


60 58 33 


62 38 31 


64 18 8 


66 67 24 




Saturn 


W. 


31 58 23 


33 44 50 


35 30 56 


37 16 40 




Spica 


E. 


38 30 10 


36 43 7 


34 66 26 


33 10 9 




Antares 


E. 


84 18 48 


82 31 29 


80 44 31 


78 57 54 


5 


Sun 


W. 


74 8 21 


75 45 27 


77 22 11 


78 58 34 




Saturn 


W. 


45 59 50 


47 43 21 


49 26 31 


51 9 19 




Eegulus 


W. 


•29 47 42 


31 32 2 


33 16 1 


34 59 38 




Spica 


E. 


24 24 48 


22 41 1 


20 67 41 


19 14 50 




Antares 


E. 


70 10 20 


68 25 56 


66 41 63 


64 58 18 


6 


Sun 


W. 


86 55 3 


88 29 18 


90 3 11 


91 36 44 




Saturn 


W. 


59 37 49 


61 18 27 


62 68 44 


64 38 40 




Regulus 


W. 


43 32 20 


46 13 49 


46 54 57 


48 35 45 




Spica 


E. 


10 49 51 


9 11 37 


- 


. - . 




Antares 


E. 


56 25 17 


54 43 47 


63 2 37 


61 21 48 




a Aquilse 


E. 


108 8 46 


106 43 22 


105 18 


103 52 42 


1 


Sun 


W. 


99 19 28 


100 51 2 


102 22 18 


103 53 16 




Saturn 


W. 


72 53 18 


74 31 15 


76 8 54 


77 46 14 




Eegulus 


W. 


56 54 41 


58 33 31 


60 12 1 


61 50 13 




Antares 


E. 


43 2 44 


41 23 53 


39 45 22 


38 7 9 




a Aquilse 


E. 


96 47 53 


95 23 23 


93 59 4 


92 34 59 


8 


Sun 


W. 


111 23 39 


112 52 63 


114 21 51 


115 50 33 




Saturn 


W. 


85 48 28 


87 24 4 


88 59 24 


90 34 28 




Regulus 


W. 


69 56 49 


71 33 18 


73 9 31 


74 46 28 




Antares 


E. 


30 29 


28 23 59 


26 47 46 


26 11 49 




a Aquilse 


E. 


85 38 9 


84 15 36 


82 53 21 


81 31 26 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


110 25 36 


108 57 5 


107 28 40 


106 21 


9 


Sun 


W. 


123 10 18 


124 37 33 


126 4 34 


127 31 22 




Saturn 


W. 


98 26 7 


99 59 44 


lOl 33 8 


103 6 19 




Regulus 


W. 


82 41 30 


84 16 1 


85 50 18 


87 24 22 




Spica 


W. 


28 43 16 


30 17 25 


31 51 23 


33 25 10 




Antares 


E. 


17 16 47 


15 41 18 


14 7 2 


12 33 




a Aquilse 


E. 


74 46 54 


73 27 7 


72 7 45 


70 48 48 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


98 40 46 


97 13 18 


95 45 58 


94 18 48 


10 


Sun 


W. 


134 42 15 


136 7 51 


137 33 15 


138 58 28 




Saturn 


W. 


110 49 12 


112 21 12 


113 53 1 


116 24 40 




Regulus 


w. 


95 11 40 


96 44 33 


98 17 16 


99 49 48 




Spica 


w. 


41 11 19 


42 44 2 


44 16 34 


45 48 57 




a Aquilse 


E. 


64 21 4 


63 6 4 


61 49 39 


60 34 49 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


87 5 36 


85 39 31 


84 13 37 


82 47 66 


j. 


a Pegasi 


E. 


109 6 15 


107 37 42 


106 9 15 


104 40 64 



JULY, 1859. 



217 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


III''. 


VIi-. 


IXt. 


Month. 


Position. 












11 


Regulus 


W. 


101 22 10 


O 1 11 

102 54 22 


O / // 

104 26 24 


o / // 

105 58 18 




Spica 


w. 


47 21 10 


48 53 13 


60 25 8 


51 56 54 




a Aquilae 


E. 


59 20 37 


58 7 4 


66 54 13 


55 42 5 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


81 22 26 


79 57 7 


78 32 2 


77 7 11 




a Pegasi 


E. 


103 12 39 


101 44 31 


100 16 29 


98 48 33 


12 


Spica 


W. 


69 33 38 


61 4 35 


62 36 25 


64 6 8 




Antares 


w. 


13 39 20 


15 10 22 


16 41 16 


18 12 4 




a Aquilse 


E. 


49 53 53 


48 47 6 


47 41 22 


46 36 48 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


70 6 18 


68 42 52 


67 19 43 


65 56 60 




a Pegasi 


E. 


91 30 36 


90 3 22 


88 36 15 


87 9 16 


13 


Spica 


W. 


71 38 3 


73 8 8 


74 38 7 


76 8 




Antares 


w. 


25 44 25 


27 14 34 


28 44 38 


30 14 37 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


59 7 


57 46 3 


56 25 29 


55 5 19 




a Pegasi 


E. 


79 56 6 


78 29 51 


77 3 45 


76 37 46 




a Arietis 


E. 


122 14 58 


120 45 15 


119 15 37 


117 46 4 


14 


Spica 


W. 


83 36 13 


85 6 37 


86 34 58 


88 4 14 




Antares 


w. 


37 43 14 


39 12 43 


40 42 9 


42 11 30 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


48 31 26 


47 14 15 


45 57 43 


44 41 50 




a Pegasi 


E. 


68 30 1 


67 4 65 


65 39 58 


64 15 12 




a Arietis 


E. 


110 19 24 


108 60 16 


107 21 12 


106 52 12 


15 


Spica 


W. 


95 29 45 


96 68 41 


98 27 35 


99 66 27 




Antares 


W. 


49 37 26 


51 6 28 


62 36 27 


54 4 24 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


38 34 34 


37 24 3 


36 14 43 


35 6 41 




a Pegasi 


E. 


57 14 4 


65 60 27 


54 27 3 


63 3 64 




a Arietis 


E. 


98 27 59 


96 69 16 


95 30 37 


94 1 69 


16 


Spica 


W. 


107 20 18 


108 48 59 


110 17 40 


111 46 21 




Antares 


W. 


61 28 41 


62 57 28 


64 26 15 


65 55 1 




a Pegasi 


E. 


46 12 20 


44 61 


43 30 4 


42 9 33 




a Arietis 


E. 


86 39 19 


85 10 51 


83 42 24 


82 13 57 




Aldebaran 


E. 


118 17 39 


116 50 45 


115 23 48 


113 56 49 


1*7 


Antares 


W. 


73 18 53 


74 47 42 


76 16 32 


77 45 24 




a Pegasi 


E. 


35 34 57 


34 18 2 


33 1 58 


31 46 50 




a Arietis 


E. 


74 51 45 


73 23 17 


71 54 48 


70 26 18 




Aldebaran 


E. 


106 41 22 


105 14 10 


103 46 54 


102 19 36 


18 


Antares 


W. 


85 10 19 


86 39 27 


88 8 40 


89 37 67 




a Aquilse 


W. 


42 14 22 


43 12 19 


44 11 43 


46 12 27 




a Arietis 


E. 


63 3 18 


61 34 34 


60 5 47 


58 36 56 




Aldebaran 


E. 


96 2 18 


93 34 39 


92 6 66 


90 39 8 


19 


Antares 


W. 


97 5 40 


98 36 32 


100 5 30 


101 36 36 


/ 


a Aquilse 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


60 33 46 


51 41 6 


52 49 19 


63 68 22 




w. 


26 28 40 


27 18 39 


28 11 45 


29 7 43 




a Arietis 


E. 


51 11 37 


49 42 19 


48 12 54 


46 43 24 




Aldebaran 


E. 


83 18 55 


81 60 35 


80 22 9 


78 53 36 




Sun 


E. 


181 26 5 


130 3 29 


128 40 46 


127 17 54 


20 


a Aquilse 


w.. 


59 64 58 


61 8 18 


62 22 14 


63 36 45 



218 



JULY, 1859. 









GREENWICH MEAN TIME. 


'■'-.-'SiS 










LUNAR 


DISTANOiSS. 








Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


xvnii. 


XXTt. 




Month. 


Position. 














11 


Begulus 


W. 


o / // 

107 30 2 


O / // 

109 1 38 


o / // 

110 33 5 


O / // 

112 4 24 






Spica 


W. 


53 28 31 


55 


56 31 20 


58 2 33 






a AquilsB 


E. 


54 30 44 


53 20 11 


52 10 30 


51 1 43 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


15 42 32 


74 18 7 


72 53 56 


71 29 59 






a Pegasi 


E. 


97 20 44 


95 53 2 


94 25 26 


92 57 58 




12 


Spica 


W. 


65 36 43 


67 7 13 


68 37 36 


70 7 52 






Antares 


W. 


19 42 45 


21 13 19 


22 43 47 


24 14 9 




1 


a Aquilse 


E. 


45 33 27 


44 31 24 


43 30 44 


42 31 33 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


64 34 15 


63 11 57 


61 49 58 


60 28 19 






a Pegasi 


E. 


86 42 22 


84 15 37 


82 48 69 


81 22 29 




13 


Spica 


W. 


77 37 49 


79 7 32 


80 37 10 


82 6 44 






Antares 


W. 


31 44 30 


33 14 18 


34 44 1 


36 13 40 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


53 45 35 


52 26 18 


51 7 29 


49 49 11 






a Pegasi 


E. 


74 11 56 


72 46 14 


71 20 41 


69 55 16 






a Arietis 


E. 


116 16 36 


114 47 11 


113 17 51 


111 48 36 




14 


Spica 


W. 


89 33 27 


91 2 37 


92 31 43 


94 46 






Antares 


w. 


43 40 48 


45 10 3 


46 39 13 


48 8 21 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


43 26 41 


42 12 18 


40 58 47 


39 46 10 






a Pegasi 


E. 


62 50 36 


61 26 10 


60 1 66 


68 37 64 






a Arietis 


E. 


104 23 16 


102 54 21 


101 25 31 


99 56 43 j 




15 


Spica 


W. 


101 25 16 


102 54 4 


104 22 60 


105 51 34 






Antares 


W. 


55 33 19 


57 2 12 


58 31 3 


59 69 52 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


34 5 


32 55 3 


31 51 44 


30 50 19 






a Pegasi 


E. 


51 41 


60 18 22 


48 56 2 


47 34 1 






a Arietis 


E. 


92 33 24 


91 4 60 


89 36 18 


88 7 48 




16 


Spica 


W. 


113 15 


114 43 40 


116 12 20 


117 41 






Antares 


W. 


67 23 47 


68 52 33 


70 21 19 


71 50 6 






a Pegasi 


E. 


40 49 30 


39 29 58 


38 10 69 


36 62 38 






a Arietis 


E. 


80 45 31 


79 17 5 


77 48 39 


76 20 12 






Aldebaran 


E. 


112 29 48 


111 2 45 


109 36 40 


108 8 32 




11 


Antares 


W. 


79 14 17 


80 43 13 


82 12 12 


83 41 14 






a Pegasi 


E. 


30 32 47 


29 19 57 


28 8 28 


26 58 32 






a Arietis 


E. 


68 57 46 


67 29 13 


66 37 


64 31 59 






Aldebaran 


E. 


100 62 16 


99 24 61 


97 57 24 


96 29 53 




18 


Antares 


W. 


91 7 18 


92 36 45 


94 6 18 


95 35 56 






a Aquilse 


W. 


46 14 28 


47 17 40 


48 22 


49 27 23 






a Arietis 


E. 


57 8 1 


55 39 2 


54 9 59 


62 40 60 






Aldebaran 


E. 


89 11 16 


87 43 19 


86 15 16 


84 47 8 




19 


Antares 


W. 


103 5 50 


104 36 13 


106 6 44 


107 37 25 






a Aquilse 


w. 


55 8 14 


56 18 62 


57 30 13 


58 42 16 






Fomalhaut 


w. 


30 6 18 


31 7 17 


32 10 27 


33 15 37 






a Arietis 


E. 


45 13 48 


43 44 6 


42 14 16 


40 44 20 






Aldebaran 


E. 


77 24 57 


75 66 10 


74 27 16 


72 68 14 






Sun 


E. 


125 64 64 


124 31 46 


123 8 28 


121 46 1 




20 


a Aquilse 


W. 


64 51 50 


66 7 28 


67 23 36 


68 40 16 



JULY, 1859. 



219 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Namt 












the 


and 




Noon. 


III'-. 


TI'". 


VS.K 


Month. 


Position. 


















O / It 


o / // 


O 1 II 


O / // 


20 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


34 22 37 


35 31 18 


36 41 33 


37 53 13 




a Arietis 


E. 


39 14 IT 


37 44 7 


36 13 50 


34 43 26 




Aldebaran 


E. 


71 29 4 


69 59 45 


68 30 18 


67 43 




Sun 


E. 


120 21 24 


118 57 36 


117 33 38 


116 9 28 


21 


a Aquilae 


W. 


69 57 22 


71 14 58 


72 33 2 


73 51 32 




Fomalliaut 


W. 


44 9 46 


45 28 10 


46 47 28 


48 7 37 




Aldebaran 


E. 


59 30 25 


57 59 52 


66 29 9 


54 58 16 




Jupiter 


E. 


90 23 


88 52 8 


87 21 3 


85 49 42 




Sun 


E. 


109 5 30 


107 40 2 


106 14 18 


104 48 20 


22 


a Aquilae 


W. 


80 30 18 


81 51 14 


83 12 32 


84 34 11 




Fomalliaut 


W. 


54 59 44 


56 24 13 


57 49 21 


69 15 5 




a Pegasi 


W. 


32 43 48 


34 4 51 


35 27 10 


36 60 40 




Aldebaran 


E. 


47 21 24 


45 49 34 


44 17 36 


42 45 80 




Jupiter 


E. 


78 8 51 


76 35 49 


75 2 28 


73 28 48 




Sun 


E. 


97 34 20 


96 6 39 


94 38 40 


93 10 21 


23 


a Aquilae 


W. 


91 27 29 


92 51 4 


94 14 56 


95 39 4 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


66 32 28 


68 1 35 


69 31 14 


71 1 24 




a Pegasi 


w. 


44 3 20 


45 32 30 


47 2 27 


48 33 9 




Aldebaran 


E. 


35 3 52 


33 31 32 


31 59 18 


30 27 14 




Jupiter 


E. 


65 35 26 


63 59 43 


62 23 37 


60 47 9 




Sun 


E. 


85 43 42 


84 13 18 


82 42 31 


81 11 22 


24 


a Aquilae 


W. 


102 43 17 


104 8 43 


105 34 17 


106 59 58 




Fomalliaut 


W. 


78 39 41 


80 12 47 


81 46 21 


83 20 21 




a Pega-si 


W. 


66 17 2 


57 51 44 


59 27 3 


61 2 57 




a Arietis 


W. 


12 40 22 


14 14 9 


15 49 44 


17 26 45 




Aldebaran 


E. 


22 53 30 


21 25 19 


19 68 39 


18 33 59 




Jupiter 


E. 


52 39 1 


51 12 


49 20 69 


47 41 21 




Sun 


E. 


73 29 40 


71 56 7 


70 22 8 


68 47 44 


25 


a Aquilae 


W. 


114 9 6 


115 34 49 


117 24 


118 25 48 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


91 16 54 


92 53 26 


94 30 21 


96 7 39 




a Pegasi 


w. 


69 11 


70 50 14 


72 30 


74 10 15 




a Arietis 


w. 


25 46 46 


27 29 5 


29 12 1 


30 55 33 




Jupiter 


E. 


39 17 4 


37 35 


35 52 31 


34 9 39 




Sun 


E. 


60 49 16 


59 12 16 


57 34 50 


66 56 58 


26 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


104 19 3 


105 58 12 


107 37 34 


109 17 9 




a Pegasi 


W. 


82 38 48 


84 21 53 


86 5 23 


87 49 17 




a Arietis 


W. 


39 41 31 


41 28 14 


43 15 25 


46 3 4 




Jupiter 

Sun 


E. 


25 29 52 


23 44 57 


21 59 47 


20 14 25 




E. 


47 41 9 


46 43 


44 19 52 


42 38 37 


21 


a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


W. 


96 34 27 


98 20 29 


100 6 48 


101 53 23 




W. 


54 7 48 


55 57 56 


57 48 27 


69 39 19 




Aldebaran 


w. 


24 5 23 


25 45 12 


27 26 40 


29 9 30 




Sun 


E. 


34 6 33 


32 23 3 


30 39 13 


28 55 4 


31 


Sun 


W. 


22 38 3 


24 23 38 


26 8 59 


27 54 5 




Spica 
Antajes 


E. 


51 33 50 


49 41 8 


47 48 42 


45 66 32 




E. 


97 23 48 


95 30 65 


93 38 17 


91 45 54 



220 



JULY, 1859. 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










tiie 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi". 


XVIIIi". 


XXTi'. 


Month. 


Position. 












20 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


/ // 

39 6 14 


40° 20 28 


O / // 

41 35 51 


42° 52 18 




a Arietis 


E. 


33 12 55 


31 42 17 


30 11 34 


28 40 44 




Aldebaran 


E. 


65 30 58 


64 1 4 


62 31 1 


61 48 




Sun 


E. 


114 45 6 


113 20 32 


111 66 45 


110 30 44 


21 


a Aquilffi 


W. 


15 10 28 


76 29 50 


77 49 36 


79 9 45 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


49 28 34 


50 50 17 


52 12 46 


53 35 54 




Aldebaran 


E. 


53 27 13 


51 56 1 


60 24 38 


48 63 6 




Jupiter 


E. 


84 18 5 


82 46 12 


81 14 3 


79 41 36 




Sun 


E. 


103 22 6 


101 55 35 


100 28 47 


99 1 43 


22 


a Aquilas 


W. 


85 56 11 


87 18 32 


88 41 12 


90 4 11 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


60 41 26 


62 8 21 


63 35 50 


65 3 52 




a Pegasi 


W. 


38 15 16 


39 40 54 


41 7 29 


42 34 59 




Aldebaran 


E. 


41 13 18 


39 41 


38 8 39 


36 36 15 




Jupiter 


E. 


1\ 54 48' 


70 20 29 


68 45 49 


67 10 48 




Sun 


E. 


91 41 43 


90 12 44 


88 43 24 


87 13 44 


23 


a Aquilae 


W. 


97 3 28 


98 28 6 


99 52 58 


101 18 2 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


72 32 5 


74 3 15 


75 34 55 


77 7 4 




a Pegasi 


w. 


60 4 35 


51 36 42 


53 9 30 


54 42 57 




Aldebaran 


E. 


28 55 27 


27 24 1 


25 63 6 


24 22 51 




Jupiter 


E. 


59 10 18 


57 33 4 


65 56 27 


54 17 26 




Sun 


E. 


79 39 49 


78 7 63 


76 35 33 


75 2 49 


24 


a Aquilae 


W. 


108 25 44 


109 51 34 


111 17 26 


112 43 17 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


84 54 49 


86 29 42 


88 6 1 


89 40 46 




a Pegasi 


W. 


62 39 27 


64 16 30 


65 64 8 


67 32 18 




a Arietis 


W. 


19 4 57 


20 44 10 


22 24 16 


24 5 9 




Aldebaran 


E. 


17 11 56 


15 53 17 


14 39 7 


13 30 49 




Jupiter 


E. 


46 1 19 


44 20 52 


42 40 


40 58 44 




Sun 


E. 


67 12 54 


65 37 38 


64 1 57 


62 25 49 


25 


a Aquilae 


W. 


119 50 57 


121 15 47 


122 40 15 


124 4 15 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


97 45 17 


99 23 16 


101 1 34 


102 40 10 




a Pegasi 


W. 


76 51 1 


77 32 15 


79 13 59 


80 66 10 




a Arietis 


W. 


32 39 40 


34 24 21 


36 9 33 


37 55 17 




Jupiter 


E. 


32 26 25 


30 42 48 


28 58 49 


27 14 30 




Sun 


E. 


54 18 40 


52 39 56 


61 46 


49 21 10 


26 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


110 56 64 


112 36 48 


114 16 49 


115 66 56 




a Pegasi 


W. 


89 33 35 


91 18 17 


93 3 20 


94 48 44 




a Arietis 


W. 


46 51 10 


48 39 42 


60 28 40 


52 18 2 




Jupiter 


E. 


18 28 55 


16 43 23 


14 57 58 


13 12 52 




Sun 


E. 


40 56 58 


39 14 65 


37 32 30 


35 49 42 


2V 


a Pegasi 


W. 


103 40 12 


105 27 13 


107 14 26 


109 1 48 




a Arietis 


W. 


61 30 31 


63 22 2 


65 13 61 


67 5 58 




Aldebaran 


W. 


30 63 33 


32 38 39 


34 24 40 


36 11 31 




Sun 


E. 


27 10 86 


25 26 61 


23 40 60 


21 55 34 


31 


Sun 


W. 


29 38 65 


31 23 28 


33 7 42 


34 61 38 




Spica 


E. 


44 4 41 


42 13 8 


40 21 65 


38 31 2 




Antares 


E. 


89 53 49 


88 2 2 


86 10 33 


84 19 24 



AUGUST, 1859. 



221 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 




1 


LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 
the 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


Illi. 


Vli. 


IXi. 




Month. 


Position. 




















O t U 


o / // 


Q 1 II 


O / 


II 


1 


Sun 


W. 


36 35 14 


38 18 29 


40 1 23 


41 43 


55 




Spica 


E. 


36 40 32 


34 60 24 


33 39 


31 11 


19 




Antares 


E. 


82 28 35 


80 38 7 


78 48 


76 58 


16 


2 


SlTN 


W. 


50 10 48 


61 60 57 


53 30 42 


56 10 


2 




Antares 


E. 


67 56 26 


66 8 6 


64 21 10 


62 34 


39 




a Aquilae 


E. 


117 43 27 


116 15 54 


114 48 8 


113 20 


14 


3 


Sun 


W. 


63 20 18 


64 57 4 


66 33 24 


68 9 


19 




Antares 


E. 


53 48 32 


52 4 36 


50 21 5 


48 38 


1 




a Aquilse 


E. 


106 10 


104 32 19 


103 4 37 


101 37 


3 


4 


Sun 


W. 


76 2 33 


77 35 68 


79 8 68 


80 41 


36 




Antares 


E. 


40 8 67 


38 28 23 


36 48 13 


35 8 


27 




a Aquilte 


E. 


94 22 32 


92 66 26 


91 30 36 


90 6 


7 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


119 36 45 


118 6 64 


116 35 9 


116 4 


30 


5 


Sun 


W. 


88 18 52 


89 49 13 


91 19 12 


92 48 


51 




Spica 


W. 


19 8 


20 44 38 


22 21 3 


23 67 


12 




Antares 


E. 


26 66 24 


25 17 55 


23 40 46 


22 3 


59 




a Aquilae 


E. 


83 2 59 


81 39 43 


80 16 51 


78 54 


24 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


107 33 26 


106 3 46 


104 34 17 


103 5 


1 


6 


Sun 


W. 


100 12 9 


101 39 53 


103 7 19 


104 34 


28 




Spica 


W. 


31 64 1 


33 28 34 


36 2 51 


36 36 


53 




a Aquilae 


E. 


72 8 69 


70 49 21 


69 30 14 


68 11 


39 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


95 42 7 


94 14 16 


92 46 37 


91 19 


14 




a Pegasi 


E. 


117 59 19 


116 29 28 


114 69 46 


113 30 


12 


7 


Sun 


W. 


111 46 14 


113 11 50 


114 37 13 


116 2 


23 




Spica 


W. 


44 23 18 


46 56 53 


47 28 15 


49 


24 




a Aquilae 


E. 


61 47 20 


60 32 20 


69 18 1 


58 4 


24 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


84 6 6 


82 40 13 


81 14 36 


79 49 


16 




a Pegasi 


E. 


106 4 46 


104 36 10 


103 7 43 


101 39 


27 


8 


Sun 


W. 


123 5 10 


124 29 10 


126 53 


127 16 


40 




Spica 


W. 


56 38 14 


68 9 16 


59 40 8 


61 10 


51 




a Aquilae 


E. 


52 8 7 


50 59 29 


49 51 61 


48 45 


15 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


72 46 27 


71 22 43 


69 69 16 


68 36 


4 




a Pegasi 


E. 


94 20 24 


92 53 3 


91 25 51 


89 58 


48 


9 


Spica 


W. 


68 42 20 


70 12 15 


71 42 3 


73 11 


45 




Antares 


W. 


22 48 24 


24 18 25 


25 48 18 


27 18 


6 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


61 44 46 


60 23 27 


59 2 31 


57 41 


57 




a Pegasi 


E. 


82 45 44 


81 19 32 


79 53 29 


78 27 


33 




a Arietis 


E. 


125 10 43 


123 41 10 


122 11 42 


120 42 


20 


10 


Spica 


W. 


80 38 56 


82 8 8 


83 37 16 


85 6 


20 




Antares 


W. 


34 46 42 


36 14 59 


37 44 12 


39 13 


22 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


61 5 13 


49 47 16 


48 29 51 


47 13 







a Pegasi 


E. 


71 19 59 


69 54 64 


68 29 56 


67 5 


7 




a Arietis 


E. 


113 16 42 


111 47 46 


110 18 56 


108 50 


6 


11 


Spica 
Antares 


W. 


92 31 


93 69 49 


96 28 37 


96 57 


23 




W. 


46 38 27 


48 7 22 


49 36 14 


61 5 


6 



222 



AUGUST, 1859. 



GREENWICH MEAN TIME. 








LUNAE 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


XTIIP'. 


XXTt. 


Month. 


Position 












1 


Sun 


W. 


o / // 

43 26 5 


O / // 

45 7 51 


o / // 

46 49 14 


O / // 

48 30 13 




Spica 


E. 


29 22 24 


27 33 55 


25 45 54 


23 58 22 




Antares 


E. 


75 8 55 


73 19 57 


71 31 22 


69 43 12 


2 


Sun 


W. 


56 48 56 


58 27 25 


60 6 28 


61 43 6 




Antares 


E. 


60 48 34 


59 2 55 


57 17 41 


55 32 54 




a Aquilae 


E. 


111 52 14 


110 24 12 


108 66 8 


107 28 7 


3 


Sun 


W. 


69 44 48 


71 19 52 


72 64 30 


74 28 44 




Antares 


E. 


46 55 22 


45 13 8 


43 31 19 


. 41 49 66 




a Aquilae 


E. 


100 9 41 


98 42 32 


97 15 37 


95 48 56 


4 


Sun 


W. 


82 13 48 


83 45 38 


85 17 6 


86 48 10 




Antares 


E. 


33 29 5 


31 60 5 


30 11 29 


28 33 16 




a Aquilae 


E. 


88 39 58 


87 15 10 


85 50 44 


84 26 40 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


113 33 58 


112 3 35 


110 33 21 


109 3 18 


5 


Sun 


W. 


94 18 10 


95 47 8 


97 15 47 


98 44 8 




Spica 


W. 


25 33 6 


27 8 44 


28 44 6 


30 19 12 




Antares 


E. 


20 21 32 


18 51 26 


17 15 39 


16 40 12 




a Aquilse 


E. 


VY 32 24 


76 10 51 


74 49 45 


73 29 7 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


101 35 59 


100 7 10 


98 38 35 


97 10 14 


6 


Sun 


W. 


106 1 20 


107 27 57 


108 54 17 


110 20 23 




Spica 


W. 


38 10 39 


39 44 10 


41 17 27 


42 50 30 




a Aquilffi 


E. 


66 53 37 


65 36 8 


64 19 15 


63 2 59 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


89 52 6 


88 25 13 


86 58 35 


85 32 13 




a Pegasi 


E. 


112 48 


110 31 33 


109 2 28 


107 33 32 


1 


Sun 


W. 


117 27 20 


118 52 5 


120 16 37 


121 40 59 




Spica 


W. 


50 32 21 


52 4 6 


53 35 39 


55 7 2 




a Aquilae 


E. 


56 51 31 


55 39 25 


64 28 7 


53 17 40 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


78 24 « 


76 59 20 


75 34 46 


74 10 29 




a Pegasi 


E. 


100 11 19 


98 43 21 


97 15 33 


95 47 54 


8 


Sun 


W. 


128 40 12 


130 3 35 


131 26 49 


132 49 65 




Spica 


W. 


62 41 25 


64 11 50 


65 42 8 


67 12 17 




a Aquilae 


E. 


47 39 45 


46 35 25 


45 32 19 


44 30 31 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


67 13 12 


65 50 37 


64 28 20 


63 6 23 




a Pegasi 


E. 


88 31 54 


87 5 9 


85 38 32 


84 12 4 


9 


Spica 


W. 


74 41 21 


76 10 53 


77 40 18 


79 9 39 




Antares 


W. 


28 47 47 


30 17 24 


31 46 54 


33 16 20 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


56 21 45 


55 1 58 


53 42 36 


52 23 40 




a Pegasi 


E. 


77 1 46 


75 36 7 


74 10 36 


72 45 14 




a Arietis 


E. 


119 13 3 


117 43 51 


116 14 44 


114 45 41 


10 


Spica 


W. 


86 35 22 


88 4 20 


89 33 16 


91 2 9 




Antares 


W. 


40 42 28 


42 11 32 


43 40 33 


46 9 31 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


45 56 45 


44 41 10 


43 26 17 


42 12 10 




a Pegasi 


E. 


65 40 27 


64 15 56 


62 61 34 


61 27 22 




a Arietis 


E. 


107 21 20 


105 62 37 


104 23 56 


102 55 18 


11 


Spica 


W. 


98 26 8 


99 54 52 


101 23 35 


102 62 18 




Antares 


W. 


52 33 56 


64 2 45 


55 31 34 


57 23 



AUGUST, 1859. 



223 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAN" TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


iiii. 


Tli. 


IXi-. 


Month. 


Position. 


















O i u 


o / n 


O / // 


O I It 


11 


Fomalhaut 


E. 


40 58 53 


39 46 29 


38 35 4 


37 24 43 




a Pegasi 


E. 


60 3 20 


58 39 28 


67 15 47 


65 52 18 




a Arietis 


E. 


101 26 41 


99 58 6 


98 29 33 


97 1 


12 


Spica 


W. 


104 21 1 


106 49 44 


107 18 27 


108 47 11 




Antares 


W. 


58 29 11 


59 58 


61 26 48 


62 65 38 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


31 52 52 


30 51 28 


29 62 8 


28 55 5 




a Pegasi 


E. 


48 58 11 


47 36 8 


46 14 24 


44 63 




a Arietis 


E. 


89 38 29 


88 9 59 


86 41 29 


85 12 59 




Aldebaran 


E. 


121 13 20 


119 46 32 


11^ 19 41 


116 52 46 


13 


Antares 


W. 


70 20 


71 48 57 


73 17 56 


74 46 57 




a Pegasi 


E. 


38 12 IT 


36 53 44 


36 35 49 


34 18 40 




a Arietis 


E. 


11 50 13 


76 21 36 


74 52 68 


73 24 17 




Aldebaran 


E. 


109 37 16 


108 9 59 


106 42 39 


105 15 15 


14 


Antares 


W. 


82 12 43 


83 42 2 


86 11 24 


86 40 60 




K a Aquilae 


W. 


40 22 51 


41 17 47 


42 14 21 


43 12 29 




a Arietis 


E. 


66 18 


64 31 23 


63 2 24 


61 33 22 




Aldebaran 


E. 


97 57 17 


96 29 30 


96 1 39 


93 33 43 


15 


Antares 


W. 


94 9 6 


95 38 59 


97 8 58 


98 39 3 




a Aquilae 


W. 


48 23 8 


49 28 43 


50 35 17 


51 42 48 




a Arietis 


E. 


54 7 20 


52 37 56 


51 8 29 


49 38 66 




Aldebaran 


E. 


86 13 


84 44 38 


83 16 10 


81 47 38 




Jupiter 


E. 


122 50 34 


121 22 22 


119 54 4 


118 25 40 


16 


Antares 


W. 


106 10 57 


107 41 40 


109 12 31 


110 43 29 




a Aquilae 


W. 


57 32 84 


58 44 39 


59 57 22 


61 10 41 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


32 14 27 


33 19 42 


34 26 46 


36 36 28 




a Arietis 


E. 


42 10 9 


40 40 11 


39 10 7 


37 39 59 




Aldebaran 


E. 


74 23 40 


72 54 36 


71 25 27 


69 56 \\ 




Jupiter 


E. 


111 2 3 


109 32 59 


108 3 46 


106 34 27 




Pollux 


E. 


116 50 1 


115 19 35 


113 49 1 


112 18 20 


11 


a Aquilae 


W. 


67 25 16 


68 41 37 


69 58 23 


71 15 34 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


41 39 22 


42 55 32 


44 12 37 


46 30 36 




a Arietis 


E. 


30 8 21 


28 37 53 


27 7 23 


25 36 54 




Aldebaran 


E. 


62 28 27 


60 58 37 


59 28 40 


57 58 37 




Jupiter 


E. 


99 5 39 


97 35 26 


96 5 3 


94 34 30 




Pollux 


E. 


104 42 40 


103 11 6 


101 39 20 


100 7 24 




Sun 


E. 


137 53 39 


136 29 


135 4 11 


133 39 12 


18 


a Aquilae 


W. 


77 47 7 


79 6 27 


80 26 6 


81 46 3 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


52 11 56 


53 34 12 


54 57 4 


56 20 30 




a Pegasi 
Aldebaran 


W. 


30 3 27 


31 20 46 


32 39 30 


33 59 32 




E. 


50 26 59 


48 66 24 


47 25 45 


45 55 2 




Jupiter 
Pollux 


E. 


86 59 


85 27 19 


8b 55 25 


82 23 18 




E. 


92 25 1 


90 51 68 


89 18 42 


87 45 12 




Son 


E. 


126 31 33 


125 6 26 


123 39 7 


122 12 35 


19 


a Aquil» 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


88 29 55 


89 51 27 


91 13 12 


92 35 10 




W. 


63 25 28 


64 51 55 


66 18 48 


67 46 8 




a Pegasi 


W. 


40 55 42 


42 21 36 


43 48 16 


45 15 88 



224 






AUGUST, 1859. 










GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


1 

' Day of 

: the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


XTnii. 


XXH. 


' Month. 


Position. 












11 


Fomalbaut 


E. 


O / // 

36 15 32 


o / // 

35 7 37 


O 1 II 

34 1 6 


O 1 II 

32 56 8 




a Pegasi 


E. 


54 29 1 


53 S 67 


61 43 7 


50 20 31 




a Arietis 


E. 


95 32 29 


94 3 58 


92 36 29 


91 6 59 


12 


Spica 


W. 


110 15 55 


111 44 40 


113 13 26 


114 42 13 




Antares 


W. 


64 24 28 


65 63 19 


67 22 11 


68 61 5 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


28 32 


27 8 44 


26 19 58 


25 34 82 




a Pegasi 


E. 


43 31 58 


42 11 20 


40 61 9 


39 31 27 




a Arietis 


E. 


83 44 28 


82 15 66 


80 47 23 


79 18 49 




Aldebaran 


E. 


115 25 47 


113 58 46 


112 31 89 


111 4 29 


13 


Antares 


W. 


76 16 


77 45 7 


79 14 16 


80 43 28 




a Pegasi 


E. 


83 2 21 


31 46 58 


30 82 39 


29 19 32 




a Arietis 


E. 


71 55 34 


70 26 49 


68 58 1 


67 29 11 




Aldebaran 


E. 


103 47 47 


102 20 15 


100 52 40 


99 25 1 


14 


Antares 


W. 


88 10 20 


89 39 65 


91 9 84 


92 39 17 




a Aquilse 


W. 


44 12 3 


46 12 59 


46 15 12 


47 18 36 




a Arietis 


E. 


60 4 17 


58 35 8 


57 5 56 


55 36 40 




Aldebaran 


E. 


92 6 44 


90 37 39 


89 9 31 


87 41 18 


15 


Antares 


W. 


100 9 13 


101 39 29 


103 9 52 


104 40 21 




a Aquilse 


W. 


52 51 11 


54 24 


55 10 24 


56 21 8 




a Arietis 


E. 


48 9 20 


46 39 39 


45 9 54 


43 40 4 




Aldebaran 


E. 


80 19 1 


78 50 19 


77 21 31 


75 62 88 




Jupiter 


E. 


116 57 10 


115 28 83 


113 59 50 


112 31 


16 


Antares 


W. 


112 14 36 


113 45 51 


116 17 14 


116 48 45 




a Aquilae 


W. 


62 24 35 


63 39 


64 53 66 


66 9 22 




Fomalbaut 


w. 


36 45 41 


37 67 18 


89 10 10 


40 24 13 




a Arietis 


E. 


36 9 47 


34 39 31 


33 9 11 


31 38 48 




Aldebaran 


E. 


68 26 50 


66 67 24 


65 27 51 


63 58 12 




Jupiter 


E. 


105 4 59 


103 35 22 


102 5 37 


100 35 43 




Pollux 


E. 


110 47 29 


109 16 31 


107 45 23 


106 14 6 


IT 


a Aquilse 


W. 


72 33 9 


73 51 6 


75 9 26 


76 28 6 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


46 49 24 


48 8 58 


49 29 17 


50 60 17 




a Arietis 


E. 


24 6 26 


22 36 2 


21 5 44 


19 85 37 




Aldebaran 


E. 


66 28 29 


64 58 15 


53 27 55 


61 57 30 




Jupiter 


E. 


93 3 46 


91 32 52 


90 1 46 


88 30 29 




Pollux 


E. 


98 35 18 


97 3 1 


95 80 32 


93 57 63 




Sun 


E. 


132 14 2 


130 48 42 


129 23 10 


127 57 27 


18 


a Aquilse 


W. 


83 6 17 


84 26 48 


85 47 36 


87 8 38 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


57 44 28 


59 8 59 


60 38 59 


61 59 80 




a Pegasi 


w. 


35 20 46 


36 48 5 


38 6 23 


39 30 37 




Aldebaran 


E. 


44 24 15 


42 53 26 


41 22 35 


89 51 44 




Jupiter 


E. 


80 50 58 


79 18 24 


77 45 37 


76 12 85 




Pollux 


E. 


86 11 30 


84 37 34 


83 3 25 


81 29 




Sun 


E. 


120 45 50 


119 18 61 


117 61 38 


116 24 10 


19 


a Aquilse 


W. 


93 57 19 


96 19 41 


96 42 12 


98 4 54 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


69 13 54 


70 42 5 


72 10 41 


73 39 40 




a Pegasi 


W. 


46 43 41 


48 12 23 


49 41 42 


51 11 86 



AUGUST, 1859. 



225 









GEEENWIOH 


MEAN Tl^rE. 






LUNAE DISTANCES. 




Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


and 




Noon. 


III''. 


VIi". 


IXi. 




Month. 


Position. 




















o / // 


o / // 

36 50 7 


o / // 


/ // 




19 


Aldebaran 


E. 


38 20 54 


85 19 25 


33 48 50 






Jupiter 


E. 


74 89 18 


73 5 46 


71 31 58 


69 57 54 






Pollux 


E. 


79 54 22 


78 19 28 


76 44 19 


76 8 64 






Sun 


E. 


114 56 28 


113 28 31 


112 18 


110 31 49 




20 


a Aquilae 


W. 


99 27 45 


100 50 44 


102 13 50 


103 87 2 






Fomalhaut 


w. 


75 9 4 


76 38 52 


78 9 2 


79 39 35 






a Pegasi 


w. 


52 42 5 


54 18 8 


55 44 43 


57 16 49 






Aldebaran 


E. 


26 19 57 


24 51 40 


28 24 14 


21 57 54 






Jupiter 


E. 


62 3 25 


60 27 39 


58 51 33 


67 15 9 






Pollux 


E. 


67 7 40 


65 30 83 


63 58 8 


62 15 25 






Sun 


E. 


103 5 12 


101 34 59 


100 4 28 


98 33 37 




21 


a Aquilse 


W. 


110 33 52 


111 57 13 


113 20 31 


114 48 42 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


87 17 51 


88 50 34 


90 23 37 


91 57 






a Pegasi 


W. 


65 4 50, 


66 89 52 


68 15 22 


69 51 19 






a Arietis 


W. 


21 83 45 


28 11 19 


24 49 34 


26 28 25 






Jupiter 


E. 


49 8 19 


47 29 56 


45 51 13 


44 12 9 






Pollux 


K 


54 2 


52 22 19 


50 42 19 


49 1 58 






Sun 


E. 


90 54 27 


89 21 86 


87 48 28 


86 14 48 




22 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


99 48 37 


101 28 48 


102 59 16 


104 34 58 






a Pegasi 


W. 


77 57 42 


79 36 16 


81 15 15 


82 64 38 






a Arietis 


W. 


34 50 46 


36 82 43 


38 15 8 


39 58 






Jupiter 


E. 


35 51 32 


34 10 21 


82 28 50 


30 46 58 




. 


Pollux 


E. 


40 35 7 


38 62 44 


37 10 1 


35 26 58 






Sun 


E. 


78 21 22 


76 45 38 


75 9 20 


73 32 45 




23 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


112 36 38 


114 13 27 


116 60 22 


117 27 20 






o Pegasi 


W. 


91 17 31 


92 59 13 


94 41 16 


96 23 41 






a Arietis 


W. 


48 38 69 


50 24 28 


52 10 22 


58 56 40 






Aldebaran 


W. 


19 18 48 


20 48 88 


22 21 5 


28 55 45 


.' 




Jupiter 


E. 


22 12 50 


20 29 11 


18 46 20 


17 1 21 






Pollux 


E. 


26 47 13 


25 2 31 


23 17 37 


21 32 86 






Sun 


E. 


65 24 


63 45 5 


62 6 47 


60 26 7 




24 


a Pegasi 


W. 


105 25 


106 44 36 


108 29 2 


110 IS 40 






a Arietis 


W. 


62 54 8 


64 42 46 


66 31 45 


68 21 6 






Aldebaran 


W. 


32 12 30 


33 55 20 


35 39 2 


87 23 32 






Sun 


E. 


52 2 9 


60 20 17 


48 38 4 


46 55 32 




25 


a Pegasi 


W. 


118 59 14 


120 44 37 


122 30 


124 15 21 






a Arietis 


W. 


77 32 39 


79 23 52 


81 16 20 


83 7 8 






Aldebaran 


W. 


46 15 54 


48 4 


49 52 33 


51 41 81 






Sun 


E. 


38 18 7 


36 33 46 


34 49 11 


33 4 21 




30 


Sun 


W. 


31 51 6 


33 82 6 


35 12 42 


36 62 54 






Antares 


E. 


69 26 50 


57 38 31 


55 50 36 


54 8 5 ' 






a Aquilse 


E. 


110 48 54 


109 13 19 


107 42 43 


106 12 9 




81 


,guN 

Antares 


W. 


45 7 88 


46 45 17 


48 22 29 


49 59 16 






E. 


45 11 54 


43 26 57 


41 42 28 


39 58 24 






a Aquilse 


E. 


98 41 5 


97 11 29 


95 42 8 


94 13 4 



TF 



226 



AUGUST, 1859. 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 






LUNAR DISTANCES. 




Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVI. 


XVIIP. 


XXP. 




Month. 


Position. 














19 


Aldebaran 


E. 


o / // 

32 18 26 


o / // 

30 48 14 


29° 18 22 


O / // 

27 48 54 






Jupiter 


E. 


68 23 35 


66 48 58 


65 14 5 


63 38 54 






Pollux 


E. 


73 33 13 


71 67 15 


70 21 1 


68 44 29 






Sun 


E. 


109 3 4 


107 34 2 


106 4 43 


104 36 6 




20 


a Aquilse 


W. 


105 19 


106 23 40 


107 47 3 


109 10 28 






Fomalliaut 


W. 


81 10 31 


82 41 49 


84 13 29 


85 45 29 






a Pegasi 


w. 


58 49 26 


60 22 33 


61 56 10 


63 30 16 




/ 


Aldebaran 


E. 


20 32 56 


19 9 44 


17 48 47 


16 30 46 






Jupiter 


E. 


55 38 27 


54 1 24 


52 24 2 


50 46 21 






Pollux 


E. 


60 37 22 


58 59 1 


67 20 20 


56 41 20 






Sun 


E. 


97 2 27 


96 30 68 


93 59 8 


92 26 58 




21 


a Aquilse 


W. 


116 6 45 


117 29 38 


118 62 17 


120 14 39 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


93 30 43 


95 4 44 


96 39 4 


98 13 42 






a Pegasi 


W. 


71 27 43 


73 4 34 


74 41 51 


76 19 34 






a Arietis 


W. 


28 7 50 


29 47 49 


31 28 18 


33 9 17 






Jupiter 


E. 


42 32 44 


40 52 58 


39 12 60 


37 32 22 






Pollux 


E. 


47 21 17 


45 40 15 


43 68 53 


42 17 10 






Sun 


E. 


84 40 51 


83 6 33 


81 31 52 


79 56 48 




22 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


106 10 54 


107 47 4 


109 23 25 


110 59 57 






a Pegasi 


W. 


84 34 26 


86 14 37 


87 65 12 


89 36 11 






a Arietis 


W. 


41 41 19 


43 26 6 


46 9 17 


46 53 55 






Jupiter 


E. 


29 4 46 


27 22 14 


25 39 23 


23 56 15 






Pollux 


E. 


33 43 36 


31 69 55 


30 15 67 


28 31 43 






Sun 


E. 


71 55 47 


70 18 25 


68 40 40 


67 2 31 




23 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


119 4 21 


120 41 21 


122 18 19 


123 55 10 






a Pegasi 


W. 


98 6 25 


99 49 28 


101 32 60 


103 16 29 






a Arietis 


W. 


55 43 23 


67 30 30 


59 18 


61 5 53 






Aldebaran 


w. 


25 32 16 


27 10 24 


28 49 65 


30 30 40 






Jupiter 


E. 


15 17 19 


13 33 22 


11 49 44 


10 6 45 






Pollux 


E. 


19 47 32 


18 2 31 


16 17 42 


14 33 17 






Sun 


E. 


58 46 4 


67 5 38 


56 24 50 


53 43 40 




24 


a Pegasi 


W. 


111 58 30 


113 43 30 


115 28 38 


117 13 54 






a Arietis 


W. 


70 10 46 


72 47 


73 61 6 


75 41 44 






Aldebaran 


w. 


39 8 46 


40 54 40 


42 41 12 


44 28 17 






Sun 


E. 


45 12 39 


43 29 28 


41 45 58 


40 2 11 




25 


a Pegasi 


W. 


126 38 


127 45 46 


129 30 43 


131 15 25 






o Arietis 


W. 


84 69 


86 51 10 


88 43 32 


90 36 6 






Aldebaran 


W. 


53 30 62 


65 20 35 


57 10 36 


59 55 






Sun 


E. 


31 19 17 


29 34 2 


27 48 35 


26 2 57 




30 


Sun 


W. 


38 32 42 


40 12 4 


41 51 1 


43 29 32 






Antares 


E. 


52 16 


50 29 20 


48 43 5 


46 67 16 






a Aquilae 


E. 


104 41 39 


103 11 16 


101 41 1 


100 10 57 




31 


Sun 


W. 


51 35 36 


53 11 29 


54 46 56 


56 21 57 






Antares 


E. 


38 14 47 


36 31 37 


34 48 54 


33 6 37 






a Aqnilae 


E. 


92 44 20 


91 15 56 


89 47 53 


88 20 14 





SEPTEMBER, 1859. 



227 







GKEENWIOH 


¥EAT^ TIME. 






LUNAB DISTANCES. 




Davof 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


HI'-. 


Til". 


IXh. 




Month. 


Position. 














1 


Sun 


W. 


o / n 

51 66 31 


/ // 

59 30 39 


o / n 

61 4 20 


O / // 

62 37 37 






Spica 


W. 


14 41 42 


16 21 40 


18 1 27 


19 41 






Antares 


E. 


31 24 46 


29 43 22 


28 2 24 


26 21 62 






a Aquilse 


E. 


86 52 58 


86 26 7 


83 69 43 


82 33 46 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


111 41 4 


110 8 14 


108 35 37 


107 3 15 




2 


Sun 


W. 


10 17 38 


71 48 24 


73 18 47 


74 48 46 






Spica 


W. 


27 54 13 


29 31 51 


31 9 7 


32 46 2 






a Aquilse 


E. 


75 31 19 


74 8 24 


72 46 3 


71 24 16 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


99 25 28 


97 54 47 


96 24 24 


94 54 21 




3 


Sun 


W. 


82 13 9 


83 40 58 


85 8 27 


86 35 36 






Spica 


W. 


40 45 28 


42 20 21 


43 64 65 


45 29 11 






o Aquilse 


E. 


64 44 36 


63 26 39 


62 9 24 


60 52 53 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


87 28 55 


86 50 


84 33 4 


83 6 39 






a Pegasi 


E. 


109 32 35 


108 1 55 


106 31 29 


105 1 18 




4 


Sun 


W. 


93 46 48 


95 12 11 


96 37 18 


98 2 10 






Spica 


W. 


53 16 1 


64 48'34 


56 20 51 


67 52 53 






a Aquilse 


E. 


54 42 13 


63 30 42 


52 20 8 


51 10 35 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


75 53 37 


74 28 14 


73 3 12 


71 38 31 






a Pegasi 


E. 


97 33 57 


96 6 11 


94 36 39 


93 8 20 




5 


Sun 


W. 


105 3 2 


106 26 35 


107 49 56 


109 13 6 






Spica 


W. 


65 29 42 


67 27 


68 31 1 


70 1 24 






Antares 


W. 


19 35 41 


21 6 31 


22 37 10 


24 7 39 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


64 40 26 


63 17 65 


61 56 47 


60 34 3 






a Pegasi 


E. 


85 50 2 


84 22 69 


82 56 9 


81 29 30 




6 


Sun 


W. 


116 6 35 


117 28 51 


118 51 1 


120 13 4 






Spica 


W. 


77 31 2 


79 33 


80 29 58 


81 59 16 






Antares 


W. 


31 37 43 


33 7 19 


34 36 49 


36 6 12 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


53 51 39 


52 32 32 


51 13 56 


49 55 51 






a Pegasi 


E. 


74 19 4 


72 53 31 


71 28 9 


70 2 57 






a Arietis 


E. 


116 24 


114 64 47 


113 26 40 


111 66 39 




1 


Sun 


W. 


127 1 56 


128 23 29 


129 44 69 


131 6 26 






Spica 


W. 


89 24 29 


90 53 19 


92 22 6 


93 50 60 






Antares 


W. 


43 31 50 


45 45 


46 29 37 


47 58 27 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


43 34 32 


42 20 23 


41 7 4 


39 54 38 






a Pegasi 


E. 


62 69 32 


61 35 22 


60 11 24 


68 47 36 






a Arietis 


E. 


104 32 46 


103 4 11 


101 35 38 


100 7 8 




8 


Spica 


W. 


101 14 8 


102 42 45 


104 11 23 


105 40 1 






Antares 


W. 


55 22 11 


56 60 64 


58 19 37 


59 48 20 






a Pegasi 


E. 


51 51 38 


50 29 7 


49 6 51 


47 44 52 






a Arietis 


E. 


92 45 1 


91 16 37 


89 48 13 


88 19 49 






Aldebaran 


E. 


124 16 26 


122 49 61 


121 23 12 


119 66 29 




9 


Spica 


W. 


113 3 32 


114 32 20 


116 1 12 


117 30 6 






Antares 


W. 


67 12 20 


68 41 15 


70 10 13 


71 19 14 






a Pegasi 


E. 


40 69 56 


39 40 11 


38 20 56 


37 2 16 






a Arietis 


E. 


80 67 26 


79 28 50 


78 13 


76 31 32 






Aldebaran 


E. 


112 41 43 


111 14 32 


109 47 16 


108 19 64 



228 



SEPTEMBER, 1859. 



i GREENWICH ME A IN" TIME. 




i 




LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 








1 Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi-. 


XTIIP. 


XXIi. 




Month. 


Position 














1 


Sun 


W. 


/ tt 

64 10 27 


o / ;/ 

65 42 52 


O / /i 

67 14 52 


O / // 

68 46 27 






Spica 


W. 


21 20 17 


22 59 16 


24 37 56 


26 16 15 






Antares 


E. 


24 41 46 


23 2 5 


21 22 49 


19 43 58 






a Aqnilse 


E. 


81 8 17 


79 43 16 


78 18 46 


76 64 47 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


105 31 8 


103 59 18 


102 27 44 


100 56 27 




2 


Sun 


W. 


76 18 23 


77 47 37 


79 16 29 


80 44 59 






Spioa 


W. 


34 22 37 


35 68 50 


37 34 43 


39 10 16 






a Aquilse 


E. 


70 3 5 


68 42 30 


67 22 33 


66 3 14 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


93 24 37 


91 65 12 


90 26 6 


88 67 21 




3 


Sun 


W. 


88 2 26 


89 28 68 


90 56 12 


92 21 8 






Spioa 


W. 


47 3 7 


48 36 46 


60 10 8 


61 43 13 






a Aquilse 


E. 


59 37 7 


58 22 9 


57 7 59 


55 64 40 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


81 38 33 


80 11 49 


78 45 24 


77 19 20 






a Pegasi 


E. 


103 31 21 


102 1 39 


100 32 11 


99 2 57 




4 


Sun 


W. 


99 26 48 


100 51 11 


102 15 21 


103 39 18 






Spica 


W. 


59 24 42 


60 66 16 


62 27 37 


63 58 46 






a Aquilae 


E. 


50 2 4 


48 54 39 


47 48 24 


46 43 23 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


70 14 11 


68 50 12 


67 26 35 


66 3 19 






a Pegasi 


E. 


91 40 15 


90 12 22 


88 44 43 


87 17 16 




5 


Sun 


W. 


110 36 6 


111 58 67 


113 21 38 


114 44 10 






Spica 


W. 


71 31 38 


73 1 42 


74 31 37 


76 1 23 






Antares 


W. 


25 37 58 


27 8 7 


28 38 7 


30 7 69 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


59 12 43 


67 51 47 


56 31 18 


55 11 15 






a Pegasi 


E. 


80 3 2 


78 36 46 


77 10 41 


75 44 47 . 




6 


Sun 


W. 


121 35 1 


122 56 52 


124 18 38 


126 40 19 






Spica 


W. 


83 28 28 


84 57 35 


86 26 37 


87 55 35 






Antares 


W. 


37 35 29 


39 4 41 


40 33 49 


42 2 61 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


48 38 20 


47 21 24 


46 6 5 


44 49 27 






a Pegasi 


E. 


68 37 55 


67 13 4 


65 48 23 


64 23 52 ■ 






a Arietis 


E. 


110 27 43 


108 58 52 


107 30 6 


106 1 24 




1 


Sun 


W. 


132 27 50 


133 49 12 


135 10 32 


136 31 51 






Spica 


W. 


95 19 32 


96 48 13 


98 16 52 


99 46 30 






Antares 


W. 


49 27 14 


60 56 


52 24 45 


53 53 28 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


38 43 11 


37 32 47 


36 23 33 


35 15 34 






a Pegasi 


E. 


57 24 


66 35 


54 37 23 


53 14 24 






a Arietis 


E. 


98 38 40 


97 10 14 


95 41 49 


94 13 25 




8 


Spica 


W. 


107 8 40 


108 37 20 


110 6 2 


111 34 46 






Antares 


W. 


61 17 5 


62 45 51 


64 14 39 


65 43 28 






a Pegasi 


E. 


46 23 10 


45 1 48 


43 40 47 


42 20 9 






a Arietis 


E. 


86 51 23 


85 22 56 


83 64 28 


82 25 68 






Aldebaran 


E. 


118 29 41 


117 2 48 


115 35 51 


114 8 50 




9 


Spica 


W. 


118 59 3 


120 28 6 


121 67 10 


123 26 19 






Antares 


W. 


73 8 18 


74 37 26 


76 6 39 


77 36 56 






a Pegasi 


E. 


35 44 15 


34 26 57 


33 10 27 


31 64 51 






a Arietis 


E. 


75 2 48 


73 34 1 


72 5 10 


70 36 15 






Aldeharan 


E. 


106 52 28 


105 24 56 


103 67 19 


102 29 36 





SEPTEMBER, 1859. 



229 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










aod ' 




Noon. 


IIP. 


VI'. 


\X\ 


Month. 


Position. 












10 


Antares 


W. 


O i II 

19 5 16 


O t II 

80 34 42 


a 1 II 

82 4 13 


O / // 

83 33 50 




a Arietis 


E. 


69 7 16 


67 38 12 


66 9 4 


64 39 51 




Aldebaran 


E. 


101 1 48 


99 33 64 


98 5 56 


96 37 49 


11 


Antares 


W. 


91 3 18 


92 33 31 


94 3 60 


95 34 16 




a Aquilae 


W. 


46 11 22 


47 16 6 


48 19 69 


49 25 58 




a Arietis 


E. 


57 12 32 


55 42 48 


64 12 58 


52 43 3 




Aldebaran 


E. 


89 15 60 


87 47 8 


86 18 19 


84 49 23 


12 


Antares 


W. 


103 8 13 


104 39 23 


106 10 41 


107 42 7 




a Aquilae 


W. 


55 10 6 


56 21 %h 


67 33 27 


58 46 9 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


30 1 38 


31 9 9 


32 12 62 


33 18 36 




a Arietis 


E. 


45 12 2 


43 41 33 


42 10 58 


40 40 18 




Aldebaran 


E. 


11 23 10 


76 63 35 


74 23 64 


72 64 7 




Jupiter 


E. 


119 


117 30 10 


116 11 


114 30 6 




Pollux 


E. 


119 52 35 


118 21 44 


116 50 44 


115 19 36 


13 


a Aqnilse 


W. 


64 58 45 


66 14 52 


67 31 27 


68 48 28 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


39 11 63 


40 26 34 


41 42 21 


42 59 8 




a Arietis 


E. 


33 6 48 


31 34 42 


30 3 35 


28 32 26 




Aldebaran 


E. 


65 23 37 


63 53 12 


62 22 42 


60 52 6 




Jupiter 


E. 


106 51 23 


105 26 24 


103 56 16 


102 23 59 




Pollux 


E. 


107 41 44 


106 9 43 


104 37 33 


103 5 14 


14 


a Aquilas 


W. 


76 19 34 


76 38 60 


77 68 26 


-79 18 18 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


49 36 1 


60 57 35 


62. 19 47 


53 42 35 




a Pegasi 


w. 


27 43 32 


28 68 9 


30 14 31 


31 32 25 




Aldebaran 


E. 


63 17 62 


51 46 48 


50 15 41 


48 44 31 




Jupiter 


E. 


94 45 9 


93 12 64 


91 40 29 


90 7 54 




Pollux 


E. 


96 21 15 


93 47 69 


92 14 32 


90 40 65 


IS 


f'a Aquilae 


W. 


86 1 36 


87 22 56 


88 44 27 


90 6 10 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


60 44 26 


62 10 12 


63 36 24 


66 2 69 




a Pegasi 


w. 


38 20 28 


39 46 1 


41 10 23 


42 36 29 




Aldebaran 


E. 


41 8 27 


39 37 18 


38 6 13 


36 35 16 




Jupiter 


E. 


82 22 19 


80 48 39 


79 14 49 


77 40 46 




Pollux 


E. 


82 60 15 


81 16 36 


79 40 44 


78 6 42 




Saturn 


E. 


112 24 23 


110 60 20 


109 16 7 


107 41 41 


16 


a Aquilae 


W. 


96 66 62 


98 19 20 


99 41 63 


101 4 29 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


72 21 27 


73 50 10 


76 19 12 


76 48 32 




a Pegasi 


w. 


49 56 31 


61 26 10 


52 56 19 


64 26 65 




Jupiter 


E. 


69 47 38 


68 12 24 


66 36 57 


65 1 17 




Pollux 


E. 


70 7 39 


68 31 26 


66 55 2 


65 18 26 




Saturn 


E. 


99 46 38 


98 11 1 


96 35 11 


94 69 8 




S0N 


E. 


132 7 8 


130 38 7 


129 8 53 


127 39 26 


IT 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


84 19 27 


86 50 26 


87 21 40 


88 63 9 




a Pegasi 


W. 


62 6 20 


63 39 24 


65 12 60 


66 46 37 




a Arietis 


w. 


18 30 47 


20 6 41 


21 41 18 


23 17 33 




Jupiter 
Pollux 


E. 


56 69 41 


66 22 41 


63 45 26 


62 7 68 




E. 


67 12 12 


56 34 17 


63 66 10 


, 62 17 60 




Saturn 


E. 


86 55 33 


85 18 9 


83 40 30 


:. 82 2 37 




Susr 


E. 


120 8 48 


118 37 59 


117 6 65 


115 35 37 



230 



SEPTEMBER, 1859. 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR ] 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVt. 


XVIIP'. 


XXlk. 


Month. 


Position. 












10 


Antares 


W. 


o / // 

85 3 32 


86° 33 20 


o / // 

88 3 13 


o / // 

89 33 13 




a Arietis 


E. 


63 10 34 


61 41 11 


60 11 43 


58 42 10 




Aldebaran 


E. 


95 9 31 


93 41 20 


92 12 56 


90 44 26 


11 


Antares 


W. 


91 4 49 


98 35 29 


100 6 16 


101 37 10 




a AquilsB 


w. 


50 32 59 


51 40 57 


52 49 50 


53 59 34 




a Arietis 


E. 


51 13 2 


49 42 55 


48 12 43 


46 42 25 




Aldebaran 


E. 


83 20 22 


81 51 13 


80 21 59 


78 52 37 


12 


Antares 


W. 


109 13 41 


110 45 23 


112 17 14 


113 49 13 




a Aquilae 


W. 


59 59 31 


61 13 29 


62 28 2 


63 43 8 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


34 26 10 


35 35 25 


36 46 12 


37 58 24 




a Arietis 


E. 


39 9 33 


37 38 43 


36 7 49 


34 36 50 




Aldebaran 


E. 


Yl 24 14 


69 54 14 


68 24 7 


66 63 55 




Jupiter 


E. 


1]2 59 50 


111 29 26 


109 58 54 


108 28 13 




Pollux 


E. 


113 48 19 


112 16 53 


110 45 19 


109 13 36 


13 


a Aqnilse 


W. 


10 5 55 


71 23 46 


72 42 1 


74 37 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


44 16 53 


45 35 29 


46 54 55 


48 15 7 




a Arietis 


E. 


27 1 11 


25 30 9 


23 59 5 


22 28 6 




Aldebaran 


E. 


59 21 25 


57 50 39 


56 19 47 


54 48 52 




Jupiter 


E. 


100 52 32 


99 20 56 


97 49 10 


96 17 15 




Pollux 


E. 


101 32 45 


100 7 


98 27 19 


96 54 21 


14 


a Aquilae 


W. 


80 38 28 


81 58 53 


83 19 34 


84 40 28 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


55 5 57 


56 29 50 


57 54 14 


59 19 6 




a Pegasi 


w. 


32 51 44 


34 12 19 


35 34 1 


36 56 46 




Aldebaran 


E. 


47 13 19 


45 42 6 


44 10 52 


42 39 38 




Jupiter 


E. 


88 35 8 


87 2 12 


85 29 5 


83 55 47 




Pollux 


E. 


89 7 8 


87 33 11 


85 59 3 


84 24 44 


15 


a Aquilse 


W. 


91 28 2 


92 50 4 


94 12 13 


95 34 29 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


66 29 58 


67 57 19 


69 25 1 


70 53 4 




a Pegasi 


W. 


44 3 17 


45 30 43 


46 58 45 


48 27 22 




Aldebaran 


E. 


35 4 27 


33 33 49 


32 3 26 


30 33 22 




Jupiter 


E. 


76 6 32 


74 32 7 


72 57 29 


71 22 40 




Pollux 


E. 


76 30 29 


74 55 4 


73 19 27 


71 43 39 




Saturn 


E. 


106 7 5 


104 32 16 


102 57. 15 


101 22 3 


16 


a Aquilae 


W. 


102 27 7 


103 49 46 


105 12 26 


106 35 4 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


78 18 9 


79 48 4 


81 18 16 


82 48 43 




a Pegasi 


W. 


55 57 58 


57 29 27 


59 1 21 


60 33 39 




Jupiter 


E. 


63 25 25 


61 49 19 


60 13 


58 36 27 




Pollux 


E. 


63 41 36 


62 4 35 


60 27 20 


58 49 52 




Saturn 


E. 


93 22 52 


91 46 23 


90 9 40 


88 32 44 




Sun 


E. 


126 9 46 


124 39 52 


123 9 45 


121 39 24 


11 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


90 24 52 


91 56 48 


93 28 58 


95 1 20 




a Pegasi 


W. 


68 20 46 


69 55 15 


71 30 5 


73 5 14 




a Arietis 


W. 


24 54 20 


26 31 38 


28 9 23 


29 47 34 




Jupiter 


E. 


50 30 15 


48 52 17 


47 14 5 


45 35 38 




Pollux 


E. 


50 39 16 


49 28 


47 21 26 


45 42 11 




Saturn 


E. 


80 24 29 


78 46 6 


77 7 28 


75 28 35 





Sun 


E. 


114 4 4 


112 32 16 


111 13 


109 27 56 



SEPTEMBER, 1859. 



231 







GEEElSrWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


Illk. 


Vlt. 


IX>. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


O i II 


O / // 


o / // 


18 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


96 33 54 


98 6 40 


99 39 37 


101 12 44 




a Pegasi 


W. 


74 40 43 


76 16 31 


77 52 38 


79 29 4 




a Arietis 


W. 


31 26 9 


33 5 8 


34 44 29 


36 24 11 




Jupiter 


E. 


43 56 55 


42 17 68 


40 38 45 


38 59 17 




Pollux 


E. 


44 2 43 


42 23 


■ 40 43 4 


39 2 55 




Saturn 


E. 


73 49 26 


72 10 1 


70 30 21 


68 60 24 




Sun 


E. 


107 55 21 


106 22 31 


104 49 25 


103 1^ 4 


19 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


109 33 


110 34 27 


112 8 26 


113 42 29 




a Pegasi 


W. 


87 35 43 


89 13 55 


90 52 23 


92 31 8 




a Arietis 


w. 


44 47 63 


46 29 38 


48 11 41 


49 54 4 




Aldebaran 


w. 


16 8 13 


17 28 8 


18 51 49 


20 18 34 




Jupiter 


E. 


30 38 7 


28 57 8 


27 15 53 


25 34 25 




Pollux 


E. 


30 38 57 


28 57 35 


27 16 4 


26 34 24 




Saturn 


E. 


60 26 34 


68 44 57 


57 a 4 


56 20 53 




Sun 


E. 


95 25 10 


93 50 9 


92 14 61 


90 39 16 


20 


a Pegasi 


W. 


100 48 43 


102 28 67 


104 9 24 


105 50 4 




a Arietis 


W. 


58 30 46 


60 16 2 


61 59 38 


63 44 31 




Aldebaran 


W. 


28 3 6 


29 40 16 


31 18 27 


32 57 33 




Saturn 


E. 


46 45 37 


45 1 42 


43 17 29 


41 32 58 




Sun 


E. 


82 37 1 


80 59 42 


79 22 6 


77 44 13 


21 


a Arietis 


W. 


72 33 28 


74 20 8 


76 7 6 


77 54 18 




Aldebaran 


W. 


41 24 9 


43 7 18 


44 50 58 


46 35 8 




Saturn 


E. 


32 46 11 


31 


29 13 32 


27 26 49 




Mars 


E. 


49 14 35 


47 32 28 


46 60 6 


44 7 27 




Sun 


E. 


69 30 32 


67 50 67 


66 11 7 


64 31 2 


22 


a Arietis 


W. 


86 54 22 


88 43 7 


90 32 6 


92 21 17 




Aldebaran 


w. 


55 22 16 


57 8 48 


68 56 40 


60 42 51 




Mars 


E. 


35 30 42 


33 46 43 


32 2 32 


30 18 12 




Sun 


E. 


56 6 48 


64 25 15 


52 43 30 


61 1 33 


23 


a Arietis 


W. 


101 30 8 


103 20 24 


105 10 49 


107 1 21 




Aldebaran 


w. 


69 42 43 


71 31 22 


73 20 13 


75 9 13 




Pollux 


w. 


26 52 23 


28 41 43 


30 31 21 


32 21 14 




Jupiter 


w. 


25 56 33 


27 45 43 


29 35 5 


31 24 38 




Sun 


E. 


42 29 7 


40 46 12 


39 3 10 


37 20 3 


28 


Sun 


W. 


26 10 46 


27 47 30 


29 23 56 


31 3 




Antares 


E. 


37 6 3 


35 21 3 


33 36 26 


31 52 11 




a Aquilae 


E. 


91 42 37 


90 12 31 


88 42 45 


87 13 21 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


116 54 26 


115 19 7 


113 43 53 


112 8 47 


29 


Sun 


W. 


38 55 28 


40 29 26 


42 3 2 


43 36 14 




a Aquilae 


E. 


79 52 27 


78 25 40 


76 69 26 


75 33 41 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


104 16 3 


102 42 12 


101 8 38 


99 35 22 


30 


Sun 


W. 


51 16 28 


52 47 21 


54 17 61 


55 47 59 




a Aquilse 


E. 


68 33 63 


67 11 50 


65 50 29 


64 29 51 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


91 63 48 


90 22 32 


88 51 36 


87 21 3 




a Pegasi 


E. 


113 68 65 


112 25 13 


110 51 48 


109 18 39 



232 



SEPTEMBER, 1859. 







GEEENWICH MEAN TIME. 












LUNAR 


DISTAJfCES. 








Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


and 




Midnight. 


XTi. 


xvmi'. 


XXII. 




Month. 


Position 














18 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


102 46 'i 


O / // 

104 19 28 


o / ii 

105 53 2 


107 26 44 






a Pegasi 


W. 


81 5 48 


82 42 51 


84 20 11 


85 57 48 






a Arietis 


w. 


38 4 15 


39 44 39 


41 25 24 


43 6 29 






Jupiter 


E. . 


B1 19 34 


35 39 35 


33 59 21 


32 18 52 






Pollux 


E. 


37 22 32 


35 41 57 


34 1 9 


32 20 9 






Saturn 


E. 


67 10 11 


65 29 42 


63 48 56 


62 7 53 






Sun 


E. 


101 42 26 


100 8 32 


98 34 21 


96 59 64 




19 


Fomalliaut 


W. 


115 16 33 


116 50 38 


118 24 41 


119 58 42 






a Pegasi 


W. 


94 10 9 


95 49 25 


97 28 57 


99 8 43 






a Arietis 


w. 


51 36 47 


53 19 48 


55 3 9 


56 46 48 






Aldebaran 


w. 


21 47 51 


23 19 14 


24 52 24 


26 27 5 






Jupiter 


E. 


23 52 42 


22 10 48 


20 28 41 


18 46 23 






Pollux 


E. 


23 52 39 


22 10 51 


20 29 2 


18 47 IS 






Saturn 


E. 


53 38 24 


51 55 38 


50 12 35 


48 29 15 






Sun 


E. 


89 3 23 


87 27 14 


85 50 47 


84 14 3 




20 


a Pegasi 


W. 


107 30 55 


109 11 58 


110 53 10 


112 34 32 






a Arietis 


W. 


65 29 43 


67 15 13 


69 1 


70 47 6 






Aldebaran 


W. 


34 37 29 


36 18 10 


37 59 33 


39 41 33 






Saturn 


E. 


39 48 11 


38 3 6 


36 17 45 


34 32 6 






Sun 


E. 


76 6 2 


74 27 35 


72 48 50 


71 9 49 




21 


a Arietis 


W. 


79 41 48 


81 29 34 


83 17 35 


85 5 51 






Aldebaran 


W. 


48 19 44 


50 4 47 


61 50 14 


53 36 4 






Saturn 


E. 


25 39 50 


23 52 37 


22 5 9 


20 17 27 






Mars 


E. 


42 24 33 


40 41 26 


38 58 4 


37 14 29 






Sun 


E. 


62 50 40 


61 10 4 


59 29 13 


57 48 7 




22 


a Arietis 


W. 


94 10 41 


96 17 


97 50 4 


99 40 1 






Aldebaran 


W. 


62 30 19 


64 18 3 


66 6 3 


67 54 16 






Mars 


E. 


28 33 42 


26 49 6 


25 4 22 


23 19 34 






Sun 


E. 


49 19 24 


47 37 4 


45 54 34 


44 11 55 




23 


a Arietis 


W. 


108 51 59 


110 42 43 


112 33 32 


114 24 24 






Aldebaran 


W. 


76 58 22 


78 47 40 


80 37 4 


82 26 33 






Pollux 


W. 


34 11 20 


36 1 38 


37 52 6 


39 42 42 






Jupiter 


w. 


33 14 20 


35 4 11 


36 54 9 


38 44 12 






Sun 


E. 


35 36 51 


33 53 36 


32 10 19 


30 27 2 




28 


Sun 


W. 


32 35 51 


34 11 17 


35 46 23 


37 21 6 






Antares 


E. 


30 8 21 


28 24 55 


26 41 53 


24 59 16 






a Aquilfe 


E. 


85 44 19 


84 15 41 


82 47 29 


81 19 44 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


110 33 50 


108 59 4 


107 24 30 


105 50 9 




29 


Sun 


W. 


45 9 4 


46 41 30 


48 13 32 


49 45 12 






a Aquilae 


E. 


74 8 31 


72 43 56 


71 19 57 


69 56 36 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


98 2 24 


96 29 45 


94 57 26 


93 25 27 




30 


Sun 


W. 


57 17 44 


58 47 7 


60 16 7 


61 44 46 






a Aquilae 


E. 


63 9 58 


61 50 51 


60 32 31 


59 15 1 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


85 50 53 


84 21 6 


82 51 40 


81 22 39 






a Pegasi 


E. 


107 45 46 


106 13 10 


104 40 52 


103 8 51 





OCTOBER, 1859. 



233 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAT^ TIME. 


1 


LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


nil". 


VII'. 


IXk. 


Month. 


Position. 


















Q 1 tl 


o / y/ 


1 II 


o / // 


1 


Sun 


W. 


63 13 4 


64 41 


66 8 36 


67 35 52 




a Aquilae 


E. 


S'Z 58 23 


56 42 39 


55 27 50 


64 13 69 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


79 54 2 


78 26 48 


76 67 58 


75 30 33 




a Pegasi 


E. 


101 37 7 


100 5 41 


98 34 32 


97 3 41 


2 


Sun 


W. 


Y4 47 25 


76 12 49 


77 37 57 


79 2 48 




Antares 


W. 


16 39 23 


17 12 23 


18 45 5 


20 17 32 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


68 19 39 


66 54 46 


66 30 17 


64 6 16 




a Pegasi 


E. 


89 33 45 


88 4 37 


86 35 46 


85 7 11 


3 


Sun 


W. 


86 3 18 


87 26 43 


88 49 55 


90 12 66 




Antares 


W. 


27 55 59 


29 26 59 


30 57 47 


32 28 24 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


57 13 7 


55 61 68 


54 31 20 


53 11 14 




a Pegasi 


E. 


77 48 14 


76 21 13 


74 54 26 


73 27 54 


4 


Sun 


W. 


97 5 20 


98 27 22 


99 49 16 


101 11 2 




Antares 


W. 


39 58 50 


41 28 28 


42 67 58 


44 27 22 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


46 39 41 


45 23 22 


44 7 49 


42 63 4 




a Pegasi 


E. 


66 18 49 


64 63 41 


63 28 48 


62 4 8 




a Arietis 


E. 


108 4 17 


106 35 


106 6 51 


103 36 49 


6 


Sun 


W. 


107 58 26 


109 19 41 


110 40 63 


112 2 2 




Antares 


W. 


51 62 55 


53 21 49 


64 50 40 


66 19 28 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


36 63 33 


35 46 3 


34 37 56 


33 32 18 




a Pegasi 


•E. 


65 4 20 


53 41 6 


52 18 7 


50 55 25 




a Arietis 


E. 


96 12 58 


94 44 24 


93 15 63 


91 47 25 


6 


Sun 


W. 


118 47 22 


120 8 25 


121 29 28 


122 60 33 




Antares 


w. 


63 43 13 


65 11 58 


66 40 45 


68 9 34 




a Pegasi 


E. 


44 6 27 


42 46 43 


41 25 24 


40 5 33 




a Arietis 


E. 


84 26 19 


82 66 64 


81 28 28 


80 


7 


Sun 


W. 


129 36 28 


130 67 49 


132 19 13 


133 40 41 




Antares 


W. 


75 34 19 


77 3 28 


78 32 42 


80 2 2 




a Pegasi 


E. 


33 36 1 


32 19 10 


31 4 17 


29 60 31 




a Arietis 


E. 


72 37 1 


71 3 14 


69 39 22 


68 10 26 




Aldebaran 


E. 


104 30 27 


103 2 60 


101 35 7 


100 7 17 


8 


Antares 


W. 


87 30 14 


89 14 


90 30 23 


92 39 




a Aquilse 


w. 


43 42 21 


44 43 17 


45 46 36 


46 49 10 




a Arietis 


E. 


60 44 19 


59 14 46 


57 45 6 


66 16 18 




Aldebaran 


E. 


92 46 26 


91 17 53 


89 49 12 


88 20 23 


9 


a Aquilae 


W. 


52 23 63 


53 33 46 


54 44 31 


66 56 5 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


27 55 


28 60 21 


29 48 33 


30 49 19 




a Arietis 


E. 


48 44 26 


47 13 50 


45 43 7 


44 12 15 




Aldebaran 


E. 


80 64 8 


79 24 26 


77 54 36 


76 24 35 


10 


a Aquilse 


W. 


62 4 48 


63 20 29 


64 36 45 


65 53 33 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


36 24 30 


37 36 39 


38 50 12 


40 5 2 




a Arietis 


E. 


36 35 59 


36 4 21 


33 32 37 


32 47 




Aldebaran 


E. 


68 62 14 


67 21 18 


65.60 13 


64 18 59 




Jupiter 


E. 


114 3 5 


112 31 14 


110 69 12 


109 26 57 


11 


a Aquilae 


W. 


72 24 54 


73 44 29 


75 4 27 


76 24 47 



234 



OCTOBER, 1859. 







GREENWICB 


: MEAN" TIME. 










LUNAR ] 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XV". 


XTIII''. 


XXTi. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Sun 


W. 


o / // 

69 2 49 


/ ;/ 

70 29 25 


71 55 43 


, o in 

73 21 43 




a Aquilse 


E. 


53 1 9 


51 49 22 


50 38 41 


49 29 10 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


74 3 32 


72 36 56 


71 10 45 


69 44 59 




a Pegasi 


E. 


95 33 V 


94 2 51 


92 32 52 


91 3 10 


2 


Sun 


W. 


80 21 23 


81 51 44 


83 15 49 


84 39 40 




Antares 


W. 


21 49 42 


23 21 38 


24 63 19 


26 24 46 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


62 42 42 


61 19 35 


59 66 57 


58 34 47 




a Pegasi 


E. 


83 38 52 


82 10 49 


80 43 2 


79 15 30 


3 


Sun 


W. 


91 35 45 


92 58 23 


94 20 62 


95 43 11 




Antares 


W. 


33 58 49 


35 29 3 


36 59 8 


38 29 3 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


51 51 42 


60 32 45 


49 14 25 


47 66 43 




a Pegasi 


E. 


72 1 37 


70 35 34 


69 9 45 


67 44 10 


4 


Sun 


W. 


102 32 42 


103 54 16 


105 15 44 


106 37 7 




Antares 


W. 


45 56 39 


47 25 50 


48 54 56 


50 23 58 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


41 39 11 


40 26 12 


39 14 13 


38 3 18 




a Pegasi 


E. 


60 39 42 


59 15 30 


57 51 32 


66 27 49 




a Arietis 


E. 


102 7 53 


100 39 2 


99 10 16 


97 41 35 


5 


Sun 


W. 


113 23 8 


114 44 13 


116 6 16 


117 26 19 




Antares 


W. 


57 48 15 


59 17 


60 45 45 


62 14 29 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


32 28 18 


31 26 6 


30 25 53 


29 27 50 




a Pegasi 


E. 


49 32 59 


48 10 52 


46 49 3 


45 27 34 




a Arietis 


E. 


90 18 58 


88 50 33 


87 22 8 


85 53 44 


6 


Sun 


W. 


124 11 39 


125 32 48 


126 53 58 


128 16 12 




Antares 


W. 


69 38 24 


71 7 18 


72 36 14 


74 6 14 




a Pegasi 


E. 


38 46 12 


37 27 25 


36 9 14 


34 61 45 




a Arietis 


E. 


78 31 30 


77 2 58 


75 34 22 


74 5 43 


V 


Sun 


W. 


135 2 14 


136 23 51 


137 45 34 


139 7 21 




Antares 


W. 


81 31 27 


83 59 


84 30 37 


86 22 




a Pegasi 


E. 


28 38 


27 26 56 


26 17 30 


25 9 57 




a Arietis 


E. 


66 41 25 


65 12 17 


63 43 4 


62 13 45 




Aldebaran 


E. 


98 39 21 


97 11 18 


95 43 8 


, 94 14 51 


8 


Antares 


W. 


93 31 4 


95 1 38 


96 32 22 


98 3 15 




u, Aquilse 


W. 


47 53 57 


48 59 53 


50 6 53 


51 14 64 




a Arietis 


E. 


54 45 23 


53 15 21 


61 45 10 


50 14 51 




Aldebaran 


E. 


86 51 25 


85 22 19 


83 53 5 


82 23 41 


9 


a Aquilae 


W. 


57 8 26 


58 21 31 


69 35 18 


60 49 44 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


31 52 25 


32 57 39 


34 4 51 


35 13 51 




a Arietis 


E. 


42 41 16 


41 10 8 


39 38 53 


38 7 29 




Aldebaran 


E. 


74 54 26 


73 24 7 


71 53 39 


70 23 1 


10 


a Aquilae 


W. 


67 10 52 


68 28 41 


69 46 59 


71 6 43 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


41 21 4 


42 38 13 


43 56 22 


45 16 29 




a Arietis 


E. 


30 28 52 


28 56 53 


27 24 61 


25 52 48 




Aldebaran 


E. 


62 47 37 


61 16 5 


59 44 26 


58 12 38 




Jupiter 


E. 


107 54 31 


106 21 52 


104 49 2 


103 15 59 


11 


a Aquilae 


W. 


77 45 29 


79 6 31 


80 27 51 


81 4fl 29 



OCTOBER, 1859. 



235 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 












LUNAR DISTANCES. 








Day of 


Star's Nam( 


) 












and 




Noon. 


IIP-. 


YIK 


IX>. 




Month. 


Position. 




















o / // 


o / // 


O 1 II 


o / // 




11 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


46 35 29 


47 56 18 


49 17 54 


60 40 15 






a Pegasi 


w. 


25 5 42 


26 16 33 


27 29 44 


28 45 






Aldebaran 


E. 


56 40 42 


55 8 40 


53 36 31 


52 4 16 






Jupiter 


E. 


101 42 43 


100 9 15 


98 36 36 


97 1 43 




12 


a Aquilse 


W. 


83 11 24 


84 33 34 


85 55 59 


87 18 38 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


57 41 31 


59 7 26 


60 33 51 


62 44 






a Pegasi 


w. 


35 25 29 


36 49 21 


38 14 13 


39 40 






Aldebaran 


E. 


44 21 45 


42 49 7 


41 16 29 


39 43 53 






Pollux 


E. 


86 11 43 


84 36 6 


83 18 


81 24 17 






Jupiter 


E. 


89 9 14 


87 34 7 


85 58 48 


84 23 16 






Saturn 


E. 


118 33 44 


116 58 33 


116 23 11 


113 47 36 




13 


FomalLaut 


W. 


69 21 26 


70 50 41 


72 20 16 


73 50 10 






a Pegasi 


w. 


47 12 


48 30 9 


50 38 


51 31 37 






Aldebaran 


E. 


32 2 32 


30 30 57 


28 59 45 


27 29 3 






Pollux 


E. 


73 21 18 


71 44 7 


70 6 46 


68 29 12 






Jupiter 


E. 


76 22 36 


74 45 52 


73 8 56 


71 31 48 






Saturn • 


E. 


105 46 40 


104 9 52 


102 32 63 


100 56 43 




14 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


81 23 67 


82 56 28 


84 27 12 


85 59 9 






a Pegasi 


W. 


59 13 14 


60 46 43 


62 20 34 


63 64 45 






Pollux 


E. 


60 18 42 


58 40 3 


67 1 15 


56 22 16 






Jupiter 


E. 


63 23 15 


61 44 58 


60 6 29 


58 27 50 






Saturn 


E. 


92 46 64 


91 8 34 


89 30 2 


87 61 20 






Regulus 


E. 


97 10 9 


95 31 9 


93 61 58 


92 12 36 




15 


a Pegasi 


W. 


71 50 10 


73 26 4 


76 2 13 


76 38 37 






a Arietis 


W. 


28 28 40 


30 7 32 


31 46 44 


33 26 15 






Pollux 


E. 


47 4 57 


45 25 2 


43 44 67 


42 4 46 






Jupiter 


E. 


50 11 49 


48 32 4 


46 52 9 


45 12 3 






Saturn 


E. 


79 36 2 


77 55 13 


76 15 14 


74 35 4 






Regulus 


E. 


83 53 


82 12 32 


80 31 54 


78 51 5 






Mars 


E. 


108 43 18 


107 7 48 


105 32 7 


103 56 15 






Sun 


E. 


137 24 4 


136 61 38 


134 18 59 


132 46 8 




16 


a Pegasi 


W. 


84 43 50 


86 21 29 


87 69 19 


89 37 19 






a Arietis 


W. 


41 47 61 


43 28 63 


45 10 9 


46 51 38 






Jupiter 


E. 


36 49 2 


35 7 56 


33 26 41 


31 45 15 






Saturn 


E. 


66 11 38 


64 30 21 


62 49 2 


61 7 29 






Regulus 


E. 


70 24 22 


68 42 30 


67 28 


66 18 16 






Mars 


E. 


95 64 18 


94 17 23 


92 40 19 


91 3 3 






Sun 


E. 


124 68 58 


123 24 58 


121 50 46 


120 16 24 




IT 


a Arietis 


W. 


55 22 8 


57 4 49 


58 47 42 


60 30 45 






Aldebaran 


W. 


25 3 8 


26 37 26 


28 12 49 


29 49 11 






Saturn 


E. 


52 37 10 


50 54 36 


49 11 52 


47 28 58 






Eegulus 
Mars 


E. 


56 44 42 


55 1 29 


53 18 6 


51 34 34 






E. 


82 64 16 


81 16 


79 37 35 


77 59 






Sun 


E. 


112 21 61 


110 46 25 


109 10 49 


107 35 2 




18 


a Arietis 


W. 


69 8 46 - 


70 62 53 


72 37 11 


74 21 39 






Aldebaran 


W. 


38 2 7 


39 42 24 


41 23 9 


43 4 18 





236 



OCTOBER, 1859. 







GREEW WICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVI. 


XVIIIt. 


XXR 


Month. 


Position. 












11 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


o / // 

52 3 17 


53 26 57 


54 61 14 


O / // 

56 16 6 




a Pegasi 


w. 


30 2 7 


31 20 53 


32 41 8 


34 2 43 




Aldebaran 


E. 


50 31 53 


48 59 27 


47 26 66 


45 54 21 




Jupiter 


E. 


95 27 38 


93 53 21 


92 18 51 


90 44 9 


12 


a Aquilae 


W. 


88 41 29 


90 4 32 


91 27 45 


92 61 7 




Fomalhaul 


W. 


63 28 4 


64 55 50 


66 23 69 


67 52 31 




a Pegasi 


W. 


41 6 37 


42 33 59 


44 2 5 


45 30 60 




Aldebaran 


E. 


38 11 20 


36 38 53 


36 6 34 


33 34 26 




Pollux 


E. 


79 48 5 


78 11 41 


76 36 6 


74 58 17 




Jupiter 


E. 


82 47 33 


81 11 37 


79 35 28 


77 69 8 




Saturn 


E. 


112 11 49 


110 35 60 


108 59 38 


107 23 15 


13 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


75 20 22 


76 50 52 


78 21 38 


79 52 40 




a Pegasi 


W. 


53 3 5 


54 35 


56 7 21 


57 40 6 




Aldebaran 


E. 


25 68 59 


24 29 40 


23 1 20 


21 34 12 




Pollux 


E. 


66 51 28 


65 13 33 


63 35 26 


61 57 9 




Jupiter 


E. 


69 54 28 


68 16 57 


66 39 14 


65 1 20 




Saturn 


E. 


99 18 20 


97 40 46 


96 3*0 


94 25 2 


14 


Foraalliaut 


W. 


87 31 18 


89 3 38 


90 36 8 


92 8 49 




a Pegasi 


W. 


65 29 15 


67 4 3 


68 39 8 


70 14 31 




Pollux 


E. 


53 43 8 


52 3 49 


50 24 21 


48 44 44 




Jupiter 


E. 


56 49 


55 9 58 


63 30 46 


61 61 23 




Saturn 


E. 


86 12 26 


84 33 22 


82 54 6 


81 14 39 




Eegulus 


E. 


90 33 3 


88 53 18 


87 13 23 


85 33 17 


15 


a Pegasi 


W. 


78 15 14 


79 52 4 


81 29 8 


83 6 23 




a Arietis 


W. 


35 6 3 


36 46 7 


38 26 27 


40 7 2 




Pollux 


E. 


40 24 24 


38 43 56 


37 3 21 


35 22 40 




Jupiter 


E. 


43 31 47 


41 51 21 


40 10 45 


38 29 59 




Saturn 


E. 


72 64 44 


71 14 13 


69 33 32 


67 52 40 




Eegulus 


E. 


77 10 5 


75 28 55 


73 47 34 


72 6 3 




Mars 


E. 


102 20 13 


100 44 


99 7 36 


97 31 2 




Sun 


E. 


131 13 5 


129 39 51 


128 6 25 


126 32 47 


16 


a Pegasi 


W. 


91 15 29 


92 53 49 


94 32 17 


96 10 56 




a Arietis 


W. 


48 33 20 


50 15 14 


51 57 20 


53 39 38 




Jupiter 


E. 


30 3 41 


28 21 67 


26 40 5 


24 58 5 




Saturn 


E. 


59 25 45 


67 43 52 


66 1 48 


54 19 34 




Regulus 


E. 


63 35 53 


61 53 21 


60 10 38 


58 27 45 




Mars 


E. 


89 25 38 


87 48 2 


86 10 17 


84 32 21 




Sun 


E. 


118 41 51 


117 7 7 


115 32 12 


113 57 7 


17 


a Arietis 


W. 


62 14 


63 57 26 


65 41 2 


67 24 48 




Aldebaran 


W. 


31 26 25 


33 4 24 


34 43 3 


36 22 19 




Saturn 


E. 


45 45 55 


44 2 42 


42 19 19 


40 35 47 




Eegulus 


E. 


49 50 51 


48 6 59 


46 22 57 


44 38 45 




Mars 


E. 


76 20 ]6 


74 41 22 


73 2 18 


71 23 5 




Sun 


E. 


105 59 5 


104 22 58 


102 46 41 


101 10 14 


18 


a Arietis 


W. 


76 6 17 


77 51 4 


79 36 1 


81 21 8 




Aldebaran 


W. 


44 45 51 


46 27 45 


48 9 59 


49 52 32 



OCTOBER, 1859. 



237 









GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 








LUNAR DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 
















the 


and 




Noon. 


IIP-. 


TJk. 


IXk. 






Month. 


Position, 






















o * // 


o / // 


o / // 


o / // 






18 


Saturn 


E. 


38 52 5 


37 8 14 


35 24 14 


33 40 4 








Kegulus 


E. 


42 54 24 


41 9 53 


39 25 13 


37 40 24 








Mars 


E. 


69 43 43 


68 4 11 


66 24 31 


64 44 42 








Sun 


E. 


99 33 38 


97 56 51 


96 19 55 


94 42 49 






19 


a Arietis 


W. 


83 6 23 


84 51 48 


86 37 22 


88 23 5 








Aldebaran 


W. 


51 35 23 


53 18 31 


55 1 54 


56 45 32 








Regulus 


E. 


28 54 4 


27 8 23 


25 22 34 


23 36 37 








Mars 


E. 


56 23 26 


54 42 46 


53 1 59 


51 21 4 








Sun 


E. 


86 35 2 


84 57 1 


83 18 52 


81 40 35 






20 


Aldebaran 


W. 


65 27 3 


67 11 57 


68 57 


70 42 13 








Pollux 


W. 


22 40 3 


24 24 59 


26 10 18 


27 55 55 








Jupiter 


W. 


18 42 46 


20 28 37 


22 14 40 


24 54 








Mars 


E. 


42 54 52 


41 13 21 


39 31 46 


37 50 7 








Sun 


E. 


73 27 8 


71 48 4 


70 8 54 


68 29 37 






21 


Aldebaran 


W. 


79 30 26 


81 16 26 


83 2 31 


84 48 41 








Pollux 


W. 


36 47 41 


38 34 36 


40 21 38 


42 8 49 








Jupiter 


W. 


32 54 19 


34 41 22 


36 28 31 


38 15 46 








Mars 


E. 


29 21 28 


27 39 48 


25 58 14 


24 16 47 








StJN 


E. 


60 11 50 


58 32 3 


56 52 12 


55 12 18 






22 


Aldebaran 


W. 


93 40 25 


95 26 51 


97 13 18 


98 59 44 








PoUux 


W. 


51 6 6 


62 53 45 


54 41 27 


56 29 10 








Jupiter 


W. 


47 12 54 


49 28 


50 48 3 


52 35 40 








Saturn 


W. 


17 48 30 


19 35 41 


21 22 67 


23 10 16 








Sun 


E. 


46 52 25 


45 12 26 


43 32 29 


41 52 35 






23 


Pollux 


W. 


65 27 45 


67 15 23 


69 2 57 


70 50 28 








Jupiter 


W. 


61 33 31 


63 20 59 


65 8 24 


66 55 44 








Saturn 


W. 


32 7 4 


33 54 23 


35 41 38 


37 28 49 








■Regulus 


W. 


28 27 30 


30 15 24 


32 3 14 


33 51 








Sun 


E. 


33 34 16 


31 54 59 


30 15 54 


28 37 1 






28 


Sun 


W. 


31 34 50 


33 4 27 


34 33 49 


36 2 56 








a Aquilse 


E. 


61 56 22 


60 36 24 


59 17 15 


57 58 58 








Fomalbaut 


E. 


84 38 20 


83 7 31 


81 37 3 


80 6 69 








a Pegasi 


E. 


106 23 46 


104 49 51 


103 16 11 


101 42 47 






29 


Sun 


W. 


43 24 17 


44 51 42 


46 18 50 


47 45 40 








Antares 


W. 


10 57 39 


12 33 15 


14 8 32 


15 43 31 








a Aquilse 
Fomalhaut 


E. 


51 41 47 


50 29 33 


49 18 30 


48 8 43' 








E. 


72 42 34 


71 14 56 


69 47 45 


68 21 1 








a Pegasi 


E. 


94 3 


92 28 23 


90 57 


89 25 56 






30 


Sun 


W. 


54 55 43 


56 20 54 


57 45 50 


59 10 31 








Antares 


W. 


23 33 49 


25 7 1 


26 39 56 


28 12 35 








Fomalhaut 


E. 


61 14 26 


59 50 37 


58 27 20 


67 4 36 








a Pegasi 


E. 


81 55 3 


80 25 46 


78 56 48 


77 28 7 






31 


Sun 


W. 


66 10 21 


67 33 39 


68 56 44 


70 19 38 








Antares 


W. 


35 52 5 


37 23 17 


38 54 17 


40 26 6 








Fomalhaut 


E. 


50 19 50 


49 49 


47 42 31 


46 24 59 








a Pegasi 


E. 


70 9 6 


68 42 10 


67 15 32 


65 49 10 





238 



OCTOBER, 1859. 







GREEITWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVI.. 


XVIIIi. 


XXP.. 


Month. 


Position. 












18 


Saturn 


E. 


31 55 46 


o / // 

30 11 20 


o ; // 

28 26 45 


26 42 2 




Regulus 


E. 


35 55 25 


34 10 18 


32 25 2 


30 39 37 




Mars 


E. 


63 4 43 


61 24 36 


59 44 21 


58 3 57 




Sun 


E. 


93 5 34 


91 28 10 


89 50 36 


88 12 53 


19 


a Arietis 


W. 


90 8 56 


91 54 56 


93 41 4 


95 27 19 




Aldebaran 


W. 


58 29 25 


60 13 31 


61 57 50 


63 42 21 




Eegulus 


E. 


21 50 33 


20 4 23 


18 18 8 


16 31 48 




Mars 


E. 


49 40 2 


47 58 54 


46 17 39 


44 36 18 




Sun 


E. 


80 2 9 


78 23 35 


76 44 53 


75 6 4 


20 


Aldebaran 


W. 


12 21 36 


74 13 1 


75 58 46 


77 44 33 




Pollux 


W. 


29 41 50 


31 27 59 


33 14 22 


35 56 




Jupiter 


W. 


25 41 19 


27 33 52 


29 20 34 


31 7 23 




Mars 


E. 


36 8 25 


34 26 41 


32 44 56 


31 3 11 




Sun 


E. 


66 50 14 


65 10 46 


63 31 12 


61 51 33 


21 


Aldebaran 


W. 


86 34 56 


88 21 14 


90 7 35 


91 53 59 




Pollux 


W. 


43 56 6 


45 43 29 


47 30 57 


49 18 29 




Jupiter 


W. 


40 3 3 


41 50 26 


43 37 52 


45 25 22 




Mars 


E. 


22 35 31 


20 54 31 


19 13 50 


17 33 37 




Sun 


E. 


53 32 22 


51 52 24 


50 12 25 


48 32 26 


22 


Aldebaran 


W. 


100 46 9 


102 32 32 


104 18 52 


106 5 9 




Pollux 


W. 


58 16 54 


60 4 38 


61 52 22 


63 40 4 




Jupiter 


W. 


54 23 16 


56 10 52 


57 58 27 


69 46 




Saturn 


W. 


24 57 31 


26 44 59 


28 32 22 


30 19 44 




Sun 


E. 


40 12 44 


38 32 57 


36 53 16 


35 13 42 


23 


Pollux 


W. 


12 37 54 


74 25 14 


76 12 28 


77 59 35 




Jupiter 


W. 


68 42 59 


70 30 8 


72 17 12 


74 4 8 




Saturn 


W. 


39 15 56 


41 2 57 


42 49 52 


44 36 41 




Regulus 


W. 


35 38 42 


37 26 18 


39 13 48 


41 1 11 




Sun 


E. 


26 58 24 


25 20 5 


23 42 6 


22 4 33 


28 


Sun 


W. 


37 31 45 


39 18 


40 28 35 


41 66 34 




a Aquilas 


E. 


56 41 34 


55 25 6 


54 9 37 


52 56 10 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


78 37 17 


77 7 59 


75 39 6 


74 10 37 




a Pegasi 


E. 


100 9 40 


98 36 50 


97 4 17 


95 32 1 


29 


Sun 


W. 


49 12 14 


50 38 31 


52 4 31 


53 30 15 




Antares 


W. 


17 18 11 


18 52 32 


20 26 35 


22 21 




a Aquilae 


E. 


47 15 


45 53 11 


44 47 35 


43 43 32 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


66 54 44 


65 28 56 


64 3 36 


62 38 46 




a Pegasi 


E. 


87 55 9 


86 24 41 


84 54 30 


83 24 38 


30 


Sun 


W. 


60 34 57 


61 59 9 


63 23 6 


64 46 50 




Antares 


w. 


29 44 68 


31 17 7 


32 49 


34 20 39 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


55 42 26 


54 20 51 


52 59 52 


51 39 31 




a Pegasi 


E. 


75 59 44 


74 31 38 


73 3 50 


71 36 19 


31 


Sun 


W. 


71 42 21 


73 4 53 


74 27 14 


75 49 27 




Antares 


W. 


41 55 40 


43 26 5 


44 66 20 


46 26 24 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


45 8 14 


43 52 20 


42 37 20 


41 23 16 




a Pegasi 


E. 


64 23 6 


62 57 19 


61 31 50 


60 6 37 



NOVEMBER, 1859. 



239 





GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 
tfce 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


IIP. 


\l\ 


IX"-. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Sun 


W. 


O 1 II 

11 11 30 


^ O J II 

78 83 24 


^ o / // 

79 55 10 


O / // 

81 16 49 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


40 10 14 


38 58 17 


37 47 30 


36 37 59 




a Pegasi 


E. 


58 41 43 


57 17 6 


65 52 47 


54 28 46 




a Arietis 


E. 


100 1 24 


98 37 68 


97 8 41 


95 39 31 


2 


Sun 


W. 


88 3 30 


89 24 36 


90 45 39 


92 6 38 




a Pegasi 


E. 


47 33 33 


46 11 33 


44 49 57 


43 28 47 




a Arietis 


E. 


88 15 14 


86 46 36 


85 18 3 


83 49 32 


3 


Sun 


W. 


98 51 15 


100 12 10 


101 33 6 


102 54 4 




a Pegasi 


E. 


36 50 16 


35 32 22 


34 15 12 


32 58 52 




a Arietis 


E. 


76 27 21 


74 58 55 


73 30 28 


72 2 




Aldebaran 


E. 


108 21 35 


106 64 20 


105 27 3 


103 59 42 


4 


Sun 


W. 


109 39 41 


111 1 1 


112 22 27 


113 43 59 




a Aquilae 


W. 


40 58 55 


41 55 54 


42 54 27 


43 54 28 




a Arietis 


E. 


64 38 53 


63 10 3 


61 41 8 


60 12 7 




Aldebaran 


E. 


96 41 52 


95 14 2 


93 46 6 


92 18 3 


5 


Sun 


W. 


120 33 28 


121 55 46 


123 18 14 


124 40 61 




a Aquilse 


W. 


49 13 55 


50 21 11 


51 29 27 


52 38 39 




a Arietis 


E. 


52 45 20 


51 15 35 


49 45 42 


48 15 39 




Aldebaran 


E. 


84 55 51 


83 26 59 


81 57 58 


80 28 46 


6 


a Aquilae 


W. 


58 37 16 


69 51 15 


61 5 54 


62 21 13 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


33 22 43 


34 29 51 


35 38 46 


36 49 19 




a Arietis 


E. 


40 43 6 


39 12 6 


37 40 56 


36 9 37 




Aldebaran 


E. 


73 12 


71 29 56 


69 59 28 


68 28 48 




Jupiter 


E. 


119 53 9 


118 21 28 


116 49 34 


115 17 27 


V 


a Aquilae 


W. 


68 46 41 


70 5 24 


71 24 37 


72 44 19 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


•43 2 64 


44 21 8 


45 40 22 


47 32 




. a Pegasi 


W. 


22 2 26 


23 5 41 


24 12 16 


25 21 47 




Aldebaran 


E. 


60 52 33 


59 20 42 


57 48 40 


56 16 26 




Pollux 


E. 


103 4 17 


101 30 48 


99 57 2 


98 23 1 




Jupiter 


E. 


107 33 8 


105 59 30 


104 25 35 


102 61 25 


8 


a Aquilae 


W. 


79 29 20 


80 51 31 


82 14 4 


83 36 58 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


53 53 45 


55 18 35 


56 44 4 


58 10 9 




a Pegasi 


W. 


31 43 8 


33 4 37 


34 27 27 


35 51 31 




Aldebaran 


E. 


48 32 26 


46 59 22 


45 26 


43 52 31 




Pollux 


E. 


90 28 49 


88 53 8 


87 17 11 


85 40 67 




Jupiter 


E. 


94 56 24 


93 20 33 


91 44 25 


90 8 


9 


a Aquilae 


W. 


90 35 56 


92 30 


93 25 18 


94 50 17 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


65 29 


66 58 18 


68 28 2 


69 58 13 




a Pegasi 


w. 


43 7 6 


44 36 47 


46 7 10 


47 38 14 




Aldebaran 


E. 


36 4 17 


34 30 42 


32 57 14 


31 23 59 




Pollux 


E. 


77 35 36 


75 67 41 


74 19 31 


72 41 5 




Jupiter 
Saturn 


E. 


82 1 38 


80 23 31 


78 45 7 


77 6 26 




E. 


111 55 20 


110 17 33 


108 29 28 


107 1 7 


10 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


77 35 3 


79 7 29 


80 40 14 


82 13 17 




a Pegasi 


W. 


65 22 23 


56 56 46 


68 31 37 


60 6 64 



240 



NOVEMBER, 1859. 



GEEENWICH MEATq- TIME. 








LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 








Day of 

the 


Star's Name 












and 




Midnight. 


XVh. 


XTIIP-. 


XXIh. 




Month. 


Position 














1 


Sun 


W. 


O 1 II 

82 38 20 


83 59 46 


85 21 5 


86° 42 20 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


35 29 50 


34 23 10 


33 18 7 


32 14 49 






a Pegasi 


E. 


53 5 4 


51 41 40 


50 18 37 


48 55 54 






a Arietis 


E. 


94 10 28 


92 41 32 


91 12 41 


89 43 55 




2 


Sun 


W. 


93 27 36 


94 48 32 


96 9 26 


97 30 21 






a Pegasi 


E. 


42 8 3 


40 47 47 


39 28 2 


38 8 51 






a Arietis 


E. 


82 21 3 


80 52 37 


79 24 11 


77 55 46 




3 


Sun 


W. 


104 15 5 


105 36 8 


106 57 15 


108 18 25 






a Pegasi 


E. 


31 43 21 


30 29 4 


29 15 52 


28 3 59 






a Arietis 


E. 


70 33 29 


69 4 55 


67 36 19 


66 7 38 






Aldebaran 


E. 


102 32 17 


101 4 48 


99 37 15 


98 9 36 




4 


Sun 


W. 


115 5 38 


116 27 24 


117 49 17 


119 11 18 






a Aquilse 


W. 


44 55 53 


45 58 36 


47 2 33 


48 7 41 






a Arietis 


E. 


58 43 


57 13 46 


55 44 25 


54 14 56 






Aldebaran 


E. 


90 49 53 


89 21 35 


87 53 9 


86 24 34 




5 


Sun 


W. 


126 3 39 


127 26 36 


128 49 45 


130 13 4 






a Ac(uil8e 


W. 


53 48 45 


54 69 41 


56 11 27 


67 23 59 






a Arietis 


E. 


46 45 28 


45 15 7 


43 44 37 


42 13 66 






Aldebaran 


E. 


78 59 25 


77 29 53 


76 10 


74 30 17 




6 


a Aquilse 


W. 


63 37 9 


64 53 42 


66 10 49 


67 28 29 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


38 1 24 


39 14 54 


40 29 43 


41 45 44 






a Arietis 


E. 


34 38 8 


33 6 29 


31 34 43 


30 2 48 






Aldebaran 


E. 


66 57 57 


65 26 54 


63 55 39 


62 24 12 






Jupiter 


E. 


113 45 5 


112 12 29 


110 39 37 


109 6 30 




1 


a Aquilae 


W. 


74 4 28 


75 25 4 


76 46 5 


78 7 31 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


48 21 36 


49 43 29 


61 6 10 


52 29 36 






a Pegasi 


W. 


26 33 54 


27 48 20 


29 4 60 


30 23 9 






Aldebaran 


E. 


54 44 1 


63 11 25 


51 38 38 


50 5 42 






Pollux 


E. 


96 48 44 


95 14 10 


93 39 20 


92 4 12 






Jupiter 


E. 


101 16 58 


99 42 16 


98 7 14 


96 31 68 




8 


a Aquilse 


W. 


85 11 


86 23 42 


87 47 31 


§9 11 36 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


59 36 51 


61 4 6 


62 31 53 


64 12 






a Pegasi 


W. 


37 16 43 


38 42 57 


40 10 8 


41 38 13 






Aldebaran 


E. 


42 18 57 


40 45 19 


39 11 38 


37 37 67 






Pollux 


E. 


84 4 26 


82 27 38 


80 50 34 


79 13 13 






Jupiter 


E. 


88 31 18 


86 64 19 


85 17 3 


83 39 29 




9 


a Aquilse 


W. 


96 15 26 


97 40 45 


99 6 11 


100 31 44 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


71 28 49 


72 69 49 


74 31 12 


76 2 57 






a Pegasi 


w. 


49 9 56 


60 42 13 


52 15 5 


63 48 29 






Aldebaran 


E. 


29 50 59 


28 18 21 


26 46 13 


25 14 41 






Pollux 


E. 


71 2 23 


69 23 25 


67 44 11 


66 4 42 






Jupiter 


E. 


75 27 29 


73 48 16 


72 8 45 


70 28 69 






Saturn 


E. 


105 22 29 


103 43 85 


102 4 25 


100 24 59 




10 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


83 46 37 


85 20 14 


86 64 5 


88 28 10 






a Pegasi 


W. 


61 42 35 


63 18 40 


64 65 8 


66 31 57 









NOVEMBER, 1859. 


241 


1 




GEEENWICH 


MEAI^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Uayof 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. . 


mi-. 


Tit. 


IXi". 


Month. 


Position. 












10 


Pollux 


E. 


o / // 

64 24 58 


O / 11 

62 45 


O / II 

61 4 47 


O 1 II 

69 24 20 




Jupiter 


E. 


68 48 58 


67 8 40 


65 28 8 


63 47 20 




Saturn 


E. 


98 45 17 


97 5 20 


96 25 7 


93 44 39 




Ecgulus 


E. 


101 17 3 


99 36 43 


97 56 7 


96 16 17 


11 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


90 2 29 


91 37 


93 11 41 


94 46 32 




a Pegasi 


W. 


68 9 6 


69 46 35 


71 24 22 


73 2 27 




a Arietis 


W. 


24 40 21 


26 20 29 


28 1 4 


29 42 4 




Pollux 


E. 


50 58 49 


49 17 6 


47 36 13 


46 53 9 




Jupiter 


E. 


65 19 46 


53 37 33 


51 66 9 


50 12 32 




Saturn 


E. 


85 18 44 


83 36 63 


81 54 48 


80 12 31 




Eegulus 


E. 


87 47 29 


86 6 15 


84 22 48 


82 40 9 


12 


a Pegasi 


W. 


81 16 39 


82 56 9 


84 35 61 


86 16 43 




a Arietis 


W. 


38 11 57 


39 64 46 


41 37 46 


43 21 1 




Pollux 


E. 


37 20 39 


36 37 49 


33 54 54 


32 11 56 




Jupiter 


E. 


41 36 34 


39 52 51 


38 8 58 


36 24 56 




Saturn 


E. 


71 38 13 


69 54 49 


68 11 15 


66 27 33 




Eegulus 


E. 


74 4 


72 20 14 


70 36 19 


68 52 14 




Mars 


E. 


116 29 29 


114 50 54 


113 12 10 


111 33 16 


13 


a Pegasi 


W. 


94 37 12 


96 17 50 


97 68 33 


99 39 19 




a Arietis 


W. 


52 5 


53 44 22 


66 28 48 


57 13 22 




Aldebaran 


W. 


21 54 12 


23 27 38 


26 2 37 


26 38 52 




Jupiter 


E. 


27 42 47 


26 58 1 


24 13 9 


22 28 13 




Saturn 


E. 


67 46 62 


56 2 22 


54 17 45 


52 33 2 




Eegulus 


E. 


60 9 45 


58 24 62 


66 39 54 


54 64 49 




Mars 


E. 


103 16 27 


101 36 42 


99 56 50 


98 16 52 


14 


a Arietis 


W. 


66 57 50 


67 43 


69 28 16 


71 13 34 




Aldebaran 


W. 


34 53 21 


36 34 7 


38 15 19 


39 56 54 




Saturn 


E. 


43 48 10 


42 2 59 


40 17 45 


38 32 27 




Eegulus 


E. 


46 8 6 


44 22 32 


42 36 55 


40 51 14 




Mars 


E. 


89 56 38 


88 15 9 


86 34 37 


84 54 1 




Sun 


E. 


129 46 50 


128 9 24 


126 31 52 


124 54 16 


16 


a Arietis 


W. 


80 57 


81 46 33 


83 32 11 


85 17 51 




Aldebaran 


W. 


48 29 15 


50 12 23 


51 55 41 


53 39 8 




Saturn 


E. 


29 46 33 


28 8 


26 14 44 


24 29 21 




Eegulus 


E. 


32 2 18 


30 16 27 


28 30 35 


26 44 42 




Mars 


E. 


76 30 26 


74 49 37 


73 8 48 


71 27 58 




Spica 
Stjn 


E. 


86 5 9 


84 19 15 


82 33 19 


80 47 22 




E. 


116 45 14 


116 7 17 


113 29 17 


111 51 15 


16 


a Arietis 


W. 


94 6 20 


95 52 3 


97 37 45 


99 23 27 




Aldebaran 


W. 


62 18 4 


64 2 7 


65 46 12 


67 30 20 




Pollux 


W. 


19 38 30 


21 21 44 


23 5 23 


24 49 21 




Jupiter 
Mars 


W. 


14 43 4 


16 28 45 


18 14 33 


20 25 




E. 


63 3 48 


61 23 1 


69 42 14 


58 1 30 




Spica 

Sun 


E. 


71 57 27 


70 11 27 


68 25 28 


66 39 30 




E. 


103 40 47 


102 2 40 


100 24 32 


98 46 25 


11 


Aldebaran 


W. 


76 11 28 


77 65 44 


79 40 


81 24 15 




Pollux 


W. 


33 32 8 


36 17 3 


37 2 1 


38 47 2 



16 



242 



NOVEMBER, 1859. 



GEEENWICH MEAT^ TIME. 








LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVt. 


XTIIP'. 


XXI'. 


Month. 


Position. 












10 


Pollux 


E. 


67 43 39 


O / // 

56 2 45 


O / // 

64 21 39 


52° 40 20 




Jupiter 


E. 


62 6 17 


60 26 


58 43 29 


57 1 44 




Saturn 


E. 


92 3 56 


90 22 69 


88 41 48 


87 23 




Eegulus 


E. 


94 34 11 


92 52 51 


91 11 18 


89 29 30 


11 


FomaUiaut 


W. 


96 21 32 


97 66 40 


99 31 54 


101 7 13 




a Pegasi 


W. 


74 40 48 


76 19 24 


77 68 16 


79 37 21 




a Arietis 


W. 


31 23 25 


33 6 6 


34 47 6 


36 29 23 




Pollux 


E. 


44 10 56 


42 28 33 


40 46 3 


39 3 24 




Jupiter 


E. 


48 29 43 


46 46 42 


46 3 30 


43 20 8 




Saturn 


E. 


78 30 2 


76 47 21 


75 4 29 


73 21 26 




Regulus 


E. 


80 57 18 


79 14 16 


77 31 1 


76 47 36 


12 


a Pegasi 


W. 


87 55 45 


89 36 55 


91 16 14 


92 56 40 




a Arietis 


W. 


45 4 29 


46 48 7 


48 31 57 


50 15 66 




Pollux 


E. 


30 28 55 


28 45 64 


27 2 55 


25 20 1 




Jupiter 


E. 


34 40 46 


32 66 27 


31 12 1 


29 27 27 




Saturn 


E. 


64 43 41 


62 59 40 


61 15 32 


59 31 16 




Regulus 


E. 


67 8 


65 23 38 


63 39 8 


61 54 30 




Mars 


E. 


109 54 11 


108 14 57 


106 35 36 


104 66 5 


13 


a Pegasi 


W. 


101 20 9 


103 1 1 


104 41 63 


106 22 47 




a Arietis 


W. 


58 58 3 


60 42 61 


62 27 45 


64 12 45 




Aldebaran 


W. 


28 16 11 


29 64 26 


31 33 25 


33 13 6 




Jupiter 


E. 


20 43 12 


18 58 9 


17 13 5 


15 28 




Saturn 


E. 


50 48 13 


49 3 19 


47 18 21 


45 33 17 




Regulus 


E. 


53 9 38 


51 24 22 


49 39 1 


47 63 36 




Mars 


E. 


96 36 47 


94 66 37 


93 16 22 


. 91 36 2 


14 


a Arietis 


W. 


72 58 57 


74 44 22 


76 29 51 


78 15 23 




Aldebaran 


W. 


41 38 60 


48 21 4 


45 3 34 


46 46 18 




Saturn 


E. 


36 47 8 


35 1 46 


33 16 22 


31 30 68 




Regulus 


E. 


39 6 31 


37 19 46 


36 33 68 


33 48 9 




Mars 


E. 


83 13 22 


81 82 41 


79 51 58 


78 11 13 




Sun 


E. 


123 16 35 


121 38 60 


120 1 1 


118 23 9 


15 


a Arietis 


W. 


87 3 32 


88 49 13 


90 34 55 


92 20 38 




Aldebaran 


W. 


66 22 43 


67 6 25 


58 50 13 


60 34 6 




Saturn 


E. 


22 44 


20 58 42 


19 13 29 


17 28 22 




Regulus 


E. 


24 58 51 


23 13 


21 27 11 


19 41 25 




Mars 


E. 


69 47 7 


68 6 17 


66 25 27 


64 44 37 




Spica 


E. 


79 1 24 


77 15 25 


75 29 26 


73 43 26 




Sun 


E. 


110 13 12 


108 35 7 


106 67 1 


105 18 54 


16 


a Arietis 


W. 


101 9 7 


102 64 47 


104 40 25 


106 26 2 




Aldebaran 


W. 


69 14 31 


70 68 44 


72 42 68 


74 27 13 




Pollux 


W. 


26 33 34 


28 18 


30 2 36 


31 47 19 




Jupiter 


W. 


21 46 20 


23 32 16 


25 18 14 


27 4 12 




Mars 


E. 


56 20 48 


54 40 8 


52 69 31 


51 18 66 




Spica 


E. 


64 63 33 


63 7 36 


61 21 41 


69 35 47 




Sun 


E. 


97 8 18 


96 30 12 


93 62 6 


92 14 1 


. 11 


Aldebaran 


W. 


83 8 29 


84 52 42 


86 36 63 


88 21 2 




Pollux 


W. 


40 32 5 


42 17 10 


44 2 16 


45 47 22 



NOVEMBER, 1859. 



243 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR DISTANCES. 






Day of 
the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


Illi. 


Vlk 


IXi-. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


Q 1 II 


O / // 


O / // 


17 


Jupiter 


W. 


28 50 11 


30 36 9 


32 22 8 


34 8 5 




Mars 


E. 


49 38 26 


47 57 59 


46 17 37 


44 37 19 




Spica 


E. 


57 49 65 


56 4 4 


54 18 15 


52 32 29 




Sun 


E. 


90 35 68 


88 67 56 


87 19 56 


86 41 67 


18 


Aldebaran 


W. 


90 5 9 


91 49 13 


93 33 14 


96 17 12 




Pollux 


W. 


47 32 29 


49 17 34 


61 2 39 


52 47 42 




Jupiter 


W. 


42 57 30 


44 43 18 


46 29 3 


48 14 45 




Saturn 


W. 


12 46 13 


14 30 24 


16 14 49 


17 59 22 




Mars 


E. 


36 17 25 


34 37 50 


32 58 25 


31 19 13 




Spica 


E. 


43 44 17 


41 68 48 


40 13 24 


38 28 3 




Sun 


E. 


77 32 38 


76 64 54 


74 17 13 


72 39 36 


19 


Pollux 


W. 


61 32 27 


63 17 15 


66 2 


66 46 41 




Jupiter 


W. 


57 2 31 


68 47 53 


60 33 12 


62 18 26 




Saturn 


w. 


26 42 49 


28 27 30 


30 12 8 


31 56 44 




Regulus 


w. 


24 31 19 


26 16 20 


28 1 19 


29 46 14 




Mars 


E. 


23 7 14 


21 30 2 


19 63 25 


18 17 32 




Spica 


E. 


29 42 36 


27 57 49 


26 13 10 


24 28 40 




Sun 


E. 


64 32 28 


62 55 16 


61 18 9 


59 41 7 


20 


Pollux 


W. 


75 28 59 


77 13 11 


78 57 18 


80 41 18 




Jupiter 


W. 


71 3 25 


72 48 9 


74 32 47 


76 17 19 




Saturn 


W. 


40 38 46 


42 22 67 


44 7 2 


45 51 1 




Eegulus 


w. 


38 29 49 


40 14 17 


41 58 39 


43 42 55 




Sun 


E. 


51-37 30 


60 1 7 


48 24 52 


46 48 46 


21 


PoUjix 


W. 


89 19 34 


91 2 50 


92 45 58 


94 28 57 




Jupiter 


w. 


84 58 14 


86 42 2 


88 25 43 


90 9 14 




Saturn 


w. 


54 29 19 


66 12 36 


57 55 46 


59 38 47 




Regulus 


w. 


52 22 32 


54 6 6 


56 49 30 


57 32 47 




Sun 


E. 


38 50 32 


37 16 26 


36 40 31 


34 5 50 


26 


Sun 


w. 


23 17 41 


24 42 59 


26 8 14 


27 33 24 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


65 30 


64 4 12 


62 38 53 


61 14 2 




a Pegasi 


E. 


86 18 36 


84 47 38 


83 16 56 


81 46 29 


27 


Sun 


W. 


34 37 13 


36 1 30 


37 25 37 


38 49 33 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


54 17 46 


52 66 15 


51 35 24 


50 15 13 




a Pegasi 


E. 


74 18 25 


72 49 39 


71 21 11 


69 53 




a Arietis 


E. 


116 31 15 


114 68 53 


113 26 44 


111 54 47 


28 


Sun 


W. 


45 46 37 


47 9 31 


48 32 15 


49 54 49 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


43 45 48 


42 30 33 


41 16 19 


40 3 10 




a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


E. 


62 36 32 


61 10 9 


69 44 5 


58 18 21 




E. 


104 18 15 


102 47 32 


101 17 


99 46 40 


29 


Sun 


W, 


56 45 26 


68 7 9 


69 28 45 


60 50 15 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


34 16 44 


33 12 6 


32 9 19 


31 8 35 




a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


E. 


51 14 41 


49 61 1 


48 27 45 


47 4 52 




E. 


92 17 23 


90 47 58 


89 18 42 


87 49 32 


30 


'Sun 


W. 


67 36 16 


68 57 14 


70 18 9 


71 39 2 




a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


E. 


40 17 19 


38 57 23 


37 38 3 


36 19 24 1 




E. 


80 25 21 


78 66 45 


77 28 14 


75 59 47 



2M 



NOVEMBER, 1859. 















1 






GEEENWICH 


MEAK TIME. 


1 


! 






LUNAR DISTANCES. 






' Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVK 


XVIII''. 


XXP>. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 

i 






o 1 II 


Q 1 II 


o / // 


o / // 


17 


Jupiter 


W. 


35 54 1 


37 39 56 


39 25 49 


41 11 41 




Mars 


E. 


42 5*7 7 


41 17 1 


39 37 1 


37 57 9 




Spica 


E. 


50 46 45 


49 1 4 


47 15 25 


45 29 49 




Sun 


E. 


84 4 1 


82 26 6 


80 48 14 


79 10 24 


18 


Aldebaran 


W. 


97 1 6 


98 44 56 


100 28 42 


102 12 23 




Pollux 


W. 


54 32 44 


56 17 43 


58 2 41 


59 47 35 




Jupiter 


w. 


50 24 


51 46 1 


53 31 34 


65 17 4 


j 


Saturn 


w. 


19 44 


21 28 41 


23 13 24 


24 68 7 




Mars 


E. 


29 40 13 


28 1 29 


26 23 2 


24 44 56 




Spica 


E. 


86 42 47 


34 57 36 


33 12 30 


31 27 80 




Sun 


E. 


71 2 2 


69 24 33 


67 47 7 


66 9 45 


19 


Pollux 


W. 


68 31 18 


70 15 51 


72 19 


73 44 42 




Jupiter 


W. 


64 3 36 


65 48 41 


67 33 41 


69 18 36 




Saturn 


W. 


33 41 16 


35 25 45 


37 10 10 


38 54 31 




Regulus 


W. 


31 31 6 


33 15 54 


35 37 


36 45 16 




Mars 


E. 


16 42 34 


15 8 47 


18 86 35 


12 6 31 




Spica 


E. 


22 44 19 


21 9 


19 16 13 


17 82 33 




Sun 


E. 


58 4 11 


56 27 21 


54 50 37 


53 14 


20 


Pollux 


W. 


82 25 11 


' 84 8 58 


85 52 37 


87 86 9 




Jupiter 


w. 


78 1 44 


79 46 2 


81 80 14 


83 14 18 




Saturn 


w. 


47 34 54 


49 18 41 


51 2 21 


52 45 58 




Regulus 


w. 


45 27 4 


47 11 7 


48 55 3 


50 38 52 




Sun 


E. 


45 12 47 


43 36 58 


42 1 19 


40 25 50 


21 


Pollux 


W. 


, 96 11 47 


97 54 28 


99 36 59 


101 19 20 




Jupiter 


W. 


91 52 37 


93 35 51 


95 18 56 


• 97 1 50 




Saturn 


W. 


61 21 40 


63 4 23 


64 46 57 


66 29 22 




Regulus 


W. 


59 15 54 


60 58 52 


62 41 41 


64 24 20 




Sun 


E. 


32 31 23 


30 57 11 


29 23 16 


27 49 39 


26 


Sun 


w. 


28 68 27 


30 23 22 


31 48 8 


88 12 46 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


59 49 41 


58 25 52 


57 2 36 


55 39 53 




a Pegasi 


E. 


80 16 19 


78 46 25 


77 16 48 


76 47 28 


2Y 


Sun 


W. 


40 13 19 


41 36 54 


48 19 


44 23 33 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


48 55 44 


47 37 1 


46 19 6 


45 2 




a Pegasi 


E. 


68 25 6 


66 57 30 


65 80 18 


64 3 13 




a Arietis 


E. 


110 23 4 


108 51 34 


107 20 16 


106 49 9 


28 


Sun 


W. 


51 17 14 


52 39 29 


54 1 36 


55 23 35 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


38 51 10 


37 40 25 


36 31 2 


35 23 5 




a Pegasi 


E. 


56 52 56 


55 27 51 


64 3 7 


52 38 43 




a Arietis 


E. 


98 16 29 


96 46 28 


95 16 38 


93 46 56 


29 


Sun 


W. 


62 11 38 


63 32 55 


64 54 6 


66 15 13 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


30 10 3 


29 13 57 


28 20 28 


27 29 62 




a Pegasi 


E. 


45 42 25 


44 20 25 


42 58 53 


41 37 60 




a Arietis 


E. 


86 20 30 


84 51 34 


83 22 44 


81 54 


30 


Sun 


W. 


72 59 52 


74 20 41 


75 41 28 


77 2 15 




a Pegasi 


E. 


35 1 29 


33 44 22 


32 28 8 


31 12 53 




a Arietis 


E. 


74 31 22 


73 2 59 


71 34 39 


70 6 19 



DECEMBER, 1859. 



245 





GKEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


°r^ 


Star's Name 










aod 




Noon. 


HI''. 


VIi-. 


IX". 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Sun 


W. 


o / // 

18 23 2 


o / // 

79 43 49 


/ // 

81 4 38 


82 25 28 




a Arietis 


E. 


68 38 


67 9 42 


65 41 22 


64 18 2 




Aldebaran 


E. 


100 42 42 


99 15 26 


97 48 8 


96 20 48 


2 


Sun 


W. 


89 10 25 


90 31 38 


91 52 56 


93 14 21 




a Aquilae 


W. 


46 2 41 


47 6 38 


48 11 40 


49 17 44 




a Arietis 


E. 


56 50 41 


56 22 9 


63 53 27 


62 24 39 




Aldebaran 


E. 


89 3 20 


87 36 87 


86 7 49 


84 39 54 


3 


Sun 


W. 


100 3 23 


101 25 39 


102 48 6 


104 10 44 




a Aquilae 


W. 


65 1 46 


56 13 1 


57 24 69 


58 87 39 




a Arietis 


E. 


44 59 1 


43 29 39 


42 2 


40 30 16 1 




Aldebaran 


E. 


11 18 36 


75 49 65 


74 21 5 


72 62 6 


4 


Sun 


W. 


111 6 51 


112 30 52 


113 66 2 


115 19 28 




a Aquilae 


W. 


64 50 35 


66 6 56 


67 23 49 


68 41 14 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


39 27 11 


40 40 44 


41 55 30 


43 11 24 




Aldebaran 


E. 


65 24 29 


63 54 24 


62 24 6 


60 53 36 




Pollux 


E. 


107 37 6 


106 5 36 


104 33 51 


108 1 50 




Jupiter 


E. 


111 22 29 


109 50 8 


108 17 33 


106 44 41 


6 


Sun 


W. 


122 25 38 


128 51 43 


125 18 7 


126 44 49 




a Aquilae 


w. 


75 15 43 


76 36 


77 56 43 


79 17 52 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


49 45 39 


51 7 8 


62 29 23 


63 62 23 




a Pegasi 


w. 


27 38 20 


28 54 19 


30 12 7 


31 31 84 




Aldebaran 


E. 


53 18 


51 46 15 


60 14 18 


48 42 9 




Pollux 


E. 


96 17 33 


93 43 49 


92 9 45 


90 35 23 




Jupiter 


E. 


98 56 10 


97 21 84 


96 46 39 


94 11 25 


6 


a Aquilae 


W. 


86 9 29 


87 32 54 


88 56 40 


90 20 45 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


60 57 41 


62 24 38 


68 62 11 


65 20 18 




a Pegasi 


w. 


38 28 53 


39 66 40 


41 23 24 


42 52 




Aldebaran 


E. 


40 68 47 


39 25 41 


87 52 30 


36 19 16 




Pollux 


E. 


82 38 33 


81 2 10 


79 25 26 


77 48 21 




Jupiter 


E. 


86 10 13 


84 32 67 


82 66 19 


81 17 19 




Saturn 


E. 


117 41 33 


116 4 56 


114 27 57 


112 50 37 


n 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


72 48 53 


74 20 5 


75 51 46 


77 23 53 




a Pegasi 


w. 


60 26 42 


51 69 44 


53 88 28 


65 7 39 




Aldebaran 


E. 


28 34 2 


27 1 43 


25 29 54 


23 58 46 




Pollux 


E. 


69 37 35 


67 58 22 


66 18 47 


64 38 51 




Jupiter 


E. 


73 1 53 


71 21 42 


69 41 9 


68 13 




Saturn 


E. 


104 38 28 


102 58 66 


101 19 1 


99 38 45 


8 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


85 10 47 


86 45 19 


88 20 11 


89 55 23 




a Pegasi 


W. 


63 7 16 


64 44 43 


66 22 39 


68 1 1 




Pollux 


E. 


56 13 59 


54 32 


52 49 42 


51 7 5 




Jupiter 


E. 


69 30 8 


57 47 3 


56 3 36 


54 19 49 




Saturn 


E. 


91 11 64 


89 29 28 


87 46 40 


86 8 33 




Eegulus 


E. 


93 4 21 


91 21 53 


89 39 4 


87 55 65 


9 


a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


W. 


76 19 7 


77 69 52 


79 40 68 


81 22 23 




W. 


33 4 34 


34 48 28 


36 32 46 


38 17 25 




Pollux 


E. 


42 29 36 


40 46 18 


39 47 


37 16 3 



m 



DECEMBER, 1859. 



1 


GEEENWICH 


: ME ATT TIME. 


/ 






LUNAH ] 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










tfie 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


XViiii.. 


XXP. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Sun 


W. 


o / // 

83 46 20 


/ // 

85 7 15 


o / // 

86 28 14 


/ // 

87 49 17 




a Arietis 


E. 


62 44 40 


61 16 17 


59 47 60 


58 19 20 




Aldebaran 


E. 


94 53 26 


93 26 


91 68 31 


90 30 58 


2 


Sun 


W. 


94 36 53 


95 57 33 


97 19 21 


98 41 17 




a Aquilae 


W. 


50 24 47 


51 32 45 


52 41 36 


53 61 17 




a Arietis 


E. 


50 55 46 


49 26 47 


47 57 41 


46 28 28 




Aldebaran 


E. 


83 11 54 


81 43 46 


80 16 30 


78 47 7 


3 


Sun 


W. 


105 33 33 


106 56 34 


108 19 48 


109 43 16 




a Aquilae 


W. 


59 51 


61 4 59 


. 62 19 35 


63 34 48 




a Arietis 


E. 


39 22 


37 30 19 


36 7 


34 29 46 




Aldebaran 


E. 


11 22 56 


69 53 36 


68 24 5 


66 64 23 


4 


Sun 


W. 


116 44 9 


118 9 6 


119 34 19 


120 69 50 




a Aquilae 


W. 


69 59 10 


71 17 36 


72 36 30 


73 55 53 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


44 28 21 


45 46 18 


47 5 12 


48 26 




Aldebaran 


E. 


59 22 54 


57 52 


56 20 52 


64 49 33 




Pollux 


E. 


101 29 33 


99 56 59 


98 24 8 


96 51 




Jupiter 


E. 


105 11 33 


103 38 9 


102 4 27 


100 30 27 


5 


Sun 


W. 


128 11 49 


129 39 8 


131 6 47 


132 34 44 




a Aquilae 


W. 


80 39 25 


82 1 22 


83 23 42 


84 46 24 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


55 16 6 


56 40 31 


68 6 36 


59 31 20 


1 


a Pegasi 


W. 


32 52 31 


34 14 49 


36 38 22 


37 3 6 




Aldebaran 


E. 


47 9 49 


45 37 18 


44 4 37 


42 31 46 


1 


Pollux 


E. 


89 41 


87 25 39 


85 60 18 


84 14 36 


1 


Jupiter 


E. 


92 35 51 


90 59 58 


89 23 43 


87 47 9 


6 


a Aquilse 


W. 


91 45 8 


93 9 49 


94 34 46 


95 59 59 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


66 48 58 


68 18 11 


69 47 55 


71 18 9 




a Pegasi 


W. 


44 21 26 


45 51 40 


47 22 39 


48 54 20 




Aldebaran 


E. 


34 46 1 


33 12 48 


31 39 41 


30 6 44 




Pollux 


E. 


76 10 54 


74 33 6 


72 54 67 


71 16 27 




Jupiter 


E. 


79 38 58 


78 15 


76 21 10 


74 41 43 




Saturn 


E. 


111 12 55 


109 34 51 


107 66 26 


106 17 38 


1 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


78 56 27 


80 29 26 


82 2 60 


83 36 37 




a Pegasi 


W. 


56 42 30 


58 17 54 


59 63 60 


61 30 18 




Aldebaran 


E. 


22 28 31 


20 59 28 


19 31 68 


18 6 29 




Pollux 


E. 


62 58 34 


61 17 56 


69 36 67 


57 55 38 




Jupiter 


E. 


66 18 56 


64 37 16 


62 66 15 


61 12 52 




Saturn 


E. 


97 58 6 


96 17 6 


94 36 43 


92 63 59 


8 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


91 30 53 


93 6 42 


94 42 46 


96 19 6 




a Pegasi 


W. 


69 39 50 


71 19 4 


72 58 42 


74 38 43 




Pollux 


E. 


49 24 10 


47 40 56 


45 57 26 


44 13 39 




Jupiter 


E. 


52 35 42 


50 51 15 


49 6 28 


47 21 22 




Saturn 


E. 


84 20 4 


82 36 16 


80 52 8 


79 7 41 




Kegulus 


E. 


86 12 26 


84 28 37 


82 44 28 


81 1 ! 


9 


a Pegasi 


W. 


83 4 6 


84 46 7 


86 28 23 


88 10 56 ! 




a Arietis 


W. 


40 2 26 


41 47 47 


43 33 26 


45 19 24 ' 




Pollux 


E. 


35 31 7 


33 46 2 


32 47 


30 16 27 



DECEMBER, 1859. 



247 





GEEENWIOH 


MEAT^ TIME. 


i 


LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


III''. 


Yl\ 


1X\ 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


/ // 


O f 11 


O / // 


9 


Jupiter 


E. 


45 35 58 


43 50 16 


42 4 15 


40 17 58 




Saturn 


E. 


11 22 56 


75 37 52 


73 52 30 


72 6 52 




Eegulus 


E. 


19 15 14 


77 30 10 


75 44 47 


73 59 8 


10 


a Pegasi 


W. 


89 53 42 


91 36 41 


93 19 53 


95 3 15 




a Arietis 


W. 


41 5 39 


48 52 10 


,50 38 56 


52 25 56 




Aldebaran 


w. 


11 38 11 


19 7 19 


20 39 25 


22 13 S3 




Jupiter 


E. 


31 22 39 


29 34 53 


27 46 55 


25 58 46 




Saturn 


E. 


63 14 41 


61 27 32 


59 40 11 


57 52 37 




Eegulus 


E. 


65 6 55 


63 19 46 


61 32 24 


59 44 50 


11 


a Arietis 


W. 


61 23 56 


63 12 1 


65 15 


66 48 36 




Aldebaran 


W. 


30 29 3T 


32 11 52 


33 54 49 


36 38 23 




Saturn 


E. 


48 52 18 


47 3 49 


45 15 14 


43 26 33 




Regulus 


E. 


50 44 25 


48 55 55 


47 7 19 


45 18 36 




Mars 


E. 


111 23 55 


109 40 40 


107 57 18 


106 13 49 


12 


a Arietis 


W. 


75 51 35 


77 40 21 


79 29 7 


81 17 64 




Aldebaran 


W. 


44 22 42 


46 8 30 


47 54 30 


49 40 42 




Saturn 


E. 


34 22 IV 


32 33 22 


30 44 28 


28 55 36 




Eegulus 


E. 


36 14 4 


34 25 4 


32 36 4 


30 47 4 




Spica 


E. 


90 16 53 


88 27 50 


86 38 46 


84 49 43 




Mars 


E. 


97 35 10 


95 51 18 


94 7 24 


92 23 30 


n 


a Arietis 


W. 


90 21 33 


92 10 8 


93 58 39 


95 47 6 




Aldebaran 


W. 


58 33 18 


60 20 


62 6 43 


63 63 24 




Spica 


E. 


75 44 45 


73 65 54 


72 7 8 


70 18 27 




Mars 


E. 


83 44 19 


82 38 


80 17 2 


78 33 30 




Sun 


E. 


134 49 46 


133 8 56 


131 28 8 


129 47 24 


14 


Aldebaran 


W. 


72 46 13 


74 32 33 


76 18 47 


78 4 54 




Pollux 


W. 


30 10 41 


31 57 24 


33 44 8 


35 30 50 




Jupiter 


W. 


27 17 


28 49 2 


30 37 40 


32 26 10 




Spica 


E. 


61 16 37 


59 28 37 


57 40 46 


66 53 5 




Mars 


E. 


69 57 35 


68 14 47 


66 32 9 


64 49 40 


' 


Sun 


E. 


121 24 55 


119 44 44 


118 4 40 


116 24 44 


15 


Aldebaran 


W. 


86 53 26 


88 38 40 


90 23 44 


92 8 37 




Pollux 


W. 


44 23 13 


46 9 22 


47 55 24 


49 41 16 




Jupiter 


w. 


41 26 31 


43 14 7 


45 1 32 


46 48 46 




Spica 


E. 


46 57 5 


45 10 25 


43 23 57 


41 37 41 




Mars 


E. 


56 20 


54 38 39 


62 57 31 


51 16 37 




Sun 


E. 


108 7 18 


106 28 18 


104 49 28 


103 10 49 


16 


Pollux 


W. 


58 28 18 


60 13 12 


61 57 54 


63 42 26 




Jupiter 


w. 


65 42 14 


57 28 22 


59 14 18 


61 2 




Saturn 


w. 


23 26 30 


25 11 28 


26 56 18 


28 40 69 ; 




Regulus 


w. 


21 26 34 


23 11 35 


24 56 27 


26 41 10 1 




Mars 


E. 


42 55 39 


41 16 14 


39 37 6 


37 68 16 




Sun 


E. 


95 17 


93 22 45 


91 45 24 


90 8 16 


It 


Pollux 


W. 


72 22 17 


74 5 41 


75 48 53 


77 31 64 




Jupiter 
Saturn 


w. 


69 45 46 


71 30 19 


73 14 40 


74 58 49 




w. 


37 22 1 


39 5 42 


40 49 13 


42 32 32 



248 



DECEMBER, 1859. 







GREENWICH 


MEAl^ TTIVTE. 




LDNAE DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Midnight. 


XVk. 


XVIIIt. 


XXP. 


9 


Jupiter 


E. 


38 31 25 


36° 44 35 


o / // 

34 57 30 


O / // 

33 10 11 




Saturn 


E. 


70 20 66 


68 34 45 


66 48 18 


65 1 37 




Eegulus 


E. 


72 13 12 


70 27 


68 40 33 


66 53 51 


10 


a Pegasi 


W. 


96 46 47 


98 30 28 


100 14 15 


101 58 8 




a Arietis 


W. 


54 13 9 


56 34 


57 48 11 


59 35 59 




Aldebarau 


W. 


23 50 18 


26 28 20 


27 7 42 


28 48 11 




Jupiter 


E. 


24 10 26 


22 21 58 


20 33 21 


18 44 38 




Saturn 


E. 


56 4 63 


54 16 68 


52 28 53 


50 40 39 




Eegulus 


E. 


57 67 4 


56 9 8 


54 21 3 


52 32 48 


11 


a Arietis 


W. 


68 37 3 


70 25 35 


72 14 11 


74 2 52 




Aldebaran 


W. 


37 22 28 


39 6 59 


40 51 54 


42 37 9 




Saturn 


E. 


41 37 48 


39 48 68 


38 6 


36 11 12 




Regulus 


E. 


43 29 48 


41 40 56 


39 62 1 


38 3 4 




Mars 


E. 


104 30 14 


102 46 34 


101 2 49 


99 19 1 


12 


a Arietis 


W. 


83 6 42 


84 55 28 


86 44 12 


88 32 54 




Aldebaran 


W. 


51 27 2 


53 13 29 


55 1 


56 46 38 




Saturn 


E. 


27 6 47 


25 18 3 


23 29 26 


21 40 55 




Regulus 


E. 


28 68 7 


27 9 12 


26 20 22 


23 31 36 




Spica 


E. 


83 39 


81 11 37 


79 22 37 


77 33 39 




Mars 


E. 


90 39 36 


88 55 43 


87 11 52 


85 28 4 


13 


a Arietis 


W. 


97 35 26 


99 23 41 


101 11 48 


102 59 49 




Aldebaran 


W. 


65 40 4 


67 26 42 


69 13 17 


70 59 48 




Spica 


E. 


68 29 62 


66 41 22 


64 63 


63 4 45 




Mars 


E. 


76 60 5 


75 6 46 


73 23 35 


71 40 30 




Sun 


E. 


128 6 43 


126 26 8 


124 45 37 


123 5 13 


14 


Aldebaran 


W. 


79 50 54 


81 36 45 


83 22 28 


85 8 2 




Pollux 


W. 


37 17 29 


39 4 3 


40 50 33 


42 36 56 




Jupiter 


w. 


34 14 32 


36 2 46 


37 60 51 


39 38 46 




Spica 


E. 


54 5 32 


52 18 9 


50 30 57 


48 43 55 




Mars 


E. 


63 7 22 


61 25 14 


59 43 18 


58 1 33 




Sun 


E. 


114 44 57 


113 5 18 


111 25 49 


109 46 29 


15 


Aldebaran 


W. 


93 53 19 


95 37 49 


97 22 8 


99 6 15 




Pollux 


W. 


51 27 


53 12 35 


54 57 59 


56 43 14 




Jupiter 


W. 


48 36 50 


50 22 43 


62 9 25 


53 55 55 




Spica 


E. 


39 51 38 


38 5 46 


36 20 8 


34 34 43 




Mars 


E. 


49 35 56 


47 55 29 


46 16 17 


44 35 20 




Sun 


E. 


101 32 20 


99 54 2 


98 15 56 


96 38 1 


16 


Pollux 


W. 


65 26 47 


67 10 57 


68 54 55 


70 38 42 




Jupiter 


W. 


62 45 34 


64 30 55 


66 16 4 


68 1 1 




Saturn 


W. 


30 25 31 


32 9 53 


33 54 6 


35 38 9 




Regulus 


W. 


28 25 43 


30 10 5 


31 54 17 


33 38 17 




Mars 


E. 


36 19 44 


34 41 32 


33 3 41 


31 26 11 




Sun 


E. 


88 31 19 


86 64 34 


85 18 1 


83 41 40 


17 


Pollux 


"W. 


79 14 42 


80 57 19 


82 39 44 


84 21 58 




Jupiter 


W. 


76 42 46 


78 26 32 


80 10 6 


81 53 28 


; 


Saturn 


w. 


44 15 40 


45 58 37 


47 41 23 


49 23 58 



DECEMBER, 1859. 



249 









GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




r 








LUNAR DISTANCES. 








Day of 
the 


Star's Name 












aud 




Noon. 


iiii-. 


Yl\ 


IX'. 




Month. 


Position. 














17 


Regulus 


W. 


35 22 7 


O 1 11 

87 5 46 


/ // 

38 49 13 


o / tl 

40 32 28 






Mars 


E. 


29 49 6 


28 12 26 


26 36 14 


25 33 






Sun 


E. 


82 5 31 


80 29 34 


78 53 60 


77 18 17 




18 


Pollux 


W. 


86 3 69 


87 45 49 


89 27 28 


91 8 64 






Jupiter 


W. 


83 36 38 


85 19 36 


87 2 22 


88 44 67 






Saturn 


w. 


51 6 21 


62 48 33 


54 30 33 


56 12 22 






Regulus 


w. 


49 5 52 


50 47 59 


62 29 53 


54 11 36 






Sun 


E. 


69 23 35 


67 49 16 


66 15 6 


64 41 10 




19 


Polkx 


W. 


99 33 10 


lOi 13 26 


102 53 31 


104 33 24 






Jupiter 


w. 


97 14 58 


98 56 24 


100 37 39 


102 18 42 






Saturn 


w. 


64 38 39 


66 19 21 


67 59 52 


69 40 11 






Regulus 


w. 


62 37 19 


64 17 53 


65 58 16 


67 38 28 






Sun 


E. 


56 54 27 


55 21 42 


63 49 9 


52 16 48 




20 


Jupiter 


W. 


110 41 9 


112 21 6 


114 50 


116 40 24 






Saturn 


W. 


77 59 1 


79 38 14 


81 17 16 


82 56 7 






Regulus 


w. 


75 56 38 


77 35 42 


79 14 35 


80 53 18 






Spica 


w. 


22 68 


23 39 19 


25 17 35 


26 55 44 






Sun 


E. 


44 38 2 


. 43 6 53 


41 35 56 


40 5 11 




21 


Saturn 


W. 


91 7 37 


92 46 22 


94 22 65 


96 18 






Regulus 


w. 


89 4 2 


90 41 37 


92 19 2 


93 66 15 






Spica 


w. 


35 4 30 


36 41 48 


38 18 67 


39 56 56 






Sun 


E. 


32 34 38 


31 5 11 


29 35 67 


28 6 68 




26 


Sun 


W. 


25 22 26 


26 44 35 


28 6 38 


29 28 36 






a Pegasi 


E. 


54 53 23 


53 28 19 


62 3 36 


50 39 12 






a Arietis 


E. 


96 12 17 


94 42 8 


93 12 7 


91 42 14 




27 


Sun 


W. 


36 17 9 


37 38 36 


38 59 58 


40 21 15 






a Pegasi 


E. 


43 43 19 


42 21 30 


41 13 


39 39 29 






a Arietis 


E. 


84 14 46 


82 45 38 


81 16 37 


79 47 41 




28 


Sun 


W. 


47 6 40 


48 27 36 


49 48 27 


51 9 17 






a Pegasi 


E. 


33 6 3 


31 49 53 


30 34 47 


29 20 51 






a Arietis 


E. 


72 24 23 


70 55 57 


69 27 34 


67 59 15 






Aldebaran 


E. 


104 29 24 


103 2 6 


101 34 60 


100 7 36 




29 


Sun 


W. 


67 53 7 


69 13 53 


60 34 39 


61 55 27 






a Aquilse 


W. 


43 14 11 


44 14 51 


46 16 45 


46 19 48 






a Arietis 


E. 


60 38 12 


59 10 3 


67 41 64 


56 13 45 






Aldebaran 


E. 


92 61 41 


91 24 31 


89 67 21 


88 30 9 




30 


Sun 


W. 


68 40 4 


70 1 11 


71 22 23 


72 43 41 






a Aquilse 


W. 


61 49 54 


62 58 30 


54 7 52 


56 17 56 






a Arietis 


E. 


48 52 42 


47 24 23 


45 56 


44 27 34 






Aldebaran 


E. 


81 13 41 


79 46 14 


78 18 44 


76 51 9 




31 


Sun 


W. 


79 31 66 


80 53 59 


82 16 12 


83 38 36 






a Aquilse 
a Arietis 


W. 


61 17 54 


62 31 38 


63 45 53 


65 38 






E. 


37 4 16 


35 35 21 


34 6 20 


32 37 14 






Aldebaran 


E. 


69 31 52 


68 3 41 


66 35 23 


66 6 67 






Jupiter 


E. 


112 43 4 


111 12 19 


109 41 26 


108 10 21 



250 



DECEMBER, 1859. 







GEEENWICH 


: MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Midnight. 


XVk. 


XTIIIi. 


XXTi". 


17 


Regulus 


W. 


o / // 

42 15 32 


o / // 

43 58 25 


o / // 

45 41 6 


O / // 

47 23 35 




Mars 


E. 


23 25 27 


21 51 1 


20 17 21 


18 44 36 




Sun 


E. 


75 42 56 


74 7 48 


72 32 52 


70 58 7 


18 


Pollux 


W. 


92 50 9 


94 31 12 


96 12 3 


97 52 42 




Jupiter 


W. 


90 27 20 


92 9 32 


93 51 32 


95 33 21 




Saturn 


W. 


57 54 


59 35 27 


61 16 42 


62 57 46 




Regulus 


W. 


55 53 8 


57 34 28 


69 15 37 


60 56 34 




Sun 


E. 


63 7 26 


61 33 53 


60 33 


58 27 24 


19 


Pollux 


W. 


106 13 5 


107 52 34 


109 31 52 


111 10 58 




Jupiter 


W. 


103 59 34 


105 40 15 


107 20 44 


• 109 1 2 




Saturn 


W. 


71 20 19 


73 16 


74 40 2 


76 19 37 




Eegulus 


W. 


69 18 28 


70 58 17 


72 37 55 


74 17 22 




Sun 


E. 


50 44 39 


49 12 41 


47 40 56 


46 9 23 


20 


Jupiter 


W. 


117 19 47 


118 58 59 


120 37 59 


122 16 49 




Saturn 


W. 


84 34 47 


86 13 16 


87 51 34 


89 29 41 




Regulus 


W. 


82 31 49 


84 10 9 


85 48 17 


87 26 15 




Spica 


W. 


28 33 45 


30 11 39 


31 49 25 


33 27 2 




Sun 


E. 


38 34 39 


. 37 4 19 


35 34 12 


34 4 18 


21 


Saturn 


W. 


97 37 30 


99 14 31 


100 51 21 


102 27 59 




Regulus 


W. 


95 33 17 


97 10 8 


98 46 48 


100 23 17 




Spica 


W. 


41 32 45 


43 9 24 


44 45 53 


46 22 11 




Sun 


E. 


26 38 14 


25 9 46 


23 41 34 


22 13 39 


26 


Sun 


W. 


30 50 29 


32 12 17 


33 34 


34 55 37 




a Pegasi 


E. 


49 15 12 


47 51 35 


46 28 23 


45 5 37 1 




a Arietis 


E. 


90 12 29 


88 42 52 


87 13 23 


85 44 1 


27 


Sun 


W. 


41 42 28 


43 3 37 


44 24 41 


45 45 42 




o Pegasi 


E. 


38 19 21 


36 59 53 


35 41 8 


34 23 9 




a Arietis 


E. 


78 18 51 


76 50 7 


75 21 27 


73 52 53 


28 


Sun 


W. 


52 30 5 


53 50 51 


55 11 37 


56 32 22 




a Pf gasi 


E. 


28 8 15 


26 57 8 


25 47 42 


24 40 11 




a Arietis 


E. 


66 30 58 


65 2 44 


63 34 32 


62 6 21 




Aldebaran 


E. 


98 40 23 


97 13 12 


95 46 1 


94 18 51 


29 


Sun 


W. 


63 16 17 


64 37 9 


65 58 4 


67 19 2 




a Aquilse 


W. 


47 23 55 


48 29 3 


49 35 7 


50 42 5 




a Arietis 


E. 


54 45 36 


53 17 25 


51 49 13 


50 20 59 




Aldebaran 


E. 


87 2 56 


85 35 41 


84 8 24 


82 41 4 


30 


Sun 


W. 


74 5 5 


75 26 36 


76 48 14 


78 10 




a Aquilffi 


W. 


56 28 41 


57 40 6 


58 52 7 


60 4 43 




a Arietis 


E. 


42 59 4 


41 30 29 


40 1 50 


38 33 5 




Aldebaran 


E. 


75 23 29 


73 55 44 


72 27 53 


70 59 55 


31 


Sun 


W. 


85 1 11 


86 23 57 


87 46 56 


89 10 7 




a Aquilse 


W. 


66 15 53 


67 31 36 


68 47 47 


70 4 25 




a Arietis 


E. 


31 8 3 


29 38 46 


28 9 25 


26 39 59 




Aldebaran 


E. 


63 38 23 


62 9 41 


60 40 50 


59 11 50 




Jupiter 


E. 


106 39 7 


105 7 41 


103 36 2 


102 4 9 



MARS. 



251 



JANUARY, 


L859. 


FEBRUARY, 


1S59. 


MEAN TIME. 


M-RAN TIME. 


Day of 
the 


GEOCENTRIC. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


GEOCBNTEIO. 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Appwreml 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


Nocm. 


Passage. 


Noon. 


Passage. 


1 
2 
3 


Q t II 

S. 9 44 18 
9 26 25 
9 8 28 


h. m. 
3 54-1 
3 53-0 
3 51-9 


1 
2 
3 


/ // 

S. 11 6 

N. 7 33 

26 11 


h. m. 
3 17-7 
3 16-4 
3 15-2 


4 
5 
6 


8 50 27 
8 32 23 
8 14 14 


3 50-8 
3 49-6 
3 48-5 


4 
5 
6 


44 48 

1 3 24 
1 21 58 


3 14-0 
3 12-7 
3 11-5 


7 
8 
9 


7 56 2 
7 37 46 
7 19 28 


3 47-4 
3 46-2 
3 45-1 


7 
8 
9 


1 40 30 

1 58 59 

2 17 27 


3 10-3 
3 9-0 

3 7-8 


10 
11 
12 


7 1 6 
6 42 42 
6 24 15 


3 43-9 
3 42-8 
3 41-6 


10 
11 
12 


2 35 52 

2 54 15 

3 12 35 


3 6-6 
3 5-3 

3 4-1 


13 
14 
15 


6 5 46 
5 47 15 
5 28 42 


3 40-4 
3 39-3 
3 38-1 


13 
14 
15 


3 30 52 

3 49 6 

4 7 16 


3 2-9 
3 1-7 ' 
3 0-4 j 


16 

17 
18 


6 10 7 
4 51 31 
4 32 53 


3 36-9 
3 36-7 
3 34-5 


16 
17 
18 


4 25 24 

4 43 27 

5 1 28 


2 59-2 , 
2 57-9 
2 56-7 


19 
20 
21 


4 14 14 
3 55 34 
3 36 53 


3 33-4 
3 32-2 
3 31-0 


19 
20 
21 


5 19 24 
5 37 17 
5 55 5 


2 55-5 
2 54-2 
2 53-0 


22 
23 
24 


3 18 11 
2 69 29 
2 40 46 


3 29-8 
3 28-6 
3 27-4 


22 
23 

24 


6 12 50 
6 30 30 
6 48 6 


2 51-8 
2 50-5 
2 49-3 


25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 
31 


2 22 3 
2 3 20 
1 44 36 

1 25 53 
1 7 10 
48 28 
29 47 


3 26-2 
3 24-9 
3 23-7 

3 22-5 
3 21-3 
3 20-1 
3 18-9 


25 
26 

27 
28 

29 


7 5 37 
7 23 3 
7 40 25 
7 57 42 

N. 8 14 53 


2 48-1 
2 46-8 
2 45-6 
2 44-4 

2 43-1 


32 


S. 11 6 


3 17-7 









252 



MARS. 



MARCS, 1§59. 


APRII., 1859. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




SEOCENTKIC. 






GEOOENTEIO. 




Day of 
the 








Day of 








Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


the 


Apparmt 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


Man. 


Passage. 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 




O 1 11 


h. 


m. 




; // 


h. 


m. 


1 


N. 8 14 53 


2 


43-1 


1 


N.16 13 7 


2 


6-3 


2 


8 31 69 


2 


41-9 


2 


16 26 25 


2 


5-1 


3 


8 49 


2 


40-7 


3 


16 39 34 


2 


4-0 


4 


9 5 56 


2 


39-5 


4 


16 52 34 


2 


2-9 


5 


9 22 45 


2 


38'3 


5 


17 5 24 


2 


1-8 


6 


9 89 29 


2 


37-1 


6 


17 18 4 


2 


0-6 


7 


9 56 7 


2 


85-8 


7 


17 30 35 




59-5 


8 


10 12 39 


2 


34-6 


8 


17 42 56 




68-4 


9 


10 29 4 


2 


38-4 


9 


17 55 8 




67-3 


10 


10 45 23 


2 


32-2 


10 


18 7 9 




56-2 


11 


11 1 86 


2 


31-0 


11 


18 19 




55-0 


12 


11 17 41 


2 


29-8 


12 


18 30 41 




63-9 


13 


11 33 40 


2 


28-6 


13 


18 42 12 




52-8 


14 


11 49 82 


2 


27-4 


14 


18 53 32 




51-7 


15 


12 5 17 


2 


26-2 


15 


19 4 42 




50-7 


16 


12 20 55 


2 


25-0 


16 


19 15 41 




49-6 


11 


12 36 25 


2 


23-8 


17 


19 26 30 




48-5 


18 


12 61 48 


2 


22-6 


18 


19 37 8 




47-4 


19 


13 7 4 


2 


21-4 


19 


19 47 36 




46-3 


20 


13 22 11 


2 


20-3 


20 


19 67 52 




46-2 


21 


13 37 11 


2 


19-1 


21 


20 7 58 




44-1 


22 


13 62 4 


2 


17-9 


22 


20 17 52 




43-1 


23 


14 6 48 


2 


16-7 


23 


20 27 36 




42-0 


24 


14 21 24 


2 


15-5 


24 


20 37 8 




40-9 


25 


14 36 51 


o 


14-4 


25 


20 46 29 




39-9 


26 


14 50 11 


2 


18-2 


26 


20 56 39 




38-8 


27 


15 4 22 


2 


12-0 


27 


21 4 88 




37-8 


, 28 


15 18 25 


2 


10-9 


28 


21 13 25 




86-7 


29 


15 32 18 


2 


9-7 


29 


21 22 1 




35-6 


30 


16 46 4 


2 


8-6 


30 


21 30 26 




34-6 


31 


15 59 40 


2 


7-4 


















31 


N.21 38 38 


1 


33-5 


32 


N.16 13 7 


2 


6-3 











MARS. 



253 



inAY, 1§59. 



JVIYE, 1859. 



MEAN TIME. 



MEAN TIME. 



Day of 

the 
Month. 



GEOCENTRIC. 



Declination. 



Noon. 



Meridian 



Day of 

the 
Month. 



9E0CENTIU0. 



Declination. 



Noon. 



Meridian 



1 
2 
3 

4 
6 
6 

Y 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 

32 



N.21 38 38 

21 46 38 

21 54 28 

22 2 5 
22 9 30 
22 16 44 

22 23 45 

22 30 35 

22 37 12 

22 43 38 

22 49 51 

22 55 62 

23 1 40 
23 7 17 
23 12 41 

23 17 53 

23 22 52 

23 27 40 

23 32 14 

23 36 37 

23 40 47 

23 44 45 

23 48 30 

23 52 2 

23 55 23 

23 58 30 

24 1 26 



24 
24 
24 



4 9 
6 39 
8 57 



24 11 



N.24 12 55 



h. m. 

1 33-5 

1 32-5 

1 31-5 



30- 
29- 
28- 

27' 
26' 
25' 



1 24-2 

1 23-2 

1 22-2 

1 21-2 

1 20-2 

1 19-2 



18 
17 
16 

15 

14 



13-0 



1 12-0 
1 11-0 
1 10-0 



9-0 
8-0 
7-0 

6-0 

4-9 



1-9 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 

18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 

31 



N.24 12 55 

24 14 36 

24 16 4 

24 17 19 

24 18 22 

24 19 13 

24 19 51 

24 20 18 

24 20 31 

24 20 33 

24 20 22 

24 19 59 

24 19 24 

24 18 37 

24 17 37 

24 16 26 

24 15 2 

24 13 27 

24 11 40 

24 9 41 

24 7 30 

24 5 7 

24 2 32 

23 59 46 

23 56 48 

23 53 39 

23 60 18 



23 46 46 

23 43 3 

23 39 

N.23 35 



8 



h. m. 

1 1-9 

1 0-9 

69-9 

68-8 

57-8 

56-8 



55-8 
54-8 
53-7 

52-7 
51-7 
50-6 



49-6 

48-5 

47-5 

46-4 

46-4 

44-3 



43-3 
42-2 
41-2 

40-1 
39-0 
37-9 

36-8 
36-8 
34-7 

33-6 



32' 
31' 



30-3 



254 



MARS. 



JUI,Y, 1859. 


AUGUST, 1859. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




GEOCENTRIC. 






GEOOENTEIC. 




Day of 

the 
Month. 






Day of 








Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


the 
Month. 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


NiMn. 


Passage. 


Soon. 


Passage. 




o / // 


h. 


m. 




t II 


h. 


m. 


1 


N.23 35 2 





30-3 


1 


N.20 2 51 


23 


52-0 


2 


23 30 45 





29-2 


2 


19 53 31 


23 


60-7 


3 


23 26 16 





28-1 


3 


19 44 3 


23 


49-4 


4 


23 21 37 





27-0 


4 


19 34 27 


23 


48-1 


5 


23 16 47 





25-8 


5 


19 24 43 


23 


46-8 


6 


23 11 46 





24-7 


6 


19 14 51 


23 


45-4 


1 


23 6 35 





23-6 


7 


19 4 51 


23 


44-1 


8 


23 1 13 





22-4 


8 


18 54 43 


23 


42-8 


9 


22 65 40 





21-3 


9 


18 44 28 


23 


41-5 


10 


22 49 57 





20-1 


10 


18 34 6 


23 


40-1 


11 


22 44 3 





19-0 


11 


18 23 36 


23 


39-8 


12 


22 37 59 





17-8 


12 


18 12 58 


23 


37-4 


13 


22 31 45 





16-6 


13 


18 2 14 


23 


36-0 


14 


22 25 21 





15-4 


14 


17 51 22 


23 


34-6 


15 


22 18 47 





14-3 


15 


17 40 23 


23 


33-3 


16 


22 12 2 





13-1 


16 


17 29 18 


23 


31-9 


17 


22 5 8 





11-9 


17 


17 18 5 


23 


30-5 


18 


21 58 4 





10-7 


18 


17 6 46 


23 


29-1 


19 


21 50 50 





9-5 


19 


16 55 20 


23 


27-7 


20 


21 43 27 





8-3 


20 


16 43 47 


23 


26-3 


21 


21 35 54 





7-1 


21 


16 32 8 


23 


24-9 


22 


21 28 12 





5-8 


22 


16 20 23 


23 


23-5 


23 


21 20 20 





4-6 


23 


16 8 31 


23 


22-0 


24 


21 12 20 





3-4 


24 


15 56 34 


23 


20-6 


25 


21 4 9 





2-1 


25 


15 44 30 


23 


19-2 


26 


20 55 50 


\ .? 


0-9 1 
69-6 f 


26 


15 32 20 


23 


17-7 


27 


20 47 22 


23 


58-4 


27 


15 20 4 


23 


16'3 


28 


20 38 45 


23 


57-1 


28 


15 7 43 


23 


14-9 


29 


20 29 59 


23 


65-8 


29 


14 55 16 


23 


18-4 


30 


20 21 5 


23 


54-6 


30 


14 42 44 


23 


11-9 


31 


20 12 2 


23 


53-3 


31 


14 30 6 


23 


10-5 


32 


N.20 2 51 


23 


52-0 


32 


N.14 17 23 


23 


9-0 



MARS. 



255 













-^ 






SEPTEinBER, 


1S59. 


OCTOBER, 


1S59 






MEAN TTlVnil 


MEAN TIME. 






GBOCENTEIC. 




GEOCENTRIC. 






Day of 
the 






Day of 

the 
Month. 










Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 




Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 

• 


JSfoon. 


Passage. 






O 1 II 


h. m. 




/ // 


h. 


m. 




1 


]Sr.l4 17 23 


23 9-0 


1 


N. 7 22 58 


22 


22-8 




2 


14 4 35 


23 7-5 


2 


7 8 19 


22 


21-2 




3 


13 51 42 


23 6-0 


3 


6 53 38 


22 


19-6 




4 


13 38 44 


23 4-6 


4 


6 38 66 


22 


18-0 




5 


13 25 41 


23 3-1 


5 


6 24 11 


22 


16-4 




6 


13 12 33 


23 1-6 


6 


6 9 24 


22 


14-8 




1 


12 59 20 


23 0-1 


7 


6 64 35 


22 


13-2 




8 


12 46 3 


22 68-6 


8 


5 39 45 


22 


11-6 




9 


12 32 42 


22 57-0 


9 


5 24 53 


22 


10-0 




10 


12 19 16 


22 55-5 


10 


5 9 59 


22 


8-4 




11 


12 5 46 


22 54-0 


11 


4 55 4 


22 


6-8 




12 


11 52 11 


22 62-5 


12 


4 40 7 


22 


6-2 




13 


11 38 33 


22 60-9 


13 


4 25 10 


22 


3-5 




14 


11 24 50 


22 49-4 


14 


4 10 11 


22 


1-9 




15 


11 11 3 


22 47-9 


15 


3 55 10 


22 


0-3 




16 


10 57 13 


22 46-4 


16 


3 49 9 


21 


58-7 




17 


10 43 19 


22 44-8 


17 


3 25 7 


21 


57-0 




18 


10 29 21 


22 43-3 


18 


3 10 4 


21 


65-4 




19 


10 16 19 


22 41-7 


19 


2 55 


21 


53-8 




20 


10 1 14 


22 40-1 


20 


2 39 56 


21 


52-2 




21 


9 47 6 


22 38-6 


21 


2 24 50 


21 


50-6 




22 


9 32 54 


22 37-0 


22 


2 9 45 


21 


48-9 




23 


9 18 39 


22 35-5 


23 


1 54 39 


21 


47-3 




24 


9 4 21 


22 33-9 


24 


i 39 33 


21 


46-7 




25 


8 50 


22 32-3 


25 


1 24 26 


21 


44-0 




26 


8 35 36 


22 30-8 


26 


1 9 20 


21 


42-4 




27 


8 21 10 


22 29-2 


27 


64 13 


21 


40-8 




28 


8 6 41 


22 27-6 


28 


39 7 


21 


39-1 




29 


7 62 9 


22 26-0 


29 


24 1 


21 


37-5 




30 


7 37 35 


22 24-4 


30 


N. 8 55 


21 


35-9 










31 


8. 6 9 


21 


34-2 




31 


N. 7 22 58 


22 22-8 


32 


S, 21 14 


21 


32-6 



256 



MARS. 



NOVEMBER, 


1859. 


DECEMBER, 


1859. 




MEAN TIME 




MEAN TIME. 




GEOOBNTEIC. 




GBOCENTEIC. 


Day of 

the 






Day of 

the 
Month. 






Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Appa/rent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


I^oon. 


Passage. 


Noon. 


Passage. 




o / // 


li. m. 




o / // 


h. m. 


1 


S. 21 14 


21 32 


6 


1 


S. 7 42 33 


20 43-9 


2 


36 18 


21 31 





2 


7 56 38 


20 42-3 


3 


51 21 


21 29 


3 


3 


8 10 40 


20 40-8 


4 


1 6 24 


21 27 


7 


4 


8 24 39 


20 39-2 


5 


1 21 26 


21 26 


1 


6 


8 38 33 


20 37-6 


6 


1 36 27 


21 24 


4 


6 


8 52 25 


20 36-0 


1 


1 51 27 


21 22 


8 


7 


9 6 12 


20 34-4 


8 


2 6 25 


21 21 


2 


8 


9 19 56 


20 32-8 


9 


2 21 23 


21 19 


5 


9 


9 33 35 


20 31-2 


10 


2 36 19 


21 17 


9 


10 


9 47 11 


20 29-7 


11 


2 51 15 


21 16 


3 


11 


10 8 43 


20 28-1 


12 


3 6 8 


21 14 


6 


12 


10 14 11 


20 26-5 


13 


3 21 


21 13 





13 


10 27 34 


20 24-9 


14 


3 35 51 


21 11 


4 


14 


10 40 54 


20 23-4 


15 


3 50 40 


21 9 


8 


15 


10 54 8 


20 21-8 


16 


4 5 27 


21 8 


2 


16 


11 7 19 


20 20-2 


IV 


4 20 12 


21 6 


5 


17 


11 20 24 


20 18-7 


18 


4 34 66 


21 4 


9 


18 


11 33 26 


20 17-1 


19 


4 49 37 


21 3 


3 


19 


11 46 22 


20 15-5 


20 


5 4 16 


21 1 


7 


20 


11 59 13 


20 14-0 


21 


5 18 53 


21 





21 


12 12 


20 12-5 


22 


5 S3 27 


20 58 


4 


22 


12 24 41 


20 10-9 


23 


5 47 59 


20 58 


8 


23 


12 37 17 


20 9-4 


24 


6 2 28 


20 55 


2 


24 


12 49 48 


20 7-8 


25 


6 16 55 


20 53 


6 


25 


13 2 13 


20 6-3 


26 


6 31 19 


20 52 





26 


13 14 34 


20 4-8 


2V 


6 45 40 


20 50 


4 


27 


13 26 48 


20 3-2 


28 


6 59 58 


20 48 


8 


28 


13 38 57 


20 1-7 


29 


7 14 13 


20 47 


2 


29 


13 51 


20 0-2 


30 


7 28 25 


20 45-6 


30 


14 2 58 


19 58-6 








31 


14 14 49 


19 57-1 


31 


8. 7 42 33 


20 43-9 














32 


S. 14 26 35 


19 55-6 



JUPITER. 



257 





lATlVARV, 1S59 




FEBRUARY, 


1859. 


MEAN TTIVTR, 


MEAN TIME. 




GBOOENTmC. 






GEOOBNTEIO. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 






Day of 
the 






Apparent 

Decimation. 

• 


Meridian 


Appm-ent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Mon. 


Passage. 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 




O 1 41 


h. 


m. 




o / ;* 


h. m. 


1 


N.21 53 37 


10 


4-6 


1 


N.21 44 48 


7 54-4 


2 


21 63 2 


10 


0-2 


2 


21 44 55 


7 60-4 


3 


21 52 28 


9 


65-8 


3 


21 45 3 


7 46-6 


4 


21 51 54 


9 


51-5 


4 


21 45 13 


7 '42-5 


5 


21 51 22 


9 


47-1 


5 


21 45 24 


■7 38-6 


6 


21 50 60 


9 


42-8 


6 


,21 45 38 


7 34-7 


1 


21 50 20 


9 


88-4 


7 


21 45 52 - 


7 30-8 


8 


21 49 51 


9 


34-1 


8 


21 46 9 


7 26-9 


9 


21 49 22 


9 


29-8 


9 


21 46 27 


7 23-0 


10 


21 48 55 


9 


25-5 


10 


21 46 46 


7 19-2 


11 - 


21 48 29 


9 


21-2 


11 


21 ,47 8 


7 15-3 


12 


21 48 4 


9 


17-0 


12 


21 47 30 


7 11-5 


13 


21 47 41 


9 


12-7 


13 


21 47 55 


7 7-6 


14 


21 47 19 


9 


8-5 


14 


21 48 20 


7 3-8 


15 


» 21 46 58 


9 


4-3 


15 


21 48 48 


7 0-0 


16 


21 46 38 


9 


0-0 


16 


21 49 17 


6 .66-2 


17 


21 46 20 


8 


55-8 


17 


21 49 47 


6 52-4 


18 


21 46 3 


8 


61-6 


18 


21 50 19 


6 48-7 


19 


21 45 48 


8 


47-5 


19 


21 50 52 


6 44-9 


20 


21 45 34 


8 


43-3 


20 


21 51 27 


6 41-2 


21 


21 45 22 


8 


39-1 


21 


21 62 3 


6 37-5 


22 


21 45 11 


8 


36-0 


22 


21 62 40 


6 33-8 


23 


21 45 1 


8 


30-9 


23 


21 63 19 


6 30-1 


24 


21 44 53 


8 


26-8 


24 


21 53 59 


6 26-6 


25 


21 44 47 


8 


22-7 


25 


21 54 40 


6 : 22-8 j 


26 


21 44 42 


8 


18-6 


26 ' 


21 65 23 


6 19-2 1 


27 


21 44 39 


8 


14-5 


27 
28 


21 66 7 
21 56 62 


6 , 15'6 1 
6 11-9 


28 


21 44 38 


8 


10-6 








29 


21 44 38 


8 


6-4 


29 


N.21 57 38 


6 8'3 


30 


21 44 40 


8 


2-4 








31 


21 44 43 


7 


58-4 








32 


N.21 44 48 


7 


54-4 









17 



258 



JUPITER. 



MARCH, 1§59. 


APRIIi, 1859. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




GEOOENTEIC. 






GEOOENTKIO. 


Day of 
the 








Day of 

the 
Month. 






Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Afparent 

Declination. 

• 


Meridian 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage; 


Noon. 


Passage. 




O 1 II 


h. 


m. 




O 1 II 


h. m. 


1 


]Sr.21 67 38 


6 


8-3 


1 


N.22 28 14 


4 22-0 


2 


21 58 25 


6 


4-7 


2 


22 29 20 


4 18-8 


3 


21 . 59 14 


6 


1-1 


3 


22 30 26 ■ 


4 15-6 


4 


22 4 


5 


57-6 


4 


22 31 32 


4 12-3 


5 


22 54 


5 


64-0 


6 


22 32 38 


4 9-0 


6 


22 1 46 


6 


50-5 


6 


22 33 44 


4 5-8 


7 


22 2 39 


5 


46-9 


7 


22 34 49 


4 2-5 


8 


22 3 33 


6 


43-4 


8 


22 36 55 


3 69-3 


9 


22 4 27 


5 


39-9 


9 


22 37 


3 56-1 


10 


22 5 23 


5 


36-4 


10 


22 38 5 


3 52-9 


11 


22 6 19 


5 


32-9 


11 


22 39 10 


3 49-7 


12 


22 7 16 


5 


29-4 


12 


22 40 15 


3 46-5 


13 


22 8 14 


6 


26-0 


13 


22 41 19 


3 43-3 


14 


22 9 13 


5 


22-5 


14 


22 42 23 


3 40-1 


15 


22 10 12 


5 


19-1 


15 


22 43 26 


3* 37-0 


16 


22 11 12 


5 


15-6 


16 


22 44 29 


3 33-8 


17 


22 12 13 


5 


12-2 


17 


22 45 32 


3 30-7 


18 


22 13 14 


5 


8-8 


18 


22 46 34 


3 27-5 


19 


22 14 16 


6 


5-4 


19 


22 47 36 


3 24-4 


20 


22 15 18 


5 


2-0 


20 


22 48 37 


3 21-2 


21 


22 16 21 


4 


68-6 


21 


22 49 38 


3 18-1 


22 


22 17 24 


4 


55-2 


22 


22 50 38 


3 16-0 


23 


22 18 28 


4 


61-9 


23 


22 61 38 


3 11-9 


24 


22 19 82 


4 


48-5 


24 


22 52 36 


3 8-7 


25 


22 20 36 


4 


45-2 


25 


22 53 36 


3 5-6 


26 


22 21 41 


4 


41-9 


26 


22 64 32 


3 2-5 


27 


22 22 46 


4 


38-5 


27 


22 55 29 


2 59-4 


28 


22 23 61 


4 


35-2 


28 


22 56 25 


2 56-3 


29 


22 24 57 


4 


31-9 


29 


22, 67 20 


2 53-3 


30 


22 26 2 


4 


28-6 


30 


22 58 14 


2 50-2 


31 


22 27 8 


4 


25-3 


31 


N.22 59 8 


2 47-1 


82 


N.22 28 14 


4 


22-0 









JUPITER. 



259 



MAT, 1S59. 


JUNE, 1S59. 


MEAN TfW, 


MEAN TTMK 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


GEOCENTEIO. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


GEOOENTHIO. 


Jpparent 
Decimation. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


M>on. 


Noon. 


1 
2 
3 


N.22 59 8 
23 1 
23 53 


h. 
2 
2 
2 


m. 
47-1 
44-0 
41-0 


1 
2 
3 


111 

N.23 18 10 
23 18 27 
23 18 43 


h. m. 
1 13-8 
1 10-8 
1 7-8 


4 
5 
6 


23 1 44 
23 2' 34 
23 3? 23 


2 
2 
2 


37-9 
34-9 
31-8 


.4 
5 
6 


23 18 57 
23 ' 19 10 
23 19 22 


1 4-9 
1 1-9 
68-9 


1 
8 
9 


23 4 11 
23 4 58 
23 5 45 


2 
2 
2 


28-8 
25-7 
22-7 


7 
8 
9 


23 19 32 
23 19 41 
23 19 49 


56-0 
63-0 
60-1 


10 
11 
12 


23 6 30 
23 T 14 
23 7 57 


2 
2 
2 


19-7 
16-6 
13-6 


10 

11^' 

12 


23 19 65 
23 19 59 
23 20 2 


47-1 
44-2 
41-2 


13 
14 
15 


23 8 39 
23 9 20 
23 9 59 


2 
2 
2 


10-6 
7-5 
4-5 


13 
14 
15 


23 20 4 
23 20 5 
23 20 4 


38-3 
35-3 
32-4 


16 
IT 
18 


23 10 38 
23 11 16 
23 11 52 


2 


1-5 
68-5 
55-5 


16 

17 
18 


23 20 1 
23 19 67 
23 19 62 


29-5 
26-5 
23-6 


19 
20 
21 


23 12 27 
23 13 I 
23 13 34 




52-5 
49-5 
46-5 


19 
20 
21 


23 19 46 
23 19 37 
23 19 28 


20-6 
17-7 
14-7 


22 
23 

24 


23 14 6 
23 14 35 
23 15 4 




43-6 
40-5 
37-5 


22 
23 
24 


23 19 17 
23 19 4 
23 18 60 


11-8 
8-8 
5-9 


25 
26" 

27 


23 15 32 
23 15 59 
23 16 24 




34-6 
31-6 
28-6 


25 
26 
27 


23 18 36 
23 18 18 
23 18 


2-9 

( 0-0 1 
) 23 61-0 f 

23 54-1 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


23 16 48 
23 17 10 
23 17 32 
23 17 52 

N.23 18 10 


1 


25-6 
22-7 
19-7 
16-7 

13-8 


28 
29 
80 

81 


23 17 41 
23 17 20 
23 16 57 

N.23 16 33 


23 61-2 
23 48-2 
23 45-3 

23 42-3 



260 



JUPITER. 



JVI.T, 1S59. 


AVGVST, 1S59. 


MEAN TTMK 


MEAN TTMK 




G-EOCENTEIO. 






eEOOENTBIC. 




Day of 
the 








Day of 
the 








Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month.- 


Soon. 


Passage. 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 




O 1 II 


h. 


m. 




o / // 


h. 


m. 


1 


N.23 16 33 


23 


42-3 


1 


N.22 53 36 


22 


10-1 


2 


23 16 8 


23 


39-4 


2 


22 52 34 


22 


7-1 


3 


23 15 42 


23 


36-4 


3 


22 51 30 


22 


4-1 


4 


23 15 14 


23 


33-5 


4 


22 50 25 


22 


1-1 


5 


23 14 44 


23 


30-5 


5 


22 49 20 


21 


58-0 


6 


23 14 14 


23 


27-6 


6 


22 48 14 


21 


56-0 


7 


23 13 42 


23 


24-6 


7 


■ 22 47 7 


21 


52-0 


8 


23 13 8 


23 


21-6 


8 


22 45 59 


21 


48-9 


9 


23 12 34 


23 


18-7 


9 


22 44 50 


21 


45-9 


10 


23 11 58 


23 


15-7 


10 


22 43 41 


21 


42-8 


11 


23 11 20 


23 


12-8 


11 


22 42 30 


21 


39-8 


12 


23 10 42 


23 


9-8 


12 


22 41 19 


21 


36-7 


13 


23 10 2 


23 


6-9 


13 


22 40 8 


21 


33-7 


14 


23 9 21 


23 


3-9 


14 


22 38 55 


21 


30-6 


15 


23 8 38 


23 


0-9 


15 


22 37 42 


21 


27-5 


16 


23 7 55 


22 


57-9 


16 


22 36 28 


21 


24-5 


17 


23 7 10 


22 


55-0 


17 


22 35 14 


21 


21-4 


18 


23 6 23 


22 


52-0 


18 


22 33 69 


21 


18-3 


19 


23 5 36 


22 


49-0 


19 


22 32 44 


21 


15-2 


20 


23 4 48 


22 


46-0 


20 


22 31 28 


21 


12-1 


21 


23 3 58 


22 


43-1 


21 


22 30 12 


21 


9-0 


22 


23 3 7 


22 


40-1 


22 


22 28 55 


21 


5-9 


23 


23 2 15 


22 


37-1 


23 


22 27 38 


21 


2-8 


24 


23 1 21 


22 


34-1 


24 


22 26 20 


20 


59-7 


25 


23 27 


22 


31-1 


25 


22 25 2 


20 


56-6 


26 


22 59 31 


22 


28-1 


26 


22 23 44 


20 


53-4 


27 


22 58 35 


22 


25-1 


27 


22 22 25 


20 


60-3 


28 


22 57 37 


22 


22-1 


28 


22 21 6 


20 


47-2 


29 


22 56 38 


22 


19-1 


29 


22 19 47 


20 


44-0 


30 


22 55 39 


22 


16-1 


30 


22 18 28 


20 


40-9 


31 


22 64 38 


22 


13-1 


31 


22 17 8 


20 


37-7 


32 


N.22 53 36 


22 


10-1 


32 


N.22 15 49 


20 


34-6 



JUPITER. 



261 



SEPTEJHBER, 


1§59. 


OCTOBER, 


1S59 


• 




MEAN TIME. 


MEAN Tip. 




Day of 

the 
Month. 


GEOCENTKIC. 


Day of 


(JBOCENTEIC. 




Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


the 
Month. 


Appa/rent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 




Soon. 


Noon. 




1 
2 
3 


o / // 

lSr.22 15 49 
22 14 29 
22 13 10 


h. m. 
20 34-6 
20 31-4 
20 28-2 


1 
2 
3 


O 1 II 

N.21 38 8 
21 37 3 
21 35 59 


h. 
18 
18 
18 


m. 

56-0 
62-6 
49-1 




4 
5 
6 


22 11 50 
22 10 30 
22 9 11 


20 25-0 
20 21-8 
20 18-6 


4 
5 
6 


21 34 57 
21 33 56 
21 32 56 


18 
18 
18 


45-7 
42-2 

38-7 




1 

8 

♦ 9 


22 7 51 
22 6 32 
22 5 13 


20 15-4 
20 12-2 
20 8-9 


7 
8 
9 


21 31 56 
21 30 59 
21 30 3 


18 
18 
18 


35-2 
31-8 
28-3 




10 
11 
12 


22 3 64 
22 2 35 
22 1 16 


20 . 5-7 
20 2-6 
19 59-2 


10 
11 
12 


21 29 8 
21 28 14 
21 27 22 


18 
18 
18 


24-7 
21-2 
17-7 




13 
14 
15 


21 59 68 
21 58 40 
21 57 23 


19 66-0 
19 62-7 
19 49-4 


13 
14 
15 


21 26 32 
21 26 43 
21 24 56 


18 
18 
18 


14-1 

10-6 

7-0 




16 

17 
18 


21 56 6 
21 54 49 
21 53 33 


19 46-2 
19 42-9 
19 39-6 


16 

17 
18 


21 24 10 
21 23 25 
21 22 43 


18 
17 
17 


3-5 
59-9 
66-3 




19 
20 
21 


21 62 17 
21 61 2 
21 49 48 


19 36-3 
19 33-0 
19 29-7 


19 
20 
21 


21 22 2 
21 21 23 
21 20 46 


17 
17 
17 


52-6 
49-0 
45-4 




22 
23 
24 


21 48 34 
21 47 21 
21 46 9 


19 26-3 
19 23-0 
19 19-6 


22 
23 
24 


21 20 10 
21 19 36 
21 19 5 


17 
17 
17 


41-7 
38-0 
34-4 




'25 
26 
27 


21 44 68 
21 43 47 
21 42 37 


19 16-3 
19 12-9 
19 9-6 . 


25 
26 

27 


21 18 35 
21 18 7 
21 17 41 


17 
17 
17 


30-7 
27-0 
23-3 




28 
29 
30 

31 


21 41 28 
21 40 20 
21 39 13 

N.21 38 8 


19 6-2 
19 2-8 
18 69-4 

18 56-0 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


21 17 17 
21 16 55 
21 16 35 
21 16 17 

N.21 16 1 


17 
17 
17 
17 

17 


19-5 

15-8 

12-0 

8-3 

4-6 





262 



JUPITER. 



NOVEMBER, 


1§59. 


DECEMBER, 


1S59. 


1 

li^AN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 


i " " " 

i 


GEOCENTRIC. 




SEOCENTRIC. | 


Day of 

the 






Day of 

the 
Month. 






Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


^oon. 


Passage. 


Noon. 


Passage. 




O 1 It 


h. m. 




o / u 


h. m. 


1 


N.21 16 1 


17 4-5 


1 


N.21 24 55 


15 4-7 


1 2 


21 15 48 


17 0-7 


2 


21 25 46 


15 0-4 


3 


21 15 36 


16 56-9 


3 


21 26 38 


14 56-2 


4 


21 15 27 


16 53-0 


4 


21 27 32 


14 52-0 


5 


21 15 19 


16 49-2 


5 


21 28 28 


14 47-8 


6 


21 15 14 


16 45-4 


6 


21 29 26 


14 43-5 


1 


21 15 11 


16 41-5 


7 


21 30 25 


14 39-2 


8 


21 15 10 


16 37-6 


8 


21 31 26 


14 34-9 


9 


21 15 12 


16 33-7 


9 


21 32 29 


14 80-7 


10 


21 15 15 


16 29-8 


10 . 


21 33 33 


14 26-3 


11 


21 15 21 


16 25-9 


11 


21 34 38 


14 22-0 


12 


21 15 29 


16 22-0 


12 


21 35 45 


14 17-7 


13 


21 15 39 


16 18-1 


13 


21 36 54 


14 13-4 


14 


21 15 52 


16 14-1 


14 


21 38 3 


14 9-0 


15 


21 16 6 


16 10-1 


15 


21 39 14 


14 4-7 


16 


21 16 23 


16 6-1 


16 


21 40 27 


14 0-3 


IT 


21 16 42 


16 2-1 


17 


21 41 40 


13 55-9 


18 


21 17 3 


15 58-1 


18 


21 42 55 


13 61-5 


19 


21 17 27 


15 54-1 


19 


21 44 10 


13 47-2 


20 


21 17 52 


15 50-0 


20 


21 45 27 


13 42-7 


21' 


21 18 20 


15 46-0 


21 


21 46 44 


13 38-3 


22 


21 18 50 


15 41-9 


22 


21 48 2 


13 33-9 


23 


21 19 22 


15 37-8 


23 


21 49 21 


13 29-5 


24 


21 19 57 


15 33-7 


24 


21 50 41 


13 25-1 


25 


21 20 33 


15 29-6 


25 


21 52 1 


13 20-6 


26 


21 21 12 


15 25-5 


26 


21 53 22 


13 16-2 


27 


21 21 52 


15 21-3 


27 


21 64 44 


13 11-7 


28 


21 22 35 


15 17-2 


28 


21 56 5 


13 7-2 


29 


21 23 20 


15 13-0 


29 


21 57 27 


13 2-8 


30 


21 24 7 


15 8-8 


30 


21 58 50 


12 58-3 








31 


22 12 


12 53-8 


31 


N.21 24 55 


15 4-7 








i 
1 






32 


N.22 1 35 


12 49-3 



SATURN. 



263 





lAWUAKY, 


1§59. 




F£BRVARY, 


1§59. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




GEOCENTEIC. 






GEOCENTRIC. 


Day of 
the 








Day of 

the 
Mouth. 






Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 


Soon. 


Passage. 




O 1 II 


h. 


m. 




O 1 II 


h. m. 


1 


N.18 11 9 


14 


9-8 


1 


N.18 53 8 


11 58-3 


2 


18 12 22 


14 


5-6 


2 


18 54 31 


11 54-1 


3 


18 13 36 


14 


1-4 


3 


18 55 53 


11 49-8 


4 


18 14 50 


13 


57-2 


4 


18 57 15 


11 46-6 


5 


18 16 6 


13 


53-0 


5 


18 68 36 


11 41-3 


6 


18 17 28 


13 


48-8 


6 


18 59 57 


11 37-0 


7 


18 18 40 


13 


44-6 


7 


19 ' 1 17 


11 32-8 


8 


18 19 58 


13 


40-3 


8 


19 2 37 


11 28-5 


9 


is' 21 17 


13 


36-1 


9 


19 3 56 


11 24-3 


10 


18 22 36 


13 


31-9 


10 


19 6 13 


11 20-0 


11 


18 23 57 


13 


27-6 


11 


19 6 31 


11 15-8 


12 


18 25 18 


13 


23-4 


12 


19 7 47 


11 11-5 


13 


18 26 39 


13 


19-2 


13 


19 9 3 


XI 7-3 


14 


18 28 1 


13 


14-9 


14 


19 10 18 


11 3-0 


15 


18 29 23 


13 


10-7 


15 


19 11 31 


10 68-8 


16 


18 30 46 


13 


6-4 


16 


19 12 44 


10 54-6 


IV 


18 32 9 


13 


2-2 


17 


19 13 66 


10 50-3 


18 


18 33 32 


12 


57-9 


18 


19 16 7 


10 46-1 


19 


18 34 56 


12 


53-7 


19 


19 16 17 


10 41-9 


20 


18 36 20 


12 


49-4 


20 


19 17 26 


10 37-7 


21 


18 37 44 


12 


45-2 


21 


19 18 34 


10 33-5 


22 


18 39 8 


12 


40-9 


22 


19 19 40 


10 29-3 


23 


18 40 33 


12 


36-7 


23 


19 20 46 


10 25-1 


24 


18 41 67 


12 


32-4 


24 


19 21 50 


10 20-9 


25 


18 43 22 


12 


28-2 


25 


19 22 63 


10 16-7 


26 


18 44 46 


12 


23-9 


26 


19 23 55 


10 12-5 


27 


18 46 10 


12 


19-6 


27 
28 


19 24 56 
19 25 65 


10 8-3 
10 4-1 


28 


18 47 34 


12 


16-4 








29 


18 48 58 


12 


11-1 


,29 


N.19 26 63 


9 59-9 


30 


18 50 22 


12 


6-8 








31 


18 51 45 


12 


2-6 








32 


N.18 53 8 


11 


58-3 









264 



SATURN. 



MARCH, 1S59. 


APRIIi, 1§59. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


GEOCENTRIC. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


GEOCENTRIC. 


Apparent 
Decimation. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Appwrent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Noon. 


Iforni. 


1 
2 
3 


N.l°9 26 53 
19 27 50 
19 28 45 


h. 
9 
9 
9 


m. 

59-9 
55-7 
51-6 


1 
2 
3 


O 1 II 

N.19 44 29 
19 44 37 
19 44 44 


h. 

1 

7 
7 


m. 

53-5 
49-5 
45-6 


4 
5 
6 


19 29 39 
19 30 31 
19 31 23 


9 
9 
9 


47-4 
43-2 
39-1 


4 
5 
6 


19 44 49 
19 44 53 
19 44 55 


7 

7 
7 


41-6 
37-7 
33-7 


7 
8 
9 


19 32 12 
19 33 
19 33 47 


9 
9 
9 


34-9 
30-8 
26-7 


7 
8 
9 


19 44 65 
19 44 S3 
19 44 50 


7 
7 
7 


29-8 
25-9 
22-0 


10 
11 
12 


19 34 32 
19 35 16 
19 35 58 


9 
9 
9 


22-5 
18-4 
14-3 


10 
11 
12 


19 44 45 
19 44 39 
19 44 31 


7 
7 
7 


18-1 
14-2 
10-3 


13 
14 
15 


19 36 39 
19 37 18 
19 37 55 


9 
9 
9 


10-2 
6-1 
2-0 


13 
14 
15 


19 44 21 
19 44 10 
19 43 57 


7 
7 
6 


6-4 

2-5 

68-6 


16 
lY 
18 


19 38 31 
19 , 39 6 
19 39 38 


I 

8 


57-9 
53-9 
49-8 


16 
17 
18 


19 43 43 
19 43 27 
19 43 9 


6 
6 
6 


64-8 
50-9 
47-1 


19 
20 
21 


19 40 10 
19 40 39 
19 ; 41 7 


8 
8 
8 


45-7 
41-7 
37-6 


19 
20 
21 


19 42 60 
19 42 29 
19 42 7 


6 
6 
6 


43-2 
39-4 
35-6 


22 
23 
24 


19 41 34 
19 41 59 
19 42 22 


8 
8 
8 


33-6 
29-5 
25-5 


22 
23 
24 


19 ~ 41 43 
19 41 17 
19 40 50 


6 
6 
6 


31-8 
27-9 
24-1 


25 
26 

27 


19 42 43 
19 43 3 
19 43 22 


8 
8 
8 


21-5 
17-4 
13-4 


25 
26 

27 


19 40 21 
19 39 51 
19 39 19 


6 
6 
6 


20-3 
16-5 
12-8 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


19 ' 43 38 
19 43 54 
19 44 7 
19 ; 44 19 

N.19 44 29 


8 
8 
8 
7 

7 


9-4 

5-4 

1-5 

57-5 

53-5 


28 
29 
30 

31 


19 38 46 
19 38 11 
19 37 36 

N.19 36 67 


6 
6 
6 

6 


9-0 
5-2 
1-4 

57-7 



SATURN. 



265 



MAY, 1859. 


JIJWE, 1859. 


MEAN TIME. 


, MEAN TIME. 




GEOCENTRIC. 




GEOCENTRIC. ' 




Day of 
the 






Day of 
the 








Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Appa/rmt 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 


Mouth. 


Noon. 


Passage. 




O 1 It 


h. m. 




O t 11 


h. 


m. 


1 


N.19 36 57 


5 57-7 


1 


N.19 5 34 


4 


4-3 


2 


19 36 17 


5 58-9 


2 


19 4 12 


4 


0-7 


3 


19 35 36 


5 60'2 


3 


19 2 49 


3 


57-1 


4 


19 34 54 


5 46-4 


4 


19 1 25 


3 


53-6 


5 


19 34 10 


5 42-7 


5 


19 


3 


50-0 


6 


19 33 24 


5 39*0 


6 


18 58 33 


3 


46-5 


n 


19 32 87 


5 35-3 


7 


18 57 5 


3 


42-9 


8 


19 31 49 


5 31-6 


8' 


18 55 36 


8 


39-4 


9 


19 30 59 


5 27-9 


9 


18 , 54 6. 


3 


35-8 


10 


19 30 8 


5 24-2 


10 


18 52 35 


3 


32-3 


11 


19 29 15 


5 20-5 


11 


18 51 2 


3 


28-8 


12 


19 28 21 


5 16-8 


12 


18 49 29 


3 


25-2 


13 


19 27 25 


5 13-1 


13 


18 47 54 


3 


21-7 


14 


19 26 28 


5 9-5 


14 


18 46 19 


3 


18-2 


15 


19 25 30 


5 5-8 


15 


. 18 44 42 


8 


14-7 


16 


19 24 30 


5 2-1 


16 


18 43 5 


3 


11-2 


IT 


19 23 29 


4 58-5 


17 


18 41 26 


8 


7-6 


18 


19 22 27 


4 54-8 


18 


18 39 46 


8 


4-1 


19 


19 21 23 


■ 4 51-2 


19 


18 38 5 


8 


0-6 


20 


19 20 18 


4 : 47-5 


20 


18 36 24 


2 


57-1 


21 


19 19 11 


4 43-9 


21 


18 34 41 


2 


58-6 


22 


19 18 4 


4 40-3 


22 


18 32 57 


2 


50-1 


23 


19 16 55 


4 36-7 


23 


18 31 12 


2 


46-6 


24 


19 15 44 


4 33-0 


24 


18 29 27 


2 


43-2 


25 


19 14 82 


4 29-4 


25 


18 27 40 


2 


39-7 


26 


19 13 19 


4 25-8 


26 


18 25 53 


2 


36-2 


27 


19 12 5 


4 22-2 


27 


18 24 4 


2 


32-7 


28 


19 10 49 


4 ' 18-6 


28 


18 22 15 


2 


29-2 


29 


19 9 32 


4 15-0 


29 


18 20 24 


2 


25-8 


30 


19 8 14 


4 11'5 


30 


18 18 33 


2 


22-3 


31 


19 , 6 55 


4 7-9 


31 


N.18 16 41 • 


2 


18-8 


32 


N.19 5 34 


4 4-3 











266 



SATURN. 



JlTIiY, 1§59. 


AirOUST, 1§59. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




GEOCENTEIO. 






GEOOEKTEIC. 


Day of - 

the 








Day of 






Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


the 
Month. 


Appatrent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


Nbrni. 


Passage. 


No(m, 


Passage. 




oil! 


h. 


m. 




O 1 If 


h. m. 


1 


N.18 16 41 


2 


18-8 


1 


N.17 13 1 


32-3 


2 


18 14 48 


2 


15-4 


2 


17 10 50 


28-8 


3 


18 12 54 


2 


11-9 


3 


17 8 38 


25-4 


4 


18 11 


2 


8-4 


4 


17 6 26 


22-0 


5 


18 9 4 


2 


5-0 


5 


17 4 13 


18-6 


6 


18 7 8 


2 


1-5 


6 


17 2 1 


16-2 


7 


18 5 11 




58-1 


7 


16 59 48 


11-7 


8 


18 3 13 




54-6 


8 


16 57 34 


8-3 


9 


18 1 15 




51-2 


9 


16 55 21 


4-9 


10 


17 59 16 




47-7 


10 


16 53 7 


( 1-5 1 

t 23 58 '0 ; 


11 


17 57 16 




44-3 


11 


16 50 54 


23 64-6 


12 


17 55 15 




40-9 


12 


16 48 40 


23 51-2 


13 


17 53 14 




37-4 


13 


16 46 26 


23 47-8 


14 


17 51 12 




34-0 


14 


16 44 12 


23 44-4 


15 


17 49 10 




30-5 


15 


16 41 57 


23 40-9 


16 


17 47 7 




27-1 


16 


16 39 43 


23 37-5 


17 


17 45 3 




23-7 


17 


16 37 29 


23 34-1 


18 


17 42 58 




20-2 


18 


16 35 14 


23 30-7 


19 


17 40" 53 




16-8 


19 


16 33 


23 27-2 


20 


17 38 48 




13-4 


20 


16 30 46 


23 23-8 


21 


17 36 42 




9-9 


21 


16 28 '31 


23 20-4 


22 


17 34 35 




6-6 


22 


16 26 17 


23 17-0 


23 


17 32 28 




3-1 


23 


16 24 3 


23 13-5 


24 


17 30 20 





59-7 


24 


16 21 49 


23 10-1 


25 


17 28 12 





56-2 


25 


16 19 34 


23 6-6 


26 


17 26 3 





52-8 


26 


16 17 21 


23 3-2 


27 


17 23 54 





49-4 


27 


16 15 7 


22 59-8 


28 


17 21 44 





46-0 


28 


16 12 53 


22 56-3 


29 


17 19 34 





42-5 


29 


16 10 40 


22 52-9 


30 


17 17 23 





39-1 


80 


16 8 27 


22 49-5 


31 


17 15 IS 





35-7 


31 


16 6 14 


22 46-0 


32 


N.17 13 1 





32-3 


32 


N.16 4 1 


22 42-6 



SATURN. 



267 



SEPTEMBER, 


1S59. 


OCTOBER, 


1S50. 






MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TTMK. 




Day of 

the 
Month. 


QEOOBNTRIC. 


Day of 


QEOGENTBIO. 




Apparent 
Decimation. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


the 
Month. 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 




Soon. 


JSbon. 




1 
2 
3 


o t tt 

N.16 4 1 
16 1 49 
15 59 37 


h. m. 
22 42-6 
22 39-1 
22 35-7 


1 
2 
3 


O 1 il 

N.15 2 2 
15 11 
14 58 21 


h. 
20 
20 
20 


m. 
58-1 
54-6 
51-0 




4 
5 
6 


15 57 26 
15 55 15 
15 53 4 


22 32-2 
22 28-8 
22 25-3 


4 
5 
6 


14 56 32 
14 54 44 
14 52 68 


20 
20 
20 


47-4 
43, -9 
40-4 




7 
8 
9 


15 50 54 
15 48 44 
15 46 35 


22 21-9 
22 18-4 
22 14-9 


7 
8 
9 


14 51 12 

14 49 28 
14 47 46 


20 
20 
20 


36-8 
33-2 
29-7 




10 
11 
12 


15 44 26 
15 42 18 
15 40 10 


22 11-5 
22 8-0 
22 4-6 


10 
11 
12 


14 46 4 
14 44 24 
14 42 45 


20 
20 
20 


26-1 

22-5 
19-0 




13 
14 
15 


15 38 3 
15 35 57 
15 33 51 


22 1-1 

21 57-6 
21 54-1 


13 

14 
15 


14 41 7 
14 39 31 
14 37 56 


20 
20 
20 


15-4 

11-8 

8-2 




16 
17 
18 


15 31 46 
15 29 41 
15 27 37 


21 50-6 
21 47-2 
21 43-7 


16 

17 
18 


14 36 23 
14 34 51 
14 33 21 


20 
20 
19 


4-6 
1:0 

57-4 




19 
20 
21 


15 25 34 
15 23 31 
15 21 30 


21 40-2 
21 36-7 
21 33-2 


19 

20 
21 


14 31 52 
14 30 25 
14 28 59 


19 
19 
19 


53-8 
50-1 
46-5 




22 
23 
24 


15 19 29 
15 17 29 
15 15 30 


21 29-7 
21 26-2 
21 22-7 


22 
23 
24 


14 27 35 
14 26 13 
14 24 62 


19 
19 
19 


42-9 
39-3 
35-6 




25 
26 

27 


15 13 31 
15 11 34 
15 9 38 


21 19-2 
21 15-7 
21 12-2 


25 
26 
27 


14 23 33 
14 22 16 
14 21 


19 
19 
19 


32-0 
28-3 
24-7 




28 
29 
30 

31 


15 7 42 
15 6 48 
15 3 55 

N.15 2 2 


21 8-6 
21 5-1 
21 1-6 

20 58-1 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


14 19 46 
14 18 34 
14 17 24 
14 16 16 

N.14 15 9 


19 
19 
19 
19 

19 


21-0 
17-3 
13-7 
10-0 

6-3 





268 



SATURN. 



nroT£MBi:R, 


1§59. 


DECEMBER, 


1859. 


MEAN. TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




GEOCENTEIC. 




GEOOENTBIO. 


Day of 

the 






Day of 
the 






Apparent 
Declination, 


Meridian 


Appa/renl 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 




o i • a 


h. m. 




O 1 u 


h. m. 


1 


N.14 15 9 


19 6-3 


1 


N.13 57 50 


17 12-8 


2 


14 14 5 


19 2-6 


2 


13 57 60 


17 8-9 


3 


14 13 2 


18 58-9 


3 


13 67 52 


17 5-0 


4 


14 12 1 


18 55-2 


4 


13 57 56 


17 1-1 


5 


14 11 2 


18 51-5 


5 


13 58 2 


16 67-1 


6 


14 10 6 


18 47-8 


6 


13 68 11 


16 53-2 


7 


14 9 10 


18 44-1 


7 


13 58 22 


16 49-3 


8 


14 8 17 


18 40-4 


8 


13 58 36 


16 45-4 


9 


14 : 7 27 


18 36-6 


9 


13 58 62 


16 41-4 


10 


14 6 38 


18 32-9 


10 


13 69 10 


16 37-5 


11 


14 5 51 


18 29-1 


11 


13 59 30 


16 33-5 


12 


14 5 6 


18 25-4 


12 


13 59 52 


16 29-6 


13 


14 4 23 


18 21-6 


13 


14 17 


16 25-6 


14 


14 3 43 


18 17-8 


14 


14 44 


16 21-6 


15 


14 3 4 


18 14-1 


15 


14 1 13 


16 17-6 


16 


14 2 28 


18 10-3 


16 


14 1 46 


16 13-6 


17 


14 1 54 


18 6-5 


17 


14 2 19 


16 9-6 


18 


14 1 22 


18 2-7 


18 


14 2 66 


16 5-6 


19 


14 52 


17 58-9 


19 


14 3 33 


16 1-6 


20 


14 24 


17 55-1 


20 


14 4 13 


15 57-6 


21 


13 59 59 


17 51-3 


21 


14 4 65 


15 63-6 


22 


13 59 36 


17 47-5 


22 


14 6 40 


15 49-5 


23 


13 59 15 


17 43-7 


23 


14 6 27 


15 46-6 


24 


13 58 56 


17 39-8 


24 


14 7 15 


15 41-4 


25 


- 13 58 40 


17 36-0 


25 


14 8 6 


16 37-4 


26 


13 58 26 


17 32-1 


26 


14 8 59 


16 33-3 


27 


13 58 14 


17 28-3 


27 


14 9 54 


16 29-2 


28 


13 58 5 


17 24-4 


28 


14 10 51 


15 25-2 


29 


13 57 58 


17 20-5 


29 


14 11 60 


15 21-1 


30 


13 57 53 


17 16-6 


30 


14 12 61 


15 17-0 






V 


31 


14 13 63 


16 12-9 


31 


N.13 57 50 


17 12-8 














32 


N.14 14 58 


16 8-8 



269 



NAUTICAL ALMANAC 

FOE THE YEAR 

18 60. 



X°7. 




Lilkut .I.Bieii, (in FuUim St XT 



271 



ECLIPSES OF THE SUN AND MOON. 



In the year 1860 there will be two Eclipses of the Sun and two of the Moon. 

I. — An Annular Eclipse of the SUN, January 22, 1860, invisible at Greenwich. 

Begins on the Earth generally January 22'' 9'' 54"'3, in Mean Time at Greenwich. 
Longitude 99° 58' E. of Greenwich, and Latitude . . 49° 20' S. 

Central Eclipse begins generally January 22'' ll"" SS^'O, in 

Longitude 30° 29' E. of Greenwich, and Latitude . . .69° 9' S. 

Central Eclipse at Noon January 22* 11'' 51'°-2, in Longi- 
tude 5° 10' E. of Greenwich, and Latitude 88° 59' S. 

Central Eclipse ends generally January 22'' IS"" 19°'-2, in 

Longitude 88° 11' W. of Greenwich, and Latitude . . 41° 59' S. 

Ends on the Earth generally January 22'' 14'' 59'°-9, in 

Longitude 126° 30' W. of Greenwich, and Latitude . . 15° 8' S. 

n. — A Partial Eclipse of the MOON, February 6, 1860, invisible at Greenwich. 

d. h. m. 

First contact with the Penumbra February 6 12 01 ") 

First contact with the Shadow " 6 13 1-8 

Middle of the Eclipse " 6 14 28'7 \ Mean Time at Greenwich. 

liast contact with the Shadow " 6 15 55'6 

Last contact with the Penumbra " 6 16 57 "3 J 

At these times respectively the Moon will be in the Zenith of the places whose positions are — 
Longitude 1° 55' E. T Latitude 15° 44' N. 

12 55 "W. , 15 29 

33 50 \ of Greenwich. 15 8 

54 44 14 46 

69 35 W. J 14 30 N. 

Magnitude of the Eclipse (Moon's diameter =- 1) 0'809. 

The first contact with the Shadow occurs at 79'' from the Northernmost point of the Moon's limb toward 
the East. 

The last contact at 32° toward the West ; in each case, for direct image. 

IIL — A Total Eclipse of the SUN, July 18, 1860, visible (as apartial one) at Greenwich. 

Begins on the Earth generally July 17'' 23'' 53'°-8, in Mean Time at Greenwich. 
Longitude 102° 14' W. of Greenwich, and Latitude . . 34° 43' N. 

Central Eclipse begins generally July 18'' 0'' 5V'°-3, in 

Longftude 125° 47' W. of Greenwich, and Latitude . . 45° 42' N. 

Central Eclipse at Noon July 18'' 2'' 8°°-l, in Longi- 
tude 30° 33' W. of Greenwich, and Latitude .... 56° 8' N. 

Central Eclipse ends generally July 18'' 3'' 53'°-2, in 

Longitude 39° 25' E. of Greenwich, and Latitude . . 15° 56' N. 

Ends on the Earth generally July 18'' 4'' S6'"-6, in 

Longitude 18° 56' E. of Greenwich, and Latitude . . 4° 16' N. 

IV! — A Partial Eclipse of the MOON, August 1, 1860, invisible at Greenwich, 

d. h. m. 

First contact with the Penumbra August 1 2 43'2 "1 

First contact with the Shadow " 14 8-4 

Middle of the Eclipse " 15 24-5 > Mean Time at Greenwich. 

Last contact with the Shadow " 16 40'6 

Last contact with the Penumbra " 1 8 5-8 J 

Magnitude of the Eclipse (Moon's diameter^ 1) 0-443. 



ELEMENTS OF THE ECLIPSES OF THE SUN. 



1 § 60. 



January 22. 



July 18. 



Greenwich Mean Time of cJ in E. A. 
© and 9 's Right Ascension . . 

d's Declination 

®'s Declination 



d. h. m. s. 

22 11 51 13 

20 18 6 

o I 41 

S. 20 31 39 
S. 19 40 24 



d. h. m. 8. 

18 2 8 7 

7 52 20 

„ o 4 II 

N.21 31 11 
N.20 57 



272 



PHASES OF 


THE 


MOON FOR 1860. 








JANUAEY. 

d. h. 

® Full Moon .... 83 


m. 
23-4 


JTOY, 

© Full Moon . . . 


d. 
2 


h. 
16 


m. 
T-0 


d Last Quarter 


. 14 18 


58-T 


d Last Quarter . . 


. 10 


IT 


68-1 


% New Moon . , 


. 22 12 


16-T 


# New Moon . . , 


18 


2 


20-3 


© First Quarter . . 


. 30 IT 


10-9 


© First Quarter . . 


. 24 


18 


19-T 


rJEBBTTABT. 

d. h. 
@ Full Moon .... 6 14 


m. 
35-4 


AUGUST. 

© Full Moon . . , 


d. 
1 


5 


m. 
33-6 


(§ Last Quarter , . 


. 13 6 


51-3 


(§ Last Quarter . . 


9 


9 


23-4 


(ii New Moon . . 


, 21 1 


38-6 


# New Moon . . , 


16 


10 


20-2 


ID Mr St Quarter . . 


. 29 1 


55-3 


© First Quarter . . 


23 





49-8 








© Full Moon , . . 


30 


20 


5T-4 


MARCH. 

d. h. 
© Full Moon .... To 


m. 
44-2 


SEPTEMBEK. 

d. 

(§ Last Quarter ... T 


h. 
23 


m. 

T-1 


(§ Last Quarter . . 


. 13 21 


8-T 


# New Moon . . . 


14 


18 


9-6 


fj New Moon . . . 


. 22 1 


55-5 


© First Quarter . . 


21 


11 


24-9 


© First Quarter . . 


. 29 18 


52-8 


© Full Moon . . . 


29 


13 


39-8 


APETL 

© Full Moon . . . 


d. h. 
. 5 10 


m. 
0-0 


OCTOBEE. 

d Last Quarter . . 


d. 

T 


h. 
11 


m. 
4-8 


(§ Last Quarter . . 


. 12 13 


34-5 


# New Moon . . . 


14 


2 


3T-6 


# New Moon . . 


. 20 IT 


44-8 


© First Quarter . . 


21 


2 


10-6 


© First Quarter . 


. 28-2 


36-2 


® Full Moon . . . 


29 


6 


49-9 


MAY. 
© Full Moon . . . 


d. h. 
4 19 


m. 
1-8 


NOVEMBEB 

. (§ Last Quarter . . 


d. 
5 


h. 
21 


m. 
lT-5 


(§ Last Quarter . . 


. 12 T 


16-4 


(11 New Moon . . . 


12 


12 


36-4 


# New Moon . . . 


. 20 6 


46-0 


© First Quarter . . 


19 


20 


52-T 


© First Quarter . . 


. 2T 8 


4-T 


© Full Moon . . . 


2T 


23 


3T-9 


JTTNE 

@ Full Moon . . 


d. h. 
. 3 4 


m. 
45-9 


DECEMBER 

d Last Quarter . . 


d. 
6 


h. 
6 


m. 
0-8 


(§ Last Quarter 


. 11 1 


4-3 


% ,New Moon . . . 


12 





48-5 


# New Moon . , . 


. 18 IT 


23 -T 


© First Quarter . . 


19 


18 


9-8 


© First Quarter . . 


. 25 12 


36-1 


© Full Moon . . . 


2T 


16 


lT-4 



273 



I860. 



AT GREENWICH APPARENT NOON. 



1860. 



JAWrARY, 1860. 



FEBRVARY, 1S60. 



^ 



Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thnr. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 



Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 



ST 

a 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

1 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
11 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 

24 

25 
26 
21 

28 
29 
30 
31 

32 



THE SUN'S 
Apparent 



S.23 3 12 
22 58 12 
22 52 45 

22 46 51 
22 40 30 
22 33 41 

22 26 26 
22 18 45 
22 10 3Y 

22 2 3 
21 53 4 
21 43 38 

21 38 48 
21 23 32 

21 12 52 

21 1 47 
20 50 18 
20 38 25 

20 26 8 
.20 13 28 
20 26 

19 47 1 
19 33 14 
19 19 5 

19 4 35 
18 49 44 
18 34 33 

18 19 1 
18 3 10 
17 46 59 
17 30 30 

8.17 13 42 



Diff. 
for 

Ihr. 



11 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 

18 
19 
20 

21 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 

31 
32 
33 

33 
84 
35 

36 
37 
38 

39 
40 
40 
41 

42 



Equation 
of Time, 

to be 
added to 
Apparent 

Tvme. 



m. s. 

3 36 

4 5 

4 33 

5 

5 27 

5 54 

6 20 

6 46 

7 12 

7 36 

8 
8 24 

8 47 

9 9 
9 31 

9 52 
10 13 
10 33 

10 52 

11 10 
11 28 

11 44 

12 
12 16 

12 30 
12 44 

12 57 

13 9 
13 20 
13 30 
13 40 

13 48 



Diff. 
for 
Ihr. 



^ 






Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 






THE SUN'S 

Appajreni 
Declination. 



Fri. 


10 


Sat. 


11 


Sun. 


12 


Mon. 


13 


Tues. 


14 


Wed. 


15 


Thur. 


16 


Fri. 


17 


Sat. 


18 


Sun. 


19 


Mon. 


20 


Tues. 


21 


Wed. 


22 


Thur. 


23 


Fri. 


24 


Sat. 


25 


Sun. 


26 


Mon. 


27 


Tues. 


28 


Wed. 


29 


Thur. 


30 



S.17 13 42 
16 56 36 
16 39 12 

16 21 32 
16 3 34 
15 45 19 

15 26 49 
15 8 3 
14 49 1 

14 29 45 
14 10 14 
13 50 29 

18 30 30 
13 10 18 
12 49 53 

12 29 15 
12 8 25 
11 47 24 

11 26 11 
11 4 48 
10 43 14 

10 21 31 
9 59 38 
9 37 36 

9 15 25 
8 53 6 
8 30 39 

8 8 5 

7 45 24 

S. 7 22 37 



Diff. 
for 
Ihr. 



42 
43 
43 

44 
45 
45 

46 

47 
47 

48 
49 
49 

60 
50 
51 

51 
52 
52 

63 
63 

54 

54 
54 
56 

56 
55 
66 

66 
56 

67 



Equation 
of Time, 

to be 
added to 
Apparent 

dHme. 



Diff. 
for 

:hr. 



m. s. 
13 48 

13 56 

14 3 

14 9 
14 15 
14 19 

14 23 
14 26 
14 28 

14 29 
14 30 
14 30 

14 29 
14 27 
14 25 

14 21 
14 18 
14 13 

14 8 
14 2 
13 55 

13 48 
,13 40 
13 32 

13 23 
13 13 
13 3 

12 52 
12 41 

12 29 



s. 









































lb 



274 



I860. 




AT GEEENWICH APPAEENT NOON. 




1860. 






MARCH, 


1S60. 




APRII., 1§60. 




Day of the Week. 


.a 

a 
o 

.a 

. <«-• 
o 

a 


THE SUN'S 

Apparent 
Declination. 


Diff. 
for 

Ihr. 


Equation 
of Time, 

to be 
added to 
Apparent 

Time. 


Diff. 
for 
Ihr. 


■i 

1 

o 

a 


o 

o 

p 


THE SUN'S 

Apparent 
Declination. 


Diff. 

for 

Ihr. 


Equation 
of Time, 

to be 
added to 


Diff. 
for 

Ihr; 
■9 




siibt.from 

Apparent: 

^Pime. ■■• 












m. s. 


s. 










m. s. 


S. 




Tliur. 


1 


S.'7 22 37 


57 


12 29 





Sun. 


1 


N. 4 44 37 


57 


3 49 







Fri. 


2 


6 59 43 


57 


12 16 





Mon. 


2 


5 7 39 


57 


3 31 







Sat. 


3 


6 36 44 


57 


12 3 





Tues. 


3 


5 30 36 


57 


3 13 







Sun. 


4 


6 13 39 


57 


11 50 





Wed. 


4 


5 53 27 


57 


2 55 







Mod. 


5 


5 50 29 


58 


11 36 





Thur. 


5 


6 16 12 


56 


2 37 







Tues. 


6 


5 27 14 


58 


11 22 





Fri. 


6 


6 38 51 


56 


2 19 







Wed. 


7 


5 3 55 


58 


11 7 





Sat. 


7 


7 1 23 


56 


2 2 







Thur. 


8 


4 40 33 


58 


10 52 





Sun. 


8 


7 23 48 


55 


1 45 







Fri. 


9 


4 17 6 


58 


10 36 





Mon. 


9 


7 46 5 


55 


1 28 







Sat. 


10 


3 53 36 


58 


10 21 





Tues. 


10 


8 8 15 


55 


1 12 







Sun. 


11 


3 30 3 


58 


10 4 





Wed. 


11 


8 30 17 


54 


55 







Mod. 


12 


3 6 28 


59 


9 48 





Thur. 


12 


8 52 11 


54 


40 







Tues. 


13 


2 42 51 


59 


9 31 





Fri. 


13 


9 13 55 


54 


24 







Wed. 
Thur. 


14 
15 


2 19 11 
1 55 31 


59 
59 


9 14 

8 57 






Sat. 
Sun. 


14 
15 


9 35 30 

9 56 57 


53 
53 


9 








5 




Fri. 


16 


1 31 49 


59 


8 40 





Mon. 


16 


10 18 13 


52 


20 







Sat. 


17 


1 8 6 


59 


8 22 





Tues. 


17 


10 39 20 


52 


34 







Sun. 


18 


44 23 


59 


8 5 





Wed. 


18 


11 15 


52 


48 







Mon. 


19 


S. 20 41 


59 


7 47 





Thur. 


19 


11 21 


51 


1 1 







Tues. 


20 


N. 3 1 


59 


7 29 





Fri. 


20 


11 41 34 


51 


1 14 







Wed. 


21 


26 43 


59 


7 11 





Sat. 


21 


12 1 56 


50 


1 26 







Thur. 


22 


50 23 


59 


6 52 





Sun. 


22 


12 22 7 


50 


1 38 







Fri. 


23 


1 14 2 


59 


6 34 





Mon. 


23 


12 42 5 


49 


1 50 







Sat. 


24 


1 37 39 


58 


6 16 





Tuea. 


24 


13 1 51 


49 


2 1 







Sun. 


25 


2 1 13 


58 


5 57 





Wed. 


25 


13 21 24 


48 


2 12 







Mon. 


26 


2 24 45 


58 


5 39 





Thur. 


26 


13 40 43 


48 


2 22 







Tues. 


27 


2 48 13 


58 


5 20 





Fri. 


27 


13 59 49 


47 


2 31 







Wed. 


28 


3 11 38 


58 


5 2 





Sat. 


28 


14 18 41 


46 


2 41 







Thur. 


29 


3 34 59 


58 


4 44 





Sun. 


29 


14 37 19 


46 


2 49 







Fri. 


30 


3 58 16 


58 


4 25 





Mon. 


30 


14 55 42 


45 


2 57 







j Sat. 


31 


4 21 29 


57 


4 7 





Tues. 


31 


N.15 13 51 


45 


3 5 







j Sun. 

■1 


32 


N. 4 44 37 


57 


3 49 


















275 



I860. 




AT GEEENWICH APPAEENT NOON. 




1860. 

! 


MAY, 1860. 


JITKTi:, 1S60. 


1 


1 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Diff. 




.a 
1 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 

of^Time, 

to be 


Diff. 


Day of the 




Apparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


to he 
subt.from 
Apparent 

Time. 


for 
Ihr. 


1 

"s 


O 


Apparent 
•• Deelinatilln. 


for 
Ihr. 


mjibt.from 


for 
Ihr. 


added to 

Apparent 

Tmu. 






oil/ 


II 


m. s. 


B. 






./ // 


II 


m. s. 


s. 


Tues. 


1 


N.15 13 51 


45 


3 5 





Fri. 


1 


N.22 7 49 


19 


2 26 





Wed. 


2 


15 31 44 


44 


3 12 





Sat. 


2 


22 15 36 


18 


2 17 





Thur. 


3 


15 49 23 


43 


3 19 





Sun. 


3 


22 23 


18 


2 7 





Fri. 


4 


16 6 45 


43 


3 25 





Mon. 


4 


22 30 1 


17 


1 57 





Sat. 


5 


16 23 52 


42 


3 30 





Tues. 


5 


22 36 38 


16 


1 47 





Sun. 


6 


16 40 42 


41 


3 35 





Wed. 


6 


22 42 51 


15 


1 37 





Mon. 


1 


16 51 16 


41 


3 40 





Thur. 


7 


22 48 40 


14 


1 26 





Tues. 


8 


17 13 33 


40 


3 43 





Fri. 


8 


22 54 5 


13 


1 14 





Wed. 


9 


17 29 32 


39 


3 47 





Sat. 


9 


22 59 7 


12 


1 3 





Thur. 


10 


17 45 15 


38 


3 49 





Sun. 


10 


23 3 44 


11 


51 





Fri. 


11 


18 39 


38 


3 51 





Mon. 


11 


23 7 57 


10 


39 





Sat. 


12 


18 15 46 


37 


3 53 





Tues. 


12 


23 11 45 


9 


27 





Sun. 


13 


18 30 34 


36 


3 54 





Wed. 


13 


23 15 9 


7 


14 





Mon. 

Tues. 


14 
15 


18 45 4 
18 59 15 


35 
35 


3 54 
3 54 






Thur. 
Fri. 


14 
15 


23 18 8 
23 20 43 


6 
5 


2 






10 


Wed. 


16 


19 13 7 


34 


3 53 


0' 


Sat. 


16 


23 22 53 


4 


23 





Thur. 


1-7 


19 26 39 


33 


3 51 





Sun. 


17 


23 24 38 


3 


36 





Fri. 


18 


19 39 51 


32 


3 49 





Mon. 


18 


23 25 58 


2 


49 





Sat. 


19 


19 52 44 


31 


3 46 





Tues. 


19 


23 26 54 


1 


1 2 





Sun. 


20 


20 5 16 


30 


3 43 





Wed. 


20 


23 27 24 





1 15 





Mon. 


21 


20 17 27 


30 


3 39 





Thur. 


21 


23 27 30 





1 28 





Tues. 


22 


20 29 18 


29 


3 35 





Fri. 


22 


23 27 11 


1 


1 41 





Wed. 


23 


20 40 48 


28 


3 30 





Sat. 


23 


23 26 27 


2 


1 54 





Thur. 


24 


20 51 66 


27 


3 25 





Sun. 


24 


23 25 18 


3 


2 7 





Fri. 


25 


21 2 43 


26 


3 19 





Mon. 


25 


23 23 45 


4 


2 20 





Sat. 


26 


21 13 8 


25. 


3 13 





Tues. 


26 


23 21 47 


5 


2 32 


•0 


Sun. 


21 


21 23 11 


24 


3 6 





Wed. 


27 


23 19 24 


6 


2 45 





Mon. 


28 


21 32 51 


23 


2 59 





Thur. 


28 


23 16 37 


7 


2 57 





Tues. 


29 


21 42 10 


22 


2 52 





Fri. 


29 


23 13 25 


• 8 


8 9 





Wed. 


30 


21 51 6 


21 


2 44 





Sat. 


30 


23 9 49 


9 


3 21 





Thur. 


.31 


21 59 39 


20 


2 35 





























Sun. 


31 


N.23 5 49 


10 


3 32 





Fri. 


32 


N.22. 7 49 


19 


2 26 


















276 



1 1860. 




AT GEEENWICH APPARENT NOON. 




1860. 


JUJuY, 1860. 




AUCrST, 


1«60. 


i ^ 


c 
o 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
of Time, 


Diff. 


^ 

$ 


§ 


THE SUN'S 


Diff. 


Equation 
oi^Time, 

to lie 
added to 


Diff. 


1 <u 
1 o 


o 


Apparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


to be 
added to 


for 

1 'ir. 




0) 


Apparent 
Declination. 


for 
Ihr. 


for 
Ihr. 


mbt.from 

Apparent 

Time. 


- 


^ 








- 


p 


« 


:,n^" 














m. s. 










m. 9. 


s. 


Sun. 


1 


N.23 5 49 


10 


3 32 





Wed. 


1 


N.17 55 13 


38 


6 





^ Mon. 


2 


23 1 25 


11 


3 44 





Thur. 


2 


17 39 50 


38 


5 56 





1 Tue«. 


3 


22 56 36 


12 


^ 55 





Fri. 


3 


17 24 10 


39 


5 51 





Wed. 


4 


22 51 24 


13 


4 5 





Sat. 


4:' 


17 8 13 


40 


5 46' 





i Tlmr. 


5 


22 45 4Y 


14 


4 16 





Sun. 


5 


16 51 59 


40 


5 40 





'■ Fri. 


6 


22 39 47 


15 


4 26 





Mon. 


6 


16 35 28 


41 


5 34 





Sat. 


1 


22 33 24 


16 


4 35 





Tues. 


7 


16 18 42 


42 


5 26 





jSm«. 


8 


22 26 37 


17 


4 45 





Wed. 


8 


16 1 39 


42 


5 19 





Mon. 


9 


22 19 26 


18 


4 54 





Thur. 


9 


15 44 21 


43 


5 11 





Tues. 


10 


22 11 53 


19 


5 2 





Fri. 


10 


15 26 47 


44 


5 2 





Wed. 


11 


22 3 56 


20 


5 10 





Sat. 


11 


15 8 59 


44 


4 53 





Thur. 


12 


21 55 37 


21 


5 18 





Sun. 


12 


14 50 56 


45 


4 43 





Fri. 


13 


21 46 55 


22 


5 25 





Mon. 


13 


14 32 39 


46 


4 32 





Sat. 


14 


21 37 51 


23 


5 32 





Tues. 


14 


14 14 8 


46 


4 21 





Sun. 


15 


21 28 24 


24 


5 38 





Wed. 


15 


13 55 23 


47 


4 10 





Moil. 


16 


21 18 35 


24 


5 44 





Thur. 


16 


13 36 25 


47 


3 68 





Tues. 


17 


21 8 26 


25 


6 50 





Fri. 


17 


13 17 14 


48 


3 45 





Wl-J. 


18 


20 57 53 


26 


5 54 





Sat. ■ 


18 


12 57 50 

• 


48 


3 32 





Thur. 


19 


20 47 


27 


5 59 





Sun. 


19 


12 38 13 


49 


3 19 





1 Fri. 


20 


20 35 46 


28 


6 2 





Mon. 


20 


12 18 25 


49 


3 5 





Sat. 


21 


20 24 11 


29 


6 5 





Tues. 


21 


11 58 26 


50 


2 51 





Sun. 


22 


20 12 15 


30 


6 8 





Wed. 


22 


11 38 15 


50 


2 36 





Mon. 


23 


20 


31 


6 10 





Thur. 


23 


11 17 52 


51 


2 20 





Tues. 


24 


19 47 24 


31 


6 11 





Fri. 


24 


10 57 20 


51 


2 4 





Wed. 


25 


19 34 29 


32 


6 12 





Sat. 


25 


10 36 37 


52 


1 48 


0' 


Thur. 


26 


19 21 14 


33 


6 12 





Sun. 


26 


10 15 44 


52 


1 31 





Fri. 


27 


19 7 40 


34 


6 12 





Mon. 


27 


9 54 41 


52 


1 14 





Sat. 


28 


18 53 47 


35 


6 11 





Tues. 


28 


9 33 29 


53 


57 





, Sun. 


29 


18 39 36 


35 


6 9 





Wed. 


29 


9 12 8 


53 


39 





Mon. 


30 


18 25 6 


36 


6 7 





Thur. 


30 


8 50 38 


53 


21 





Tues. 

Wed. 

i 


31 
32 


18 10 19 
N.17 55 13 


37 


6 4 
6 




; 

o' 


Fri. 

Sat. 


31 


8 29 
N. 8 7 14 


54 
54 


2 






16 



277 



I860. 



AT GEEENWICH APPAEENT NOOK. 



1860. 



SEPTEMBER, 1860. 



OCTOBER, 1S60. 



a 



a 



THE SUN'S 

Apparent 
Secliuatiou. 



Diff. 
for 
Ihr. 



Equation 
or Time, 

to be 

subt.from 

Apparent 

Time. 



Difif. 
for 
Ihr. 



V 

I 

■a 



THE SUN'S. 

Appa/reni 
Declinalioiii 



Diff. 
for 
Ihr. 



Equation 
of Time, 

to be 

subt.frmn 

Apparent 

Tvme. 



Sat. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 

Tnes. 
Wed. 

Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 
Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

1 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 

17 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 

24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 

31 



N. 



8 7 14 
7 45 19 
7 23 17 

7 18 
6 38 51 
6 16 28 



53 59 
31 23 



5 8 42 

4 45 56 

4 23 5 

4 8 

3 37 7 

3 14 3 

2 50 55 

2 27 44 

2 4 29 

1 4,1 12 

1 17 53 

54 3,3 

31 11 



7 47 
15 36 

3,9 1 

1 2 25 
1 25 50 

1 49 14 

2 12 37 
2 35 58 
2 59 19 



S. 3 22 37 



64 
54 
55 

55 
55 
56 

56 
56 
56 

57 
57 
57 

57 
57 
57 

58 
58 
58 

58 
58 

58 

58 
58 
58 

58 
68 
68 

58 
58 
58 

58 



0^6 
35 

54 

1 14 
1 33 

1 53 

2 14 
2 34 

2 55 

3 15 
3 36 

3 57 

4 18 

4 39 

5 

5 21 

5 42 

6 3 

6 24 

6 45 

7 6 



27 

48 

8 



8 29 

8 49 

9 .9 

9 29 
9 49 

10 8 

10 28 



Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon., 

I Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon, 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 

17 
18 

19 

20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 
31 

32 



S. 3 22 37 

3 45 54 

4 9 8 

4 32 18 

4 55 26 

5 18 31 

5 41 31 

6 4 27 
6 27 19 

6 50 5 

7 12 46 
7 35 21 

7 57 60 

8 20 13 

8 42 28 

9 4 35 
9 26 35 

9 48 27 

10 10 10 
10 31 44 
10 53 9 



11 14 


23 


62 


11 35 


28 


52 


11 56 


21 


62 


12 17 


4 


51 


12 37 


35 


51 


12 57 


65 


50 


13 18 


2 


50 


13 37 


57 


49 


13 57 


39 


48 


14 17 


8 


48 


S.14 36 


23 


47 



68 
68 
58 

57 
57 
57 

57 
57 
57 

66 
56 
56 

66 
65 
65 

55 
54 
54 

54 
63 
53 



m. s. 
10 28 

10 46 

11 5 

11 23 
11 41 

11 69 

12 16 
12 32 

12 48 

13 4 
13 19 
13 34 

13 48 

14 1 
14 14 

14 27 
14 39 
14 60 



15 1 
15 11 
15 20 







15 29 

15 37 

16 45 







15 51 

15 67 

16 3 







16 7 
16 11 
16 14 
16 16 








16 18 






278 



I860. 



AT GKEENWICH APPAEENT NOON. 



1860. 



KTOTEMBER, 1860. 



DECEMBER, 1S60. 





5 




O 






^ 


ja 






t*~i 




o 


o 


>-^ 


i>-. 






a 


a 


Thur. 


1 


Fri. 


2 


Sat. 


3 


Sun. 


4 


Mob. 


5 


Tues. 


6 


Wed. 


7 


Thur. 


8 


Fri. 


9 


Sat. 


10 


Sim. 


11 


Mon. 


12 


Tues. 


13 


AVed. 


14 


Thur. 


15 


Fri. 


16 


Sat. 


IV 


Sun. 


18 


Mon. 


19 


Tues. 


20 


Wed. 


21 


Thur. 


22 


Fri. 


23 


Sat. 


24 


Sun. 


25 


Mon. 


26 


Tues. 


27 


Wed. 


28 


Thur. 


29 


Fri. 


30 


Sat. 


31 



THE SUN'S 



Declination. 



S. 14 36 23 

14 55 23 

15 14 10 

15 32 41 

15 50 57 

16 8 58 

16 26 42 

16 44 10 

17 1 20 

17 18 13 
17 34 49 

17 51 6 

18 7 5 
18 22 44 
18 38 4 

18 53 4 

19 7 44 
19 22 3 

19 36 2 

19 49 38 

20 2 54 

20 15 47 
20 28 17 
20 40 25 

20 52 10 

21 3 31 
21 14 28 

21 25 2 
21 35 11 
21 44 55 

S. 21 54 15 



Diff. 

for 

Ihr. 



47 
47 
46 

45 

45 
44 

43 
43 
42 

41 
41 
40 

39 

38 
37 

37 
36 
35 

34 

33 
32 

31 
30 
29 

28 
27 
26 

25 
24 
23 

22 



Equation 
of Time, 

to be 

s-uht./rom 

Apparent 

Time. 



Diff. 
for 
Ihr. 



m. s. 
16 18 
16 18 
16 18 

16 17 
16 15 
16 12 

16 9 
16 4 
15 59 

15 53 
15 46 
15 38 

15 29 
15 20 
15 9 

14 58 
14 46 
14 33 

14 19 
14 5 
13 49 

13 33 
13 16 
12 59 

12 40 
12 21 
12 2 

11 41 
11 20 

10 58 

10 35 



Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 

15 

16 
17 
18 

19 

20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 
31 

32 



THE SUN'S 

Apparent 
Declination. 



S.21 54 15 
22 3 9 
22 11 38 

22 19 41 
22 27 18 
22 34 29 

22 41 13 
22 47 31 
22 53 21 

22 58 44 

23 3 40 
23 8 9 

23 12 10 
23 15 43 
23 18 48 

23 21 25 
23 28 34 
23 25 15 

23 26 28 
23 27 12 
23 27 29 

23 27 16 
23 26 36 
23 25 27 

23 23 50 
23 21 45 
23 19 11 

23 16 10 



23 
23 
23 



12 41 
8 43 

4 18 



S. 22 59 26 



Diff. 
for 
Ihr. 



22 
21 
20 

19 

18 
17 

16 
15 
14 

12 
11 
10 



5 
4 
3 

2 
1 


1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



Equation 
of Time, 

to be 
svbt./rtmt 



added to 

Apparent 

lyne. 



Diff. 
for 
Ihr. 



m. s. 
10 35 
10 12 

9 48 

9 24 
8 59 
8 33 



7 
41 
14 



6 46 
6 18 
5 50 

5 21 
4 53 
4 23 

3 54 
3 24 
2 55 

2 25 
1 55 
1 25 

55 
25 



4 

34 

1 4 
1 33 



3 58 



279 



THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 



JAWUARY, 1§60. 



FEBRUARY, 1§60. 



MEAN TIME. 



MEAN TIME. 



BIGHT ASCENSION. 



DECLINATION. 



EIGHT ASCENSION.. 



DECLINATION. 



Day. 



Midniglit. 



Noon. 



Midnight. 



Day. 



Midnight. 



Noon. 



Midnight. 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
IT 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 

31 



h. m. s. 

65 26 

1 42 24 

2 33 7 



3 


28 


18 


4 


28 


5 


5 


31 


29 


6 


36 


25 


7 


40 


26 


8 


41 


39 


9 


39 


19 


10 


33 


46 


11 


25 


54 


12 


16 


53 


13 


7 


51 


13 


59 


44 


14 


53 


8 


15 


48 


8 


16 


44 


13 


17 


40 


23 


18 


35 


26 


19 


28 


17 


20 


18 


24 


21 


5 


44 


21 


50 


39 


22 


33 


50 


23 


16 


5 


23 


58 


19 





41 


30 


1 


26 


41 


2 


14 


50 


3 


6 


50 



N. 8 28 5 

13 39 19 
18 25 3 

22 28 21 

25 28 16 
27 2 11 

26 51 30 

24 48 51 

21 2 3 

15 52 3 

9 46 30 

N. 3 13 31 

, 3 21 43 
9 37 51 

15 16 67 

20 3 36 

23 44 26 

26 8 49 

27 10 16 
26 47 60 

25 6 41 

22 16 55 
18 31 23 

14 3 35 

9 6 9 

S. 3 50 25 
N. 1 33 31 

6 56 10 
12 7 42 

16 56 55 

N.21 10 3 



N.ll 5 59 

16 6 19 
20 33 14 

24 7 40 

26 27 19 

27 10 43 

26 4 3 

23 7 24 

18 35 48 

12 54 25 
N. 6 31 46 
S. 5 14 

6 33 21 
12 33 3 

17 47 43 

22 2 58 

25 6 42 

26 50 7 

27 9 21 
26 6 33 

23 49 36 

20 30 17 
16 21 57 
11 37 50 

6 29 56 
S. 1 8 53 
N. 4 15 36 

9 33 69 
14 35 54 

19 8 59 

N.22 67 52 



10 
11 
12 

13 

14 
15 

16 
17 
18 

19 

20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 

31 



h. m. s. 

4 3 9 

5 3 31 

6 6 39 

7 10 33 

8 13 9 

9 13 10 

10 10 16 

11 4 59 

11 58 14 

12 51 4 

13 44 23 

14 38 49 

15 34 27 

16 30 55 

17 27 18 

18 22 30 

19 15 36 

20 6 3 

20 53 48 

21 39 10 

22 22 44 

23 5 14 
23 47 30 

30 25 

1 14 50 

2 1 40 

2 51 41 

3 45 21 

4 42 40 



N.24 30 2 

26 37 12 

27 12 8 

26 1 8 
23 1 54 
18 25 53 

12 35 45 
N. 6 9 
S. 51 23 

7 31 46 

13 37 54 

18 50 51 

22 65 45 
25 41 58 

27 3 39 

27 32 
25 37 47 

23 4 51 

19 33 41 

15 16 66 
10 26 53 

S. 5 14 59 

N. 8 4 

5 32 2 

10 46 32 

16 40 21 

20 45 

23 33 1 
N.26 33 



N.25 44 
27 7 16 
26 50 21 

24 44 39 
20 64 47 
15 38 21 



9 21 45 
. 2 34 36 
. 4 14 31 

10 40 24 

16 22 3 
21 2 35 

24 29 11 

26 33 32 

27 12 30 

26 28 36 
24 29 23 
21 25 46 

17 30 13 
12 65 20 

7 52 59 



S. 2 34 13 

N. 2 60 35 

8 11 9 

13 16 46 
17 65 36 
21 53 54 

24 55 57 
N.26 44 45 



280 



THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION" AND DECLINATION. 

1 

1 
1 


MARCH, I860. 


APRIIi, 1860. 


HBAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 


EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 




h. m. s. 


o / II 


O 1 il 




h. m. s. 


O t II 


O 1 II 


1 


5 42 51 


N.27 6 38 


N.27 4 38 


1 


9 20 42 


N.17 24 26 


N.14 42 13 


2 


6 44 28 


26 37 38 


25 45 5 


2 


10 15 31 


11 45 53 


8 38 8 


3 


7 45 51 


24 27 9 


22 44 36 


3 


11 9 18 


N. 6 21 64 


N. 2 17 


4 


8 45 40 


20 38 56 


18 12 12 


4 


12 2 59 


S. 1 22 32 


S. 4 46 15 


5 


9 43 22 


15 27 1 


12 26 20 


5 


12 57 29 


8 4 33 


11 15 9 


6 


10 39 7 


9 13 27 


N. 5 51 50 


6 


13 53 31 


14 14 50 


17 36 


V 


11 33 37 


N. 2 25 4 


S. 1 3 14 


7 


14 51 23 


19 29 38 


21 39 33 


8 


12 27 49 


S. 4 29 33 


7 50 28 


8 


15 60 42 


23 28 19 


24 54 27 


9 


13 22 34 


11 2 46 


14 3 27 


9 


16 50 24 


25 57 4 


26 35 50 


10 


14 18 28 


16 49 50 


19 19 31 


10 


17 49 2 


26 51 2 


26 43 27 


11 


15 15 39 


21 30 28 


23 21 4 


11 


18 45 17 


26 14 20 


25 25 14 


12 


16 13 40 


24 60 4 


25 56 43 


12 


19 38 21 


24 17 56 


22 54 13 


13 


17 11 31 


26 40 44 


27 2 13 


13 


20 28 4 


21 16 


19 25 3 


14 


18 8 3 


27 1 45 


26 40 16 


14 


21 14 49 


17 23 4 


15 11 37 


15 


19 2 14 


25 59 


24 59 21 


15 


21 59 16 


12 52 9 


10 26 1 


16 


19 53 31 


23 42 55 


22 11 18 


16 


22 42 17 


7 64 28 


S. 5 18 44 


17 


20 41 53 


20 26 9 


18 29 3 


17 


23 24 45 


S. 2 39 58 


N. 39 


18 


21 27 42 


16 21 32 


14 5 4 


18 


7 36 


N. 2 41 54 


5 22 32 


19 


22 11 36 


11 41 4 


9 10 52 


19 


51 44 


8 1 11 


10 36 26 


20 


22 54 21 


6 35 46 


S. 3 57 1 


20 


1 38 


13 6 41 


15 30 14 


21 


23 36 46 


S. 1 15 55 


N. 1 26 18 


21 


2 27 8 


17 46 15 


19 49 45 


22 


19 42 


N. 4 8 19 


6 48 46 


22 


3 19 33 


21 41 42 


23 18 58 


23 


1 4 


9 26 17 


11 59 20 


23 


4 15 12 


24 39 30 


25 41 20 


24 


1 50 29 


14 26 20 


16 45 38 


24 


5 13 23 


26 22 42 


26 42 14 


; 25 


2 39 50 


18 55 25 


20 53 49 


25 


6 12 47 


26 38 65 


26 12 17 


1 26 


3 32 27 


22 38 52 


24 8 35 


26 


7 11 53 


25 22 25 


24 9 52 


: 27 


4 28 17 


25 21 1 


26 14 16 


27 


8 9 28 


22 35 44 


20 41 27 


! 28 


5 26 40 


26 46 40 


26 56 51 


28 


9 4 58 


18 28 51 


16 69 56 


29 


6 26 22 


26 43 49 


26 7 2 


29 


9 68 33 


13 16 56 


10 22 12 


' 30 


7 25 56 


25 6 30 


23 42 43 


30 


10 50 52 


N. 7 18 10 


N. 4 7 23 


31 


8 24 13 


N.21 56 44 


N.19 50 


31 









Wi 



THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 



MAY, 1S60. 



jrWE, I860. 



MEAN TIME. 



MEAN TIME. 



RIGHT ASCENSION. 



DECLINATION. 



EIGHT ASCENSION. 



DECLINATION. 



Day. Midnight. 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
SO 

31 



h. m. s. 

11 42 53 

12 85 38 

13 30 4 

14 26 45 

15 25 39 

16 25 55 

17 26 5 

18 24 25 

19 19 42 

20 11 23 

20 59 39 

21 45 7 

22 28 39 

23 11 13 
23 53 49 

37 27 

1 23 3 

2 11 32 

3 3 28 

3 59 

4 57 33 

5 57 45 

6 57 53 

7 56 25 

8 52 30 

9 46 8 

10 87 55 

11 28 50 

12 20 

13 12 27 

14 7 3 



Noon. 



N. 52 29 

S. 6 88 38 

11 52 16 

17 24 41 

21 53 4 
24 58 83 

26 29 52 
26 25 46 

24 54 28 

22 10 21 

18 29 35 
14 7 16 

9 16 7 
S. 4 6 40 
N. 1 11 51 

6 30 24 
11 39 
16 25 38 

20 85 41 

23 52 3 

25 56 59 

26 35 23 
25 39 8 
28 9 23 

19 16 62 
14 18 2 

8 32 5 

N. 2 18 46 

S. 4 2 18 

10 11 14 

S.15 47 35 



Midnight. 



Day. Midnight. 



, 2 28 48 

8 49 7 
14 45 6 

19 48 12 
28 37 6 

25 56 19 

26 39 25 
25 50 13 

23 40 30 

20 26 3 
16 22 46 
11 44 86 

6 43 5 

S. 1 27 69 
N. 3 51 42 

9 6 38 
14 5 55 
18 36 15 

22 21 42 

25 4 30 

26 27 43 

26 19 12 

24 35 25 

21 22 32 

16 54 34 
11 29 43 

N. 5 27 37 

S. 62 2 

7 9 38 

■ 13 4 47 

S.18 17 2 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 

19 

20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 



Noon. 



h. m. s. 

16 4 6 

16 8 14 

17 3 16 

18 2 31 

18 59 23 

19 52 54 

20 42 51 

21 29 87 

22 18 58 

22 56 51 

23 89 16 

22 15 

1 6 49 

1 53 58 

2 44 80 

3 88 64 

4 36 68 

5 37 38 

6 39 7 

7 39 33 

8 87 88 

9 32 56 

10 26 50 

11 17 11 

12 8 7 

12 59 42 

13 52 53 

14 48 14 

15 46 43 

16 44 33 



S.20 30 37 

24 1 
26 3 58 

26 32 44 

25 30 24 
23 8 23 

19 42 41 
15 29 48 
10 44 24 

5 38 36 
S. 22 26 
N. 4 66 13 

10 5 20 

14 57 33 

19 19 6 

22 54 7 

25 24 29 

26 32 23 

26 4 59 

23 58 56 

20 22 9 

15 31 29 

9 48 28 
N. 3 35 13 

S. 2 46 42 

8 57 22 

14 37 46 

19 29 26 

23 14 57 

S.26 39 48 



Midnight. 



S.22 25 58 

25 14 4 

26 30 10 

26 12 24 
24 28 24 
21 32 26 

17 41 10 

13 10 21 

8 13 23 

S. 3 1 14 

N. 2 16 45 

7 81 49 

12 34 24 
17 13 5 
21 18 31 

24 18 83 



26 


9 


44 


26 


31 


4 


25 


14 


8 


22 


21 





18 


4 


46 


12 


45 


5 


6 


44 


12 


N. 


24 


4 


S. 5 


54 


38 


11 


52 


31 


17 


10 


49 


21 


31 


28 


24 


38 


11 


S.26 


18 


54 



282 





J-/. 


J ' 


5 


■6' 


''} 


J 


'! 





THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 


JU1,Y, 1860. 


AlTGirST, 1860. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 


EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DBOLINATION. 


EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 




h. m. s. 


O 1 II 


O / // 




h. m. s. 


o / // 


o 


/ // 


1 


17 43 23 


S.26 35 6 


S.26 28 33 


1 


21 9 


S. 18 10 24 


S.16 


56 


2 


18 40 38 


26 


25 10 39 


2 


21 46 2 


13 42 40 


11 


17 19 


3 


19 35 6 


24 2 4 


22 36 8 


3 


22 29 54 


8 46 29 


6 


11 39 


4 


20 26 14 


20 54 50 


19 15 


4 


23 12 35 


S. 3 34 10 


S. 


55 22 


5 


21 U 9 


16 54 23 


14 39 7 


6 


23 54 57 


N. 1 43 33 


N. 4 


21 24 


6 


21 59 23 


12 16 16 


9 47 27 


6 


37 64 


6 57 1 


9 


29 12 


1 


22 42 47 


7 14 9 


S. 4 37 44 


7 


1 22 23 


11 56 45 


14 


18 22 


8 


23 25 14 


S. 1 59 25 


N. 39 37 


8 


2 9 15 


16 32 40 


18 


38 8 


9 


7 45 


N. 3 18 14 


5 55 21 


9 


2 59 15 


20 33 6 


22 


15 47 


10 


51 19 


8 29 50 


11 28 


10 


3 52 51 


23 44 16 


24 


56 29 


11 


1 36 56 


13 25 59 


15 44 66 


11 


4 49 54 


26 50 29 


26 


24 16 


12 


2 25 31 


17 55 46 


19 56 40 


12 


6 49 38 


26 36 5 


26 


24 33 


13 


3 17 46 


21 45 42 


23 20 45 


13 


6 50 36 


25 48 44 


24 


48 16 


14 


4 13 55 


24 39 34 


25 39 62 


14 


7 51 12 


23 23 29 


21 


36 22 


15. 


5 13 26 


26 19 30 


26 36 31 


16 


8 50 13 


19 25 32 


16 


66 12 


16 


6 14 58 


26 29 25 


25 57 18 


16 


9 47 12 


14 10 


11 


9 57 


17 


7 16 39 


24 59 55 


23 37 60 


17 


10 42 22 


7 59 19 


N. 4 


41 27 


18 


8 16 47 


21 52 18 


19 45 16 


18 


11 36 27 


N. 1 19 48 


S. 2 


2 17 


19 


9 14 28 


17 19 11 


14 36 54 


19 


12 30 20 


S. 5 21 30 


8 


34 42 


20 


10 9 35 


11 41 29 


8 36 7 


20 


13 24 66 


11 38 58 


14 


31 33 


21 


11 2 47 


N. 5 23 59 


N. 2 8 10 


21 


14 20 60 


17 9 55 


19 


31 61 


22 


11 54 59 


S. 1 8 19 


S. 4 22 38 


22 


16 18 13 


21 35 22 


23 


18 51 


23 


12 47 15 


7 32 5 


10 34 7 


23 


16 16 37 


24 41 2 


26 


41 3 1 


24 


13 40 32 


13 26 18 


16 6 22 


24 


17 15 2 


26 18 31 


26 


33 29 


25 


14 35 28 


18 32 10 


20 41 41 


25 


18 12 14 


26 26 24 


25 


58 12 


26 


15 32 11 


22 33 8 


24 4 66 


26 


19 7 6 


26 10 6 


24 


3 34 


2V 


16 30 10 


25 15 51 


26 4 57 


■27 


19 69 2 


22 40 18 


21 


2 4 


28 


17 28 20 


26 31 49 


26 36 24 


28 


20 47 57 


19 10 39 


17 


7 50 1 


29 


18 25 19 


26 19 12 


25 41 7 


29 


21 34 12 


14 66 21 


12 


34 52 


30 


19 19 57 


24 43 25 


23 27 40 


30 


22 18 24 


10 7 55 


7 


36 2 


31 


20 11 35 


S.21 65 40 


S.20 9 16 


31 


23 1 17 


S. 5 37 


S. 2 


23 1 



283 



THE MOON'S EIGHT ASOENSION AND DECLINATION. 



SEPTEMBER, 1S60. 



OCTOBER, 1§60. 



MEAN TIME. 



MEAN TIME. 



EIGHT ASCENSION. 



DECLINATION. 



EIGHT ASCENSION. 



DECLINATION. 



Day. 



Midnight. 



NoQn. 



Midnight. 



Day. 



Midnight. 



Noon. 



Midnight. 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

]6 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 



h. m. s. 
23 43 42 

26 28 

1 10 24 

1 56 17 

2 44 49 
8 36 25 

4 31 7 

5 28 25 

6 27 17 

7 26 27 

8 24 61 

9 21 62 

10 17 33 

11 12 26 

12 7 20 

13 3 4 

14 16 

14 59 6 

15 59 4 

16 59 4 

17 57 43 

18 53 48 
.19 46 40 

20 36 16 

21 22 68 

22 7 27 

22 60 31 

23 33 
15 44 
69 30 



N. 15 29 

5 30 7 

10 33 20 

15 14 48 
19 23 21 
22 46 32 

25 10 45 

26 22 17 
26 9 28 

24 26 31 
21 10 46 

16 33 42 

10 60 17 
N. 4 22 20 
S. 2 24 13 



16 

20 



1 35 

2 21 
2 1 



23 41 25 

25 48 58 

26 21 57 

26 26 5 
23 13 8 
19 57 40 

15 54 21 

11 16 37 

6 16 21 

S. 1 4 14 
N. 4 9 40 
N. 9 15 15 



N, 



2 53 37 
8 3 47 

12 57 28 

17 23 57 

21 11 27 

24 6 53 

25 56 24 

26 27 

25 29 3 

22 59 8 
19 1 41 

13 49 2 

7 40 19 
N. 59 40 
S. 5 45 48 

12 8 10 

17 41 11 
22 2 41 

24 57 4 

26 17 6 
26 4 30 

24 28 22 
21 42 17 

18 1 7 

13 39 

8 48 37 
S. 3 41 8 

N. 1 33 7 

6 44 8 

N.ll 41 39 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 

31 



h. m. s. 

1 45 3 

2 32 59 

3 23 41 

4 17 9 

5 12 64 

6 10 3 

7 7 28 

8 4 14 

8 59 48 

9 64 16 

10 48 6 

11 42 7 

12 37 17 

13 34 20 

14 33 38 

15 34 51 

16 36 49 

17 37 63 

18 36 24 

19 31 23 

20 22 36 

21 10 26 

21 55 36 

22 39 

23 21 34 
4 12 

47 46 

1 33 6 

2 20 46 

3 11 15 

4 4 30 



N.14 1 67 
18 18 16 

21 61 42 

24 29 11 

25 68 3 

26 7 58 

24 52 53 

22 12 34 
18 12 56 

13 6 28 

7 6 21 

N. 36 52 

S. 6 1 67 
12 20 17 
17 51 30 

22 10 22 

24 58 13 
26 6 35 

25 38 16 

23 45 8 
20 43 36 

16 60 29 
12 20 44 

7 26 51 

S. 2 19 20 

N. 2 62 17 

7 68 36 

12 49 30 

17 13 34 
20 57 56 

N.23 48 51 



N.16 14 40 
20 11 10 
23 18 16 

26 22 55 
26 13 22 
26 41 13 

23 43 9 
20 22 4 
15 46 47 

10 11 11 
N. 3 53 36 
S. 2 43 46 

9 15 18 
15 13 27 
20 11 20 

23 46 28 
26 44 55 
26 3 56 

24 51 20 
22 21 51 

18 52 30 

14 39 22 
9 56 7 

S. 4 54 11 

N. 16 32 

5 26 43 

10 26 40 

15 5 39 

19 11 33 
22 30 56 

N.24 50 2 



284 





THE MOON'S EIGHT ASCENSION AND DECLINATION. 


[ 


IVOTX:iTIBER, 1860. 




DECEMBER, 1§60 




MEAN TIME; 


MEAN TIME. 


EIGHT ASOENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


EIGHT ASCENSION. 


DECLINATION. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. 


Day. 


Midnight. 


Noon. 


Midnight. [ 




h. m. s. 


o / // 


o / // 




h. m. s. 


o / // 


o 


/ // 


1 


5 2 


N.25 33 


N.25 56 32 


1 


7 36 54 


N.23 12 53 


N.21 


■40 57 


2 


5 56 50 


25 59 41 


25 41 56 


2 


8 31 54 


19 50 43 


17 


43 52 


• 3 


6 63 44 


25 3 7 


24 3 29 


3 


9 24 56 


15 22 18 


12 


48 2 


4 


7 49 42 


22 43 42 


21 4 45 


4 


10 16 26 


10 3 11 


7 


9 52 


5 


8 44 11 


19 7 55 


16 54 42 


5 


11 7 12 


N. 4 10 16 


N. 1 


6 38 


6 


9 37 12 


14 26 49 


11 46 7 


6 


11 58 18 


S. 1 58 46 


S. 5 


3 34 


V 


10 29 17 


8 54 39 


N. 5 54 31 


7 


12 50 48 


8 5 17 


11 


1 20 


: 8 


11 21 18 


N. 2 48 2 


S. 22 21 


8 


13 45 39 


13 49 3 


16 


26 35 


9 


12 14 17 


S. 3 34 


6 44 4 


9 


14 43 24 


18 48 8 


20 


53 55 


10 


13 9 12 


9 49 35 


12 47 22 


10 


15 43 62 


22 40 18 


24 


5 1 


11 


14 6. 47 


15 34 11 


18 6 46 


11 


16 45 57 


25 6 17 


25 


42 56 


; 12 


15 7 9 


20 22 


22 17 1 


12 


17 47 48 


25 54 34 


25 


41 35 


13 


16 9 31 


23 49 25 


24 57 27 


13 


18 47 ^8 


25 5 4 


24 


6 43 


14 


17 12 U 


25 40 6 


25 57 9 


14 


19 43 37 


22 48 41 


21 


13 22 


15 


18 13 18 


25 49 13 


25 17 37 


15 


20 35 48 


19 23 14 


17 


20 44 


16 


19 11 6 


24 24 13 


23 11 15 


16 


21 24 21 


15 8 8 


12 


47 34 


17 


20 4 53 


21 41 6 


19 56 10 


17 


22 9 59 


10 20 53 


7 


49 47 


18 


20 54 44 


17 58 50 


15 51 11 


18 


22 53 42 


5 15 43 


S. 2 


40 1 


19 


21 41 20 


13 35 12 


11 12 37 


19 


23 36 30 


S. 3 52 


N. 2 


31 36 


20 


22 25 35 


8 44 57 


6 13 36 


20 


19 25 


N. 5 5 21 


7 


36 18 


21 


23 8 29 


S. 3 39 49 


S. 1 4 45 


21 


1 3 24 


10 3 21 


12 


25 22 


22 


23 51 3 


N. 1 30 32 


N. 4 4 55 


22 


1 49 23 


14 41 3 


16 


49 4 


23 


34 15 


6 37 19 


9 6 34 


23 


2 38 7 


18 47 53 


20 


35 51 


24 


1 19 


11 31 27 


13 50 37 


24 


3 30 3 


22 11 10 


23 


32 1 


25 


2 6 5 


16 2 36 


18 5 49 


25 


4 25 8 


24 36 30 


25 


22 49 


26 


2 56 4 


19 58 34 


21 39 1 


26 


5 22 42 


25 49 21 


25 


54 48 


27 


3 49 8 


23 5 20 


24 15 40 


27 


6 21 26 


25 38 17 


24 


59 25 


28 


4 44 53 


25 8 18 


25 41 42 


28 


7 19 60 


23 58 22 


22 


35 54 


29 


5 42 20 


25 54 39 


25 46 21 


29 


8 16 41 


20 53 17 


18 


52 11 


30 


6 40 7 


N.25 16 26 


N.24 25 4 


30 


9 11 25 


16 34 40 


14 


2 58 










31 


10 4 11 


N.ll 19 30 


N. 8 


26 45 



285 



I860. 



^T GEEENWIOH MEAN NOON. 



1860. 



JAWIJARY. 



FEBRVARY. 



MARCH. 



a 



THE MOON'S 



Afe. 



Noon. 



Meridian 



•a 






THE MOON'S 



Age. 



Noon. 






Meridian 



THE MOON'S 




Meridian 

Passeg'-. 



Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed, 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 
Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 



Y 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 
17 

18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 
30 
31 

32 



d. 

8-4 

9-4 

10-4 



4 11-4 

5 12-4 

6 13-4 



14-4 
15-4 
16-4 

17-4 
18-4 
19-4 

20-4 
21-4 
22-4 

23-4 
24-4 
25-4 

26-4 
27-4 
28-4 

29-4 
0-5 
1-5 



9-5 



h. m. 
6 1-7 

6 45-3 

7 32-8 

8 25-1 

9 22-5 

10 24-2 

11 27-9 

12 30-6 

13 30-1 

14 25-6 

15 17-6 

16 7-2 

16 55-7 

17 44-5 

18 34-5 

19 26-2 

20 19-6 

21 13-9 

22 7-7 

22 59-8 

23 49-0 

6 

35-2 

1 18-5 

1 59-5 

2 39-2 

3 18-4 

3 68-3 

4 39-9 
6 24-5 
6 13-1 



AYed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat.' 
Sun. 
Mon. 



Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 



Tues. 7 
Wed. 8 
Thur. 



d. 

9-5 
10-5 
11-5 

12-5 
13-5 
14-5 

15-5 
16-5 
17-5 

18-5 
19-5 
20-5 

21-5 
22-5 
23-6 

24-5 
25-5 
26-5 

27-5 
28-5 
29-5 



h. m. 

7 6-4 

8 4-4 

9 5-8 



10 
11 
12 

13 



8-4 
9-7 
8-0 

3-2 

">'7 
.1-6 



22 


0-7 


23 


1-7 


24 


2-7 


25 


3-7 


26 


4-7 


27 


5-7 


28 


6-7 


29 


7-7 


30 


8-7 



15 37-3 

16 28-6 

17 21-2 

18 15-1 

19 9-7 

20 3-8 

20 66-3 

21 46-1 

22 32-9 

23 16-9 
23 58-5 

6 

38-6 

1 18-0 

1 57-6 

2 38-5 

3 21-6 

4 8-0 

4 58-3 

5 52-6 

6 50-5 



Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 

14 
15 

16 

17 
18 

19 

20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 

32 



d. 

8-7 

9-7 

10-7 

11-7 
12-7 
13-7 

14-7 
15-7 
16-7 

17-7 
18-7 
19-7 

20-7 
21-7 
22-7 

23-7 
24-7 
25-7 

26-7 

27-7 
28-7 

29-7 
0-9 
1-9 

2-9 
3-9 
4-9 



5-9 
6-9 
7-9 
8-9 

9-9 



h. m. 

6 50-5 

7 50-5 

8 50-4 

9 48-8 

10 44-8 

11 38-6 

12 31-0 

13 23-1 

14 15-8 

15 9-9 

16 5-4 

17 1-6 

17 57-4 

18 51-4 

19 42-6 

20 30-4 

21 15-1 

21 57-4 

22 37-9 

23 17-5 
23 57-2 

6 

37-9 

1 20-6 

2 6-1 

2 55-1 

3 47-7 



43 
41' 
39 
36 



31-1 



286 



I860. 




AT GREENWICH MEAN NOON. 




1860. 




APRII 


i* 


MAY. 


JUWE. 


M 


■S 


. 




■i 


1 






M 


5 








§ 


THE MOON'S 





o 


THE 


MOON'S 




P 
O 


THE MOON'S 1 


o 


03 
Ih-i 

o 

..ft 






o 


o 

■ ^ 






O 

a 


03 
(4-1 

a 






4 Age.- 


Meridian 
. Passage. 


Age. 


Meridian 
, Passage. 


Age. 


Meridian , 
Passage. . 


u-^<^on. 


Jfoon. 


Mon. 






d. • 


h. m. 






d. 


h. m. 






d. 


h. m. 


Sun. 


1 


9-9 


8 31-1 


Tues. 


1 


10-3 


8 56-2 


Fri. 


1 


11-7 


10 17-5 


Mon. 


2 


10-9 


9 23-9 


Wed. 


2 


11-3 


9 46-6 


Sat. 


2 


12-7 


11 14-8 


Tues. 


3 


11-9 


10 15-6 


Thur. 


3 


12-3 


10 38-7 


Sun. 


3 


13-7 


12 13-2 


Wed. 


4 


12-9 


11 7-0 


Fri. 


4 


13-3 


11 33-4 


Mon. 


4 


14-7 


13 10-6 


Thur. 


5 


13-9 


11 59-4 


Sat. 


5 


14-3 


12 30-5 


Tues. 


5 


15-7 


14 5-3 


Fri. 


6 


14-9 


12 53-5 


Sun. 


6 


15-3 


13 29-2 


Wed. 


6 


16-7 


14 56-3 


Sat. 


Y 


15-9 


13 49-7 


Mon. 


7 


16-3 


14 27-6 


Thur. 


7 


17-7 


15 43-3 


Sim. 


8 


16-9 


14 47-3 


Tues. 


8 


17-3 


15 23-8 


Fri. 


8 


18-7 


16 26-9 


Mon. 


9 


17-9 


15 45-3 


Wed. 


9 


18-3 


16 16-4 


Sat. 


9 


19-7 


17 8-1 


Tnes. 


10 


18-9 


16 41-8 


Thur. 


10 


19-3 


17 5-0 


Sun. 


10 


20-7 


17 47-9 


Wed. 


11 


19-9 


17 35-4 


Fri. 


11 


20-3 


17 50-0 


Mon. 


11 


21-7 


18 27-5 


Thur. 


12 


20-9 


18 25-3 


Sat. 


12 


21-3 


18 32-2 


Tues. 


12 


22-7 


19 8-0 


Fri. 


13 


21-9 


19 11-6 


Sim. 


13 


22-3 


19 12-5 


Wed. 


13 


23-7 


19 50-6 1 


Sat. 


14 


22-9 


19 54-9 


Mon. 


14 


23-8 


19 52-1 


Thur. 


14 


24-7 


20 36-3 


Sun. 


15 


23-9 


20 36-0 


Tues. 


15 


24-3 


20 32-1 


Fri. 


15 


25-7 


21 25'9 


Mon. 


16 


24-9 


21 15-8 


Wed. 


16 


25-3 


21 13-5 


Sat. 


16 


26-7 


22 19-9 


Tues. 


17 


25-9 


21 55-4 


Thur. 


17 


26-3 


21 57-6 


Sim. 


17 


27-7 


23 17-6 


Wed. 


18 


26-9 


22 35-9 


Fri. 


18 


27-3 


22 45-0 


Mon. 


18 


28-7 


6 


Thur. 


19 


27-9 


23 18-2 


Sat. 


19 


28-3 


23 36-5 


Tnes. 


19 


0-3 


17-3 


Fri. 


20 


28-9 


6 


Sun. 


20 


29-3 


6 


Wed. 


20 


1-3 


1 16-9 


Sat. 


21 


0-3 


3-2 


Mon. 


21 


0-7 


31-8 


Thur. 


21 


2-3 


2 14-3 


Sun. 


22 


1-3 


51-6 


Tues. 


22 


1-7 


1 29-7 


Fri. 


22 


3-3 


3 8-7 


Mon. 


23 


2-3 


1 43-7 


Wed. 


23 


2-7 


2 28-4 


Sat. 


23 


4-3 


4 0-2 


Tues. 


24 


3-3 


2 39-1 


Thur. 


24 


3-7 


3 20-0 


St(n. 


24 


5-3 


4 49-7 


Wed. 


25 


4-3 


3 36-5 


Fri. 


25 


4-7 


4 21-0 


Mon. 


25 


6-3 


5 38-3 


Thur. 


26 


5-3 


4 34-1 


Sat. 


26 


5-7 


5 13-2 


Tnes. 


26 


7-3 


6 27-3 


Fri. 


27 


6-3 


5 30-4 


Sun. 


27 


6-7 


6 3-1 


Wed. 


27 


8-3 


7 17-8 


Sat. 


28 


7-3 


6 24-4 


Mon. 


28 


7-7 


6 51-8 


Thur. 


28 


9-3 


8 10-7 


Sun. 


29 


8-3 


7 16-2 


Tues. 


29 


8-7 


7 40-5 


Fri. 


29 


10-3 


9 6-2 


Mon. 


30 


9-3 


8 6-5 


Wed. 
Thur. 


30 
31 


9-7 
10-7 


8 30-4 

9 22-6 


Sat. 


30 


<ll-3 


10 3-0 


Tues. 


31 


10-3 


8 56-2 










Sun. 


31 


12-3 


11 0-1 










Fri. 


32 


11-7 


10 17-5 











287 



1 
1 


1860. 


AT GEEENWICH MEAN NOON. 


1860. 




JIJliY. 


AUGUST. 


SEPTEMBER. 




4 


-a 




i 


5 




4 


^ 






0) 


o 


THE MOON'S 


u 

^ 


C3 

O 


THE MOON'S 


$ 


o 


THE MOON'S 






O 




0) 

p 






o 


0} 






Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Age. 


Meridian 
Passage. ' 


A-ge. 


Meridian 
I^asaage. 




Mem. 


Noqn. 


Noon. 


■ 






d. 


h. m. 






d. 


h. m. 






d. 


h. m. 




iSmw. 


1 


12-3 


11 0-1 


Wed. 


1 


13-9 


12 17-4 


Sat. 


1 


15-6 


12 59-8 




Mon. 


2 


13-3 


11 55-5 


Thur. 


2 


14-9 


13 0-6, 


Sun. 


2 


16-6 


13 39-8 




Tucs. 


3 


14-3 


12 47-8 


Fri. 


3 


15-9 


13 41-5 


Mon. 


3 


17-6 


14 21-1 




Wed. 


4 


15-3 


13 36-4 


Sat. 


4 


16-9 


14 21-3 


Tues. 


4 


18-6 


15 4-6 




Thur. 


' 5 


16-3 


14 21-5 


Sun. 


5 


17-9 


15 0-8 


Wed. 


5 


19-6 


15 51-0 




Fri. 


6 


17-3 


15 3-8 


Mon. 


•6 


18-9 


15 41-0 


Thur. 


6 


20-6 


16 40-9 




Sat. 


V 


18-3 


15 44-1 


Tues. 


7 


19-9 


16 23-1 


Fri. 


7 


21-6 


17 34-2 




(Smji. 


8 


19-3 


16 23-7 


Wed. 


8 


20-9 


17 8-0 


Sat. 


8 


22-6 


18 30-1 




Mon. 


9 


20-3 


17 3-4 


Thur. 


9 


21-9 


17 56-4 


Sun. 


9 


23-6 


19 27-4 




Tues. 


10 


21-3 


17 44-6 


Fri. 


10 


22-9 


18 48-9 


Mon. 


10 


24-6 


20 24-7 




Wed. 


11 


22-3 


18 28-2 


Sat. 


11 


23-9 


19 45-0 


Tues. 


11 


25-6 


21 20-8 




Thnr. 


12 


23-3 


19 15-3 


Sun. 


12 


24-9 


20 43-7 


Wed. 


12 


26-6 


22 15-3 




Fri. 


13 


24-3 


20 6-7 


Mon. 


13 


25-9 


21 43-1 


Thur. 


13 


27-6 


23 8-6 




Sat, 


14 


25-3 


21 2-2 


Tues. 


14 


26-9 


22 41-5 


Fri. 


14 


28-6 


6 




Sun. 


15 


26-3 


22 1-1 


Wed. 


15 


27-9 


23 37-7 


Sat. 


15 


0-2 


1-2 1 




Mon. 


16 


27-3 


23 1-4 


Tliur. 


16 


28-9 


6 


Sun. 


16 


1-2 


54-3 




Tues. 


IV 


28-3 


ci 


Fri. 


17 


0-6 


31-7 


Mon. 


17 


2-2 


1 48-9 




Wed. 


18 


29-3 


0-9 


Sat. 


18 


1-6 


1 24-1 


Tues. 


18 


3-2 


2 45-3 




Thur. 


19 


0-9 


58-1 


Sun. 


19 


2-6 


2 15-8 


Wed. 


19 


4-2 


3 43-2 




Fri. 


20 


1-9 


1 52-3 


Mon. 


20 


3-6 


3 7-9 


Thur. 


20 


5-2 


4 41-7 




Sat. 


21 


2-9 


2 44-0 


Tues. 


21 


4-6 


4 1-3 


Fri. 


21 


6-2 


5 39-1 




Sun. 


22 


3-9 


3 34-2 


Wed. 


22 


5-6 


4 56-3 


Sat. 


22 


7-2 


6 34-0 




Mon. 


23 


4-9 


4 24-1 


Thur. 


23 


6-6 


5 52-7 


Sun. 


23 


8-2 


7 25-4 




Tues. 


24 


6-9 


5 14-8 


Fri. 


24 


7-6 


6 49-4 


Mon. 


24 


9-2 


8 13-1 




Wed. 


25 


6-9 


6 7-1 


Sat. 


25 


8-6 


7 45-1 


Tues. 


25 


10-2 


8 67-6 




Thur. 


26 


7-9 


7 1-5 


Sun. 


26 


9-6 


8 38-3 


Wed. 


26 


11-2 


9 39-6 




Fri. 


27 


8-9 


7 57-5 


Mon. 


27 


10-6 


9 28-4 


Thur. 


27 


12-2 


10 19-9 1 




Sat. 


28 


9-9 


8 53-9 


Tues. 


28 


11-6 


10 15-1 


Fri. 


28 


13-2 


10 59-5 i 




Sun. 


29 


10-9 


9 49-2 


Wed. 


29 


12-6 


10 58-8 


Sat. 


29 


14-2 


11 39-3 i 




Mon. 


30 


11-9 


10 41-9 


Tliur. 


30 


13-6 


11 40-3 


Sum. 


30 


15-2 


12 20-3 ! 




Tues. 


31 


12-9 


11 31-4 


Fri. 


31 


14-6 


12 20-3 


Mon. 


31 


16-2 


13 3-2 1 




Wed. 


32 


13-9 


12 17-4 


Sat. 


32 


15-6 j 12 59-8 








j 



288 



I860. 



AT GEEENWIOH MEAN NOON. 



1860. 



OCTOBER. 



nrOTElHBER. 



DECEMBER. 



^ 


^ 


^ 


1 


(D 


v 


^ 


XI 






«.- 




O , 


o 


K 


t^. 






a 


^ 


Mon. 


1 


Tues. 


2 


Wed. 


3 


Thur. 


4 


Fri. 


5 


Sat. 


6 


Sun. 


V 


Mon. 


8 


Tues. 


9 


Wed. 


10 


Thur. 


11 


Fri. 


12 


Sat.' 


13 


Sun. 


14 


Mon. 


15 


Tues. 


16 


Wed. 


17 


Thur. 


18 


Fri. 


19 


Sat. 


20 


Sun. 


21 


Mon. 


22 


Tues. 


23 


Wed. 


24 


Thur. 


25 


Fri. 


26 


Sat. 


27 


Sun. 


28 


Mon. 


29 


Tues. 


30 


Wed. 


31 


Thur. 


32 



THE MOON'S 



Age. 



Noon. 



17-9 



Meridian 



h. m 
13 3 

13 48 

14 37 

15 29 

16 23 

17 18 

18 13 

19 8 

20 1 

20 53 

21 45 

22 37 

23 31 

6 

27 

1 26 

2 26 

3 27 

4 24 

5 18 

6 8 

6 54 

7 37 

8 18 

8 68 

9 38 

10 18 

11 1 

11 46 

12 34 

13 25 



Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 
Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tues. 
Wed. 
Thur. 

Fri. 

Sat. 
Sun. 

Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 

Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 

Sun. 
Mon. 

Tues. 

Wed. 
Thur. 
Fri. 

Sat. 



14 19-1 



10 
11 
12 

13 
14 
15 

16 

17 
18 

19 
20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 
27 

28 
29 
30 

31 



THE MOON'S 



Age. 



Noon. 



18-5 



Meridiiin 

Passag?. 

h. in. 

14 19-1 

15 14-1 

16 9-0 

17 2-7 

17 54-7 

18 45-1 

19 34'8 

20 24-8 

21 16-2 

22 10-1 

23 7-2 
6 



7 

1 8 

2 9 

3 6 

3 59 

4 48 

5 33 

6 15 

6 55 

7 35 

8 15 

8 57 

9 41 

10 28 

11 19 

12 12 

13 8 

14 4 



14 59-1 





■3 

a 

1 
1 

O 

p 


a 


Sat. 


1 


Sun. 


2 


Mon. 


3 


Tues. 


4 


Wed. 


5 


Thur. 


6 


Fri. 


7 


Sat. 


8 


Sun. 


9 


Mon. 


10 


Tues. 


11 


Wed. 


12 


Thur. 


13 


Fri. 


14 


Sat. 


15 


Sun. 


16 


Mon. 


17 


Tues. 


18 


Wed. 


19 


Thur. 


20 


Fri. 


21 


Sat. 


22 


Sun. 


23 


Mon. 


24 


Tues. 


25 


Wed. 


26 


Thur. 


27 


Fri. 


28 


Sat. 


29 


Sun. 


30 


Mon. 


31 


Tues. 


32 



THE MOON'S 



Age. 



Noon. 



Meridian 



18-5 


19-5 


20-5 


21-5 


22-5 


23-5 


24-5 


25-5 


26-5 


27-5 


28-5 


29-5 


1-0 


2-0 


3-0 


4-0 


6-0 


6-0 


7-0 


8-0 


9-0 


10-0 


11-0 


12-0 


13-0 


14-0 


15-0 


16-0 


17-0 


18-0 


19-0 


20-0 



1). m. 

14 59-1 

15 51-7 

16 42-2 

17 31-1 

18 19-5 

19 8-6 

19 59-5 

20 53-4 

21 50-5 

22 50-3 

23 51-0 
6 



50 

1 46 

2 38 

3 25 

4 9 

4 50 

5 30 

6 10 

6 51 

7 34 

8 20 

9 9 

10 2 

10 57 

11 54 

12 51 

13 45 

14 38 

15 28 



16 17-6 



JANUARY, 1860. 



289 





GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


HI'-. 


Vlt. 


IX". 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Sun 


W. 


90° 33 29 


91 57 7 


93° 21 


O / // 

94 45 8 




Venus 


W. 


67 22 24 


68 44 27 


70 6 44 


71 29 16 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


46 2 59 


47 20 13 


48 38 18 


49 57 12 




Aldebaran 


E. 


57 42 41 


66 13 24 


54 43 56 


53 4 17 




Jupiter 


E. 


100 32 3 


98 59 45 


97 27 12 


95 54 25 


2 


Sun 


W. 


101 49 54 


103 15 45 


104 41 54 


106 8 23 




Venus 


W. 


78 26 4 


79 50 19 


81 14 63 


82 39 46 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


56 42 25 


58 5 27 


59 29 6 


60 53 19 




Aldebaran 


E. 


45 43 37 


44 13 1 


42 42 17 


41 11 26 




Pollux 


E. 


87 28 32 


85 55 19 


84 21 47 


82 47 65 




Jupiter 


E. 


88 6 18 


86 31 47 


84 56 58 


83 21 49 


3 


Sun 


W. 


113 25 59 


114 54 36 


116 23 35 


117 62 68 




Venus 


W. 


89 49 22 


91 16 23 


92 43 47 


94 11 34 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


68 3 1 


69 30 35 


70 68 41 


72 27 17 




a Pegasi 


w. 


45 28 32 


46 57 36 


48 27 21 


49 5/ 47 




Pollux 


E. 


74 53 30 


73 17 33 


71 41 13 


70 4 30 




Jupiter 


E. 


75 20 53 


73 43 37 


72 5 56 


70 27 53 




Saturn 


E. 


109 15 15 


107 38 41 


106 1 44 


104 24 23 


4 


Sun 


W. 


125 25 51 


126 57 40 


128 29 64 


130 2 33 




Venus 


W. 


101 36 28 


103 6 41 


104 37 19 


106 8 23 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


79 57 42 


81 29 12 


83 1 10 


84 33 35 




a Pegasi 


w. 


57 39 34 


59 13 45 


60 48 32 


62 23 63 




Pollux 


E. 


61 55 6 


60 16 1 


58 36 32 


66 56 38 




Jupiter 


E. 


62 11 38 


60 31 8 


58 50 13 


57 8 53 




Saturn 


E. 


96 11 34 


94 31 45 


92 51 31 


91 10 61 


5 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


92 21 59 


93 56 51 


96 32 5 


97 7 40 




a Pegasi 


W. 


70 28 45 


72 7 17 


73 46 19 


75 25 50 




a Arietis 


W. 


27 4 27 


28 45 49 


30 27 46 


32 10 17 




Pollux 


E. 


48 31 5 


46 48 46 


45 6 4 


43 22 59 




Jupiter 


E. 


48 35 42 


46 51 48 


45 7 28 


43 22 42 




Saturn 


E. 


82 41 2 


80 57 46 


79 14 4 


77 29 67 




Regulus 


E. 


85 19 36 


83 36 40 


81 53 19 


80 9 32 


6 


a Pegasi 


W. 


83 50 22 


85 32 35 


87 15 11 


88 58 11 




a Arietis 


W. 


40 50 42 


42 36 14 


44 22 12 


46 8 36 




Jupiter 


E. 


34 32 37 


32 45 22 


30 57 45 


29 9 46 




Saturn 


E. 


68 43 1 


66 56 24 


65 9 23 


63 21 59 




Regulus 


E. 


71 24 16 


69 37 59 


67 61 19 


66 4 15 


1 


a Arietis 


W. 


55 6 41 


66 55 25 


68 44 30 


60 33 64 




Aldebaran 


W. 


24 39 21 


26 19 1 


28 5 


29 42 22 




Saturn 


E. 


54 19 30 


52 29 59 


60 40 10 


48 60 3 




Regulus 


E. 


57 3 26 


55 14 15 


63 24 45 


51 34 57 




Spica 


E. 


111 6 


...109 16 64 


107 27 27 


105 37 42 


8 


a Arietis 


W. 


69 45 8 


71 36 7 


73 27 18 


75 18 41 




Aldebaran 


W. 


38 27 16 


40 14 16 


42 1 47 


43 49 45 




Saturn 


E. 


39 35 37 


37 44 4 


36 52 21 


34 30 




Regulus 
Spica 


E. 


42 22 2 


40 30 46 


38 39 19 


36 47 42 




E. 


96 24 55 


94 33 39 


92 42 11 


90 50 33 



19 



290 



JANUARY, 1860. 





GEEENWICH 


MEAE" TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


xv. 


XVIIIi-. 


XXP. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Sun 


W. 


96 9 32 


o / // 

97 34 12 


o / // 

98 59 9 


O / // 

100 24 23 




Venus 


W. 


Y2 52 4 


74 15 9 


75 38 30 


77 2 8 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


51 16 51 


52 37 13 


53 58 17 


65 20 2 




Aldebaran 


E. 


51 44 29 


50 14 30 


48 44 22 


47 14 4 




Jupiter 


E. 


94 21 21 


92 48 1 


91 14 24 


89 40 30 


2 


Sun 


W. 


107 35 12 


109 2 22 


110 29 53 


111 57 45 




Venus 


W. 


84 4 59 


85 30 33 


86 56 28 


88 22 44 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


62 18 8 


63 43 32 


65 9 29 


66 35 59 




Aldebaran 


E. 


39 40 28 


38 9 24 


36 38 17 


35 7 9 




Pollux 


E. 


81 13 44 


79 39 12 


78 4 19 


76 29 5 




Jupiter 


E. 


81 46 20 


80 10 30 


78 24 19 


76 57 47 


3 


Sun 


W. 


119 22 44 


120 52 54 


122 23 28 


123 54 27 




Venus 


W. 


95 39 44 


97 8 18 


98 37 17 


100 6 40 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


73 56 23 


75 25 59 


76 56 5 


78 26 39 




a Pegasi 


w. 


51 28 52 


53 36 


54 32 58 


56 6 58 




Pollux 


E. 


68 27 24 


66 49 55 


65 12 3 


63 33 46 




Jupiter 


E. 


68 49 27 


67 10 37 


65 31 21 


63 61 42 




Saturn 


E. 


102 46 38 


101 8 29 


99 29 55 


97 60 57 


4 


Sun 


W. 


131 35 37 


133 9 7 


134 43 3 


136 17 24 




Venus 


W. 


107 39 52 


109 11 47 


110 44 8 


112 16 55 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


86 6 26 


87 39 42 


89 13 24 


90 47 30 




a Pegasi 


W. 


63 59 47 


65 36 14 


67 13 13 


68 50 44 




Pollux 


E. 


55 16 20 


53 35 38 


51 54 31 


50 13 




Jupiter 


E. 


55 27 7 


53 44 54 


52 2 16 


50 19 12 




Saturn 


E. 


89 29 45 


87 48 13 


86 6 16 


84 23 52 


5 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


98 43 35 


100 19 49 


101 56 20 


103 33 8 




a Pegasi 


W. 


77 5 50 


78 46 19 


80 27 14 


82 8 35 




a Arietis 


W. 


33 53 21 


35 36 56 


37 21 2 


39 5 38 




Pollux 


E. 


41 '39 32 


39 55 43 


38 11 33 


36 27 3 




Jupiter 


E. 


41 37 31 


39 51 54 


38 5 53 


36 19 27 




Saturn 


E. 


75 45 24 


74 25 


72 15 1 


70 29 13 




Regulus 


E. 


78 25 19 


76 40 41 


74 55 37 


73 10 9 


6 


a Pegasi 


W. 


90 41 32 


92 25 15 


94 9 19 


95 63 41 




a Arietis 


W. 


47 55 26 


49 42 40 


51 30 18 


53 18 19 




Jupiter 


E. 


27 21 26 


25 32 44 


23 43 41 


21 54 21 




Saturn 


E. 


61 34 12 


59 46 3 


57 57 32 


56 8 41 




Regulus 


E. 


64 16 48 


62 28 59 


60 40 49 


58 52 18 


7 


a Arietis 


W. 


62 23 36 


64 13 35 


66 3 51 


67 54 22 




Aldebaran 


W. 


31 25 42 


33 9 58 


34 55 2 


36 40 50 




Saturn 


E. 


46 59 39 


45 9 


43 18 6 


41 26 58 




Regulus 


E. 


49 44 53 


47 54 32 


46 3 56 


44 13 6 




Spica 


E. 


103 47 40 


101 57 21 


100 6 47 


98 15 58 


8 


a Arietis 


W. 


77 10 14 


79 1 55 


80 53 45 


82 45 42 




Aldebaran 


W. 


45 38 8 


47 26 52 


49 15 54 


51 5 14 




Saturn 


E. 


32 8 31 


30 16 25 


28 24 15 


26 32 2 




Regulus 


E. 


34 55 67 


33 4 4 


31 12 5 


29 20 1 




Spica 


E. 


88 58 45 


87 6 48 


85 14 43 


83 22 32 



JANUARY, 1860. 



291 







GKEENWICH 


MEAN TI\rE. 










LUNAR DISTANCES. 






Day of 
the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


HI''. 


Vli'. 


IXi-. 


Month. 


Position. 












9 


a Arietis 


W. 


o / // 

84 37 44 


o / // 

86 29 50 


88° 22 


90 14 12 




Aldebaran 


W. 


52 54 48 


54 44 34 


56 34 30 


68 24 36 




Spica 


E. 


81 30 16 


79 37 55 


77 45 31 


75 53 5 




Mars 


E. 


106 12 18 


104 25 6 


102 37 50 


100 50 32 


10 


Aldebaran 


W. 


67 36 14 


69 26 37 


71 16 57 


73 7 15 




Jupiter 


W. 


25 4 7 


26 67 20 


28 50 30 


30 43 36 




Pollux 


W. 


25 2 41 


26 52 59 


28 43 28 


30 34 2 




Spica 


E. 


66 31 4 


64 38 49 


62 46 40 


60 54 37 




Mars 


E. 


91 54 4 


90 6 54 


88 19 49 


86 32 50 


11 


Aldebaran 


W. 


82 17 4 


84 6 35 


85 55 64 


87 45 1 




Jupiter 


W. 


40 7 4 


41 59 16 


43 61 16 


46 43 4 




Pollux 


W. 


39 46 57 


41 37 17 


43 27 30 


45 17 33 




Spica 


E. 


51 36 36 


49 45 33 


47 54 44 


46 4 8 




Mars 


E. 


77 40 3 


75 54 2 


74 8 14 


72 22 40 




Sun 


E. 


140 16 12 


138 32 41 


136 49 21 


135 6 14 


12 


Jupiter 


W. 


54 58 26 


56 48 43 


58 38 42 


60 28 24 




Pollux 


W. 


54 24 49 


56 13 34 


58 2 3 


69 60 16 




Saturn 


w. 


20 28 7 


22 17 4 


24 5 51 


25 54 26 




Spica 


E. 


36 55 7 


35 6 12 


33 17 37 


31 29 22 




Mars 


E. 


63 38 39 


61 54 43 


60 11 4 


58 27 44 




Antares 


E. 


82 39 28 


80 50 8 


79 1 6 


77 12 21 




Sun 


E. 


126 34 10 


124 52 32 


123 11 12 


121 30 9 


13 


Jupiter 


W. 


69 32 17 


71 20 6 


73 7 35 


74 54 45 




Pollux 


W. 


68 46 59 


■ 70 33 25 


72 19 31 


74 5 18 




Satum 


W. 


34 53 41 


36 40 41 


38 27 23 


40 13 46 




Regulus 


W. 


31 45 59 


33 32 38 


35 18 58 


37 4 59 




Mars 


E. 


49 56 15 


48 15 2 


46 34 11 


44 53 44 




Antares 


E. 


68 13 16 


66 26 24 


64 39 52 


62 63 40 




Sun 


E. 


113 9 26 


111 30 15 


109 51 23 


108 12 61 


14 


Jupiter 


W. 


83 45 34 


85 30 43 


87 15 32 


89 1 




Pollux 


W. 


82 49 19 


84 33 8 


86 16 37 


87 59 46 




Saturn 


W. 


49 1 1 


50 45 30 


52 29 40 


54 13 30 




Regulus 


W. 


45 50 15 


47 34 20 


49 18 5 


51 1 30 




Mars 


E. 


36 37 34 


34 59 38 


33 22 10 


31 45 11 




Antares 


E. 


54 7 42 


52 23 30 


50 39 38 


48 56 7 




Sun 


E. 


100 5 9 


98 28 37 


96 52 24 


95 16 32 


15 


Jupiter 


W. 


97 37 33 


99 20 6 


101 2 19 


102 44 14 




Pollux 


W. 


96 30 39 


98 11 52 


99 62 45 


101 33 20 




Saturn 


W. 


62 47 54 


64 29 50 


66 11 28 


67 62 47 




Regulus 


W. 


59 33 46 


61 15 16 


62 56 27 


64 37 20 




Antares 


E. 


40 23 25 


38 41 61 


37 35 


35 19 38 1 




Sun 


E. 


87 22 3 


85 48 7 


84 14 29 


82 41 10 i 


16 


Jupiter 


W. 


111 9 17 


112 49 26 


114 29 17 


116 8 62 




Saturn 


W. 


76 14 56 


77 64 30 


79 33 47 


81 12 48 




Regulus 


w. 


72 57 16 


74 36 23 


76 15 14 


77 53 48 ! 




Spica 


w. 


19 4 18 


20 42 19 


22 20 12 


23 57 57 ' 




Sun 


E. 


74 59 5 


73 27 32 


71 56 16 


70 25 16 ; 



292 



JANUARY, 1860. 





GEEENWICH MEAN TIME. 












LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 










Day of 


Star's Name 














the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi". 


XVIIIk. 


XXP. 






Month. 


Position. 
















9 


a Arietis 


W. 


92 6 26 


93 58 39 


O / // 

95 50 51 


97 43 'i 








Aldebaran 


W. 


60 14 48 


62 5 6 


63 55 27 


65 45 50 








Spica 


E. 


74 38 


72 8 12 


70 15 47 


68 23 24 








Mars 


E. 


99 3 13 


97 15 54 


95 28 35 


93 41 18 






10 


Aldebaran 


W. 


1i 57 27 


76 47 33 


78 37 32 


80 27 23 








Jupiter 


W. 


32 36 33 


34 29 24 


36 22 7 


38 14 41 








Pollux 


W. 


32 24 40 


34 15 19 


36 5 56 


37 66 30 








Spica 


E. 


59 2 42 


57 10 55 


55 19 18 


53 27 51 








Mars 


E. 


84 45 58 


82 59 14 


81 12 40 


79 26 16 






11 


Aldebaran 


W. 


89 33 55 


91 22 34 


93 10 58 


94 59 7 








Jupiter 


W. 


47 34 38 


49 25 58 


51 17 3 


53 7 52 








Pollux 


W. 


47 7 25 


48 57 6 


50 46 34 


62 35 49 








Spica 


E. 


44 13 47 


42 23 42 


40 33 63 


38 44 21 








Mars 


E. 


70 37 20 


68 52 15 


67 7 26 


65 22 54 








Sun 


E. 


133 23 20 


131 40 40 


129 58 14 


128 16 4 






12 


Jupiter 


W. 


62 17 48 


64 6 53 


65 55 40 


67 44 8 








Pollux 


W. 


61 38 12 


63 25 51 


65 13 12 


67 15 








Saturn 


w. 


27 42 48 


29 30 55 


31 18 47 


33 6 23 








Spica 


E. 


29 41 29 


27 53 58 


26 6 50 


24 20 7 








Mars 


E. 


56 44 45 


55 2 6 


53 19 48 


51 37 51 








Antares 


E. 


75 23 55 


73 35 47 


71 47 57 


70 27 








StTN 


E. 


119 49 23 


118 8 56 


116 28 47 


114 48 57 






13 


Jupiter 


W. 


76 41 35 


78 28 5 


80 14 15 


82 4 








Pollux 


W. 


75 50 46 


77 35 54 


79 20 42 


81 5 11 








Saturn 


W. 


41 59 51 


43 45 38 


45 31 5 


47 16 12 








Regulus 


W. 


38 50 41 


40 36 4 


42 21 7 


44 5 51 








Mars 


E. 


43 13 40 


41 34 


39 54 46 


38 15 57 








Antares 


E. 


61 7 48 


59 22 16 


57 37 5 


55 52 13 








Susr 


E. 


106 34 39 


104 56 47 


103 19 15 


101 42 2 






14 


Jupiter 


W. 


90 44 10 


92 28 


94 11 31 


95 64 41 








Pollux 


W. 


89 42 36 


91 25 6 


93 7 16 


94 49 7 








Saturn 


W. 


55 57 1 


57 40 13 


59 23 5 


61 5 39 








Eegulu-s 


W. 


52 44 36 


54 27 22 


56 9 49 


57 61 57 








Mars 


E. 


30 8 43 


28 32 47 


26 57 24 


25 22 38 








Antares 


E. 


47 12 55 


45 30 4 


43 47 31 


42 5 18 








Sun 


E. 


93 40 59 


92 5 46 


90 30 52 


88 56 18 






15 


Jupiter 


W. 


104 25 50 


106 7 8 


107 48 8 


109 28 51 








Pollux 


W. 


103 13 37 


104 53 35 


106 33 15 


108 12 37 








Saturn 


W. 


69 33 48 


71 14 31 


72 54 57 


74 35 5 








Regulus 


W. 


66 17 55 


67 58 12 


69 38 11 


71 17 52 








Antares 


E. 


33 38 58 


31 58 36 


30 18 32 


28 38 44 








Sun 


E. 


81 8 9 


79 35 27 


78 3 2 


76 30 56 






16 


Jupiter 


W. 


117 48 10 


119 27 12 


121 5 68 


122 44 28 








Saturn 


W. 


82 51 33 


84 30 2 


86 8 16 


87 46 14 








Regulus 


W. 


79 32 6 


81 10 7 


82 47 53 


84 25 24 








Spica 


E. 


25 35 33 


27 12 58 


28 50 12 


30 27 15 









Sun 


E. 


68 54 33 


67 24 5 


65 53 53 


64 23 57 





JANUARY, 1860. 



293 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 


/ 








LUNAE DISTANCES. ^ 


'■•-x 




D^oT 


Star's Name 




'■•-.'- 








the 


~ sod*- 




Noon. 


IIX'>. 


VP. 


IX>. 


Month. 


Position. 


■ 
















o / // 


o / // 


/ // 


/ /' 


17 


Saturn 


W. 


89 23 57 


91 1 25 


92 38 40 


94 15 40 




Regulus 


^V. 


86 2 40 


87 39 41 


89 16 28 


90 53 




Spica 


w. 


32 4 6 


33 40 45 


35 17 11 


36 53 25 




Sdn 


'3. 


62 54 15 


61 24 49 


59 55 36 


58 26 38 


18 


Saturn ( 


w. 


102 17 18 


103 52 59 


105 28 27 


107 3 43 




Spica ^ 


w. 


44 51 31 


46 26 33 


48 1 23 


^49 36 2 




Mars 


w. 


15 36 32 


17 33 


18 25 24 


19 50 61 




Sdn 


E. 


51 5 11 


49 37 33 


48 10 6 


46 42 52 


19 


Spica 


W. 


57 26 31 


59 6 


60 33 30 


62 6 45 




Mars 


w. 


27 2 52 


28 29 41 


29 56 34 


31 23 27 




Sun 


E. 


39 29 33 


38 3 26 


36 37 30 


35 11 43 


25 


Sun 


W. 


27 1 32 


28 22 35 


29 43 37 


31 4 37 




a Arietis 


E. 


64 51 


62 32 33 


61 4 17 


59 86 3 




Aldebaran 


E. 


96 13 2 


94 45 47 


93 18 33 


91 51 19 


26 


Sun 


W. 


37 49 33 


39 10 33 


40 31 35 


41 52 38 




a Arietis 


E. 


62 15 13 


50 47 5 


49 18 58 


47 50 60 




Aldebaran 


E. 


84 35 21 


83 8 10 


81 40 58 


80 13 45 


27 


Sun 


W. 


48 38 28 


49 59 48 


61 21 13 


52 42 42 




Venus 


W. 


19 59 36 


21 18 3 


22 36 41 


23 56 30 




a Arietis 


E. 


40 30 5 


39 1 53 


37 33 40 


36 6 25 




Aldebaran 


E. 


72 57 21 


71 29 58 


70 2 33 


68 35 5 




Jupiter 


E. 


112 38 57 


111 9 9 


109 39 18 


108 9 22 


28 


Sun 


W. 


59 31 36 


60 53 44 


62 16 


63 38 24 




Venus 


W. 


30 32 16 


31 52 8 


33 12 11 


34 32 24 




Aldebaran 


E. 


61 16 52 


59 49 2 


68 21 7 


56 53 7 




Jupiter 


E. 


100 38 13. 


99 7 38 


97 36 56 


96 6 6 




Pollux 


E. 


103 20 49 


101 51 26 


100 21 56 


98 52 15 


29 


Sun 


W. 


70 32 56 


71 56 24 


73 20 4 


74 43 57 




Venus 


W. 


41 16 25 


42 37 60 


43 59 29 


46 21 21 




Aldebaran 


E. 


49 31 55 


48 3 26 


46 34 52 


46 6 14 




Jupiter 


E. 


88 29 25 


86 67 31 


85 25 26 


83 53 7 




Pollux 


E. 


91 21 25 


89 50 42 


88 19 46 


86 48 37 


30 


Sun 


W. 


81 46 59 


83 12 22 


84 38 2 


86 4 




Venus 


W. 


52 14 29 


53 37 56 


66 1 38 


56 25 39 




a Pegasi 


w. 


41 31 7 


42 55 68 


44 21 31 


45 47 46 




Aldebaran 


E. 


37 42 17 


36 13 26 


34 44 36 


33 15 51 




Jupiter 
Pollux 


E. 


76 8 3 


74 34 15 


73 11 


71 25 61 




E. 


79 9 22 


77 36 46 


76 3 51 


74 30 40 




Saturn 


E. 


111 47 16 


110 13 49 


108 40 5 


107 6 4 


01 


Sun 


W. 


93 18 28 


94 46 22 


96 14 38 


97 43 15 




Venus 


W. 


63 30 30 


64 66 29 


66 22 50 


67 49 33 




a Pegasi 

Jupiter 

Pollux 


W. 


53 8 7 


54 37 55 


66 8 16 


57 39 10 




E. 


63 29 26 


61 53 9 


60 16 32 


58 39 33 




E. 


66 40 12 


66 5 8 


63 29 43 


61 53 58 




Saturn 


E. 


99 11 15 


97 35 17 


96 58 58 


94 22 17 



294 



JANUARY, 1860. 



1l- 



Day of 

the 
Month. 



18 



19 



25 



26 



21 



28 



29 



30 



31 



GEEENWICH MEAN TIME. 



v^ LUNAE DISTANCES. 



Star's Name 

and 

Position. 



Saturn 

Regulus 

Spica 

Sun 

Saturn 
Spica 
Mars 
Sun 

Spica 
Mars 

Sun 

Sun 

a Arietis 

Aldebaran 

Sun 

a Arietis 

Aldebaran 

Sun 
Venus 
. a Arietis 
Aldebaran 
Jupiter 

Sun 

Venus 

Aldebaran 

Jupiter 

Pollux 

Sun 

Venus 

Aldebaran 

Jupiter 

Pollux 

Sun 

Venus 

a Pegasi 

Aldebaran 

Jupiter 

Pollux 

Saturn 

Sun 

Venus 

a Pegasi 

Jupiter 

Pollux 

Saturn 



W. 
W. 
W. 
E. 

W. 
W. 
W. 
E. 

W. 

w. 

E. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

W. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

E. 

W. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

E. 

W. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

E. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

E. 

E. 

W. 
W. 

W. 
E. 
E. 
E. 




Midnight. 



95 52 26 

92 29 19 

38 29 26 

56 57 54 

108 38 47 
51 10 29 
21 16 46 

45 15 50 

63 39 50 

32 50 19 

33 46 7 

32 25 37 
58 7 51 
90 24 7 

43 13 43 

46 22 43 
78 46 31 

54 4 16 
25 14 30 

34 37 8 
67 7 34 

106 39 20 

65 58 

35 52 49 

55 25 3 
94 35 6 
97 22 26 

76 8 4 
46 43 28 
43 37 32 
82 20 36 
85 17 15 

87 30 15 
57 49 58 
38 
14 
12 
12 
105 31 45 



47 14 
31 47 
69 51 
72 57 



12 14 
69 16 38 
59 10 35 
67 2 12 
17 51 
45 13 



99 



60 
92 



97 28 59 

94 5 24 

40 5 15 

55 29 24 

110 13 39 

52 44 46 

22 43 

43 48 69 

65 12 45 
34 17 10 

32 20 41 

33 46 36 

56 39 40 
88 56 55 

44 34 50 
44 54 35 
77 19 16 

56 25 56 
26 33 41 
33 8 49 

65 39 59 
105 9 13 

66 23 42 
37 13 25 
63 56 53 
93 3 56 
95 52 26 

77 32 25 
48 5 50 
42 8 47 
80 47 50 
83 45 39 

88 56 49 
59 14 37 
48 42 7 
30 18 47 
68 16 14 
71 23 26 
103 57 7 



Or 



100 41 
70 44 
60 42 31 
55 24 29 
58 41 
91 7 



36 
6 



22 
47 



98> 5 18 

95^41 15 

41 40 52 
64 M 6 

111 48 20 

54 VS 52 
24 9 29 

42 22 19 

66 46 31 

35 43 59 

30 65 24 

36 7 35 

55 11 30 
87 29 43 

45 56 59 

43 26 26 
75 51 59 

56 47 42 
27 53 3 

31 40 30 
64 12 21 

103 39 

67 46 36 
38 34 12 
52 28 38 
91 32 36 



94 


22 


16 


78 


57 


1 


49 


28 


27 


40 


39 


68 


79 


14 


49 


82 


13 


49 


90 


23 


42 


60 


39 


35 


50 


10 


12 


28 


60 


33 


66 


40 


68 


69 


49 


21 


102 


22 


9 


102 


11 


22 


72 


11 


57 


62 


14 


69 


63 


46 


23 


67 


4 


31 


89 


29 


57 



100 41 25 
97 16 63 
43 16 17 

62 33 2 

113 22 52 
65 52 47 
26 36 7 

40 55 51 

68 18 8 
37 10 45 
29 30 17 

36 28 34 

63 43 21 
86 2 32 

47 17 12 

41 58 16 
74 24 41 

58 9 36 

29 12 34 

30 12 10 
62 44 39 

102 8 40 

69 9 40 
39 56 12 
51 19 
90 1 6 
92 51 56 

80 21 52 
60 51 20 
39 11 8 
77 41 34 
80 41 43 



50 55 

4 52 
61 38 53 
27 22 33 

5 22 
14 56 



91 

62 



65 
68 



100 46 62 



103 41 31 

73 40 12 
47 59 

7 



63 

52 



55 27 



63 
18 



87 61 44 



FEBRUARY, 1860. 



295 





GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TI\fE. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 
the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


III''. 


VP'. 


IX". 


Month. 


Position. 


















/ n 


/ It 


o / // 


/ // 


1 


Sun 


W. 


105 12 4 


106 43 2 


108 14 25 


109 46 13 




Venus 


W. 


75 8 52 


76 37 67 


78 7 26 


79 37 20 




a Pegasi 


W. 


65 21 27 


66 55 28 


68 29 58 


70 4 58 




a Arietis 


W. 


21 49 30 


23 25 50 


25 2 49 


26 40 26 




Jupiter 


E. 


50 28 59 


48 49 41 


47 9 59 


45 29 52 




Pollux 


E. 


53 49 42 


52 11 43 


50 33 20 


48 64 35 




Saturn 


E. 


86 13 1 


84 34 5 


82 54 38 


81 14 46 




Regulus 


E. 


90 40 17 


89 1 47 


87 22 54 


86 43 36 


2 


Sun 


W. 


117 31 46 


119 6 12 


120 41 6 


122 16 27 




Venus 


W. 


87 13 20 


88 45 53 


90 18 52 


91 62 19 




a Pegasi 


w. 


78 7 23 


79 45 20 


81 23 45 


83 2 39 




a Arietis 


w. 


34 57 15 


36 38 17 


38 19 49 


40 1 63 




Jupiter 


E. 


37 2 53 


35 20 11 


33 37 3 


81 53 29 




Pollux 


E. 


40 34 51 


38 53 43 


37 12 15 


35 30 20 




Saturn 


E. 


72 48 55 


71 6 25 


69 23 27 


67 40 2 




Eegulus 


E. 


77 20 30 


75 38 32 


73 56 9 


72 13 17 


3 


Sun 


W. 


130 20 6 


131 58 13 


133 36 47 


135 15 48 




Venus 


W. 


99 46 19 


101 22 29 


102 59 6 


104 36 9 




a Pegasi 


W. 


91 24 4 


93 5 41 


94 47 43 


96 30 10 




a Arietis 


W. 


48 39 48 


50 24 53 


52 10 25 


53 56 26 




Aldebaran 


W. 


18 59 8 


20 29 4 


22 1 40 


23 36 27 




Pollux 


E. 


26 55 57 


25 12 15 


23 28 22 


21 44 24 




Saturn 


E. 


58 56 11 


57 10 3 


65 23 28 


53 36 26 




Regulus 


E. 


63 32 7 


61 46 31 


60 28 


58 13 59 


4 


Venus 


W. 


112 47 52 


114 27 27 


' 116 7 26 


117 47 47 




a Pegasi 


w. 


105 8 6 


106 52 44 


108 37 39 


110 22 50 




a Arietis 


w. 


62 53 25 


64 42 8 


66 31 16 


68 20 47 




Aldebaran 


w. 


31 54 24 


33 37 32 


36 21 37 


37 6 32 




Saturn 


E. 


44 34 53 


42 45 20 


40 65 24 


39 5 6 




Regulus 
Spica 


E. 


49 15 


47 25 57 


45 36 31 


43 46 42 




E. 


103 17 54 


101 28 54 


99 39 29 


97 49 40 


6 


a Arietis 


W. 


77 34 3 


79 25 44 


81 17 43 


83 10 




Aldebaran 


w. 


46 1 28 


47 50 12 


49 39 24 


51 29 3 




Saturn 


E. 


29 48 27 


27 56 14 


26 3 47 


24 11 7 




Regulus 


E. 


34 32 14 


32 40 23 


30 48 15 


28 65 52 




Spica 


E. 


88 35 6 


86 43 11 


84 50 57 


82 58 27 


6 


a Arietis 


W. 


92 35 1 


94 28 37 


96 22 22 


98 16 16 




Aldebaran 


W. 


60 42 50 


62 84 29 


64 26 22 


66 18 27 




Jupiter 
Pollux 


w. 


21 23 47 


23 18 8 


25 12 42 


27 7 26 




w. 


18 12 39 


20 2 47 


21 63 40 


23 46 11 




Spica 
Mars 


E. 


73 32 20 


71 38 31 


69 44 33 


67 50 27 




E. 


115 18 34 


113 29 44 


111 40 44 


109 51 34 


T 


Aldebaran 


W. 


75 40 56 


77 33 39 


79 26 23 


81 19 7 




Jupiter 
Pollux 


W. 


36 42 47 


38 38 


40 33 13 


42 28 24 




W. 


33 8 58 


35 1 48 


36 65 14 


38 48 43 




Spica 
Mars 


E. 


58 18 46 


56 24 21 


64 29 67 


62 36 36 




E. 


100 44 17 


98 54 42 


97 5 7 


95 15 34 




Antares 


E. 


104 6 16 


102 11 89 


100 17 2 


98 22 27 



296 



I'EBRUARY, 1860. 





GEEENWICH 


MEAN TnVTF,. 






LUNAR DISTANCES. 




Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


XVIIP. 


XXp. 




Month. 


Position. 














1 


Sun 


W. 


o / // 

111 18 27 


o / // 

112 61 7 


O i // 

114 24 13 


O / // 

116 67 46 






Venus 


w. 


81 1 39 


82 38 25 


84 9 37 


85 41 16 






a Pegasi 


w. 


11 40 27 


73 16 27 


74 52 57 


76 29 65 






a Arietis 


w. 


28 18 39 


29 57 27 


31 36 49 


33 16 46 






Jupiter 


E. 


48 49 20 


42 8 22 


40 26 58 


38 45 9 






Pollux 


E. 


47 15 25 


45 35 52 


43 56 56 


42 15 35 






Saturn 


E. 


79 34 28 


77 63 44 


76 12 34 


74 30 58 






Regulus 


E. 


84 3 50 


82 23 40 


80 43 3 


79 2 




2 


Sun 


W. 


123 52 16 


125 28 32 


127 6 16 


128 42 27 






Venus 


W. 


93 26 12 


95 33 


96 35 21 


98 10 37 






a Pegasi 


W. 


84 42 1 


86 21 61 


88 2 9 


89 42 53 






a Arietis 


W. 


41 44 28 


43 27 33 


45 11 8 


46 56 13 






Jupiter 


E. 


30 9 28 


28 26 2 


26 40 10 


24 54 62 






Pollux 


E. 


33 48 6 


32 5 31 


30 22 37 


28 39 25 


- 




Saturn 


E. 


65 56 10 


64 11 51 


62 27 5 


60 41 52 






Eegulus 


E. 


70 29 57 


68 46 10 


67 1 66 


65 17 16 


3 


Sun 


W. 


136 55 15 


138 35 8 


140 15 28 


141 56 13 






Venus 


W. 


106 13 38 


107 51 33 


109 29 54 


111 8 41 






a Pegasi 


W. 


98 13 1 


99 56 15 


101 39 51 


103 23 48 






a Arietis 


w. 


55 42 55 


57 29 52 


59 17 17 


61 5 8 






Aldebaran 


w. 


25 13 10 


26 51 29 


28 31 15 


30 12 15 






Pollux 


E. 


20 27 


18 16 41 


16 33 18 


14 50 28 






Saturn 


E. 


51 48 59 


50 1 5 


48 12 46 


46 24 2 






Regulus 


E. 


56 27 3 


64 39 41 


52 61 53 


61 3 39 




4 


Venus 


W. 


119 28 31 


121 9 36 


122 51 1 


124 32 46 






a Pegasi 


W. 


112 8 17 


113 53 58 


115 39 60 


117 26 52 






a Arietis 


W. 


70 10 42 


72 1 


73 51 40 


75 42 41 






Aldebaran 


W. 


38 62 13 


40 38 36 


42 25 38 


44 13 16 






Saturn 


E. 


37 14 25 


35 23 24 


33 32 4 


31 40 24 






Regulus 


E. 


41 56 29 


40 6 55 


38 16 1 


36 23 47 






Spioa 


E. 


95 59 28 


94 8 54 


92 17 58 


90 26 42 




5 


a- Arietis 


W. 


85 2 32 


86 56 20 


88 48 21 


90 41 35 






Aldebaran 


W. 


53 19 7 


65 9 33 


57 20 


58 61 27 






Saturn 


E. 


22 18 16 


20 25 19 


18 32 17 


16 39 14 






Regulus 


E. 


27 3 15 


25 10 26 


23 17 26 


21 24 17 






Spica 


E. 


81 6 41 


79 12 40 


77 19 25 


76 25 58 




6 


a Arietis 


W. 


100 10 15 


102 4 19 


103 58 28 


106 52 39 






Aldebaran 


W. 


68 10 43 


70 3 7 


71 55 38 


73 48 15 






Jupiter 


W. 


29 2 19 


30 57 19 


32 52 26 


34 47 35 






Pollux 


W. 


25 37 12 


27 29 37 


29 22 20 


31 16 18 






Spica 


E. 


65 56 14 


64 1 57 


62 7 36 


60 13 11 






Mars 


E. 


108 2 16 


106 12 52 


104 23 23 


102 33 51 




1 


Aldebaran 


W. 


83 11 48 


85 4 25 


86 66 57 


88 49 22 






Jupiter 


W. 


44 23 32 


46 18 36 


48 13 34 


50 8 26 






Pollux 


W. 


40 42 13 


42 35 44 


44 29 12 


46 22 37 






Spioa 


E. 


50 41 20 


48 47 9 


46 53 4 


44 69 9 






Mars 


E. 


93 26 3 


91 36 37 


89 47 17 


87 58 6 




' Antares 


E. 


96 27 56 


94 33 29 


92 39 9 


90 44 65 









FEBRUARY, 1860. 


297 






GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


nil'. 


VI'. 


IXK 


' Month. 


Position. 


















o ; /; 


/ // 


/ // 


Q i II 


8 


Aldebaran 


W. 


90 41 39 


92 33 46 


94 25 42 


96 17 26 




Jupiter 


W. 


52 3 8 


53 57 41 


65 62 4 


67 46 15 




Pollux 


W. 


48 15 57 


50 9 10 


52 2 14 


63 55 9 




Saturn 


W. 


16 17 11 


18 10 31 


20 3 51 


21 67 10 




Spica 


E. 


43 5 23 


41 11 48 


39 18 26 


37 25 16 




Mars 


E. 


86 9 1 


84 20 6 


82 31 22 


80 42 49 




Antares 


E. 


88 50 50 


86 66 55 


86 3 10 


83 9 87 


9 


Jupiter 


W. 


67 13 38 


69 6 15 


70 58 36 


72 50 36 




Pollux 


w. 


63 16 32 


65 8 3 


66 69 16 


68 60 11 




Saturn 


w. 


31 21 40 


83 13 54 


35 5 62 


36 57 88 




Regulus 


w. 


26 14 51 


28 6 82 


29 67 67 


31 49 4 




Spica 


E. 


28 3 43 


26 12 26 


24 21 33 


22 31 7 




Mars 


E. 


71 43 43 


69 56 45 


68 10 6 


66 23 46 




Antares 


E. 


73 45 27 


71 53 27 


70 1 46 


68 10 23 


10 


Jupiter 


W. 


82 5 23 


83 55 13 


86 44 40 


87 38 42 




Pollux 


W. 


77 59 39 


79 48 27 


81 36 52 


83 24 68 




Saturn 


w. 


46 11 1 


48 39 


49 49 54 


51 38 46 




Regulus 


w. 


40 59 44 


42 48 47 


44 37 27 


46 25 44 




Mars 


E. 


57 37 35 


66 53 32 


64 9 63 


52 26 39 




Antares 


E. 


58 58 44 


57 9 32 


65 20 43 


63 32 18 




Sun 


E. 


132 14 24 


130 32 45 


128 51 30 


127 10 89 


11 


Jupiter 


W. 


96 32 40 


98 19 12 


100 5 18 


101 50 68 




Saturn 


W. 


60 36 58 


62 23 24 


64 9 21 


66 64 55 




Regulus 


W. 


56 21 7 


57 6 57 


68 52 22 


60 37 22 




Mars 


E. 


43 57 12 


42 16 41 


40 36 40 


38 57 7 




Antares 


E. 


44 36 25 


42 60 30 


41 5 


39 19 55 




Sun 


E. 


118 52 34 


117 14 12 


115 36 16 


113 58 46 


12 


Saturn 


W. 


74 36 27 


76 19 80 


78 2 8 


79 44 22 




Regulus 


W. 


69 16 


70 68 29 


72 40 33 


74 22 12 




Spica 


W. 


15 26 6 


17 6 64 


18 47 36 


20 28 7 




Antares 


E. 


30 40 64 


28 -68 22 


27 16 14 


25 34 31 




Mars 


E. 


80 47 4 


29 10 40 


27 34 52 


25 59 40 




Sun 


E. 


105 57 .33 


104 22 34 


102 48 


101 18 61 


13 


Saturn 


W. 


88 9 33 


89 49 26 


91 28 56 


93 8 3 




Regulus 


W. 


82 44 30 


84 28 48 


86 2 44 


87 41 18 




Spica 


W. 


28 46 47 


30 25 36 


32 4 6 


33 42 17 




Sun 


E. 


93 29 3 


91 57 16 


90 25 51 


88 54 48 


14 


Saturn 


W. 


101 18 27 


102 55 31 


104 32 16 


106 8 41 




Regulus 
Spica 

Sun 


W. 


95 48 48 


97 25 18 


99 1 28 


100 37 21 




w. 


41 48 21 


43 24 37 


45 35 


46 36 16 




E. 


81 24 49 


79 65 50 


78 23 10 


76 68 49 


15 


Saturn 


W. 


114 6 30 


115 41 14 


117 15 42 


118 49 64 




Spica 
Sun 


W. 


64 30 25 


66 4 27 


67 38 14 


59 11 46 




E. 


69 41 27 


68 14 48 


66 48 25 


65 22 17 


16 


Spica 
Antares 


w. 


66 56 4 


68 28 17 


70 19 


71 82 9 




w. 


21 3 51 


22 36 13 


24 8 28 


25 40 22 




Mars 


w. 


19 40 36 


21 6 25 


22 30 25 


28 56 88 



298 



FEBRUARY, 1860. 







GEEEIsTWICH 


MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR ] 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Midnight. 


X.VK 


XTIIIi". 


XXTt. 


8 


Aldcbaran 


W. 


/ // 

98 8 57 


O / fi 

100 13 


101 51 12 


O / // 

103 41 54 




Jupiter 


W. 


59 40 13 


61 33 57 


63 27 26 


65 20 40 




Pollux 


w. 


55 47 53 


57 40 24 


59 32 42 


61 24 45 




Saturn 


w. 


23 50 24 


25 43 30 


27 36 26 


29 29 10 




Spica 


E. 


35 32 22 


33 39 44 


31 47 24 


29 55 23 




Mars 


E. 


78 54 29 


77 6 23 


75 18 33 


73 30 59 




Antares 


E. 


81 16 17 


79 23 11 


77 30 20 


75 37 45 


9 


Jupiter 


W. 


74 42 16 


76 33 35 


78 24 34 


80 15 10 




Pollux 


W. 


70 40 46 


72 31 1 


74 20 55 


76 10 28 




Saturn 


w. 


38 48 55 


40 39 57 


42 30 39 


44 21 1 




Regulus 


w. 


33 39 52 


35 30 21 


37 20 30 


39 10 18 




Spica 


E. 


20 41 10 


18 51 46 


17 2 58 


15 14 54 




Mars 


E. 


64 37 47 


62 52 10 


61 6 55 


59 22 3 




Antares 


E. 


66 19 20 


64 28 38 


62 38 18 


60 48 20 


10 


Jupiter 


W. 


89 22 19 


91 10 32 


92 58 20 


94 45 43 




Pollux 


W. 


85 12 30 


86 59 42 


88 46 30 


90 32 54 




Saturn 


W. 


53 27 13 


55 15 15 


57 2 64 


58 50 9 




Regulus 


W. 


48 13 38 


50 1 7 


51 48 12 


53 34 52 




Mars 


E. 


50 43 52 


49 1 31 


47 19 36 


45 38 10 




Antares 


E. 


51 44 18 


49 56 42 


48 9 32 


46 22 46 




Son 


E. 


125 30 13 


123 50 11 


122 10 34 


120 31 21 


11 


Jupiter 


W. 


103 36 13 


105 21 2 


107 5 26 


108 49 25 




Saturn 


W. 


67 40 4 


69 24 47 


71 9 5 


72 52 59 




Regulus 


W. 


62 21 66 


64 6 4 


65 49 48 


67 33 7 




Mars 


E. 


37 18 4 


35 39 32 


34 1 31 


32 24 1 




Antares 


E. 


37 35 16 


35 51 2 


34 7 14 


32 23 52 




Sun 


E. 


112 21 41 


110 45 1 


109 8 46 


107 32 57 


12 


Saturn 


W. 


81 26 12 


83 7 38 


84 48 40 


86 29 18 




Regulus 


W. 


76 3 27 


77 44 18 


79 24 45 


81 4 49 




Spica 


W. 


22 8 25 


23 48 27 


25 28 12 


27 7 39 




Antares 


E. 


23 S3 12 


22 12 18 


20 31 47 


18 51 40 




Mars 


E. 


24 25 6 


22 51 14 


21 18 6 


19 45 47 




SnN 


E. 


99 40 6 


98 6 45 


96 33 48 


95 1 14 


13 


Saturn 


W. 


94 46 50 


96 25 15 


98 3 19 


99 41 3 




Regulus 


W. 


89 19 30 


90 57 20 


92 34 49 


94 11 59 


.I* 


Spica 


W. 


35 20 8 


36 57 39 


38 34 52 


40 11 46 




Son 


E. 


87 24 6 


85 53 46 


84 23 47 


82 54 8 


14 


Saturn 


W. 


107 44 49 


109 20 40 


110 56 14 


112 31 30 




Regulus 


W. 


102 12 54 


103 48 10 


105 23 8 


106 57 50 




Spica 


W. 


48 11 39 


49 46 45 


51 21 34 


52 56 8 




Sun 


E. 


75 30 46 


74 3 1 


72 35 33 


71 8 22 


15 


Saturn 


W. 


120 23 52 


121 57 35 


123 31 5 


125 4 21 




Spica 


W. 


60 45 5 


62 18 10 


63 51 1 


65 23 39 




Sun 


E. 


63 56 24 


62 30 45 


61 5 20 


59 40 8 


16 


Spica 


W. 


73 3 49 


74 35 19 


76 6 39 


77 37 48 




Antares 


w. 


27 12 10 


28 43 47 


30 15 14 


31 46 31 




Mars 


w. 


25 20 46 


26 46 1 


28 11 18 


29 36 34 



FEBRUARY, 1860. 



299 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 


1 








LUNAK DISTANCES. 


S 




Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


IIP. 


ri\ 


IXt. 


Month. 


Position. 












16 


Sun 


E. 


o / // 

58 15 8 


o / // 

56 50 21 


1 It 

55 25 46 


o / // 

54 1 23 


17 


Spica 


W. 


79 8 48 


80 39 39 


82 10 21 


83 40 55 




Antares 


W. 


33 17 38 


34 48 39 


36 19 27 


37 50 8 




Mars 


W. 


31 1 49 


32 27 2 


33 52 13 


35 17 21 




Sun 


E. 


47 2 8 


45 38 46 


44 15 33 


42 52 29 


18 


Spica 


W. 


91 11 55 


92 41 47 


94 11 33 


95 41 13 




Antares 


W. 


45 21 43 


46 51 42 


48 21 34 


49 51 21 




Mars 


W. 


42 22 10 


43 46 57 


45 11 41 


46 36 21 




Sun 


E. 


35 59 6 


34 36 47 


33 14 34 


31 52 28 


23 


Sun 


W. 


18 29 59 


19 51 11 


21 12 24 


22 33 41 




Aldebaran 


E. 


75 56 42 


74 29 10 


73 1 86 


71 34 




Jupiter 


E. 


113 14 46 


111 45 23 


110 15 58 


108 46 30 


24 


Sun 


W. 


29 21 15 


30 43 5 


32 5 


33 27 1 




Aldebaran 


E. 


64 15 35 


62 47 48 


61 19 59 


59 52 8 




Jupiter 


E. 


101 18 15 


99 48 23 


98 18 27 


96 48 26 




Pollux 


E. 


106 23 21 


104 54 9 


103 24 54 


101 55 83 


25 


Sun 


W. 


40 18 42 


41 41 23 


43 4 18 


44 27 11 




Aldebaran 


E. 


52 32 23 


51 4 21 


49 36 17 


48 8 13 




Jupiter 


E. 


89 16 52 


87 46 13 


86 15 28 


84 44 36 




Pollux 


E. 


94 27 13 


92 57 13 


91 27 5 


89 56 50 




Saturn 


E. 


125 3 15 


123 32 27 


122 1 32 


120 30 29 


26 


Sun 


W. 


51 24 13 


52 48 7 


54 12 11 


55 36 27 




Venus 


W. 


16 34 18 


17 53 9 


19 12 39 


20 32 43 




Aldebaran 


E. 


40 47 47 


39 19 46 


37 51 48 


36 23 56 




Jupiter 


E. 


77 8 3 


75 36 16 


74 4 19 


72 82 11 




Pollux 


E. 


82 23 23 


80 52 13 


79 20 53 


77 49 28 




Saturn 


E. 


112 53 1 


111 21 1 


109 48 52 


108 16 32 


27 


Sun 


W. 


62 40 44 


64 6 15 


65 31 59 


66 57 58 




Venus 


W. 


27 19 52 


28 42 28 


30 5 25 


31 28 42 




Jupiter 


E. 


64 48 87 


63 15 16 


61 41 42 


60 7 54 




Pollux 


K 


70 8 57 


68 36 14 


67 3 18 


65 30 8 




Saturn 


E. 


100 31 50 


98 58 15 


97 24 26 


95 50 23 




Eegulus 


E. 


107 3 22 


105 30 19 


103 57 3 


102 23 32 


28 


, Sun 


W. 


74 11 47 


75 39 23 


77 7 16 


78 85 27 




Venus 


W. 


38 30 13 


39 55 31 


41 21 11 


42 47 10 




Jupiter 


E. 


52 15 2 


50 39 38 


49 3 58 


47 28 1 




Pollux 


E. 


57 40 37 


56 5 56 


54 30 59 


52 55 45 




Saturn 


E. 


87 56 13 


86 20 32 


84 44 85 


83 8 20 




Eegulus 


E. 


94 32 4 


92 56 56 


91 21 81 


89 45 48 


29 


Sun 


W. 


86 1 11 


87 31 21 


89 1 51 


90 82 43 


V 


Venus 


W. 


50 2 25 


51 30 34 


52 59 5 


54 27 59 




a Arietis 


w. 


30 39 17 


32 15 48 


33 52 46 


85 30 11 




Jupiter 


E. 


39 23 33 


37 45 40 


36 7 27 


34 28 58 




Pollux 


E. 


44 65 12 


43 18 12 


41 40 53 


40 8 16 




Saturn 


E. 


75 2 17 


73 24 4 


71 45 80 


70 6 34 




Eegulus 


E. 


81 42 24 


80 4 42 


78 26 40 


76 48 16 



300 






FEBRUARY, 1860. 




GEEENWICH MEAN TIME. 








LUNAR ] 


DISTANCES. 




1 
1 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XTt. 


XTIIIk. 


VXtl>. 


Month. 

1 


Position. 










1 


16 


Sun 


E. 


O 1 It 

52 37 11 


51 13 10 


O 1 II 

49 49 19 


O ' / // 

48 25 39 


17 


Spica 


W. 


85 11 21 


86 41 41 


88 11 53 


89 41 57 




Antares 


W. 


39 20 42 


40 51 8 


42 21 27 


43 51 38 




Mars 


w. 


36 42 26 


38 7 27 


39 32 25 


40 67 19 




Sun 


E. 


41 29 33 


40 6 45 


38 44 5 


37 21 32 


18 


Spica 


W. 


97 10 47 


98 40 16 


100 9 41 


101 39 1 




Antares 


W. 


51 21 3 


52 50 39 


54 20 11 


65 49 38 




Mars 


W. 


48 58 


49 25 32 


50 50 3 


52 14 30 




Sun 


E. 


30 30 29 


29 8 35 


27 46 47 


26 25 4 


23 


Sun 


W. 


23 55 1 


25 16 26 


26 37 56 


27 69 32 




Aldebaran 


E. 


70 6 23 


68 38 44 


67 11 3 


65 43 20 




Jupiter 


E. 


107 16 58 


105 47 23 


104 17 44 


102 48 1 


24 


Sun 


W. 


34 49 8 


36 11 21 


37 33 41 


38 56 8 




Aldebaran 


E. 


58 24 15 


56 56 20 


55 28 23 


54 24 




Jupiter 


E. 


95 18 19 


93 48 7 


92 17 48 


90 47 23 




Pollux 


E. 


100 26 5 


98 56 31 


97 26 52 


95 57 6 


25 


Sun 


W. 


45 50 17 


47 13 32 


48 36 56 


60 29 




Aldebaran 


E. 


46 40 7 


45 12 


43 43 54 


42 15 50 




Jupiter 


E. 


83 13 35 


81 42 25 


80 11 7 


78 39 40 




Pollux 


E. 


88 26 20 


86 55 54 


85 25 13 


83 54 23 




Saturn 


E. 


118 59 18 


117 27 58 


115 56 29 


114 24 50 


28 


Sun 


W. 


57 54 


58 25 33 


59 50 24 


61 15 27 




Venus 


W. 


21 53 17 


23 14 19 


24 35 47 


25 57 38 




Aldebaran 


E. 


34 66 11 


33 28 34 


32 1 8 


30 33 57 




Jupiter 


E. 


70 59 52 


69 27 22 


67 54 40 


66 21 46 




Pollux 


E. 


76 17 42 


74 45 48 


73 13 43 


71 41 26 




Saturn 


E. 


106 44 


105 11 17 


103 38 21 


102 6 12 


27 


Sun 


W. 


68 24 12 


69 50 42 


71 17 27 


72 44 28 




Venus 


W. 


32 52 20 


34 16 18 


35 40 36 


37 5 15 




Jupiter 


E. 


58 33 51 


56 59 32 


55 24 58 


53 60 8 




Pollux 


E. 


63 56 44 


62 23 5 


60 49 11 


69 15 2 1 




Saturn 


E. 


94 16 4 


92 41 30 


91 6 41 


89 31 36 




Regulus 


E. 


100 49 46 


99 15 45 


97 41 28 


96 6 65 


28 


Sun 


W. 


80 3 57 


81 82 46 


83 1 54 


84 31 22 




Venus 


W. 


44 13 30 


45 40 11 


47 7 14 


48 34 39 




Jupiter 


E. 


45 51 45 


44 15 11 


42 38 18 


41 1 5 




Pollux 


E. 


51 20 14 


49 44 25 


48 8 18 


46 31 54 




Saturn 


E. 


81 31 47 


79 54 53 


78 17 41 


76 40 9 




liegulus 


E. 


88 9 47 


86 33 26 


84 56 45 


83 19 46 


29 


Sun 


W. 


92 3 57 


93 35 34 


95 7 33 


96 39 65 




Venus 


W. 


55 57 16 


57 26 57 


58 57 1 


60 27 30 




a Arietis 


W. 


37 8 2 


38 46 20 


40 25 6 


42 4 16 




Jupiter 


E. 


32 49 59 


31 10 43 


29 31 6 


27 51 7 




Pollux 


E. 


38 25 20 


36 47 6 


35 8 35 


33 29 46 




Saturn 


E. 


68 27 17 


66 47 37 


65 7 35 


63 27 9 i 




Regulus 


E. 


75 9 30 


73 30 21 


71 50 49 


70 10 55 ' 



MARCH, 1860. 



301 





GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




] 

LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


IIP". 


VP. 


IXt. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Sun 


W. 


o / // 

98 12 40 


o / // 

99 45 49 


101 19 2.3 


o / // 

102 53 21 




Venus 


W. 


61 58 23 


63 29 40 


66 1 22 


66 33 30 




a Arietis 


W. 


43 43 53 


46 23 66 


47 4 26 


48 45 22 




Jupiter 


E. 


26 10 45 


24 30 3 


22 48 59 


21 7 34 




Saturn 


E. 


61 46 22 


60 5 9 


58 23 33 


56 41 33 




Kegulus 


E. 


68 30 37 


66 49 56 


65 8 61 


63 27 22 


2 


Sun 


W. 


110 49 19 


112 26 47 


114 2 40 


115 39 58 




Venus 


W. 


74 20 27 


75 65 8 


77 30 14 


79 6 47 




a Arietis 


W. 


67 16 40 


59 16 


60 44 18 


62 28 46 




Aldebaran 


W. 


26 37 15 


28 13 27 


29 50 61 


31 29 21 




Saturn 


E. 


48 5 27 


46 20 59 


44 36 6 


42 50 48 




Regulus 


E. 


54 53 42 


53 9 43 


61 26 18 


49 40 28 


3 


Sun 


W. 


123 52 43 


125 32 30 


127 12 41 


128 63 16 




Venus 


W. 


87 9 56 


88 48 2 


90 26 33 


92 6 29 




a Arietis 


W. 


71 17 40 


73 4 44 


74 62 14 


76 40 9 




Aldebaran 


W. 


39 55 26 


41 38 57 


43 23 8 


45 7 56 




Saturn 


E. 


33 58 11 


32 10 28 


30 22 23 


28 33 56 




Kegulus 


E. 


40 50 2 


39 2 43 


37 14 59 


36 26 62 


4 


Venus 


W. 


100 26 


102 7 13 


103 48 47 


106 30 41 




a Arietis 


w. 


85 45 36 


87 35 48 


89 26 22 


91 17 17 




Aldebaran 


w. 


54 27 


55 48 28 


57 36 67 


69 25 61 




Jupiter 


w. 


16 17 2 


18 7 8 


19 57 42 


21 48 41 




Spica 


E. 


80 23 11 


78 32 43 


76 41 56 


74 60 47 


5 


Aldebaran 


W. 


68 36 5 


70 27 8 


72 18 27 


74 10 2 




Jupiter 


w. 


31 9 


33 1 58 


34 55 11 


36 48 38 




Pollux 


w. 


26 3 4 


27 64 4 


29 45 33 


31 37 26 




Spica 


E. 


65 30 31 


63 37 39 


61 44 33 


59 51 14 




Antares 


E. 


111 18 43 


109 25 40 


107 32 23 


105 38 53 


6 


Aldebaran 


W. 


83 30 59 


85 23 37 


87 16 21 


89 9 8 




Jupiter 


W. 


46 18 44 


48 13 9 


50 7 39 


62 2 13 




Pollux 


w. 


41 1 31 


42 54 59 


44 48 37 


46 42 22 




Spica 


E. 


50 22 9 


48 27 58 


46 33 44 


44 39 27 




Antares 


E. 


96 8 45 


94 14 20 


92 19 49 


90 25 15 




Mars 


E. 


109 12 38 


107 22 50 


106 32 57, 


103 43 


7 


Jupiter 


W. 


61 35 19 


63 29 50 


66 24 16 


67 18 35 




Pollux 


W. 


56 11 56 


58 5 61 


59 59 41 


61 63 27 




Saturn 


W. 


26 20 


28 14 33 


SO 9 4 


32 3 32 




Spica 


E. 


35 8 10 


33 14 7 


31 20 12 


29 26 27 




Antares 


E. 


80 52 11 


78 57 41 


77 3 16 


75 8 68 




Mars 


E. 


94 32 51 


92 42 54 


90 53 3 


89 3 18 


8 


Jupiter 


W. 


76 47 61 


78 41 6 


80 34 6 


82 26 51 




Pollux 


W. 


71 20 11 


73 12 68 


75 5 31 


76 67 49 




Saturn 


w. 


41 33 57 


43 27 29 


45 20 48 


47 13 52 




Regulus 


w. 


34 19 20 


36 12 23 


38 5 12 


39 57 46 




Antares 


E. 


66 39 43 


63 46 28 


61 53 28 


60 44 




Mars 


E. 


79 56 47 


78 8 5 


76 19 37 


74 31 25 


9 


Jupiter 


W. 


91 46 


93 36 49 


96 27 17 


97 17 22 



302 



MARCH, 1860. 



GEEElSrWICH MEAN TIME. 



LUNAR DISTANCES. 



Day of 

the 
Month. 



Star's Name 

and 

Position. 



Midnight. 



XVK 



XVIIP". 



XXP. 



Sun 

Venus 

a Arietis 

Jupiter 

Saturn 

Regulus 

Sun 

Venus 

a Arietis 

Aldebaran 

Saturn 

Regulus 

Sun 

Venus 

a Arietis 

Aldebaran 

Saturn 

Regulus 

Venus 
a Arietis 
Aldebaran 
Jupiter 
Spica 

Aldebaran 

Jupiter 

Pollux 

Spica 

Antares 

Aldebaran 

Jupiter 

Pollux 

Spica 

Antares 

Mars 

Jupiter 

Pollux 

Saturn 

Spica 

Antares 

Mars 

Jupiter 

Pollux 

Saturn 

Regulus 

Antares 

Mars 

Jupiter 



W. 

W. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

E. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

W. 

W. 
W. 
W. 
E. 

W. 

W. 

W. 

E. 

E. 

W. 
W. 

w. 

E. 
E. 
E. 

W. 

w. 
w. 

E. 
E. 
E. 

W. 

w. 
w. 
w. 

E. 
E. 

W. 



104 21 43 
68 6 2 



50 


26 


44 


19 


25 


49 


54 


--59 


10 


61 


45 


28 


117 


17 


40 


80 


41 


45 


64 


13 


40 


33 


8 


52 


41 


5 


5 


47 


55 


13 


130 


34 


14 


93 


44 


49 


78 


28 


28 


46 


53 


20 


26 


45 


7 


33 


38 


22 


107 


12 


54 


93 


8 


31 


61 


15 


10 


23 


40 


4 


72 


59 


19 


76 


1 


51 


38 


42 


18 


33 


29 


41 


57 


57 


44 


103 


45 


11 


91 


1 


58 


53 


56 


50 


48 


36 


12 


42 


45 


8 


88 


30 


38 


101 


52 


59 


69 


12 


47 


63 


45 


7 


33 


57 


54 


27 


32 


54 


73 


14 


47 


87 


13 


40 


84 


19 


18 


78 


49 


50 


49 


6 


39 


41 

CO 


60 

O 


6 

1 a 



58 8 16 
72 43 29 

99 7 3 



106 2 
69 39 
52 8 



29 



33 



17 43 45 



53 
60 



16 21 
3 9 



118 55 49 
82 18 10 
65 59 1 
34 49 18 
18 ^7 
9 32 



39 
46 



132 15 35 
95 24 32 
80 17 10 
48 39 19 

24 55 58 
31 49 30 

108 55 26 
95 4 
63 4 53 

25 31 49 
71 7 33 

77 53 53 
40 36 10 
35 22 16 
56 4 3 
101 51 18 

92 54 50 

55 51 29 
50 30 6 
40 50 49 
86 36 

100 2 56 

71 6 50 
65 40 37 
35 52 9 
25 39 35 
71 20 45 

85 24 10 

86 11 28 
80 41 34 
50 59 9 
43 42 6 

56 16 6 
70 55 52 

100 56 20 



107 37 40 
71 12 23 
63 50 49 
1 23 
33 8 



16 
51 



58 20 25 



120 34 22 

83 55 
67 44 49 

36 30 34 

37 32 26 
44 23 26 

133 57 19 

97 4 39 

82 6 16 
50 25 51 
23 6 31 
30 16 

110 38 15 

96 51 55 

64 54 57 

27 23 54 

69 15 29 

79 46 6 
42 30 13 

37 15 7 
54 10 13 
99 57 15 

94 47 41 
57 46 7 
62 24 3 

38 56 32 

84 41 22 

98 12 53 

73 42 
67 33 59 
37 46 15 
23 46 32 
69 26 53 

83 34 51 



19 



21 



88 3 
82 33 
52 51 
45 33 49 
54 24 15 
69 8 33 

102 45 12 



109 13 17 
72 46 12 
55 33 31 
14 18 44 
49 49 30 
66 37 16 

122 13 20 
85 82 15 
69 31 2 

38 12 38 
35 45 31 
42 36 66 

136 39 26 
98 46 8 
83 55 46 
52 12 64 
21 16 46 

28 10 40 

112 21 21 

98 44 2 

66 45 21 

29 16 18 

67 23 8 

81 38 29 

44 24 25 

39 8 13 
52 16 14 
98 3 4 



96 40 29 
59 40 44 
54 18 
37 2 19 
82 46 45 
96 22 51 

74 64 23 
69 27 11 
39 40 12 
21 53 48 
67 33 12 
81 45 43 

89 64 49 

84 24 7 

64 43 14 

47 26 13 

52 32 43 

67 21 35 

104 33 39 



MARCH, 1860. 



303 







GKEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


IIXi-. 


VIi-. 


IX^. 


Month. 


Position. 












9 


Pollux 


w. 


O i 11 

86 14 54 


o / /; 

88 5 19 


89° 55 23 


/ // 

91 45 5 




Saturn 


w. 


56 34 47 


58 25 59 


60 16 60 


62 7 18 




Regulus 


w. 


49 16 17 


61 7 1 


52 57 23 


54 47 23 




Antares 


E. 


50 41 31 


48 60 40 


47 11 


45 10 6 




Mars 


E. 


65 34 56 


63 48 39 


62 2 45 


60 17 14 




a Aquilse 


E. 


103 31 35 


101 56 33 


100 21 39 


98 46 54 


10 


Jupiter 


W. 


106 21 40 


108 9 15 


109 56 24 


111 43 7 




Pollux 


W. 


100 47 30 


102 34 43 


104 21 30 


106 7 50 




Saturn 


W. 


71 13 41 


73 1 42 


74 49 18 


76 36 27 




Regulus 


W. 


63 51 25 


65 38 59 


67 26 6 


69 12 47 




Antares 


E. 


36 5 38 


34 18 1 


32 30 49 


30 44 3 




Mars 


E. 


51 35 44 


49 52 43 


48 10 10 


46 28 4 




a Aquilse 


E. 


90 56 43 


89 23 37 


87 50 55 


86 18 37 


11 


Saturn 


W. 


85 25 28 


87 9 55 


88 53 54 


90 37 26 




Regulus 


W. 


77 59 31 


79 43 31 


81 27 3 


83 10 8 




Spica 


W. 


24 2 41 


25 46 7 


27 29 4 


29 11 38 




Mars 


E. 


38 4 40 


36 26 27 


34 46 43 


33 8 30 




a Aquilse 


E. 


78 44 12 


77 14 63 


75 46 9 


74 18 1 




Sun 


E. 


125 12 37 


123 36 16 


122 22 


120 24 64 


12 


Saturn 


W. 


99 8 21 


100 49 12 


102 29 37 


104 9 37 




Regulus 


W. 


91 38 49 


93 19 13 


94 59 12 


96 38 46 




Spica 


W. 


37 38 30 


39 18 39 


40 68 23 


42 37 42 




a Aquilae 


E. 


67 7 6 


65 43 1 


64 19 41 


62 67 9 




Sun 


E. 


112 34 14 


111 1 25 


109 29 1 


107 57 2 


13 


Regulus 


W. 


104 50 19 


106 27 26 


108 4 11 


109 40 33 




Spica 


W. 


60 48 25 


62 26 24 


54 2 1 


65 38 16 




a Aquilae 


E. 


56 17 16 


55 6 


53 43 67 


52 28 52 




Sun 


E. 


100 23 21 


98 53 48 


97 24 38 


95 66 50 


14 


Spica 


W. 


63 34 18 


65 8 31 


66 42 26 


68 16 3 




Antares 


w. 


17 42 8 


19 16 30 


20 60 33 


22 24 18 




Sun 


E. 


88 37 10 


87 10 26 


85 44 1 


84 17 64 


15 


Spica 


W. 


75 59 55 


77 31 55 


79 3 40 


80 35 12 




Antares 


w. 


30 8 48 


31 40 56 


33 12 48 


34 44 26 




Sun 


E. 


77 11 37 


75 47 9 


74 22 56' 


72 68 56 


16 


Spica 


W. 


88 9 43 


89 40 4 


91 10 15 


92 40 16 




Antares 


W. 


42 19 32 


43 60 


45 20 17 


46 50 25 




Mars 


W. 


23 50 47 


26 15 59 


26 41 9 


28 6 15 




Sun 


E. 


66 2 10 


64 39 24 


63 16 48 


61 54 22 


17 


Spica 


W. 


100 8 16 


101 37 30 


103 6 38 


104 36 41 




Antares 


W. 


54 18 59 


56 48 20 


67 17 35 


58 46 45 




Mars 


W. 


35 10 43 


36 35 24 


38 1 


39 24 35 




Sun 


E. 


55 4 23 


53 42 46 


52 21 16 


50 69 63 


18 


Antares 


W. 


66 11 26 


67 40 11 


69 8 54 


70 37 35 




Mars 


w. 


46 26 39 


47 50 57 


49 15 14 


60 39 30 




Sun 


E. 


44 14 16 


42 53 24 


41 32 34 


40 11 48 



304 



MAKCH, 1860. 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XTl. 


XTIIIi-. 


XXR 


Month. 


Position. 












9 


Pollux 


W. 


o / // 

93 34 23 


95 23 17 


O / // 

97 11 47 


98 59 62 




Saturn 


w. 


63 57 23 


65 47 4 


67 36 21 


69 25 14 




Eegulus 


w. 


56 37 


58 26 13 


60 15 2 


62 3 26 




Antares 


E. 


43 20 22 


41 31 4 


39 42 10 


37 53 41 




Mars 


E. 


58 32 6 


56 47 23 


55 3 4 


63 19 10 




a Aquilae 


E. 


97 12 20 


95 38 


94 3 56 


92 30 10 


10 


Jupiter 


W. 


113 29 23 


115 15 12 


117 33 


118 45 27 




Pollux 


W. 


107 53 43 


109 39 9 


111 24 7 


113 8 38 




Saturn 


w. 


78 23 9 


80 9 24 


81 55 13 


83 40 34 




Regulus 


w. 


70 59 2 


72 44 50 


74 30 11 


76 15 4 




Antares 


E. 


28 57 43 


27 11 49 


25 26 20 


23 41 17 




Mars 


E. 


44 46 26 


43 5 17 


41 24 35 


39 44 23 




a Aquilae 


E. 


84 46 46 


83 15 22 


81 44 28 


80 14 4 


11 


Saturn 


W. 


92 20 31 


94 3 9 


95 45 20 


97 27 4 




Regulus 


w. 


84 52 46 


86 34 56 


88 16 40 


89 57 58 




Spica 


w. 


30 53 49 


32 35 36 


34 16 58 


35 67 56 




Mars 


E. 


31 30 46 


29 53 35 


28 16 54 


26 40 46 




a Aquilse 


E. 


72 50 30 


71 23 38 


69 57 25 


68 31 65 




Sun 


E. 


118 49 53 


117 15 19 


115 41 11 


114 7 29 


12 


Saturn 


W. 


105 49 11 


107 28 20 


109 7 4 


110 45 24 




Regulus 


W. 


98 17 54 


99 56 36 


101 34 54 


103 12 48 




Spica 


W. 


44 16 38 


45 55 10 


47 33 18 


49 11 3 




a Aquilje 


E. 


61 35 25 


60 14 32 


58 54 31 


57 35 25 




Sun 


E. 


106 25 29 


104 54 21 


103 23 37 


101 53 17 


13 


Regulus 


W. 


111 16 33 


112 52 12 


114 27 29 


116 2 25 




Spica 


W. 


57 14 9 


58 49 42 


60 24 54 


61 59 46 




a Aquilse 


E. 


51 14 53 


50 2 3 


48 50 26 


47 40 8 




Sun 


E. 


94 27 24 


92 59 20 


91 31 37 


90 4 13 


14 


Spica 


W. 


69 49 22 


71 22 24 


73 55 11 


74 27 40 




Antares 


w. 


23 57 45 


25 30 55 


27 3 48 


28 36 26 




Sun 


E. 


82 52 5 


81 26 34 


80 1 19 


78 36 20 


15 


Spica 


W. 


82 6 30 


83 37 36 


85 8 30 


86 39 12 




Antares 


w. 


36 15 52 


37 47 5 


39 18 5 


40 48 54 




Sun 


E. 


71 35 10 


70 11 37 


68 48 16 


67 25 8 


16 


Spica 


W. 


94 10 8 


95 39 52 


97 9 27 


98 38 56 




Antares 


w. 


48 20 24 


49 50 14 


51 19 66 


52 49 31 




Mars 


w. 


29 31 17 


30 56 15 


32 21 8 


33 45 58 




Sun 


E. 


60 32 5 


69 9 57 


57 47 38 


66 26 7 


17 


Spica 


w. 


106 4 38 


107 33 31 


109 2 19 


110 31 4 




Antares 


w. 


60 15 50 


61 44 50 


63 13 46 


64 42 38 




Mars 


w. 


40 49 5 


42 13 32 


43 37 57 


45 2 19 




Sun 


E. 


49 38 35 


48 17 24 


46 56 17 


45 36 14 


18 


Antares 


W. 


72 6 13 


73 34 50 


75 3 26 


76 32 1 




Mars 


W. 


52 3 44 


53 27 57 


64 52 10 


66 16 24 




Sun 


E. 


38 51 5 


37 30 26 


36 9 60 


34 49 17 



MARCH, 1860. 



305 









GKEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 






LUNAR DISTANCES. 




Day of 
the 


Star's Name 














and 




Noon. 


nil'. 


\l\ 


U>. 




Month. 


Position. 














19 


Antares 


W. 


o / // 

18 36 


i (1 

79 29 11 


O / // 

80 57 46 


O / // 

82 26 22 






Mars 


W. 


51 40 87 


59 4 50 


60 29 5 


61 53 22 






S0N 


E. 


33 28 47 


32 8 20 


30 47 65 


29 27 34 




24 


Sun 


W. 


21 54 17 


23 17 8 


24 40 16 


26 3 40 






Aldebaran 


E. 


43 35 1 


42 6 18 


40 37 39 


39 9 3 






Jupiter 


E. 


80 2 13 


78 30 52 


76 59 23 


75 27 46 






Pollux 


E. 


85 18 21 


83 47 


82 15 31 


80 43 54 




25 


Sun 


W. 


33 4 17 


34 29 4 


35 54 4 


37 19 17 






Aldebaran 


E. 


31 48 1 


30 20 28 


28 63 15 


27 26 27 






Jupiter 


E. 


67 47 25 


66 14 53 


64 42 11 


63 9 19 






Pollux 


E. 


73 3 33 


71 31 1 


69 68 20 


68 25 30 






Saturn 


E. 


101 46 46 


100 13 36 


98 40 16 


97 6 45 






Eegulus 


E. 


109 58 11 


108 25 19 


106 52 18 


106 19 6 




26 


Sun 


W. 


44 28 32 


45 55 2 


47 21 44 


48 48 40 






Jupiter 


E. 


55 22 22 


53 48 25 


62 14 17 


60 39 57 






Pollux 


E. 


60 38 45 


59 4 53 


57 30 50 


65 56 37 






Saturn 


E. 


89 16 31 


87 41 55 


86 7 7 


84 32 6 






Regulus 


E. 


97 30 25 


95 66 6 


94 21 36 


92 46 54 




27 


Sun 


W. 


56 6 41 


57 35 


69 3 33 


60 32 21 






Jupiter 


E. 


42 45 12 


41 9 35 


39 33 45 


37 57 42 






Pollux 


E. 


48 2 37 


46 27 14 


44 51 40 


43 15 64 






Saturn 


E. 


76 33 56 


74 67 38 


73 21 6 


71 44 20 






Regulus 


E. 


84 50 12 


83 14 11 


81 37 56 


80 1 28 




28 


Sun 


W. 


68 15 


69 30 38 


71 1 17 


72 32 13 






Venus 


W. 


26 46 68 


28 15 35 


29 44 33 


31 13 63 






Jupiter 


E. 


29 53 49 


28 16 18 


26 38 32 


25 30 






Pollux 


E. 


35 14 14 


33 37 21 


32 19 


30 23 8 






Saturn 


E. 


63 36 48 


61 58 31 


60 19 58 


58 41 8 






Regulus 


E. 


71 55 17 


70 17 15 


68.38 68 


67 24 




29 


Sun 


W. 


80 11 17 


81 43 59 


83 17 


84 50 20 






Venus 


W. 


38 45 39 


40 17 1 


41 48 43 


43 20 46 






Aldebaran 


W. 


23 3 50 


24 34 37 


26 6 46 


27 40 9 






Saturn 


E. 


50 22 47 


48 42 14 


47 1 23 


45 20 15 






Eegulus 


E. 


58 43 16 


57 2 57 


56 22 20 


53 41 24 






Spica 


E. 


112 46 19 


111 6 4 


109 25 29 


107 44 36 




30 


Sun 


W. 


92 41 49 


94 17 6 


95 52 42 


97 28 38 






Venus 


W. 


51 6 7 


62 40 14 


64 14 41 


55 49 30 






Aldebaran 


W. 


35 41 18 


37 19 51 


38 59 3 


40 38 52 






Saturn 


E. 


36 49 54 


35 6 54 


33 23 36 


31 39 57 






Regulus 
Spica 


E. 


45 12 1 


43 29 11 


41 46 1 


40 2 32 






E. 


99 15 16 


97 32 25 


96 49 14 


94 6 43 




31 


Sun 


W. 


105 33 22 


107 11 19 


108 49 36 


110 28 10 






Venus 


W. 


63 48 50 


65 25 46 


67 3 2 


68 40 38 






Aldebaran 


W. 


49 6 9 


50 49 7 


52 32 32 


54 16 24 






Regulus 
Spica 


E. 


31 20 17 


29 34 53 


27 49 11 


26 3 10 






E. 


85 23 2 


83 37 29 


81 51 35 


80 6 22 



20 



306 



MARCH, 1860. 







GKEENWICH 


MEAN" TIME. 




LTJNAB DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVI'. 


XVIIIi-. 


XXIi. 


Month. 


Position. 


















O 1 It 


O i II 


o / // 


o / // 


19 


Antares 


W. 


83 54 58 


85 23 36 


86 52 15 


88 20 66 




Mars 


W. 


63 VI 39 


64 41 57 


66 6 18 


67 30 42 




Sun 


E. 


28 7 17 


26 47 2 


26 26 52 


24 6 46 


24 


Sot 


W. 


27 27 20 


28 51 14 


30 16 22 


31 39 43 




Aldebaran 


E. 


37 40 33 


36 12 10 


34 43 56 


33 16 52 




Jupiter 


E. 


73 56 


72 24 5 


70 52 1 


69 19 48 




Pollux 


E. 


79 12 7 


77 40 11 


76 8 8 


74 36 66 


25 


Sun 


W. 


38 44 43 


40 10 21 


41 36 11 


43 2 15 




Aldebaran 


E, 


26 -0 10 


24 34 32 


23 9 42 


21 45 52 




Jupiter 


E. 


61 36 17 


60 3 4 


58 29 41 


56 66 7 




Pollux 


E. 


66 52 29 


65 19 18 


63 46 57 


62 12 26 




Saturn 


E. 


95 33 4 


93 59 12 


92 25 9 


90 50 56 




Kegulus 


E. 


103 45 44 


102 12 12 


100 38 28 


99 4 32 


26 


Sun 


W. 


50 15 49 


51 43 11 


53 10 46 


54 38 36 




Jupiter 


E. 


49 5 25 


47 30 41 


45 55 44 


44 20 36 




Pollux 


E. 


54 22 11 


52 47 34 


51 12 46 


49 37 48 




Saturn 


E. 


82 56 64 


81 21 29 


79 45 61 


78 10 




Regulus 


E. 


91 12 


89 36 52 


88 1 31 


86 25 68 


27 


Sun 


W. 


62 1 25 


63 30 44 


65 18 


66 30 8 




Jupiter 


E. 


36 21 24 


34 44 52 


33 8 6 


31 31 6 




Pollux 


E. 


41 39 57 


40 3 48 


38 27 27 


36 60 56 




Satum 


E. 


70 7 20 


68 30 5 


66 52 35 


66 14 49 




Regulua 


E. 


78 24 44 


76 47 45 


76 10 31 


73 33 2 


28 


Sun 


W. 


74 3 26 


75 34 57 


77 6 46 


78 38 53 




Venus 


W. 


32 43 34 


34 13 35 


35 43 56 


37 14 37 




Jupiter 


E. 


23 22 13 


21 43 41 


20 4 55 


.18 26 54 




Pollux 


E. 


28 45 49 


27 8 23 


25 30 53 


23 63 23 




Satum 


E. 


57 2 2 


55 22 39 


53 42 59 


52 3 2 




Regulua 


E. 


65 21 33 


63 42 25 


62 3 


60 23 17 


29 


Sun 


W. 


86 24 


87 57 58 


89 32 15 


91 6 62 




Venus 


W. 


44 53 8 


46 25 51 


47 68 55 


49 32 21 




Aldebaran 


W. 


29 14 36 


30 50 2 


32 26 20 


34 3 27 




Saturn 


E. 


43 38 48 


41 57 2 


40 14 58 


38 32 35 




Regulus 


E. 


52 10 


60 18 36 


48 36 44 


46 54 82 




Spica 


E. 


106 3 23 


104 21 51 


102 39 59 


100 57 47 


30 


Sun 


W. 


99 4 55 


100 41 32 


102 18 28 


103 55 45 




Venus 


W. 


57 24 40 


59 10 


60 36 2 


62 12 15 




Aldebaran 


W. 


42 19 15 


44 12 


45 41 41 


47 23 40 




Saturn 


E. 


29 56 2 


28 11 49 


26 27 18 


24 42 30 




Regulus 


E. 


38 18 44 


36 34 36 


34 50 9 


33 5 22 




Spica 


E. 


92 21 52 


90 37 40 


88 53 8 


87 8 15 


31 


Sun 


W. 


112 7 5 


113 46 20 


115 25 64 


117 5 45 




Venus 


W. 


70 18 35 


71 56 53 


73 35 31 


76 14 27 




Aldebaran 


w. 


56 41 


67 45 24 


59 30 31 


61 16 2 




Regulus 


E. 


24 16 53 


22 30 20 


20 43 32 


18 56 30 




Spica 


E. 


78 18 49 


76 31 56 


74 44 43 


72 67 11 



APRIL, 1860. 



307 





GEEENWICH 


MEA^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name. 










and 




Noon. 


IIP'. 


VI>>. 


IXX 


Month. 


Position. 














* 




<i 1 II 


O 1 II 


O 1 II 


O / // 


1 


Sun 


W. 


118 45 54 


120 26 22 


122 7 8 


123 48 10 




Venus 


w. 


76 53 45 


78 33 22 


80 13 17 


81 53 31 




Aldebaran 


w. 


63 2 


64 48 18 


66 34 57 


68 21 58 




Jupiter 


w. 


24 49 40 


26 37 15 


28 25 10 


30 13 25 




Pollux 


w. 


20 34 50 


22 19 53 


24 5 42 


25 52 11 




Spica 


E. 


71 9 21 


69 21 12 


67 32 45 


65 43 59 


2 


Venus 


W. 


90 19 1 


92 55 


93 43 4 


95 25 27 




Aldebaran 


W. 


77 21 47 


79 10 37 


80 59 43 


82 49 3 




Jupiter 


W. 


39 19 3 


41 8 59 


42 59 10 


44 49 35 




Pollux 


W. 


34 52 19 


36 41 35 


38 31 13 


40 21 9 




Spica 


E. 


56 35 58 


54 45 35 


52 54 59 


51 4 10 




Antares 


E. 


102 22 57 


100 32 23 


98 41 35 


96 50 33 


3 


Venus 


W. 


104 25 


105 43 55 


107 27 33 


109 11 18 




Jupiter 


W. 


54 4 42 


55 56 13 


57 47 52 


59 39 39 




Pollux 


W. 


49 34 49 


51 26 11 


53 17 44 


55 9 26 




Saturn 


W. 


21 2 23 


.22 54 3 


24 45 58 


26 38 4 




Spica 


E. 


41 47 19 


39 55 30 


38 3 35 


36 11 34 




Antares 


E. 


87 32 25 


85 40 17 


83 48 2 


81 55 39 




Mars 


E. 


115 53 49 


114 5 41 


112 17 25 


110 29 1 


4 


Jupiter 


W. 


68 59 41 


70 51 47 


72 43 54 


74 35 58 




Pollux 


W. 


64 29 28 


66 21 39 


68 13 50 


70' 6 




Saturn 


w. 


36 26 


37 53 6 


39 45 46 


41 38 26 




Eegulus 


w. 


27 27 45 


29 20 8 


31 12 32 


33 4 57 




Antares 


E. 


72 32 36 


70 39 53 


68 47 11 


66 54 30 




Mars 


E. 


101 25 44 


99 36 57 


97 48 11 


95 59 25 


5 


Jupiter 


W. 


83 55 23 


85 46 56 


87 38 20 


89 29 33 




Pollux 


W. 


79 26 6 


81 17 49 


83 9 24 


85 49 




Saturn 


W. 


51 1 2 


52 53 15 


54 45 20 


56 37 15 




Eegulus 


W. 


42 26 26 


44 18 26 


46 10 19 


48 2 2 




Antares 


E. 


57 32 


55 39 50 


53 47 48 


51 55 57 




Mars 


E. 


86 56 28 


85 8 11 


83 20 3 


81 32 5 


% 


Jupiter 


W. 


98 42 36 


100 32 29 


102 22 4 


104 11 22 




Saturn 


W. 


65 53 47 


67 44 22 


69 34 41 


71 24 42 




Regulus 


w. 


57 17 39 


59 8 4 


60 58 12 


62 48 3 




Antares 


E. 


42 39 44 


40 49 13 


38.58 59 


37 9 2 




Mars 


E. 


72 35 16 


70 48 37 


69 2 15 


67 16 11 




a Aquilae 


E. 


96 34 40 


94 59 4 


93 23 38 


91 48 24 


7 


Saturn 


W. 


80 29 59 


82 18 


84 5 39 


85 52 54 




Eegulus 


w. 


71 52 32 


73 40 24 


75 27 53 


77 14 59 




Mars 


E. 


58 30 36 


56 46 32 


55 2 49 


53 19 29 




a Aquilae 


E. 


83 56 29 


82 23 11 


80 50 18 


79 17 53 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


108 39 50 


107 1 27 


105 23 14 


103 45 13 


8 


Saturn 


W. 


94 43 13 


96 28 2 


98 12 26 


99 56 25 




Eegulus 

Spica 

Mars 


w. 


86 4 33 


87 49 14 


89 33 30 


91 17 20 




w. 


32 4 35 


33 48 55 


35 32 62 


37 16 25 




E. 


44 48 49 


43 7 55 


41 27 27 


39 47 24 




a Aquilae 
Fomalhaut 


E. 


71 43 53 


70 14 54 


68 46 35 


67 18 59 




E. 


95 38 58 


94 2 39 


92 26 41 


90 51 6 



308 



APRIL, 1860. 





GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










1 the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


XTim. 


XXP. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Sun 


W. 


o t u 

125 29 29 


o / // 

127 11 4 


O 1 It 

128 52 64 


130 34 59 




Venus 


W. 


83 34 3 


86 14 52 


86 55 58 


88 37 21 




Aldebaran 


W. 


70 9 18 


71 66 67 


73 44 57 


75 33 13 




Jupiter 


W. 


32 1 58 


33 60 49 


36 39 57 


37 29 22 




Pollux 


W. 


21 39 15 


29 26 61 


31 14 54 


33 3 24 




Spica 


E. 


63 54 55 


62 5 34 


60 15 68 


58 26 6 


2 


Venus 


W. 


97 8 3 


98 50 52 


100 33 52 


102 17 4 




Aldebaran 


W. 


84 38 37 


86 28 23 


88 18 22 


90 8 31 




Jupiter 


W. 


46 40 14 


48 31 4 


50 22 6 


52 13 19 




Pollux 


W. 


42 11 23 


44 1 63 


45 52 38 


47 43 37 




Spica 


E. 


49 13 9 


47 21 56 


45 30 33 


43 39 




Antares 


E. 


94 59 18 


93 7 51 


91 16 12 


89 24 24 


3 


Venus 


W. 


110 55 10 


112 39 6 


114 23 7 


116 7 10 




Jupiter 


W. 


61 31 32 


63 23 29 


65 15 30 


67 7 35 




Pollux 


w. 


57 1 16 


58 53 12 


60 45 14 


62 37 19 




Saturn 


w. 


28 30 20 


30 22 43 


32 16 13 


34 7 48 




Spica 


E. 


34 19 30 


32 27 23 


30 36 15 


28 43 8 




Antares 


E. 


80 3 10 


78 10 37 


76 17 59 


74 26 19 




Mars 


E. 


108 40 30 


106 51 54 


106 3 14 


103 14 31 


4 


Jupiter 


W. 


76 28 1 


78 20 


80 11 64 


82 3 42 




Pollux 


w. 


71 58 10 


73 50 16 


75 42 19 


77 34 16 




Saturn 


w. 


43 31 6 


45 23 42 


47 16 14 


49 8 41 




Regulus 


w. 


34 67 22 


36 49 44 


38 42 3 


40 34 17 




Antares 


E. 


65 1 50 


63 9 15 


61 16 44 


69 24 18 




Mars 


E. 


94 10 40 


92 22 


90 33 24 


88 44 62 


5 


Jupiter 


W. 


91 20 36 


93 11 27 


95 2 5 


96 52 28 




Pollux 


W. 


86 62 3 


88 43 5 


90 33 55 


92 24 30 




Saturn 


W. 


58 28 59 


60 20 31 


62 11 61 


64 2 67 




Regulus 


W. 


49 63 36 


51 44 56 


63 36 4 


66 26 59 




Antares 


E. 


60 4 17 


48 12 48 


46 21 33 


44 30 31 




Mars 


E. . 


79 44 18 


77 56 42 


76 9 19 


74 22 10 


6 


Jupiter 


W. 


106 22 


107 49 2 


109 37 23 


111 25 22 




Saturn 


W. 


73 14 25 


76 3 49 


76 62 53 


78 41 36 




Regulus 


w. 


64 37 36 


66 26 61 


68 15 45 


70 4 19 




Antares 


E. 


35 19 24 


33 30 4 


31 41 5 


29 52 27 




Mars 


E. 


65 30 25 


63 44 57 


61 59 49 


60 15 2 




a Aquilse 


E. 


90 13 26 


88 38 42 


87 4 16 


85 30 11 


1 


Saturn 


W. 


87 39 46 


89 26 15 


91 12 19 


92 57 58 




Regulus 


W. 


79 1 41 


80 48 1 


82 33 57 


84 19 27 




Mars 


E. 


51 36 33 


49 54 


48 11 52 


46 30 8 




a Aquilae 


E. 


77 45 59 


76 14 36 


74 43 46 


73 13 30 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


102 7 25 ■ 


100 29 52 


98 52 36 


97 15 38 


8 


Saturn 


W. 


101 39 57 


103 23 4 


105 6 44 


106 47 59 




Regulus 


W. 


93 45 


94 43 44 


96 26 17 


98 8 24 




Spica 


W. 


38 59 35 


40 42 20 


42 24 40 


44 6 36 




Mars 


E. 


38 7 48 


36 28 37 


34 49 53 


33 11 34 




a Aquilse 


E. 


65 52 8 


64 26 3 


63 46 


61 36 19 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


89 16 63 


87 41 6 


86 6 42 


84 32 44 



APRIL, 1860. 



309 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 






LUNAR DISTANCES. 




Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Noon. 


ni". 


Vlk. 


IX''. 




9 


Saturn 


W. 


108 29 48 


/ // 

110 11 11 


/ // 

111 52 10 


o / // 

113 32 46 






Eegulus 


W. 


99 50 5 


101 31 21 


103 12 11 


104 52 35 






Spica 


W. 


45 48 8 


47 29 14 


49 9 65 


50 60 12 






Mars 


E. 


31 33 44 


29 56 19 


28 19 20 


26 42 47 






a Aquilae 


E. 


60 12 46 


58 60 7 


57 28 26 


56 7 44 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


82 59 12 


81 26 8 


79 63 32 


78 21 24 






Sun 


E. 


131 58 23 


130 26 


128 62 1 


127 19 25 




10 


Spica 


W. 


59 5 28 


60 43 19 


62 20 46 


63 57 50 






Antares 


W. 


13 13 34 


14 51 36 


16 29 12 


18 6 26 




a Aquilse 


E. 


49 40 69 


48 27 21 


47 15 6 


46 4 20 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


70 48 14 


69 19 11 


67 50 40 


66 22 41 






a Pegasi 


E. 


91 41 10 


90 6 55 


88 33 3 


86 69 34 






Son 


E. 


119 42 26 


118 12 13 


116 42 24 


115 12 67 




11 


Spica 


W. 


71 57 33 


73 32 25 


75 6 57 


76 41 10 






Antares 


W. 


26 6 52 


27 41 51 


29 16 30 


30 60 49 






Fomalliaut 


E. 


59 11 40 


57 47 19 


66 23 37 


66 36 






a Pegasi 


E. 


79 17 48 


77 46 36 


76 15 44 


74 45 15 






Sun 


E. 


107 61 11 


106 23 64 


104 56 67 


103 30 19 




12 


Spica 


W. 


84 27 32 


86 59 56 


87 32 3 


89 3 66 






Antares 


W. 


38 37 41 


40 10 11 


41 42 26 


43 14 25 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


48 16 83 


46 68 10 


45 40 41 


44 24 7 






a Pegasi 


E. 


67 18 19 


65 50 


64 22 4 


62 64 29 






Sun 


E. 


96 21 49 


94 66 68 


93 32 24 


92 8 6 




13 


Spica 


W. 


96 39 43 


98 10 14 


99 40 38 


101 10 41 






Antares 


W. 


60 50 45 


52 21 22 


63 51 47 


65 22 2 






Mars 


W. 


17 32 6 


18 58 41 


20 25 8 


21 61 27 






a Pegasi 


E. 


56 41 55 


54 16 30 


62 61 27 


61 26 48 






Sun 


E. 


85 10 7 


83 47 10 


82 24 25 


81 1 51 




14 


Antares 


W. 


62 50 53 


64 20 14 


66 49 29 


67 18 38 






Mars 


W. 


29 1 18 


30 26 53 


31 52 13 


33 17 38 






a Pegasi 


E. 


44 29 40 


43 7 36 


41 46 1 


40 24 58 






Sun 


E. 


74 11 26 


72 49 46 


71 28 13 


70 6 47 




16 


Antares 


W. 


74 43 4 


76 11 47 


77 40 26 


79 9 6 






Mars 


W. 


40 23 37 


41 48 39 


43 13 39 


44 38 39 






Sun 


E. 


63 20 56 


61 69 69 


60 39 4 


59 18 11 




16 


Antares 


W. 


86 32 3 


88 39 


89 29 17 


90 67 57 






Mars 


W. 


61 43 30 


63 8 30 


64 33 32 


55 68 36 






a Aquilae 


W. 


42 23 67 


43 24 18 


44 25 57 


45 28 <fc9 






Sun 


E. 


52 34 15 


51 13 29 


49 52 43 


48 31 57 




17 


Antares 


W. 


08 22 1 


99 51 1 


101 20 6 


102 49 16 






Mars 


W. 


63 4 48 


64 30 15 


65 55 46 


67 21 23 






a Aquilae 


w. 


50 58 41 


52 7 21 


63 16 47 


64 26 68 






Sun 


E. 


41 47 44 


40 26 49 


39 6 51 


37 44 60 




18 ■ 


Mars 


W. 


74 31 1 


76 67 17 


77 23 41 


78 60 12 






a Aquilae 


W. 


60 27 36 


61 41 26 


62 66 46 


64 10 36 




1 


Sun 


E. 


30 59 11 


29 37 59 


28 16 46 


26 55 32 





310 






iVPRIL, 1860. 








' 


GKEENWICH 


IVTF.AW TIME. 


1 


LUNAE DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVK 


XVIIP'. 


XXIi-. 


Month. 


Position. 












9 


Saturn 


W. 


o / // 

115 12 55 


o / // 

116 52 41 


/ il 

118 32 5 


/ // 

120 11 7 




Regulus 


W. 


106 32 34 


108 12 7 


109 61 16 


111 29 59 




Spica 


W. 


52 30 4 


54 9 31 


65 48 34 


57 27 13 




Mars 


E. 


25 6 41 


23 31 2 


21 65 50 


20 21 5 




a Aquilae 


E. 


54 48 5 


53 29 33 


52 12 9 


50 56 55 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


76 49 45 


76 18 36 


73 47 58 


72 17 50 




Sun 


E. 


125 47 13 


124 16 26 


122 44 3 


121 13 3 


10 


Spica 


W. 


65 34 31 


67 10 49 


68 46 45 


70 22 20 




Antares 


w. 


19 43 17 


21 19 44 


22 55 49 


24 31 32 




a Aquilse 


E. 


44 55 7 


43 47 28 


42 41 33 


41 37 31 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


64 65 18 


63 28 29 


62 2 16 


60 36 39 




a Pegasi 


E. 


85 26 27 


83 63 44 


82 21 23 


80 49 24 




Sun 


E. 


113 43 62 


112 16 9 


110 46 49 


109 18 50 


11 


Spica 


W. 


78 16 3 


79 48 37 


81 21 53 


82 54 51 




■ Antares 


W. 


32 24 48 


33 58 27 


35 31 50 


37 4 65 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


53 38 17 


52 16 42 


50 55 51 


49 35 47 




a Pegasi 


E. 


73 15 8 


71 45 23 


70 16 


68 46 59 




Son 


E. 


102 4 


100 38 1 


99 12 20 


97 46 56 


12 


Spica 


W. 


90 36 33 


92 6 56 


93 38 5 


95 9 




Antares 


W, 


44 46 9 


46 17 38 


47 48 53 


49 19 66 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


43 8 34 


41 54 5 


40 40 42 


39 28 31 




a Pegasi 


E. 


61 27 14 


60 22 


68 33 52 


57 7 42 




Sun 


E. 


90 44 2 


89 20 13 


87 56 38 


86 33 16 


13 


Spica 


W. 


102 40 39 


104 10 27 


105 40 5 


107 9 35 




Antares 


W. 


56 52 7 


68 22 1 


59 61 47 


61 21 24 




Mars 


w. 


23 17 38 


24 43 41 


26 9 37 


27 35 26 




a Pegasi 


E. 


50 2 32 


48 38 40 


47 15 14 


45 52 14 




Sun 


E. 


79 39 27 


78 17 13 


76 55 9 


76 33 13 


14 


Antares 


W. 


68 47 40 


70 16 37 


71 45 30 


73 14 19 




Mars 


w. 


34 42 58 


86 8 14 


37 33 25 


38 58 32 




a Pegasi 


E. 


39 4 30 


37 44 39 


36 25 26 


35 6 58 




Sun 


E. 


68 46 27 


67 24 12 


66 3 2 


64 41 57 


15 


Antares 


W. 


80 37 41 


82 6 17 


83 34 52 


85 3 27 




Mars 


W. 


46 3 37 


47 28 34 


48 53 32 


50 18 31 




Sun 


E. 


67 57 22 


66 36 34 


65 16 47 


63 55 1 


16 


Antares 


W. 


92 26 39 


93 65 24 


95 24 13 


96 63 5 




Mars 


w. 


67 23 44 


68 48 54 


60 14 8 


61 39 26 


t 


a Aquilse 


w. 


46 32 48 


47 37 51 


48 43 53 


49 60 60 




Sun 


E. 


47 11 9 


46 60 20 


44 29 30 


43 8 38 


17 


Antares 


W. 


104 18 32 


105 47 53 


107 17 20 


108 46 53 




Mars 


w. 


68 47 6 


70 12 55 


71 38 50 


73 4 52 




a Aquilse 


w. 


55 37 51 


66 49 22 


58 1 32 


59 14 17 




Sun 


E. 


36 23 47 


35 2 41 


33 41 33 


32 20 23 


18 


Mars 


w. 


80 16 52 


81 43 40 


83 10 37 


84 37 43 




a Aquilse 


w. 


65 25 54 


66 41 38 


67 57 47 


69 14 19 




Sun 


E. 


25 34 18 


24 13 8 


22 52 1 


21 31 



APRIL, 1860. 



311 







GKEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










iL 


and 




Noon. 


III"". 


VP. 


IX'. 


Month. 


Position. 












23 


Sun 


W. 


O / II 

26 50 49 


O / II 

28 18 33 


O / II 

29 46 36 


Q 1 il 

31 15 




Jupiter 


E. 


48 9 26 


46 33 44 


44 57 51 


43 21 47 




Pollux 


E. 


51 3 35 


49 27 38 


47 51 31 


46 15 16 




Satum 


E. 


79 6 1 


77 29 29 


75 52 48 


74 15 55 




Regulus 


E. 


87 51 32 


86 14 57 


84 38 10 


83 1 12 


24 


Sun 


W. 


38 41 10 


40 11 12 


41 41 28 


43 11 69 




Jupiter 


E. 


35 18 35 


33 41 23 


32 3 59 


30 26 24 




Pollux 


E. 


38 11 50 


36 34 47 


34 57 38 


33 20 23 




Saturn 


E. 


66 8 36 


64 30 33 


62 62 19 


61 13 54 




Regulus 


E. 


74 58 29 


73 15 21 


71 37 2 


69 68 30 


25 


Sun 


W. 


50 48 6 


62 20 1 


63 62 9 


56 24 31 




Aldebaran 


W. 


20 18 38 


21 46 38 


23 16 18 


24 47 26 




Saturq 


E. 


52 58 52 


51 19 16 


49 39 29 


47 69 30 




Eegulus 


E. 


61 42 57 


60 3 14 


68 23 19 


56 43 13 




Spica 


E. 


115 46 9 


114 6 28 


112 26 36 


110 46 31 


26 


Sun 


W. 


63 9 42 


65 43 25 


67 17 21 


68 51 29 




Aldebaran 


W. 


32 38 36 


34 15 8 


35 52 17 


37 30 




Venus 


W. 


18 16 31 


19 50 7 


21 23 67 


22 58 




Saturn 


E. 


39 36 41 


37 66 32 


36 14 13 


34 32 42 




Regulus 


E. 


48 19 37 


46 38 18 


44 56 46 


43 16 2 




Spica 


E. 


102 22 58 


100 41 37 


99 4 


97 18 18 


27 


Sun 


W. 


75 45 35 


77 21 4 


78 56 46 


80 32 42 




Aldebaran 


W. 


46 45 34 


47 25 54 


49 6 36 


60 47 40 




Venus 


W. 


30 51 34 


32 26 58 


34 2 35 


35 38 25 




Satum 


E. 


26 2 25 


24 19 62 


22 37 11 


20 54 23 




Regulus 


E. 


34 43 23 


33 28 


31 17 22 


29 34 4 




Spica 


E. 


88 46 12 


87 3 9 


85 19 52 


83 36 22 


28 


Sun 


W. 


88 35 37 


90 12 62 


91 50 19 


93 27 59 




Aldebaran 


W. 


59 17 41 


61 35 


62 43 46 


64 27 12 




Venus 


W. 


43 40 59 


46 18 9 


46 56 32 


48 33 10 




Jupiter 


W. 


18 18 7 


20 1 52 


21 46 50 


23 30 2 




Spica 


E. 


74 55 41 


73 10 54 


71 25 64 


69 40 41 




Antares 


E. 


120 43 33 


118 58 37 


117 13 30 


115 28 9 


29 


Sun 


W. 


101 39 26 


103 18 19 


104 67 23 


106 36 39 




Aldebaran 


W. 


73 8 14 


74 53 9 


76 38 17 


78 23 39 




Venus 


W. 


56 44 29 


58 23 22 


60 2 28 


61 41 46 




Jupiter 


W. 


32 14 24 


33 59 54 


36 45 37 


37 31 31 




Pollux 


w. 


30 43 7 


32 28 


34 13 15 


35 58 49 




. Spica 


E. 


60 51 36 


59 6 11 


57 18 34 


55 31 4f 




Antares 


E. 


106 38 17 


104 51 42 


103 4 56 


101 17 56 


30 


Sun 


W. 


114 55 37 


116 35 64 


118 16 19 


119 56 52 




Venus 


w. 


70 1 4 


71 41 28 


73 22 2 


75 2 45 




Jupiter 
Pollux 


w. 


46 23 49 


48 10 48 


49 67 66 


61 45 14 




w. 


44 50 50 


46 37 57 


48 26 17 


50 12 49 




Saturn 


w. 


16 27 42 


18 14 26 


20 1 32 


21 48 66 




Spica 
Antares 


E. 


46 35 12 


44 47 25 


42 59 30 


41 11 26- 




E. 


92 20 17 


90 32 14 


88 44 2 


86 65 40 



312 



APRIL, 1860. 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVk. 


XVIIP. 


XXI''. 


Month. 


Position. 












23 


Sot 


W. 


o / // 
32 43 42 


o / // 

34 12 39 


Oil! 

35 41 63 


oil! 

37 11 24 




Jupiter 


E. 


41 45 32 


40 9 4 


38 32 26 


36 55 36 




Pollux 


E. 


44 38 51 


43 2 18 


41 25 37 


39 48 47 




Saturn 


E. 


72 38 50 


71 1 33 


69 24 6 


67 46 27 




Eegulus 


E. 


81 24 2 


79 46 41 


78 9 9 


76 31 26 


24 


Sun 


W. 


44 42 44 


46 13 44 


47 44 57 


49 16 25 




Jupiter 


E. 


28 48 36 


27 10 38 


25 32 29 


23 54 8 




Pollux 


E. 


31 43 4 


30 5 41 


28 28 17 


26 60 55 




Saturn 


E. 


59 35 17 


57 56 28 


56 17 27 


54 38 15 




Eegulus 


E. 


68 19 47 


66 40 62 


65 1 46 


63 22 27 


25 


Sun 


W. 


56 67 7 


68 29 66 


60 2 67 


61 36 18 




Aldebaran 


w. 


26 19 47 


27 53 12 


29 27 32 


31 2 42 




Saturn 


E. 


46 19 20 


44 38 58 


42 68 23 


41 17 38 




Eegulus 


E. 


55 2 54 


53 22 23 


51 41 40 


50 46 




Spica 


E. 


109 6 14 


107 25 44 


105 45 1 


104 4 6 


26 


Sun 


W. 


69 25 52 


71 28 


72 35 17 


74 10 20 




Aldebaran 


W. 


'39 8 13 


40 46 65 


42 26 3 


44 6 37 




Venus 


w. 


24 32 15 


26 6 45 


27 41 28 


29 16 25 




Saturn 


E. 


32 51 


31 9 7 


29 27 3 


27 44 49 




Eegulus 


E. 


41 33 6 


39 60 58 


38 8 37 


36 26 6 




Spica 


E. 


95 36 18 


93 54 6 


92 11 41 


90 29 8 


27 


Sun 


W. 


82 8 50 


83 45 12 


85 21 47 


86 58 36 




Aldebaran 


w. 


52 29 3 


54 10 45 


55 52 46 


57 35 5 




Venus 


w. 


37 14 29 


38 50 47 


40 27 18 


42 4 2 




Saturn 


E. 


19 11 30 


17 28 35 


15 45 40 


14 2 48 




Eegulus 


E. 


27 50 36 


26 6 57 


24 23 9 


22 39 11 




Spica 


E. 


81 52 40 


80 8 44 


78 24 36 


76 40 16 


28 


Sun 


W. 


95 5 52 


96 43 67 


98 22 14 


100 44 




Aldebaran 


W. 


66 10 54 


67 64 52 


69 39 5 


71 23 33 




Venus 


W. 


50 11 


51 49 4 


53 27 20 


55 6 48 




Jupiter 


W. 


25 14 28 


26 59 8 


28 44 1 


30 29 7 




Spica 


E. 


67 55 17 


66 9 40 


64 23 50 


62 37 49 




Antares 


E. 


113 42 36 


111 56 50 


110 10 51 


108 24 40 


29 


Sun 


W. 


108 16 6 


109 65 45 


111 35 33 


113 15 30 




Aldebaran 


W. 


80 9 13 


81 54 68 


83 40 66 


85 27 4 




Venus 


W. 


63 21 15 


66 56 


66 40 48 


68 20 51 




Jupiter 


W. 


39 17 37 


41 3 54 


42 50 22 


44 37 1 




Pollux 


W. 


37 44 41 


39 30 50 


41 17 15 


43 3 56 




Spica 


E. 


53 44 48 


51 57 39 


50 10 20 


48 22 61 




Antares 


E. 


99 30 46 


97 43 26 


96 55 53 


94 8 10 


30 


Sun 


W. 


121 37 33 


123 18 21 


124 59 16 


126 40 17 




Venus 


W. 


76 43 38 


78 24 38 


80 5 47 


81 47 4 




Jupiter 


W. 


53 32 40 


55 20 14 


57 7 66 


58 56 46 




Pollux 


W. 


62 32 


53 48 26 


55 36 29 


57 24 42 




Saturn 


W. 


23 86 35 


25 24 28 


27 12 33 


29 60 




Spica 


E. 


39 23 14 


37 34 56 


36 46 33 


33 58 3 




Antares 


E. 


85 7,10 


83 18 32 


81 29 46 


79 40 52 

.... 



MAY, 1860. 



313 





GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


iiik. 


yi\ 


IX". 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


o / // 


a 1 II 


o / // 


1 


Venus 


W. 


83 28 28 


85 9 58 


86 51 34 


88 33 16 




Jupiter 


W. 


60 43 42 


62 31 44 


64 19 53 


66 8 6 




Pollux 


W. 


59 13 3 


61 1 32 


62 50 8 


64 38 49 




Saturn 


W. 


30 49 17 


32 37 51 


34 26 34 


36 15 24 




Spica 


E. 


32 9 29 


30 20 51 


28 32 11 


26 43 31 




Antares 


E. 


11 51 62 


76 2 45 


74 13 32 


72 24 16 




Mars 


E. 


119 19 54 


117 33 61 


115 47 42 


114 1 27 


2 


Venus 


W. 


97 2 46 


98 44 47 


100 26 50 


102 8 52 




Jupiter 


W. 


75 10 7 


76 58 ZT 


78 47 9 


80 35 39 




Pollux 


w. 


73 43 30 


75 32 34 


77 21 40 


79 10 45 




Saturn 


w. 


45 20 46 


47 9 59 


48 59 13 


50 48 28 




Kegulus 


w. 


. 36 42 46 


38 32 7 


40 21 29 


42 10 53 




Antares 


E. 


63 16 52 


61 27 17 


59 37 41 


57 48 6 




Mars 


E. 


105 9 13 


103 22 40 


101 36 6 


99 49 30 


3 


Jupiter 


W. 


89 37 43 


91 25 56 


93 14 3 


96 2 4 




Pollux 


W. 


88 15 48 


90 4 37 


91 53 21 


93 41 59 




Saturn 


w. 


59 54 19 


61 43 19 


63 32 13 


65 21 1 




Regulus 


w. 


51 17 30 


53 6 40 


54 55 45 


56 44 44 




Antares 


E. 


48 40 36 


46 51 18 


45 2 4 


43 12 58 




Mars 


E. 


90 56 59 


89 10 40 


87 24 25 


85 38 17 


4 


Jupiter 


W. 


104 4 


105 47 11 


107 34 6 


109 20 48 




Saturn 


W. 


74 28 2 


76 10 56 


77 58 38 


79 46 9 




Regulus 


W. 


65 47 42 


67 35 48 


69 23 42 


71 11 25 




Antares 


E. 


34 9 26 


32 21 12 


30 33 9 


28 45 19 




Mars 


E. 


76 49 30 


75 4 14 


73 19 10 


71 34 17 




a Aquilse 


E. 


89 12 22 


87 38 23 


86 4 36 


84 31 3 


5 


Saturn 


W. 


88 40 13 


90 26 15 


92 12 


93 67 28 




Regulus 


W. 


80 6 31 


81 52 46 


83 38 44 


85 24 24 




Spica 


W. 


26 7 41 


27 53 24 


29 38 54 


31 24 10 




Mars 


E. 


62 63 17 


61 9 51 


59 26 41 


57 43 49 




a Aquilse 


E. 


76 47 59 


75 16 32 


73 45 33 


72 15 4 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


101 9 54 


99 32 31 


97 55 18 


96 18 17 


6 


Saturn 


W. 


102 40 4 


104 23 36 


106 6 48 


107 49 38 




Regulus 


W. 


94 8 8 


95 51 54 


97 35 21 


99 18 27 




Spica 


W. 


40 6 29 


41 50 3 


43 33 18 


45 16 13 




Mars 


E. 


49 13 58 


47 32 58 


45 52 18 


44 11 58 




a Aquilse 


E. 


64 51 22 


63 24 38 


61 58 40 


60 33 30 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


88 16 54 


86 41 31 


85 6 28 


83 31 47 


1- 


Spica 
Mars 


W. 


53 45 38 


55 26 27 


57 6 55 


58 47 2 




E. 


35 55 41 


34 17 30 


32 39 40 


31 2 12 




a Aquilae 
Fomalhaut 


E. 


53 41 24 


52 22 5 


51 3 67 


49 47 3 




E. 


75 44 25 


74 12 15 


72 40 35 


71 9 24 




a Pegasi 


E. 


96 45 49 


95 8 37 


93 31 46 


91 65 15 


8 


Spica 
Antares 


W. 


67 2 6 


68 40 1 


70 17 36 


71 64 49 




W. 


21 11 37 


22 49 41 


24 27 24 


26 4 44 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


63 41 31 


62 13 39 


60 46 25 


69 19 49 




a Pegasi 
Sun 


E. 


83 58 1 


82 23 40 


80 49 41 


79 16 5 




E. 


138 58 29 


137 28 26 


135 58 43 


134 29 18 



314 



MAY, 1860. 



/ — - 

GEEENWICH. MF.ATq" TIME. 






LUNAE ] 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


XVIIIi'. 


XXR 


Month. 


Position. 




1 








1 


Venus 


W. 


o / W 

90 15 S 


O / It 

91 66 54 


t II 

93 38 48 


o / // 

95 20 46 




Jupiter 


W. 


67 56 2\ 


69 44 46 


71 33 10 


73 21 38 




Pollux 


w. 


66 27 37 


68 16 30 


70 5 27 


71 54 27 




Saturn 


w. 


38 4 20 


39 63 21 


41 42 26 


43 31 35 




Spica 


E. 


24 54 61 


23 6 13 


21 17 40 


19 29 14 




Antares 


E. 


70 34 53 


68 46 27 


66 55 58 


65 6 26 




Mars 


E. 


112 15 7 


110 28 44 


108 42 17 


106 55 46 


2 


Venus 


W. 


103 50 54 


105 32 54 


107 14 52 


108 56 47 




Jupiter 


W. 


82 24 9 


84 12 37 


86 1 3 


87 49 24 




Pollux 


W. 


80 59 51 


82 48 54 


84 37 65 


86 26 54 




Saturn 


w. 


52 37 43 


54 26 56 


66 16 7 


58 5 15 




Eegnlus 


w. 


44 16 


45 49 38 


47 38 58 


49 28 16 




Antares 


E. 


55 58 30 


54 8 58 


62 19 27 


50 30 




Mars 


E. 


98 2 55 


96 16 22 


94 29 52 


92 43 23 


3 


Jupiter 


"W. 


96 49 68 


98 37 43 


100 25 20 


102 12 47 




Pollux 


W. 


95 30 30 


97 18 52 


99 7 6 


100 55 10 




Saturn 


w. 


67 9 43 


68 58 16 


70 46 40 


72 34 56 




Regulus 


w. 


68 33 36 


60 22 21 


62 10 67 


63 59 24 




Antares 


E. 


41 23 58 


39 35 7 


37 46 23 


35 57 50 




Mars 


E. 


83 52 14 


82 6 20 


80 20 34 


78 34 67 


4 


Jupiter 


W. 


111 7 18 


112 53 33 


114 39 33 


116 25 18 




Saturn 


W. 


81 33 28 


83 20 31 


86 7 20 


86 53 65 




Regulus 


w. 


72 58 55 


74 46 11 


76 33 12 


78 19 59 




Antares 


E. 


26 57 43 


25 10 22 


23 23 16 


21 36 26 




Mars 


E. 


69 49 36 


68 5 10 


66 20 58 


64 36 69 




a Aquilae , 


E. 


82 57 46 


81 24 47 


79 62 8 


78 19 52 


^ 6 


Saturn 


W. 


95 42 37 


97 27 28 


99 12 


100 56 12 




Regulus 


W. 


87 9 47 


88 54 51 


90 39 37 


92 24 2 




Spica 


w. 


33 9 11 


34 53 66 


36 38 26 


38 22 36 




Mars 


E. 


56 1 13 


54 18 56 


52 36 68 


50 55 18 




a Aquilae 


E. . 


70 45 6 


69 15 43 


67 46 66 


66 18 49 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


94 41 28 


93 4 55 


91 28 37 


89 52 36 


6 


Saturn 


w. 


109 32 7 


111 14 14 


112 66 


114 37 24 




Regulus 


W. 


101 1 12 


102 43 36 


104 25 36 


106 7 16 




Spica 


w. 


46 58 47 


48 41 1 


50 22 56 


52 4 27 




Mars 


E. 


42 32 1 


40 62 23 


39 13 8 


37 34 13 




a Aquilse 


E. 


59 9 11 


67 45 46 


56 23 17 


56 1 49 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


81 67/29 


80 23 35 


78 60 6 


77 17 2 


7 


Spica 


W. 


60 26 46 


62 6 9 


63 45 10 


> 66 23 49 




Mars 


E. 


29 25 6 


27 48 23 


26 12 1 


24 36 1 




a Aquilae 


E. 


48 31 28 


47 17 17 


46 4 36 


44 53 26 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


69 38 44 


68 8 35 


66 38 59 


65 9 57 




a Pegasi 


E. 


90 19 5 


88 43 17 


87 7 60 


85 32 44 


8 


Spica 


W. 


73 31 41 


75 8 12 


76 44 22 


78 20 13 




Antares 


W. 


27 41 44 


29 18 24 


30 64 40 


.32 30 37 


• 


Fomalhaut 


E. 


57 53 64 


56 28 39 


'65 4 7 


63 40 19 




o Pegasi 


E. 


77 42 53 


76 10 3 


74 37 36 


73 5 33 




Sun 


E. 


133 14 


131 31 28 


130 3 1 


128 34 62 



MAY, 1860. 



315 





GEEENWICH 


MF,AT^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 
the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


IHi-. 


VIi. 


IX''. 


Month. 


Position. 












9 


Spica 


w. 


/ // 

79 56 42 


o / // 

81 30 52 


83 5 42 


/ // 

84 40 13 




Antares 


w. 


34 6 14 


35 41 31 


37 16 28 


38 51 6 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


52 17 IT 


60 55 4 


49 33 40 


48 13 9 




a Pegasi 


E. 


71 33 52 


70 2 35 


68 31 42 


67 1 12 




Sun 


E. 


127 7 3 


126 39 33 


124 12 20 


122 45 25 


10 


Spica 


W. 


92 28 13 


94 67 


95 33 26 


97 6 37 




Antares 


W. 


46 39 41 


48 12 31 


49 45 7 


51 17 26 




Fomallaaut 


E. 


41 45 29 


40 31 21 


39 18 31 


38 7 6 




a Pegasi 


E. 


59 34 42 


58 6 37 


56 38 57 


55 11 41 




Sun 


E. 


115 35 14 


114 10 2 


112 46 5 


111 20 23 


11 


Spica 


W. 


104 42 59 


106 13 47 


107 44 23 


109 14 47 




Antares 


W, 


58 55 23 


60 26 18 


61 67 1 


63 27 33 




a Pegasi 


E. 


48 1 59 


46 37 26 


45 13 24 


43 49 53 




Sun 


E. 


104 20 27 


102 57 7 


101 33 68 


100 11 


12 


Antares 


W. 


70 67 40 


72 27 15 


73 56 42 


76 26 2 




Mars 


W. 


25 21 12 


26 48 10 


28 16 2 


29 41 47 




Sun 


E. 


93 18 40 


91 56 38 


90 34 44 


89 12 66 


13 


Antares 


W. 


82 51 25 


84 20 17 


85 49 7 


87 17 64 




Mars 


W, 


36 54 22 


38 20 42 


39 47 


41 13 16 




Sun 


E. 


82 25 17 


81 3 57 


79 42 40 


78 21 24 


14 


Antares 


W. 


94 41 42 


96 10 30 


97 39 19 


99 8 11 




Mars 


W. 


48 24 33 


49 60 61 


51 17 13 


52 43 36 




a Aquilae 


W, 


48 3 10 


49 9 57 


60 17 36 


61 26 4 




Sun 


E. 


71 35 23 


70 14 9 


68 62 54 


67 31 36 


15 


Antares 


W. 


106 33 28 


108 2 46 


109 32 11 


111 1 42 




Mars 


W. 


59 56 39 


61 23 31 


62 50 31 


64 17 38 




a Aquilse 


w. 


57 19 11 


58 31 43 


59 44 48 


60 68 26 




Sun 


E. 


60 44 15 


59 22 34 


58 47 


66 38 53 


16 


Mars 


W. 


71 35 10 


73 3 8 


74 31 16 


75 69 35 




a Aquilae 


W. 


67 13 61 


68 30 15 


69 47 4 


71 4 16 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


42 10 44 


43 24 6 


44 38 26 


46 53 41 




Sun 


E. 


49 47 42 


48 25 5 


47 2 19 


45 39 24 


IV 


Mars 


W. 


83 23 69 


84 63 29 


86 23 11 


87 63 7 




a Aquilae 


W. 


77 35 39 


78 54 54 


80 14 28 


81 34 20 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


62 21 48 


53 41 30 


65 1 49 


56 22 44 




Sun 


E. 


38 42 32 


37 18 41 


35 54 40 


34 30 29 


22 


Sun 


W. 


21 25 48 


22 67 41 


24 29 59 


26 2 42 




Jupiter 


E. 


29 49 24 


28 9 33 


26 29 30 


24 49 16 




Saturn 


E. 


57 19 7 


55 38 30 


53 57 43 


62 16 46 




Kegulus 


E. 


65 10 26 


63 29 21 


61 48 6 


60 6 39 


,23 


Sun 


W. 


33 51 8 


35 25 39 


37 23 


38 35 20 




Saturn 


E. 


43 49 19 


42 7 21 


40 25 15 


38 43 




Regulus 


E. 


51 36 44 


49 64 15 


48 11 37 


46 28 50 




Spica 


E. 


105 40 10 


103 57 39 


102 14 58 


100 32 7 



316 



MAY, 1860. 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 










, LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Stains Name 










the 


and 




Midnight, 


XVb. 


XVIIIk. 


XXTk. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


O t 11 


O / // 


O / // 


9 


Spica 


W. 


86 14 25 


87 48 18 


89 21 63 


90 55 11 




Antares 


w. 


40 25 25 


41 69 26 


43 33 7 


45 6 33 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


46 53 34 


45 34 67 


44 17 21 


43 60 




a Pegasi 


E. 


65 31 6 


64 1 24 


62 32 6 


61 3 12 




Sun 


E. 


121 18 49 


119 62 30 


118 26 28 


117 43 


10 


Spica 


W. 


98 37 35 


100 9 17 


101 40 45 


103 11 59 




Antares 


W. 


62 49 30 


54 21 19 


55 52 64 


57 24 15 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


36 57 8 


35 48 48 


34 42 12 


33 37 27 




a Pegasi 


E. 


53 44 51 


62 18 28 


60 62 31 


49 27 1 




Sun 


E. 


109 56 66 


108 31 44 


107 7 45 


106 43 59 


11 


Spica 


W. 


110 45 


112 16 2 


113 44 55 


115 14 38 




Antares 


W. 


64 67 64 


66 28 4 


67 68 6 


69 27 57 




a Pegasi 


E. 


42 26 54 


41 4 30 


39 42 42 


38 21 34 




Sun 


E. 


98 48 13 


97 25 36 


96 3 9 


94 40 51 


12 


Antares 


W. 


76 65 17 


78 24 26 


79 63 30 


81 22 30 




Mars 


W. 


31 8 27 


32 35 2 


34 1 33 


35 27 69 




Sun 


E. 


87 51 14 


86 29 38 


85 8 7 


83 46 40 


13 


Antares 


W. 


88 46 41 


90 15 26 


91 44 11 


93 12 57 




Mars 


W. 


42 39 31 


44 6 45 


45 32 


46 58 16 




Sun 


E. 


77 11 


75 38 69 


74 17 47 


72 56 35 


14 


Antares 


W. 


100 37 6 


102 6 5 


103 35 7 


105' 4 15 




Mars 


w. 


64 10 4 


56 36 35 


67 3 11 


58 29 52 




a Aquilae 


w. 


62 35 18 


63 45 16 


54 56 56 


56 7 15 




Sun 


E. 


66 10 15 


64 48 51 


63 27 23 


62 5 61 


15 


Antares 


W. 


112 31 20 


114 1 6 


115 30 67 


117 67 




Mars 


w. 


65 44 51 


67 12 13 


68 39 43 


70 7 22 




a Aquilae 


w. 


62 12 34 


63 27 12 


64 42 18 


65 57 51 




Sun 


E. 


65 16 63 


63 54 47 


62 32 33 


61 10 12 


16 


Mars 


W. 


77 28 6 


78 66 45 


80 25 38 


81 64 43 




a AquilK 


w. 


72 21 51 


73 39 47 


74 68 5 


76 16 42 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


47 9 47 


48 26 41 


49 44 21 


61 2 43 




Sun 


E. 


44 16 20 


42 63 7 


41 29 45 


40 6 13 


17 


Mars 


W. 


89 23 16 


90 63 37 


92 24 13 


93 66 4 




a Aquilae 


w. 


82 64 28 


84 14 52 


85 35 33 


86 66 28 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


57 44 14 


69 6 16 


60 28 47 


61 51 49 




Sun 


E. 


33 6 10 


31 41 41 


30 17 3 


28 62 16 


22 


Sun 


w. 


27 35 47 


29 9 12 


30 42 64 


32 16 63 




Jupiter 


E. 


23 8 62 


21 28 16 


19 47 29 


18 6 32 




Saturn 


E. 


60 36 37 


48 54 17 


47 12 47 


46 31 8 




Eegulus 


E. 


58 25 1 


56 43 12 


55 1 13 


53 19 3 


23 


Sun 


W. 


40 10 32 


41 46 54 


43 21 28 


44 57 14, 




Saturn 


E. 


37 36 


35 18 5 


33 35 27 


31 52 43 




Regulus 


E. 


44 45 53 


43 2 48 


41 19 35 


39 36 14 




Spica 


E. 


98 49 6 


97 5 67 


95 22 39 


93 39 13 



MAY, 1860. 



317 







GKEENWICiL 


¥F,ATT TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 








-- 


and 




Noon. 


nil'. 


Vlk. 


IXh. 


Month. 


Position. 












24 


Sun 


W. 


46 33 10 


O 1 II 

48 9 16 


O 1 II 

49 45 32 


O 1 [I 

61 21 67 




Satum 


E. 


30 9 54 


28 26 59 


26 44 


26 57 




Eegulus 


E. 


37 52 46 


36 9 11 


34 25 30 


32 41 42 




Spica 


E. 


91 55 38 


90 11 64 


88 28 2 


86 44 2 


25 


Sun 


W. 


69 26 11 


61 3 26 


62 40 48 


64 18 17 




Venus 


W. 


15 22 13 


17 28 


18 38 55 


20 17 32 




Eegulus 


E. 


24 1 31 


22 17 20 


20 33 9 


18 49 1 




Spica 


E. 


78 2 15 


76 17 33 


74 32 45 


72 47 51 


26 


Sun 


W. 


72 27 14 


74 6 19 


75 43 29 


77 21 46 




Venus 


W. 


28 32 51 


30 12 17 


31 51 51 


33 31 30 




Pollux 


W. 


27 39 48 


29 23 13 


31 6 66 


32 50 64 




Jupiter 


W. 


24 44 52 


26 29 5 


28 13 23 


29 57 46 




Spica 


E. 


64 1 57 


62 16 31 


60 31 1 


58 46 27 




Antares 


E. 


109 48 10 


108 2 34 


106 16 64 


104 31 8 


27 


Sun 


W. 


85 34 9 


87 12 50 


88 51 35 


90 30 23 




Pollux 


W. 


41 33 53 


43 18 67 


46 4 8 


46 49 27 




Venus 


W. 


41 51 9 


43 31 19 


45 11 34 


46 61 64 




Jupiter 


W. 


38 40 46 


40 25 34 


42 10 26 


43 66 19 




Spica 


E. 


49 56 38 


48 10 43 


46 24 45 


44 38 45 




Antares 


E. 


95 41 15 


93 56 5 


92 8 52 


90 22 36 


28 


Sun 


W. 


98 45 6 


100 24 9 


102 3 14 


103 42 20 




Pollux 


W. 


55 37 24 


57 23 13 


59 9 6 


60 55 




Venus 


w. 


65 14 28 


56 66 9 


58 35 52 


60 16 37 




Jupiter 


w. 


52 40 31 


54 25 40 


66 10 60 


67 56 ■ 3 




Saturn 


w. 


26 4 69 


27 50 25 


29 36 56 


31 21 33 




Spica 


E. 


35 48 22 


34 -2 16 


32 16 11 


30 30 7 




Antares 


E. 


81 30 30 


79 43 58 


77 67 26 


76 10 50 


29 


Sun 


W. 


111 58 5 


113 37 15 


115 16 24 


116 55 31 




Pollux 


W. 


69 45 9 


71 31 14 


73 17 20 


75 3 26 




Venus 


W. 


68 40 55 


70 21 50 


72 2 45 


73 43 41 




Jupiter 


W. 


66 42 19 


68 27 36 


70 12 50 


71 58 5 




Satum 


w. 


40 10 24 


41 66 16 


43 42 9 


46 28 2 




Eegulus 


w. 


32 43 36 


34 29 55 


36 16 16 


38 2 36 




Antares 


E. 


67 17 39 


66 31 


63 44 21 


61 67 42 




Mars 


E. 


117 35 68 


115 50 55 


114 5 52 


112 20 49 


30 


Pollux 


W. 


83 63 43 


85 39 41 


87 25 37 


89 11 29 




Venus 


w. 


82 8 14 


83 49 5 


85 29 54 


87 10 40 




Jupiter 


w. 


80 44 


82 29 5 


84 14 6 


85 59 4 




Satum 


w. 


64 17 21 


56 3 8 


67 48 52 


59 34 34 




Eegulus 


w. 


46 54 19 


48 40 36 


60 26 60 


62 13 2 




Antares 


E. 


53 4 50 


51 18 22 


49 31 67 


47 45 35 




Mars 


E. 


103 35 45 


101 50 49 


100 5 55 


98 21 4 


31 


Venus 


w. 


95 33 45 


97 14 9 


98 54 28 


100 34 41 




Jupiter 


w. 


94 42 56 


96 27 25 


98 11 49 


99 56 6 




Saturn 


w. 


68 22 3 


70 7 18 


71 62 27 


73 37 30 




Eegulus 


w. 


61 3 6 


62 48 52 


64 34 33 


66 20 7 




Antares 


E. 


38 54 46 


37 8 52 


36 23 4 


33 37 23 




Mars 


E. 


89 37 42 


87 53 16 


86 8 55 


84 24 41 



318 



MAY, 1860. 







GEEENWIUJbL MEAT^T TIME. 












LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 








Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


.' and 




Midnight. 


XTh. 


XVIIP-. 


XXIi. 




Month. 


Position. 














24 


Sun 


W. 


O i II 

52 58 31 


o 1 n 

64 35 14 


O 1 II 

66 12 5 


o / // 

57 49 4 






Saturn 


E. 


23 11 53 


21 34 48 


19 61 45 


18 8 46 






Regulns 


E. 


30 57 48 


29 13 49 


27 29 46 


25 46 40 






Spica 


E. 


84 59 65 


83 15 41 


81 31 19 


79 46 50 




25 


Sun 


W. 


65 55 52 


6,7 33 34 


69 11 21 


70 49 15 






Venus 


W. 


21 56 19 


23 35 16 


25 14 20 


26 53 32 






Eegnlus 


E. 


17 5 


15 21 10 


13 37 35 


11 54 21 






Spica 


E. 


71 2 51 


69 17 46 


67 32 35 


65 47 19 




26 


Sun 


W. 


79 5 


8a 38 30 


82 16 68 


83 55 32 






Venus 


W. 


35 11 15 


36 51 6 


38 31 2 


40 11 3 






Pollux 


w. 


34 35 7 


36 19 33 


38 4 9 


39 48 56 






Jupiter 


w. 


31 42 14 


33 26 46 


35 11 22 


36 56 2 






Spica 


E. 


56 59 48 


65 14 6 


53 28 20 


51 42 30 






Antares 


E. 


102 45 17 


,100 59 22 


99 13 24 


97 27 22 




27 


Sun 


W. 


92 9 14 


93 48 8 


95 27 5 


97 6 4 






Pollux 


W. 


48 34 52 


50 20 23 


52 5 58 


53 51 39 






Venus 


W. 


48 32 18 


60 12 45 


51 53 16 


53 33 51 






Jupiter 


W. 


45 40 16 


47 25 16 


49 10 19 


50 65 24 






Spica 


E. 


42 52 43 


41 6 39 


39 20 35 


37 34 28 






Antares 


E. 


88 36 16 


86 49 53 


85 3 28 


83 17 1 




28 


Sun 


W. 


105 21 28 


107 36 


108 39 45 


110 18 55 






Pollux 


W. 


62 40 58 


64 26 68 


66 13 


67 59 4 






Venus 


w. 


61 57 26 


63 38 16 


65 19 7 


67 






Jupiter 


w. 


59 41 17 


61 26 31 


63 11 46 


64 57 2 






Saturn 


w. 


33 7 14 


34 52 58 


36 38 45 


38 24 34 






Spica 


E. 


28 44 5 


26 58 6 


25 12 12 


23 26 23 






Antares 


E. 


74 24 13 


72 37 36 


70 60 57 


69 4 19 




29 


Sun 


W. 


118 34 38 


120 13 43 


121 52 46 


123 31 46 






Pollux 


w. 


76 49 32 


78 35 37 


80 21 41 


82 7 43 






Venus 


w. 


75 24 37 


77 5 33 


78 46 28 


80 27 22 






Jupiter 


w. 


73 43 19 


76 28 32 


77 13 44 


78 58 53 






Saturn 


w. 


47 13 57 


48 69 60 


50 45 42 


62 31 32 






Regulus 


w. 


39 48 58 


41 36 20 


43 21 41 


45 81 






Antares 


E. 


60 11 5 


68 24 29 


56 37 54 


54 51 21 






Mars 


E. 


110 35 47 


108 50 45 


107 5 43 


105 20 43 




30 


Pollux 


w. 


90 57 17 


93 43 2 


94 28 42 


96 14 17 






Venus 


w. 


88 51 25 


90 Zi 6 


92 12 43 


93 53 16 






Jupiter 


w. 


87 44 


89 28 60 


91 13 37 


92 68 19 






Saturn 


w. 


61 20 12 


63 5 47 


64 51 17 


66 36 42 






Regulus 


w. 


S3 59 11 


55 45 16 


67 31 17 


69 17 14 






Antares 


E. 


45 59 16 


44 13 1 


42 26 61 


40 40 46 






Mars 


E. 


96 36 15 


94 51 30 


93 6 50 


91 22 14 




31 


Venus 


W. 


102 14 48 


103 64 48 


105 34 43 


107 14 29 






Jupiter 


W. 


101 40 17 


103 24 20 


105 8 15 


106 62 2 






Saturn 


W. 


75 22 26 


77 7 15 


78 61 56 


80 36 29 






Regulus 


W. 


68 5 35 


69 60 55 


71 36 8 


73 21 14 






Antares 


E. 


31 51 47 


30 6 20 


28 21 


26 35 48 






Mars 


E. 


82 40 31 


80 56 30 


79 12 36 


77 28 50 





JUNE, 1860. 



319 





GEEKNIVTOH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










tfie 


and 




Noon. 


III''. 


VP. 


IXk. 


Month. 


Position. 


















O 1 tt 


/ // 


O / // 


O / // 


1 


Jupiter 


W. 


108 35 40 


110 19 10 


112 2 30 


113 46 40 




Venus 


W. 


108 54 8 


110 33 39 


112 13 1 


113 52 14 




Saturn 


W. 


82 20 53 


84 5 8 


85 49 14 


87 33 10 




Eegulus 


W. 


Y5 6 10 


76 50 57 


78 35 35 


80 20 3 




Spica 


W. 


21 9 38 


22 53 32 


24 37 25 


26 21 14 




Mars 


E. 


75 45 12 


74 1 42 


72 18 22 


70 35 11 




a Aquilae 


E. 


81 9 41 


79 38 48 


78 8 12 


76 37 64 


2 


Satum 


W. 


96 10 2 


97 52 48 


99 35 21 


101 17 41 




Regulus 


W. 


88 59 42 


90 43 2 


92 26 9 


94 9 3 




Spica 


W. 


34 58 42 


36 41 44 


38 24 35 


40 7 15 




Mars 


E. 


62 1 57 


60 19 53 


58 38 2 


56 66 25 




a Aquilse 


E. 


69 12 8 


67 44 22 


66 17 7 


64 50 28 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


93 40 


91 25 48 


89 51 8 


88 16 41 


3 


Saturn 


W. 


109 45 48 


111 26 41 


113 7 18 


114 47 39 




Regulus 


W. 


102 40 1 


104 21 28 


106 2 39 


107 43 35 




Spica 


W. 


48 37 21 


50 18 41 


51 59 45 


53 40 34 




Mars 


E. 


48 31 45 


46 51 35 


45 11 40 


43 32 1 




a Aquilse 


E. 


57 47 15 


56 24 57 


55 3 34 


53 43 7 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


80 28 7 


78 55 17 


77 22 47 


75 60 38 




a Pegasi 


E. 


101 42 7 


100 4 25 


98 26 56 


96 49 40 


4 


Spica 


W. 


62 42 


63 39 54 


65 18 50 


66 57 28 




Mars 


E. 


35 18 4 


33 40 12 


32 2 38 


30 26 23 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


68 15 51 


66 46 14 


65 17 6 


63 48 29 




a Pegasi 


E. 


88 46 59 


87 11 15 


85 35 48 


84 38 


5 


Spica 


W. 


75 6 21 


76 43 15 


78 19 52 


79 56 12 




Antares 


W. 


29 16 55 


30 53 57 


32 30 42 


34 7 9 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


56 33 56 


55 8 56 


63 44 39 


52 21 6 




a Pegasi 


E. 


76 9 28 


74 36 13 


73 3 18 


71 30 43 , 




a Arietis 


E. 


118 35 14 


116 58 39 


115 22 20 


113 46 18 


6 


Spica 


W. 


87 53 29 


89 28 5 


91 2 25 


92 36 29 




Antares 


W. 


42 5 6 


43 39 50 


45 14 18 


46 48 29 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


45 36 


44 17 52 


43 49 


41 44 58 




a Pegasi 


E. 


63 53 13 


62 22 50 


60 52 50 


59 23 14 




a Arietis 


E. 


105 60 17 


104 15 54 


102 41 48 


101 7 67 


7 


Spica 


W. 


100 22 51 


101 55 22 


103 27 38 


104 69 41 




Antares 


W. 


54 35 29 


56 8 7 


57 40 32 


69 12 42 




a Pegasi 


E. 


52 1 25 


50 34 22 


49 7 48 


47 41 43 




a Arietis 


E. 


93 22 36 


91 50 17 


90 18 12 


88 46 22 




Sun 


E. 


134 35 28 


133 10 22 


13] 45 29 


130 20 49 


8 


Antares 


W. 


66 50 17 


68 21 12 


69 51 55 


71 22 28 




Mars 


W. 


15 20 15 


16 48 46 


18 17 18 


19 45 60 




a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


E. 


40 39 18 


39 16 38 


37 64 39 


36 33 24 




E. 


81 10 23 


79 39 49 


78 9 25 


76 39 13 




Sun 


E. 


123 20 31 


121 57 2 


120 33 44 


119 10 36 


9 


Antares 


W. 


78 52 47 


80 22 26 


81 51 59 


83 21 24 




Mars 


W. 


27 8 30 


28 36 56 


30 5 17 


31 33 34 




a Arietis 


E. 


69 10 36 


67 41 19 


66 12 10 


64 43 7 



320 



JUNE, 1860. 







GEEEJTWICH 


MF,AT^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVi-. 


JJIIIK 


XXTk. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Jupiter 


W. 


115 28 40 


o / // 

117 11 29 


O / // 

118 54 6 


o / // 

120 36 32 




Venus 


w. 


116 31 18 


117 10 11 


118 48 54 


120 27 26 




Saturn 


w. 


89 16 55 


91 29 


92 43 52 


94 27 3 




Regulus 


w. 


82 4 22 


83 48 30 


85 32 26 


87 16 10 




Spica 


w. 


28 4 59 


29 48 37 


31 32 7 


33 15 29 




Mars 


E. 


68 52 10 


67 9 20 


65 26 41 


63 44 14 




a AquilsB 


E. 


Y5 7 56 


73 38 21 


72 9 10 


70 40 26 


2 


Saturn 


W. 


102 59 48 


104 41 41 


106 23 19 


108 4 42 




Regulus 


W. 


95 51 43 


97 34 9 


99 16 21 


100 68 19 




Spica 


W. 


41 49 43 


43 31 58 


45 14 


46 55 48 




Mars 


E. 


55 15 1 


53 33 50 


51 52 53 


50 12 12 




a Aquilae 


E. 


63 24 25 


61 59 2 


60 34 21 


59 10 24 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


86 42 27 


85 8 27 


83 34 43 


82 1 16 


3 


Saturn 


W. 


116 27 43 


118 7 31 


119 47 1 


121 26 14 




Regulus 


W. 


109 24 14 


111 4 36 


112 44 42 


114 24 31 




Spica 


w. 


55 21 8 


57 1 26 


58 41 27 


60 21 13 




Mars 


E. 


41 52 39 


40 13 34 


38 34 46 


36 56 16 




a Aquilae 


E. 


52 23 42 


51 5 22 


49 48 11 


48 32 15 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


74 18 51 


72 47 28 


71 16 30 


69 45 67 




a Pegasi 


E. 


95 12 37 


93 35 49 


91 69 16 


90 23 


4 


Spica 


W. 


68 35 50 


70 13 54 


71 51 40 


73 29 9 




Mars 


E. 


28 48 29 


27 11 56 


25 35 44 


23 59 65 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


62 20 23 


60 52 52 


69 25 66 


57 69 36 




a Pegasi 


E. 


82 25 46 


80 51 13 


79 16 59 


77 43 4 


5 


Spica 


W. 


81 32 13 


83 7 57 


84 43 25 


86 18 35 i 




Antares 


W. 


35 43 19 


37 19 11 


38 54 47 


40 30 5 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


50 58 20 


49 36 23 


48 15 19 


46 65 10 




a Pegasi 


E. 


69 58 30 


68 26 37 


66 55 7 


66 23 69 




a Arietis 


E. 


112 10 33 


110 35 4 


108 59 52 


107 24 56 


6 


Spica 


W. 


94 10 17 


95 43 48 


97 17 4 


98 50 5 




Antares 


W. 


48 22 24 


49 56 4 


61 29 27 


63 2 36 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


40 30 21 


39 17 6 


38 5 17 


36 54 68 




a Pegasi 


E. 


57 54 2 


56 25 14 


64 56 52 


53 28 56 




a Arietis 


E. 


99 34 21 


98 1 2 


96 27 59 


94 55 9 


1 


Spica 


W. 


106 31 29 


108 3 4 


109 34 26 


111 5 36 




Antares 


W. 


60 44 39 


62 16 22 


63 47 53 


66 19 11 




o Pegasi 


E. 


46 16 7 


44 51 4 


43 26 34 


42 2 38 




a Arietis 


E. 


87 14 44 


85 43 20 


84 12 9 


82 41 10 




Sun 


E. 


128 56 21 


127 32 6 


126 8 2 


124 44 11 


8 


Antares 


W, 


72 52 50 


74 23 2 


75 53 5 


77 23 




Mars. 


W. 


21 14 22 


22 42 54 


24 11 26 


25 39 69 - 




a Pegasi 


E. 


35 12 58 


33 53 23 


32 34 44 


31 17 8 




a Arietis 


E. 


75 9 10 


73 39 18 


72 9 35 


70 40 2 




Sun 


E. 


117 47 37 


116 24 47 


115 2 6 


113 39 34 


9 


Antares 


W. 


84 50 43 


86 19 56 


87 49 5 


89 18 10 




Mars 


w. 


33 1 48 


34 30 


35 58 9 


37 26 16 


^^^^^^ 


a Arietis 


E. 


63 14 10 


61 45 21 


60 16 37 


58 47 68 



JUNE, 1860. 



321 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


III"'. 


TI". 


IX". 


Month. 


Position. 


















/ // 


o / // 


O / // 


Q / /i 


9 


Sun 


E. 


112 17 10 


110 54 53 


109 32 42 


108 10 37 


10 


Antares 


W. 


90 47 10 


92 16 8 


93 45 2 


95 13 55 




a Aquilse 


W. 


45 2 8 


46 6 38 


47 12 8 


48 18 35 




Mars 


W. 


38 54 21 


40 22 25 


41 50 29 


43 18 34 




a Arietis 


E. 


57 19 23 


55 60 53 


54 22 26 


52 54 2 




Sun 


E. 


101 21 33 


99 59 55 


98 38 20 


97 16 47 


11 


Antares 


W. 


102 38 6 


104 6 69 


105 35 53 


107 4 50 




a Aquilse 


W. 


54 2 46 


55 13 39 


66 25 9 


67 37 14 




Mars 


w. 


50 39 2 


52 7 14 


63 36 29 


55 3 48 




a Arietis 


E. 


45 32 33 


44 4 18 


42 36 3 


41 7 47 




Sun 


E. 


90 29 9 


89 7 35 


87 45 59 


86 24 20 


12 


a Aquilae 


W. 


63 45 12 


65 10 


66 15 32 


67 31 19 




Mars 


W. 


62 26 38 


63 66 31 


65 24 31 


66 53 39 




Fomalhant 


W. 


39 7 18 


. 40 17 3 


41 27 58 


42 39 56 




a Arietis 


E. 


33 46 14 


32 17 52 


30 49 28 


29 21 3 




Sun 


E. 


79 35 4 


78 12 56 


76 60 41 


75 28 19 


13 


Mars 


W. 


74 21 43 


76 51 52 


77 22 13 


78 52 47 




a Aquilae 


W. 


73 55 47 


75 13 42 


76 31 57 


77 60 32 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


48 53 27 


60 10 32 


61 28 19 


52 46 47 




Sun 


E. 


68 34 21 


67 11 4 


66 47 36 


64 23 56 


14 


Mars 


W. 


86 28 66 


88 54 


89 33 7 


91 5 36 




a Aquilae 


W. 


84 27 61 


85 48 9 


87 8 42 


88 29 32 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


59 28 6 


60 60 1 


62 12 27 


63 35 23 




a Pegasi 


W. 


36 45 27 


38 8 24 


39 32 9 


40 66 39 




Sun 


E. 


57 22 27 


55 57 28 


54 32 15 


63 6 46 


15 


Mars 


W. 


98 52 9 


100 26 20 


102 49 


103 36 37 




a Aquilae 


W. 


95 17 7 


96 39 15 


98 1 34 


99 24 4 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


70 37 3 


72 2 43 


73 28 47 


76 56 16 




a Pegasi 


W. 


48 9 23 


49 37 44 


51 6 39 


52 36 5 




Sun 


E. 


45 55 26 


44 28 20 


43 58 


41 33 18 


16 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


82 13 27 


83 42 11 


85 11 15 


86 40 40 




a Pegasi 


W. 


60 10 45 


61 43 5 


63 15 62 


64 49 4 




Sun 


E. 


34 10 37 


32 41 12 


31 11 29 


29 41 30 


21 


Sun 


W. 


29 44 43 


31 24 11 


33 3 47 


34 43 31 




Spica 


E. 


81 55 5 


80 8 8 


78 21 7 


76 33 59 


22 


Sun 


W. 


43 3 38 


44 43 52 


46 24 9 


48 4 27 




Jupiter 

Spica 

Antares 


W. 


15 52 23 


17 38 27 


19 24 33 


21 10 40 




E. 


67 37 26 


65 49 59 


64 2 31 


62 15 3 




E. 


113 23 32 


111 35 54 


109 48 16 


-108 36 


23 


Sun 


W. 


56 26 7 


6§ 6 25 


69 46 41 


61 26 56 




Jupiter 
Venus ;^ 


W. 


30 1 11 


31 47 13 


33 33 14 


35 19 12 




W. 


24 16 20 


26 1 41 


27 48 3 


29 34 23 




Spica 
Antares 


E. 


53 17 50 


61 30 29 


49 43 10 


47 55 54 




E. 


99 2 17 


97 14 40 


96 27 6 


93 39 36 



21 



322 



JUNE, 1860. 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 






LUNAR DISTANCES. 




Day of 

tbe 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Midnight. 


KVK 


XVIIP'. 


XXTi. 




9 


Sun 


E. 


106 48 39 


O / // 

105 26 46 


o / // 

104 4 58 


o / n 

102 43 14 




10 


Antares 


W. 


96 42 45 


98 11 35 


99 40 25 


101 9 16 






a Aquilae 


W. 


49 25 54 


50 34 1 


61 42 54- 


62 52 29 






Mars 


w. 


44 46 3*7 


46 14 41 


47 42 46 


49 10 53 






a Arietis 


E. 


51 25 40 


49 57 21 


48 29 4 


47 48 






Sun 


E. 


95 55 15 


94 33 44 


93 12 13 


91 60 41 




11 


Antares 


W. 


108 83 50 


110 2 64 


111 32 3 


113 1 17 






a Aquilae 


W. 


58 49 51 


60 2 59 


61 16 36 


62 30 40 






Mars 


W. 


56 32 12 


58 40 


59 29 13 


60 67 52 






a Arietis 


E. 


39 39 31 


38 11 14 


36 42 55 


35 14 35 






Sun 


E. 


85 2 38 


83 40 52 


82 19 1 


80 57 6 




12 


a Aquilae 


W. 


6a.47 29 


70 4 1 


71 20 55 


72 38 10 






Mars 


W. 


68 ^2 56 


69 52 23 


71 21 59 


72 51 46 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


43 52 53 


. 45 6 46 


46 21 31 


47 37 6 






a Arietis 


E. 


21 52 38 


26 24 13 


24 55 49 


23 27 27 






Sun 


E. 


74 5 50 


72 43 12 


71 20 26 


69 57 28 




13 


Mars 


W. 


80 23 33 


81 64 32 


83 26 45 


84 67 13 






a Aquilae 


W. 


79 9 25 


80 28 35 


81 48 4 


83 7 49 






Fomalhaut 


w. 


54 5 52 


66 25 34 


56 45 51 


58 6 42 






Sun 


E. 


63 4 


61 36 


60 11 43 


68. 47 12 




14 


Mars 


W. 


92 38 20 


94 11 22 


95 44 41 


97 18 16 






a Aquilae 


w. 


89 60 36 


91 11 54 


92 33 25 


93 55 10 






Fomalhaut 


w. 


64 68 48 


66 22 42 


67 47 3 


69 11 49 






a Pegasi 


w. 


42 21 64 


43 47 49 


45 14 24 


46 41 35 






Sun 


E. 


51 41 1 


50 15 2 


48 48 47 


47 22 15 




15 


Mars 


W. 


105 10 43 


106 46 9 


108 21 53 


109 57 55 






a Aquilse 


w. 


100 46 44 


102 9 32 


103 32 28 


104 55 30 






Fomalhaut 


w. 


76 22 8 


77 49 24 


79 17 3 


80 45 3 






a Pegasi 


w. 


54 6 2 


65 36 29 


67 7 26 


58 38 52 






Sun 


E. 


40 5 21 


38 37 6 


37 8 33 


35 39 44 




16 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


88 10 24 


89 40 27 


91 10 47 


92 41 26 






a Pegasi 


W. 


66 22 43 


67 56 45 


69 31 13 


71 6 5 






Sun 


E. 


28 11 14 


26 40 42 


25 9 54 


23 38 51 




21 


Sun 


W. 


36 23 22 


38 3 19 


39 43 21 


41 23 28 






Spica 


E. 


74 46 48 


72 59 32 


71 12 12 


69 24 50 




22 


Sun 


W. 


49 44 46 


51 25 7 


53 5 27 


64 45 47 






Jupiter 


W. 


22 56 47 


24 42 54 


26 29 1 


28 15 7 






Spica 


E. 


60 27 35 


58 40 7 


66 62 40 


55 5 14 






Antares 


E. 


106 12 56 


104 25 15 


102 37 36 


100 49 66 




23 


Sun 


W. 


63 7 8 


64 47 17 


66 27 23 


68 7 26 






Jupiter 


W. 


37 6 7 


38 50 59 


40 36 47 


42 22 32 






Venus 


w. 


31 20 44 


33 7 3 


34 63 21 


36 39 36 






Spica 


E. 


46 8 42 


44 21 35 


42 34 32 


40 47 35 






Antares 


E. 


91 52 5 


90 4 39 


88 17 17 


86 30 





JUNE, 1860. 



323 





GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 


i 


LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


IIP'. 


\l\ 


IX\ 


Month. 


Position. 












24 


Sdn 


W. 


O 1 II 

69 47 24 


o / // 

71 27 18 


/ // 

73 7 8 


ll 46 52 




Jupiter 


W. 


44 8 12 


46 53 47 


47 39 18 


49 24 43 




Venus 


w. 


38 25 50 


40 12 


41 58 8 


43 44 13 




Saturn 


w. 


20 46 37 


22 31 53 


24 17 13 


26 2 35 




Spica 


E. 


39 44 


37 13 59 


35 27 22 


33 40 51 




Antares 


E. 


84 42 45 


82 55 36 


81 8 32 


79 21 32 


25 


Sdn 


W. 


83 4 14 


84 43 24 


86 22 28 


88 1 24 




Jupiter 


W. 


58 10 24 


59 55 12 


61 39 54 


63 24 30 




Venus 


w. 


52 33 43 


54 19 24 


56 5 


57 50 33 




Saturn 


w. 


34 49 19 


36 34 31 


38 19 38 


40 4 40 




Antares 


E. 


70 28 


68 41 37 


66 55 20 


66 9 11 




Mars 


E. 


122 2 21 


120 15 33 


118 28 49 


116 42 11 


26 


Sun 


W. 


96 14 15 


97 52 27 


99 30 31 


101 8 27 




Jupiter 


w. 


72 5 38 


73 49 28 


75 33 10 


77 16 44 




Venus 


w. 


66 36 54 


68 21 53 


70 6 47 


71 51 34 




Saturn 


w. 


48 48 20 


50 32 44 


52 17 


54 1 9 




Regulus 


w. 


43 40 2 


45 25 12 


47 10 15 


48 55 11 




Antares 


E. 


56 20 10 


54 34 46 


52 49 30 


51 4 21 




Mars 


E. 


107 50 32 


106 4 32 


104 18 39 


102 32 63 


27 


Sun 


W. 


109 16 1 


110 53 6 


112 30 2 


114 6 49 




Jupiter 


w. 


85 52 28 


87 35 11 


89 17 44 


90 9 




Venus 


w. 


80 33 57 


82 18 6 


84 2 8 


86 46 3 




Saturn 


w. 


62 39 58 


64 23 19 


66 6 31 


67 49 35 ■ 




Regulus 


w. 


57 37 54 


59 22 2 


61 6 1 


62 49 52 




Antares 


E. 


42 20 43 


40 36 26 


38 52 17 


37 8 17 




Mars 


E. 


93 45 59 


92 1 


90 16 10 


88 31 28 




a Aquilse 


E. 


96 27 1 


94 56 18 


93 25 39 


91 56 6 


28 


Sdn 


W. 


122 8 25 


123 44 16 


125 19 57 


126 56 27 




Jupiter 


W. 


99 29 54 


101 11 23 


102 52 41 


104 33 50 




Venus 


W. 


94 23 52 


96 7 3 


97 50 7 


99 33 4 




Saturn 


W. 


76 22 38 


78 4 47 


79 46 46 


81 28 35 




Regulus 


W. 


71 26 52 


73 9 48 


74 52 35 


76 35 12 




Mars 


E. 


79 50 8 


78 6 20 


76 22 40 


74 39 11 




a Aquilse 


E. 


84 24 14 


82 54 37 


81 25 14 


79 56 7 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


109 40 


107 27 14 


105 53 47 


104 20 19 


29 


Venus 


W. 


108 5 47 


109 47 55 


111 29 54 


113 11 44 




Saturn 


w. 


89 55 9 


91 35 57 


93 16 34 


94 67 1 




Regulus 


w. 


85 5 46 


86 47 22 


88 28 48 


90 10 3 




Spica 


w. 


31 5 53 


32 47 5 


34 28 8 


36 9 3 




Mars 


E. 


66 4 15 


64 21 47 


62 39 30 


60 57 23 




a Aqnilse 


E. 


72 35 6 


71 8 


69 41 20 


68 15 6 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


96 33 37 


95 31 


93 27 33 


91 54 42 


30 


Saturn 


W. 


103 16 27 


104 55 46 


106 34 53 


108 18 49 




Spica 


W. 


44 31 21 


46 11 19 


47 61 6 


49 30 42 i 




Mars 


E. 


52 29 46 


50 48 51 


49 8 9 


47 27 39 




a AquilsB 


E. 


61 11 55 


59 49 7 


58 27 2 


57 5 41 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


84 13 2 


82 41 19 


81 9 49 


79 38 34 




a Pejjasi 


E. 


105 40 36 


104 4 12 


102 27 56 


100 61 49 



324 



JUNE, 1860. 



GEEEIS'WIOH MEAN TIME. 








LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 
the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


XVIII''. 


XXIh. 


Month. 


Position. 












24 


Sun 


W. 


o / // 

76 26 32 


O 1 il 

78 6 6 


79 45 34 


81 24 57 




Jupiter 


W. 


51 10 3 


52 55 17 


54 40 26 


56 25 28 




Venus 


W. 


45 30 15 


47 16 13 


49 2 7 


50 47 57 




Saturn 


W. 


27 47 59 


29 33 22 


31 18 44 


33 4 3 




Spica 


E. 


31 54 29 


30 8 17 


28 22 14 


26 36 21 




Antares 


E. 


77 34 38 


75 47 50 


74 1 7 


72 14 30 


25 


Sun 


W. 


89 40 12 


91 18 54 


92 57 28 


94 35 50 




Jupiter 


W. 


65 8 58 


66 53 19 


68 37 33 


70 21 40 




Venus 


W. 


59 36 


61 21 21 


63 6 37 


64 51 48 




Saturn 


W. 


41 49 36 


43 34 26 


45 19 11 


47 3 49 




Antares 


E. 


63 23 7 


61 37 12 


59 61 24 


58 5 43 




Mars 


E. 


114 55 39 


113 9 13 


111 22 63 


109 36 39 


26 


Sun 


W. 


102 46 14 


104 23 53 


106 1 24 


107 38 47 




Jupiter 


W. 


79 10 


80 43 27 


82 26 36 


84 9 37 




Venus 


W. 


73 36 16 


75 20 50 


77 5 19 


78 49 42 




Saturn 


W. 


55 45 11 


57 29 5 


59 12 51 


60 56 29 




Eegulus 


W. 


50 40 


52 24 40 


64 9 12 


56 63 37 




Antares 


E. 


49 19 20 


47 34 28 


45 39 46 


44 5 10 




Mars 


E. 


100 47 15 


99 1 44 


97 16 21 


95 31 6 


27 


Sun 


W. 


115 43 27 


117 19 56 


118 66 15 


120 32 25 




Jupiter 


W. 


92 42 25 


94 24 31 


96 6 28 


97 48 16 




Venus 


w. 


87 29 51 


89 13 32 


90 57 6 


92 40 32 




Saturn 


w. 


69 32 30 


71 15 16 


72 57 52 


74 40 20 




Kegulus 


w. 


64 33 34 


66 17 7 


68 31 


69 43 46 




Antares 


E. 


35 24 26 


33 40 45 


31 67 14 


30 13 51 




Mars 


E. 


, 86 46 54 


85 2 29 


83 18 13 


81 34 6 




a Aquilse 


E. 


90 24 36 


88 54 16 


87 24 4 


85 54 3 


28 


Sun 


W. 


128 30 48 


130 5 59 


131 40 69 


133 15 49 




Jupiter 


w. 


106 14 49 


107 65 38 


109 36 17 


111 16 45 




Venus 


w. 


101 15 53 


102 58 33 


104 41 6 


106 23 31 




Saturn 


w. 


83 10 14 


84 61 43 


86 33 2 


88 14 11 




Eegulus 


w. 


78 17 39 


79 59 66 


81 42 2 


83 23 59 




Mars 


E. 


72 55 52 


71 12 42 


69 29 43 


67 46 64 




a Aquilse 


E. 


78 27 15 


76 58 42 


75 30 29 


74 2 36 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


102 46 52 


101 13 27 


99 40 6 


98 6 49 


29 


Venus 


W. 


114 53 26 


116 34 58 


118 16 22 


119 57 37 




Saturn 


w. 


96 37 17 


98 17 21 


99 67 16 


101 36 57 




Kegulus 


w. 


91 51 7 


93 32 


95 12 41 


96 53 12 




Spica 


w. 


37 49 50 


39 30 27 


41 50 55 


42 51 13 




Mars 


E. 


59 15 28 


57 33 45 


65 52 13 


54 10 53 




a Aquilse 


E. 


66 49 21 


65 24 8 


63 69 28 


62 36 23 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


90 22 1 


88 49 29 


87 17 8 


85 44 59 


30 


Saturn 


W. 


109 52 33 


111 31 4 


113 9 23 


114 47 30 




Spica 


w. 


51 10 8 


52 49 22 


54 28 25 


56 7 16 




Mars 


E. 


45 47 24 


44 7 22 


42 27 36 


40 48 2 




a Aquilse 


E. 


55 45 8 


54 25 26 


53 6 89 


61 48 49 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


78 7 37 


76 36 56 


75 6 33 


73 36 29 




a Pegasi 


E. 


99 15 51 


97 40 2 


96 4 22 


94 28 53 



JULY, 1860. 



325 





GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










and 


1 


Noon. 


im. 


VR 


IX"-. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


O 4 H 


O t il 


o / ii 


1 


Spica 


W. 


57 45 56 


59 24 24 


61 2 39 


62 40 43 




Antares 


w. 


11 54 47 


13 33 25 


15 11 51 


16 50 4 




Mars 


E. 


39 8 47 


37 29 45 


35 51 


34 12 32 




a Aquilae 


E. 


50 32 2 


49 16 21 


48 1 51 


46 48 36 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


72 6 46 


70 37 22 


69 8 21 


67 39 43 




a Pegasi 


E. 


92 53 35 


91 18 28 


89 43 33 


88 8 50 


2 


Spica 


W. 


70 47 53 


72 24 41 


74 1 16 


75 37 38 




Antares 


W. 


24 58 2 


26 34 59 


28 11 43 


29 48 14 




Mars 


E. 


26 5 14 


24 28 58 


22 53 11 


21 17 56 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


60 23 7 


58 57 16 


57 31 58 


56 7 16 




a Pegasi 


E. 


80 18 33 


78 45 11 


77 12 5 


55 39 14 




a Arietis 


E. 


122 53 4 


121 16 34 


119 40 16 


118 4 11 


3 


Spica 


W. 


83 36 11 


85 11 13 


86 46 3 


88 20 39 




Antares 


W. 


37 47 30 


39 22 41 


40 57 89 


42 32 24 




Fomalliaut 


E. 


49 13 45 


47 53 21 


46 33 50 


45 15 15 




a Pegasi 


E. 


67 59 3 


66 27 53 


64 57 1 


63 ^6 28 




a Arietis 


E. 


110 6 52 


108 32 3 


106 57 26 


105 23 2 


4 


Spica 


W. 


96 10 27 


97 43 46 


99 16 51 


100 49 44 




Antares 


W. 


50 22 52 


51 56 19 


53 29 33 


55 2 35 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


38 58 59 


37 47 41 


■ 36 37 57 


35 29 53 




a Pegasi 


E. 


55 58 49 


54 30 22 


53 2 19 


51 34 40 




a Arietis 


E. 


97 34 12 


96 1 4 


94 28 9 


92 55 27 


6 


Spica 


W. 


108 31 7 


110 2 48 


111 34 17 


113 5 36 




Antares 


W. 


62 44 41 


64 16 31 


65 48 9 


67 19 37 




Mars 


W. 


13 43 26 


15 10 47 


16 39 6 


18 8 5 




a Pegasi 


E. 


44 23 9 


42 58 21 


41 34 8 


40 10 31 




a Arietis 


E. 


85 14 54 


83 43 23 


82 12 3 


80 40 55 




Aldebaran 


E. 


117 22 48 


115 52 37 


114 22 35 


112 52 42 


6 


Antares 


W. 


74 64 19 


76 24 46 


77 55 4 


79 25 14 




Mars 


W. 


25 37 46 


27 8 4 


28 38 U 


30 8 44 




a Arietis 


E. 


73 7 50 


71 37 43 


70 7 45 


68 37 56 




Aldebaran 


E. 


105 25 21 


103 56 18 


102 27 22 


100 58 34 


1 


Antares 


W. 


86 54 4 


88 23 29 


89 52 49 


91 22 3, 




a Aquilae 


W. 


42 13 39 


43 15 21 


44 18 20 


45 22 25 




Mars 


W. 


37 40 25 


39 10 41 


40 40 54 


42 11 6 




a Arietis 


E. 


61 10 57 


59 41 56 


58 13 1 


56 44 13 




Aldebaran 


E. 


93 36 19 


92 8 11 


90 40 9 


89 12 13 




Sun 


E. 


130 57 25 


129 35 11 


128 13 3 


126 50 59 


8 


Antares 


W. 


98 47 5 


100 15 55 


101 44 43 


103 13 30 




a Aquilae 
Mars 


W. 


50 56 49 


52 6 4 


53 15 58 


54 26 29 




w. 


49 41 40 


51 11 43 


52 41 46 


54 11 49 




a Arietis 


E. 


49 21 31 


47 53 12 


46 24 57 


44 56 45 




Aldebaran 


E. 


81 53 39 


80 26 7 


78 58 38 


77 31 11 




Sun" 


E. 


120 1 48 


118 40 7 


117 18 29 


115 56 52 


9 


Antares 


W. 


110 37 17 


112 6 4 


113 34 54 


115 3 46 




Mars 


W. 


61 42 21 


63 12 33 


64 42 49 


66 13 8 




a Aquilse 


w. 


60 27 3 


61 40 34 


62 54 30 


64 8 50 



326 



JULY, 1860. 





GEEENWICH 


MEAT^ TIME. 






LDNAE DISTANCES. 




Day of 


Star's Name 












and 




Midnight. 


XVi-. 


XTIIIi'. 


XXTii. 




Month. 


Position. 




• 
















/ // 


o / // 


/ II 


O i II 




1 


Spica 


W. 


64 18 34 


65 56 13 


67 33 39 


69 10 62 






Antares 


W. 


18 28 5 


20 5 53 


21 43 29 


23 20 52 






Mars 


E. 


32 34 22 


30 56 33 


29 19 4 


27 41 66 






a Aquilse 


E. 


45 36 41 


44 26 13 


43 17 18 


42 10 2 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


66 11 30 


64 43 42 


63 16 21 


61 49 29 






a Pegasi 


E. 


86 34 20 


85 3 


83 25 59 


81 52 9 




2 


Spica 


W. 


17 13 41 


78 49 43 


80 25 25 


82 56 






Antares 


w. 


31 24 32 


33 36 


34 36 27 


36 12 5 






Mars 


E. 


19 43 19 


18 9 27 


16 36 27 


15 4 32 






Fomalliaut 


E. 


54 43 11 


63 19 44 


51 56 59 


50 34 59 






a Pegasi 


K 


74 6 38 


72 34 19 


71 2 17 


69 30 31 






a Arietis 


E. 


116 28 18 


114 62 38 


113 17 10 


111 41 55 




3 


Spica 


W. 


89 55 3 


91 29 13 


93 3 11 


94 36 55 






Antares 


w. 


44 6 66 


45 41 14 


47 15 20 


48 49 12 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


43 57 40 


42 41 10 


41 25 50 


40 11 44 






a Pegasi 


E. 


61 56 15 


60 26 22 


58 56 49 


67 27 38 






a Arietis 


E. 


103 48 50 


102 14 62 


100 41 6 


99 7 33 




4 


Spica 


W. 


102 22 25 


103 54 54 


105 27 10 


106 59 14 






Antares 


W. 


56 35 25 


58 8 2 


59 40 27 


61 12 40 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


34 23 40 


33 19 26 


32 17 21 


31 17 39 






a Pegasi 


E.- 


50 7 27 


48 40 39 


47 14 19 


45 48 29 






a Arietis 


E. 


91 22 56 


89 50 38 


88 18 31 


86 46 37 




5 


Spica 


W. 


114 36 43 


116 7 39 


117 38 25 


119 9 1 






Antares 


W. 


68 50 54 


70 22 


71 52 56 


73 23 43 






Mars 


W. 


19 37 32 


21 7 20 


22 37 21 


24 7 31, 






a Pegasi 


E. 


38 47 32 


37 25 16 


36 3 45 


34 43 4 






a Arietis 


E. 


79 9 57 


77 39 10 


76 8 33 


74 38 7 






Aldebaran 


E. 


111 22 57 


109 53 21 


108 23 53 


106 54 33 




6 


Antares 


W. 


80 55 15 


82 25 8 


83 54 54 


85 24 32 






Mars 


W. 


31 39 5 


33 9 26 


34 39 47 


36 10 7 






a Arietis 


E. 


67 8 16 


65 38 44 


64 9 21 


62 40 5 






Aldebaran 


E. 


99 29 53 


98 1 20 


96 32 53 


95 4 33 




1 


Antares 


W. 


92 51 12 


94 20 16 


95 49 16 


97 18 12 






a Aquilse 


W. 


46 27 32 


47 33 36 


48 40 32 


49 48 17 






Mars 


W. 


43 41 16 


45 11 24 


46 41 31 


48 11 36 






a Arietis 


E. 


55 15 30 


53 46 53 


52 18 21 


50 49 54 






Aldebaran 


E. 


87 44 21 


86 16 34 


84 48 52 


83 21 14 






Sun 


E. 


125 29 1 


124 7 7 


122 45 17 


121 23 31 




8 


Antares 


W. 


104 42 16 


106 11 1 


107 39 46 


109 8 31 






a Aquilas 


W. 


55 37 33 


56 49 10 


58 1 19 


59 13 57 






Mars 


W. 


55 41 53 


57 11 58 


58 42 4 


60 12 11 






a Arietis 


E. 


43 28 37 


42 31 


40 32 28 


39 4 26 






Aldebaran 


E. 


76 3 47 


74 36 24 


73 9 3 


71 41 43 






Sun ■ 


E. 


114 35 16 


113 13 40 


111 52 5 


110 30 29 




9 


Antares 


W. 


116 32 42 


118 1 41 


119 30 45 


120 59 64 






Mars 


W. 


67 43 31 


69 13 59 


70 44 32 


72 15 10 






a Aquilae 


W. 


65 23 33 


66 38 37 


67 54 2 


69 9 47 





JULY, 1860. 



327 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR DISTANCES. 






Day of 
the 


Star's Nam( 












and 




Noon. 


nil'. 


VP. 


IXi. 


Month. 


Position. 






• 






9 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


O 1 II 

36 15 41 


o / // 

37 21 36 


38° 28 52 


a 1 II 

39 37 23 




a Arietis 


E. 


37 36 27 


36 8 29 


34 40 33 


33 12 38 




Aldebaran 


E. 


70 14 23 


68 47 3 


67 19 43 


65 52 22 




Sun 


E. 


109 8 52 


107 47 14 


106 25 33 


105 3 50 


10 


Mars 


W. 


73 45 55 


75 16 47 


76 47 46 


78 18 53 




a Aquilae 


W. 


70 25 52 


71 42 15 


72 58 56 


74 15 54 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


45 35 27 


46 49 43 


48 4 43 


49 20 27 




a Arietis 


E. 


25 53 32 


24 25 51 


22 58 16 


21 30 49 




Aldebaran 


E. 


58 35 15 


57 7 43 


55 40 8 


54 12 30 




Sun 


E. 


98 14 12 


96 52 


95 29 42 


94 7 17 


11 


Mars 


W. 


85 56 45 


87 28 50 


89 1 7 


90 33 37 




a Aquilae 


w. 


80 44 55 


82 3 30 


83 22 20 


84 41 24 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


65 48 35 


57 7 55 


58 27 46 


59 48 7 




a Pegasi 


w. 


32 58 35 


34 48 4 


36 38 29 


36 59 47 




Aldebaran 


E. 


46 53 26 


46 25 29 


43 57 27 


42 29 21 




Sun 


E. 


87 12 55 


86 49 32 


84 25 58 


83 2 12 


12 


Mars 


W. 


98 19 27 


99 53 21 


101 27 31 


103 1 57 




a Aquilae 


w. 


91 20 15 


92 40 40 


94 1 18 


95 22 7 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


66 36 59 


68 6 


69 23 38 


70 47 36 




a Pegasi 


w. 


43 57 27 


45 22 57 


46 49 2 


48 15 41 




Aldebaran 


E. 


35 8 38 


33 40 34 


32 12 36 


30 44 46 




Sun 


E. 


76 2 


74 34 52 


73 9 26 


71 43 43 


13 


Mars 


W. 


110 58 26 


112 34 39 


114 11 11 


115 48 2 




a Aquilae 


w. 


102 8 51 


103 30 40 


104 52 36 


106 14 38 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


77 53 32 


79 19 54 


80 46 39 


82 13 47 




a Pegasi 


w. 


55 36 53 


57 6 37 


58 36 50 


60 7 32 




Son 


E. 


64 30 46 


63 3 13 


61 35 21 


60 7 9 


14 


a Aquilse 


w. 


113 6 51 


114 28 8 


115 50 22 


117 12 31 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


89 34 53 


91 4 10 


92 33 47 


94 3 44 




a Pegasi 


w. 


67 47 59 


69 21 26 


70 55 19 


72 29 39 




a Arietis 


w. 


24 18 5 


25 63 44 


27 29 57 


29 6 42 




Sun 


E. 


52 40 55 


51 10 35 


49 39 52 


48 8 46 


15 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


101 38 


103 9 41 


104 41 38 


106 13 45 




a Pegasi 


w. 


80 27 48 


82 4 41 


83 41 59 


85 19 41 




a Arietis 


w. 


37 18 1 


38 67 41 


40 37 49 


42 18 23 




Sun 


E. 


40 27 30 


38 54 4 


37 20 15 


35 46 2 


20 


Sun 


w. 


26 4 51 


27 48 31 


29 32 11 


31 15 51 




Spica 


E. 


57 56 34 


66 5 59 


54 16 24 


52 24 61 




Antares 


E. 


103 41 28 


101 50 39 


99 59 49 


98 9 1 


21 


Sun 


W. 


39 53 30 


41 36 48 


43 19 59 


45 3 3 




Spica 


E. 


43 13 3 


41 22 59 


39 33 3 


37 43 15 




Antares 


E. 


88 55 40 


87 5 14 


85 14 54 


83 24 42 




Mars 


E. 


134 25 44 


132 34 1 


130 42 25 


128 50 56 


22 


Sun 


W. 


63 36 15 


55 18 23 


67 20 


58 42 6 




Spica 


E. 


28 37 13 


26 48 42 


25 29 


23 12 37 




Antares 


E. 


74 15 49 


72 26 33 


70 37 28 


68 48 34 



328 



JULY, 1860. 







GKEENWICH 


MEAN" TIME. 










LUNAR DISTANCES. 






Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Midnight. 

• 


XV". 


XVIIP'. 


XXIk. 


9 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


/ // 

40 4T 1 


o / // 

41 57 -43 


o / // 

43 9 24 


o / tt 

44 22 




a. Arietis 


E. 


31 44 45 


30 16 53 


28 49 3 


27 21 16 




Aldebaran 


E. 


64 25 0"^ 


62 57 37 


61 30 12 


60 2 45 




Sun 


E. 


103 42 3 


102 20 12 


100 58 17 


99 36 17 


10 


Mars 


W. 


T9 60 8 


81 21 82 


82 53 6 


84 24 60 




a Aquilae 


W. 


75 33 10 


76 50 42 


78 8 31 


79 26 35 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


50 36 51 


51 53 54 


53 11 33 


64 29 47 




a Arietis 


E. 


20 3 31 


18 36 27 


17 9 43 


15 48 24 




Aldebaran 


E. 


52 44 48 


51 17 3 


49 49 14 


48 21 22 




Sun 


E. 


92 44 43 


91 22 1 


89 69 9 


88 36 7 


11 


Mars 


W. 


92 6 19 


93 39 15 


95 12 24 


96 45 48 




a Aquilae 


W. 


86 43 


87 20 16 


88 40 3 


90 2 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


61 8 58 


62 30 17 


63 62 4 


66 14 18 




a Pegasi 


w. 


38 21 53 


39 44 45 


41 8 20 


42 32 36 




Aldebaran 


E. 


41 1 13 


39 33 3 


38 4 53 


36 36 45 




Sun 


E. 


81 38 13 


80 14 1 


78 49 36 


77 24 66 


12 


Mars 


W. 


104 36 39 


106 11 39 


107 46 57 


109 22 32 




a Aquilae 


W. 


96 43 7 


98 4 18 


99 25 40 


100 47 11 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


72 11 59 


73 36 46 


76 1 58 


76 27 33 




A Pegasi 


w. 


49 41 53 


51 10 37 


52 38 52 


54 7 37 




Aldebaran 


E. 


29 17 8 


27 49 46 


26 22 45 


24 56 11 




Sun 


E. 


70 17 43 


68 51 26 


■67 24 61 


66 57 57 


13 


Mars 


W. 


117 25 13 


119 2 44 


120 40 36 


122 18 48 




a Aquilae 


W. 


107 36 46 


108 58 59 


110 21 16 


111 43 33 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


83 41 17 


85 9 9 


86 37 22 


88 6 67 




a Pegasi 


w. 


61 38 42 


63 10 20 


64 42 26 


66 14 59 




Sun 


E. 


58 38 37 


57 9 44 


55 40 29 


54 10 53 


,14 


a Aquilse 


W. 


118 34 33 


119 56 26 


121 18 6 


122 39 30 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


95 33 59 


97 4 33 


98 35 26 


100 6 35 




a Pegasi 


w. 


74 4 25 


75 39 37 


77 15 15 


78 61 19 




a Arietis 


w. 


30 43 59 


32 21 46 


34 2 


35 38 47 




Sun 


E. 


46 37 17 


45 5 25 


43 33 10 


42 32 


15 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


107 46 5 


109 18 38 


110 51 18 


112 24 2 




a Pegasi 


W. 


86 57 46 


88 36 14 


90 15 6 


91 54 21 




o Arietis 


W. 


43 59 24 


45 40 51 


47 22 43 


49 5 1 




Sun 


E. 


34 11 26 


32 86 26 


31 1 8 


29 26 16 


20 


Sun 


w. 


32 59 29 


34 43 5 


36 26 38 


88 10 6 




Spica 


E. 


50 34 21 


48 43 54 


46 53 31 


45 3 14 




Antares 


E. 


96 18 14 


94 27 30 


92 36 49 


90 46 12 


21 


Sun 


W. 


46 46 


48 28 48 


50 11 27 


51 53 66 




Spica 


E. 


35 53 39 


34 4 14 


32 15 


30 26 




Antares 


E. 


81 34 37 


79 44 41 


77 64 54 


76 5 16 




Mars 


E. 


126 69 34 


125 8 20 


123 17 14 


121 26 17 


22 


Sun 


W. 


60 23 39 


62 4 59 


63 46 6 


65 26 59 




Spica 


E. 


21 25 6 


19 37 57 


17 51 18 


16 5 13 




Antares 


E. 


66 59 53 


65 11 25 


63 23 10 


61 35 8 



JULY, 1860. 



329 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 
the 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


Illk. 


VI"-. 


IXi'. 


Month. 


Position. 


















O t 11 


O / // 


O I II 


/ // 


22 


Mars 


E. 


119 35 29 


117 44 50 


115 54 21 


114 4 3 


23 


Sun 


W. 


6T 7 39 


68 48 4 


70 28 15 


72 8 11 




Antares 


E. 


59 47 20 


57 59 46 


66 12 27 


54 25 23 




Mars 


E. 


104 55 25 


103 6 22 


101 17 81 


99 28 64 




a Aquilae 


E. 


111 30 62 


109 59 17 


108 27 36 


106 55 48 


24 


Sun 


W. 


80 24 7 


82 2 32 


83 40 41 


85 18 34 




Antares 


E. 


45 33 46 


43 48 14 


42 2 67 


40 17 56 




Mars 


E. 


90 29 39 


88 42 35 


86 65 46 


85 9 15 




a Aquilae 


E. 


99 16 42 


97 45 3 


96 13 32 


94 42 9 


25 


Sun 


W. 


93 24 


95 17 


96 36 19 


98 12 6 




Spica 


W. 


14 31 54 


16 13 3 


17 54 21 


19 35 45 




Antares 


E. 


31 36 50 


29 53 24 


28 10 14 


26 27 20 




Mars 


E. 


76 20 38 


74 35 45 


72 61 7 


71 6 46 




a Aquilae 


E. 


87 8 10 


85 38 6 


84 8 18 


82 38 49 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


111 47 41 


110 14 19 


108 40 69 


107 7 41 


26 


Sun 


W. 


106 7 3 


107 41 17 


109 15 15 


110 48 69 




Spica 


W. 


28 1 29 


29 42 11 


31 22 42 


33 3 2 




Mars 


E. 


62 29 8 


60 46 26 


59 4 


67 21 51 




a Aquilae 


E. 


75 16 38 


73 49 23 


72 22 34 


70 66 13 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


99 22 35 


97 49 57 


96 17 29 


94 45 11 




a Pegasi 


E. 


121 33 14 


119 56 48 


118 20 27 


116 44 11 


27 


Sun 


W. 


118 33 59 


120 6 16 


121 38 19 


123 10 8 




Spica 


W. 


41 21 38 


43 43 


44 39 36 


46 18 16 




Mars 


E. 


48 55 11 


47 14 41 


46 34 28 


43 54 32 




a Aquilae 


E. 


63 52 13 


62 29 9 


61 6 45 


69 45 1 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


87 6 43 


86 35 42 


84 4 55 


82 34 24 




a Pegasi 


E. 


108 44 36 


107 9 6 


106 33 46 


103 58 35 


28 


Spica 


W. 


54 28 30 


66 5 56 


67 43 9 


59 20 10 




Mars 


E. 


35 39 12 


34 1 4 


32 23 16 


30 45 49 




a Aquilae 


E. 


53 8 3 


51 51 19 


60 35 37 


49 20 58 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


75 6 2 


73 37 17 


72 8 52 


70 40 48 




a Pegasi 


E. 


96 5 13 


94 31 6 


92 57 10 


91 23 26 


29 


Spica 


W. 


67 22 17 


68 68 7 


70 33 46 


72 9 14 




Antares 


W. 


21 31 58 


23 7 58 


24 43 47 


26 19 24 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


63 26 13 


62 34 


60 35 22 


69 10 41 




a Pegasi 


E. 


83 37 41 


82 5 9 


80 32 50 


79 44 


30 


Spica 
Antares 


W. 


80 3 46 


81 38 7 


83 12 18 


84 46 18 




W. 


34 14 41 


35 49 11 


37 23 30 


38 57 39 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


52 15 30 


60 54 21 


49 33 54 


48 14 14 




a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


E. 


71 23 39 


69 52 57 


68 22 29 


66 52 17 




E. 


113 39 11 


112 5 3 


110 31 5 


108 57 17 


31 


Spica 
Antares 


W. 


92 33 44 


94 6 43 


95 39 31 


97 12 10 




w. 


46 45 47 


48 18 54 


49 61 61 


51 24 38 




a Pegasi 
Arietis 


E. 


59 25 19 


57 56 47 


56 28 34 


55 40 




E. 


101 10. 51 


99 38 3 

• 


98 6 26 


96 32 57 



330 



JULY, 1860. 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 


1 


LUNAK DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XVt. 


XTIIP. 


XXP". 


Month. 


Position. 


















1 II 


/ // 


O / // 


O 4 II 


22 


Mars 


E. 


112 13 56 


110 24 


108 34 16 


106 44 44 


23 


Sun 


W. 


73 47 53 


75 27 19 


77 6 31 


78 45 27 




Antares 


E. 


52 38 33 


50 51 58 


49 5 39 


47 19 35 




Mars 


E. 


97 40 32 


95 52 26 


94 4 34 


92 16 59 




a Aquilse 


E. 


105 23 58 


103 52 7 


102 20 16 


100 48 27 


24 


Sun 


W. 


86 56 11 


88 33 32 


90 10 37 


91 47 26 




Antares 


E. 


38 33 11 


36 48 42 


35 4 29 


33 20 32 




Mars 


E. 


83 22 69 


81 37 


79 51 17 


78 5 49 




a Aquilae 


E. 


93 10 56 


91 39 55 


90 9 6 


88 38 31 


25 


Sun 


W. 


99 47 36 


101 22 51 


102 57 50 


104 32 34 




Spica 


W. 


21 17 6 


22 58 24 


24 39 34 


26 20 36 




Antares 


E. 


24 44 41 


23 2 18 


21 20 11 


19 38 19 




Mars 


E. 


69 22 41 


67 38 54 


65 55 22 


64 12 7 




a Aquilse 


E. 


81 9 39 


79 40 50 


78 12 23 


76 44 18 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


105 34 27 


104 1 19 


102 28 17 


100 55 22 


26 


Sun 


W. 


112 22 28 


113 55 42 


115 28 42 


117 1 28 




Spica 


W. 


34 43 10 


36 23 6 


38 2 49 


39 42 20 




Mars 


E. 


55 39 58 


53 58 22 


52 17 2 


50 35 69 




a A qui las 


E. 


69 30 20 


68 4 58 


66 40 9 


65 15 63 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


93 13 5 


91 41 10 


90 9 28 


88 37 69 




a Pegasi 


E. 


115 8 1 


113 31 58 


111 66 3 


110 20 15 


27 


Sun 


W. 


124 41 44 


126 13 6 


127 44 15 


129 15 11 




Spica 


W. 


47 66 44 


49 34 59 


51 13 2 


62 50 52 




Mars 


E. 


42 14 52 


40 35 30 


38 56 25 


37 17 40 




a Aquilae 


E. 


58 24 1 


57 3 46 


55 44 19 


64 25 44 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


81 4 9 


79 34 11 


78 4 30 


76 35 7 




a Pogasi 


E. 


102 23 34 


100 48 43 


99 14 2 


97 39 32 


28 


Spica 


W. 


60 56 59 


62 33 36 


64 10 1 


65 46 16 




Mars 


E. 


29 8 43 


27 32 2 


25 55 47 


24 19 59 




a Aquilae 


E. 


48 7 28 


46 55 12 


45 44 13 


44 34 37 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


69 13 6 


67 45 46 


66 18 50 


64 52 19 




a Pegasi 


E. 


89 49 52 


88 16 31 


86 43 22 


85 10 26 


29 


Spica 


W. 


73 44 31 


75 19 36 


76 54 30 


78 29 14 




Antares 


W. 


27 54 50 


29 30 5 


31 5 8 


32 40 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


57 46 30 


56 22 51 


54 59 47 


53 37 19 




a Pegasi 


E. 


77 28 52 


75 57 13 


74 25 47 


72 54 36 


30 


Spica 


W. 


86 20 8 


87 53 48 


89 27 17 


91 36 




Antares 


W. 


40 31 37 


42 5 25 


43 39 3 


45 12 30 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


46 55 23 


45 37 23 


44 20 20 


43 4 17 




a Pegasi 


E. 


66 22 21 


63 52 40 


62 23 16 


60 54 9 




a Arietis 


E. 


107 23 40 


105 50 13 


104 16 56 


102 43 48 


31 


Spica 


W. 


98 44 39 


100 16 58 


101 49 8 


103 21 8 




Antares 


W. 


52 57 15 


54 29 43 


56 2 1 


57 34 10 




a Pegasi 


E. 


53 33 7 


52 5 55 


60 39 5 


49 12 38 




a Arietis 


E. 


95 38 

• 


93 28 29 


91 66 29 


90 24 39 



AUGUST, 1860. 



331 





GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


IHK 


Vlt. 


IX". 


Month. 


Position. 


















t n 


O / // 


O 1 II 


O / // 


1 


Spica 


W. 


104 52 69 


106 24 40 


107 56 12 


109 27 35 




Antares 


W. 


59 6 9 


60 37 59 


62 9 40 


63 41 12 




Mars 


W. 


16 55 41 


18 24 36 


19 54 2 


21 23 51 




a Pegasi 


E. 


47 46 35 


46 20 58 


44 55 48 


43 31 8 




a Arietis 


E. 


88 52 58 


87 21 26 


86 50 4 


84 18 50 


2 


Antares 


W. 


71 16 47 


72 47 29 


74 18 4 


76 48 30 




Mars 


W. 


28 55 35 


30 26 9 


31 66 43 


33 27 16 




a Arietis 


E. 


76 44 51 


75 14 28 


73 44 14 


72 14 7 




Aldebaran 


E. 


108 59 43 


107 30 28 


106 1 20 


104 32 16 


3 


Antares 


W. 


83 18 55 


84 48 40 


86 18 19 


87 47 51 




Mars 


W. 


40 59 26 


42 29 43 


43 69 66 


46 30 6 




a Aquila 


w. 


39 50 32 


40 49 3 


41 49 2 


42 60 22 




a Arietis 


E. 


64 45 28 


63 16 6 


61 46 50 


60 17 41 




Aldebaran 


E. 


97 8 38 


95 40 12 


94 11 51 


92 43 37 


4 


Antares 


W. 


95 14 12 


96 43 14 


98 12 13 


99 41 8 




Mars 


w. 


52 59 53 


54 29 40 


55 69 23 


57 29 4 




a Aquilae 


w. 


48 13 53 


49 21 23 


50 29 40 


51 38 41 




a Arietis 


E. 


52 53 28 


51 24 54 


49 66 26 


48 28 3 




Aldebaran 


E. 


85 23 42 


83 55 58 


82 28 18 


81 41 


6 


Mars 


W. 


64 56 50 


66 26 18 


67 56 45 


69 26 11 




a Aquilae 


W. 


57 32 51 


58 45 14 


59 68 4 


61 11 19 




a Arietis 


E. 


41 7 14 


39 39 17 


38 11 23 


36 43 34 




Aldebaran 


E. 


73 43 34 


72 16 18 


70 49 5 


69 21 63 




Venus 


E. 


114 13 6 


112 44 16 


111 15 28 


109 46 42 




Sun 


E. 


138 22 30 


137 1 1 


136 39 33 


134 18 6 


6 


Mars 


W. 


76 52 23 


78 21 52 


79 61 23 


81 20 57 




a Aquilse 


W. 


67 22 57 


68 38 14 


69 53 48 


71 9 38 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


42 89 39 


43 51 30 


45 4 14 


46 17 46 




Aldebaran 


E. 


62 6 22 


60 39 19 


69 12 17 


57 45 16 




Venus 


E. 


102 23 6 


100 54 22 


99 25 39 


97 66 65 




Pollux 


E. 


104 3 55 


102 35 40 


101 7 22 


99 39 2 




Sun 


E. 


127 30 44 


126 9 12 


124 47 38 


123 26 1 


7 


Mars 


W. 


88 49 37 


90 19 34 


91 49 37 


93 19 46 




a Aquilae 


W. 


77 32 26 


78 49 40 


80 7 6 


81 24 44 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


52 35 11 


53 52 25 


55 10 8 


56 28 20 




a Pegasi 


w. 


29 47 18 


31 3 21 


32 20 30 


33 38 38 




Aldebaran 


E. 


50 30 11 


49 3 9 


47 36 7 


46 9 6 




Venus 


E. 


90 32 39 


89 3 39 


87 34 35 


86 5 27 




Pollux 


E. 


92 16 19 


90 47 31 


89 18 36 


87 49 35 




Sun 


E. 


116 36 57 


115 14 53 


113 52 43 


112 30 26 


8 


Mars 


W. 


100 52 23 


102 23 20 


103 54 27 


105 25 43 




a Aquilae 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


87 55 42 


89 14 25 


90 33 18 


91 52 20 




w. 


63 6 4 


64 26 51 


66 48 1 


67 9 32 




a Pegasi 
Aldebaran 


w. 


40 21 39 


41 44 19 


43 7 33 


44 31 20 




E. 


38 54 10 


37 27 16 


36 26 


34 33 43 




Venus 


E. 


78 38 17 


77 8 31 


76 38 37 


74 8 35 




Pollux 


E. 


80 22 29 


78 52 37 


77 22 34 


76 62 20 




Sun 


E. 


105 37 2 


104 13 53 


102 50 34 


101 27 3 



332 






AUGUST, 1860. 








GEEEITWIOH 


MEAE" TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










tte 


and 




Midnight. 


xv*. 


XVIII''. 


XXP. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Spica 


W. 


/ // 

110 68 50 


o / // 

112 29 65 


O 1 ft 

114 52 


O / // 

115 31 40 




Antares 


W. 


65 12 36 


66 43 51 


68 14 58 


69 46 67 




Mars 


W. 


22 53 55 


24 24 10 


26 54 34 


27 25 3 




a Pegasi 


E. 


42 6 58 


40 43 21 


39 20 20 


37 57 68 




a Arietis 


E. 


82 47 45 


81 16 49 


79 46 1 


78 15 22 


2 


Antares 


W. 


TT 18 49 


78 49 1 


80 19 6 


81 49 4 




Mars 


W. 


34 57 48 


36 28 17 


37 58 43 


39 29 6 




a Arietis 


E. 


70 44 8 


69 14 17 


67 44 33 


66 14 57 




Aldebaran 


E. 


103 3 21 


101 34 31 


100 6 48 


98 37 9 


3 


Antares 


W. 


89 17 17 


90 46 38 


92 15 64 


98 45 5 




Mars 


W. 


47 10 


48 30 11 


50 8 


61 30 2 




a Aquilse 


W. 


43 52 57 


44 56 40 


46 1 27 


47 7 13 




a Arietis 


E. 


58 48 38 


57 19 42 


66 50 51 


64 22 7 




Aldebaran 


E. 


91 15 28 


89 47 24 


88 19 25 


86 51 31 


4 


Antares 


W. 


101 9 59 


102 38 47 


104 7 33 


106 36 17 




Mars 


W. 


58 58 42 


60 28 17 


61 57 50 


63 27 21 




a Aquila 


w. 


52 48 21 


63 58 39 


56 9 31 


56 20 56 




a Arietis 


E. 


46 59 44 


46 31 30 


44 3 20 


42 35 15 




Aldebaran 


E. 


79 33 9 


78 6 41 


76 38 16 


75 10 53 


6 


Mars '■'- 


W. 


70 54 86 


72 24 2 


73 63 28 


75 22 66 




a Aquilse 


w. 


62 24 57 


63 38 57 


64 53 18 


66 7 58 




a Arietis 


E. 


35 15 48 


33 48 6 


32 20 28 


30 52 66 




Aldebaran 


E. 


67 54 44 


66 27 37 


65 31 


63 33 26 




Venus 


E. 


108 17 67 


106 49 13 


105 20 30 


103 61 48 




Sun 


E. 


132 66 38 


131 35 11 


130 18 43 


128 52 14 


6 


Mars 


W. 


82 50 34 


84 20 14 


86 49 57 


87 19 44 




a Aquilse 


W. 


72 25 43 


73 42 3 


74 68 37 


76 15 25 




Fomalbaut 


w. 


47 31 58 


48 46 51 


60 2 23 


51 18 30 




Aldebaran 


E. 


56 18 15 


54 51 14 


68 24 13 


51 67 12 




Venus 


E. 


96 28 8 


94 59 20 


93 30 29 


92 1 36 




Pollux 


E. 


98 10 38 


96 42 10 


95 13 38 


93 46 1 




Sdn 


E. 


122 4 20 


120 42 36 


119 20 48 


117 58 55 


1 


Mars 


W. 


94 50 2 


96 20 26 


97 50 57 


99 21 36 




a Aquilas 


W. 


82 42 34 


84 35 


85 18 47 


86 37 9 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


67 47 1 


69 6 9 


60 25 42 


61 45 41 




a Pegasi 


w. 


34 67 42 


36 17 34 


37 88 13 


88 69 36 




Aldebaran 


E. 


44 42 5 


43 15 4 


41 48 4 


40 21 6 




Venus 


E. 


84 36 13 


83 6 53 


81 87 28 


80 7 56 




Pollux 


E. 


86 20 26 


84 51 10 


83 21 45 


81 62 12 




Sun 


E. 


111 8 2 


109 46 30 


108 22 50 


107 1 


8 


Mars 


W. 


106 57 11 


108 28 61 


110 42 


111 32 46 




a Aquilse 


W. 


93 11 31 


94 30 51 


95 50 20 


97 9 67 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


68 81 27 


69 53 44 


71 16 22 


72 39 20 




a Pegasi 


w. 


45 55 40 


47 20 30 


48 45 50 


50 11 38 




Aldebaran 


E. 


33 7 7 


31 40 40 


30 14 25 


28 48 26 




Venus 


E. 


72 38 23 


71 8 2 


69 37 82 


68 6 61 




Pollux 


E. 


74 21 55 


72 61 18 


71 20 28 


69 49 26 




Sun 


E. 


100 3 22 


98 39 27 


97 15 19 


95 50 58 



AUGUST, 1860. 



333 







GEEENAViCH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


III". 


Vli. 


IX". 


Mouth. 


Position. 


















O 1 II 


o / // 


O 1 u 


1 II 


9 


ffl Aquilae 


W. 


98 29 42 


99 49 34 


101 9 33 


102 29 39 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


74 2 40 


75 26 21 


76 60 22 


78 14 43 




a Pegasi 


W. 


51 37 54 


53 4 38 


54 31 47 


55 59 23 




Venus 


E. 


66 36 


65 4 58 


63 33 44 


62 2 18 




Pollux 


E. 


68 18 10 


66 46 40 


65 14 56 


63 42 57 




Sun 


E. 


94 26 23 


93 1 33 


91 86 28 


90 11 7 


10 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


85 21 30 


86 47 61 


88 14 31 


89 41 30 




a Pegasi 


W. 


63 23 47 


64 53 56 


66 24 29 


67 65 27 




a Arietis 


W. 


19 48 32 


21 20 16 


22 62 38 


24 25 36 




Venus 


E, 


54 21 54 


62 49 8 


51 16 9 


49 42 66 




Pollux 


E. 


55 59 1 


54 26 23 


52 51 27 


51 17 13 




Sun 


E. 


83 7 


81 33 


80 5 33 


78 37 47 


11 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


97 1 7 


98 29 58 


99 59 6 


101 28 28 




a Pegasi 


W. 


75 36 37 


77 10 6 


78 44 1 


80 18 21 




a Arietis 


W. 


32 18 30 


33 54 34 


36 31 7 


37 8 7 




Venus 


E. 


41 53 12 


40 18 34 


38 43 44 


37 8 41 




Pollux 


E. 


43 21 21 


41 45 13 


40 8 47 


38 32 2 




Sun 


E, 


71 13 36 


69 43 39 


68 13 19 


66 42 35 


12 


a Pegasi 


W. 


88 16 20 


89 53 11 


91 30 27 


93 8 8 




a Arietis 


W. 


45 20 9 


46 69 57 


48 40 12 


60 20 55 




Venus 


E. 


29 11 15 


27 35 36 


26 


24 24 34 




Sun 


E. 


59 2 50 


57 29 38 


65 56 


54 21 67 


13 


a Arietis 


W. 


58 51 25 


60 34 53 


62 18 48 


64 3 10 




Aldebaran 


W. 


27 47 19 


29 24 34 


31 2 52 


32 42 9 




Sun 


E. 


46 25 11 


44 48 32 


43 11 27 


41 33 57 


14 


a Arietis 


"W. 


72 51 33 


74 38 30 


76 25 51 


78 13 35 




Aldebaran 


W. 


41 10 56 


42 64 48 


44 39 17 


46 24 21 




Sun 


E. 


33 20 12 


31 40 15 


29 59 65 


28 19 14 


18 


Sun 


W. 


22 27 46 


24 13 19 


25 58 49 


27 44 13 




Spica 


E. 


34 2 17 


32 9 41 


30 17 15 


28 26 1 




Antares 


E. 


79 42 56 


77 49 45 


75 56 42 


74 3 47 


19 


Sun 


W. 


36 29 8 


38 13 33 


39 57 45 


41 41 43 




Antares 


E. 


64 41 40 


62 49 62 


60 68 18 


69 6 58 




Mars 


E. 


105 47 6 


103 55 48 


102 4 45 


100 13 58 


20 


Sun 


W. 


50 17 27 


51 69 42 


63 41 38 


55 23 15 




Antares 


E. 


49 54 32 


48 4 57 


46 15 42 


44 26 47 




Mars 


E. 


91 4 20 


89 15 21 


87 26 42 


85 38 23 




a Aquilae 


E. 


103 1 2 


101 26 16 


99 51 33 


98 17 


21 


Sun 


W. 


63 46 6 


65 25 36 


67 4 46 


68 43 31 




Antares 


E. 


35 27 22 


33 40 34 


31 54 8 


30 8 3 




Mars 


E. 


76 42 13 


74 56 6 


73 10 22 


71 26 1 




a Aquilse 


E. 


90 27 23 


88 54 17 


87 21 31 


86 49 7 


22 


Sun 


W. 


76 61 51 


78 28 24 


80 4 35 


81 40 24 




Spica 
Mars 


W. 


24 36 4 


26 19 6 


28 1 61 


29 44 19 




E. 


62 44 6 


61 1 6 


69 18 29 


57 36 16 



334 






AUGUST, 1860. 










GEEENWICH 


W&KE TIME. 


■ 


LUNAR DISTANUJiS. 


Day of 


Star's Name ' 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVK 


XVIIIi. 


XXTl'. 


Month. 


Position. 












9 


a Aquilae 


W. 


o / // 

103 49 50 


O I II 

105 10 7 


106° 30 28 


O 1 II 

107 50 52 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


79 39 24 


81 4 26 


82 29 48 


83 66 29 




a Pegasi 


w. 


b1 27 25 


58 65 53 


60 24 46 


61 54 3 




Venus 


E. 


60 30 39 


58 58 48 


57 26 44 


55 54 26 




Pollux 


E. 


62 10 42 


60 38 12 


69 5 26 


57 32 22 




Sun 


E. 


88 45 30 


87 19 36 


85 53 24 


84 26 55 


10 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


91 8 48 


92 36 26 


94 4 22 


95 32 35 




a Pegasi 


W. 


69 26 51 


70 58 40 


72 30 64 


74 3 33 




a Arietis 


w. 


25 59 8 


27 33 13 


29 7 49 


30 42 65 




Venus 


E. 


48 9 28 


46 35 45 


46 1 48 


43 27 37 




Pollux 


E. 


49 42 40 


48 7 49 


46 32 38 


44 57 9 




Sun 


E. 


77 9 40 


75 41 12 


74 12 22 


72 43 10 


11 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


102 58 9 


104 28 5 


105 58 16 


107 28 40 




a Pegasi 


w. 


81 53 6 


83 28 17 


85 3 63 


86 39 64 




a Arietis 


w. 


38 45 36 


40 23 33 


42 1 57 


43 40 49 




Venus 


E. 


35 33 27 


33 68 3 


32 22 32 


30 46 66 




Pollux 


E. 


36 54 58 


35 17 36 


33 39 57 


32 2 2 




Sun 


E. 


65 11 27 


63 39 65 


62 7 68 


60 35 37 


12 


a Pegasi 


W. 


94 46 14 


96 24 44 


98 3 38 


99 42 55 




a Arietis 


W. 


52 2 6 


53 43 44 


56 26 50 


57 8 24 




Venus 


E. 


22 49 26 


21 14 46 


19 40 45 


18 7 40 




Sun 


E. 


52 47 28 


61 12 32 


49 37 11 


48 1 24 


13 


a Arietis 


W. 


65 47 59 


67 33 14 


69 18 56 


71 6 1 




Aldebaran 


W. 


34 22 21 


36 3 22 


37 45 11 


39 27 43 




Sun 


E. 


39 56 1 


38 17 41 


36 38 55 


34 59 46 


14 


a Arietis 


W. 


80 1 43 


81 50 14 


83 39 7 


86 28 21 




Aldebaran 


w. 


48 9 56 


49 56 6 


61 42 43 


63 29 49 




Sun 


E. 


26 38 11 


24 56 48 


23 15 5 


21 33 5 


18 


Sun 


W. 


29 29 31 


31 14 40 


32 69 40 


34 44 30 




Spica 


E. 


26 33 1 


24 41 18 


22 49 53 


20 58 49 




Antares 


E. 


72 11 


70 18 23 


68 26 67 


66 33 42 


19 


Sun 


W. 


43 25 26 


45 8 52 


46 52 1 


48 34 63 




Antares 


E. 


57 15 54 


55 25 8 


63 34 38 


51 44 26 




Mars 


E. 


98 23 27 


96 33 13 


94 43 19 


92 63 39 


20 


Sun 


W. 


57 4 31 


58 45 26 


60 26 1 


62 6 15 




Antares 


E. 


42 38 12 


40 49 58 


39 2 5 


37 14 33 




Mars 


E. 


83 60 25 


82 2 49 


80 15 35 


78 28 43 




a AquilsB 


E. 


96 42 37 


95 8 26 


93 34 29 


92 47 


21 


Sun 


W. 


70 21 56 


71 69 68 


73 37 38 


75 14 56 




Antares 


E. 


28 22 21 


26 37 1 


24 52 4 


23 7 28 




Mars 


E. 


69 40 3 


67 66 29 


66 11 18 


64 27 30 




a Aquilae 


E. 


84 17 5 


82 45 27 


81 14 16 


79 43 29 


22 


Sun 


W. 


83 15 51 


84 50 66 


86 25 40 


88 2 




Spica 


W. 


31 26 30 


33 8 21 


34 49 54 


36 31 10 




Mars 


E. 


55 54 26 


54 12 59 


52 31 56 


60 51 16 









AUGUST, 1860. 






335 






GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 






LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


III''. 


Vli. 


IXt. 




Month. 


Position. 




















o / // 


o / il 


o / n 


o / 


II 


22 


a Aquilae 


E. 


78 13 11 


76 43 22 


75 14 4 


73 45 


17 


23 


Sun 


W. 


89 34 3 


91 7 43 


92 41 2 


94 14 


1 ' 




Spica 


W. 


38 12 5 


39 52 40 


41 32 67 


43 12 


56 




Mars 


E. 


49 10 59 


47 31 5 


45 51 35 


44 12 


27 




a Aquilae 


E. 


66 30 2 


65 4 53 


63 40 24 


62 16 


40 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


90 2 20 


88 29 51 


86 57 43 


86 25 


64 


24 


Son 


W. 


101 53 56 


103 24 57 


104 65 40 


106 26 


6 




Spica 


w. 


61 28 6 


53 6 14 


54 44 4 


56 21 


35 




Mars 


E. 


36 2 30 


34 25 39 


32 49 11 


51 13 


8 




a Aquilse 


E. 


55 29 51 


64 11 9 


52 53 25 


51 36 


43 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


77 52 10 


76 22 33 


74 53 19 


73 24 


29 




a Pegasi 


E. 


98 58 26 


97 23 41 


96 49 11 


94 14 


58 


25 


Sun 


W. 


113 58 50 


116 22 34 


116 51 1 


118 19 


13 




Spica 


W. 


64 25 7 


66 1 1 


67 36 40 


69 12 


5 




Antares 


W. 


18 34 47 


20 10 60 


21 46 39 


23 22 


12 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


66 6 43 


64 40 31 


63 14 48 


61 49 


36 




a Pegasi 


E. 


86 27 53 


84 55 17 


83 22 56 


81 50 


51 


26 


Sun 


W. 


125 36 32 


127 3 18 


128 29 51 


129 56 


11 




Spica 


W. 


77 5 34 


78 39 35 


80 13 24 


81 47 


1 




Antares 


w. 


31 16 25 


32 50 34 


34 24 31 


35 58 


16 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


54 51 34 


63 29 45 


62 8 36 


60 48 


8 




a Pegasi 


E. 


74 14 24 


72 43 56 


71 13 41 


69 43 


44 


27 


Spica 


W. 


89 32 9 


91 4 37 


92 36 66 


94 9 


5 




Antares 


W. 


43 44 5 


45 16 41 


46 49 7 


48 21 


24 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


44 17 39 


43 2 18 


41 48 


40 34 


60 




a Pegasi 


E. 


62 18 4 


60 49 47 


69 21 47 


67 54 


6 




a Arietis 


E. 


104 12 3 


102 39 47 


101 7 41 


99 36 


44 


28 


Spica 


W. 


101 47 27 


103 18 41 


104 49 47 


106 20 


45 




Antares 


W. 


56 26 


67 31 48 


59 3 2 


60 34 


8 




a Pegasi 


E. 


50 40 23 


49 14 41 


47 49 22 


46 24 


28 




a Arietis 


E. 


91 58 17 


90 27 13 


88 66 17 


87 25 


28 


29 


Antares 


W. 


68 7 49 


69 3'8 13 


71 8 30 


73 38 


41 




Mars 


W. 


26 27 11 


27 56 12 


29 23 13 


30 51 


13 




a Pegasi 


E. 


39 26 69 


38 6 8 


36 43 57 


35 23 


29 




a Arietis 


E. 


79- 53 21 


78 23 18 


76 53 21 


76 23 


31 




Aldebaran 


E. 


112 5 66 


110 37 


109 8 10 


107 39 


24 


30 


Antares 


W. 


80 8 12 


81 37 50 


83 7 24 


84 36 


53 




Mars 


W. 


38 10 43 


39 38 29 


41 6 12 


42 33 


62 




a Aquilae 
a Arietis 


W. 


37 51 37 


38 46 49 


39 43 40 


40 42 


3 




E. 


67 56 48 


66 26 31 


64 57 20 


63 28 


14 




Aldebaran 


E. 


100 16 40 


98 48 19 


97 20 3 


96 51 


51 


31 


Antares 


W. 


92 3 18 


93 32 24 


95 1 27 


96 30 


27 




Mars 


W. 


49 51 24 


51 18 46 


52 46 5 


64 13 


21 




a Aquilae 
a Arietis 


W. 


45 53 39 


46 59 17 


48 6 61 


49 13 


17 




E. 


56 3 65 


54 35 17 


63 6 43 


61 38 


13 




Aldebaran 


E. 


88 31 46 


87 3 65 


85 36 8 


84 8 





336 






AUGUST, 1860. 












GREE]!nVICH 1VTF,A¥ TIME. 












LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 








Day of 

the 


Star's Name 












and 




Midnight. 


XVi. 


xvim. 


XXTi. 




Month. 


Position. 




















o / // 


O 1 II 


i II 


O 1 II 




22 


a Aquilse 


E. 


T2 17 3 


70 49 23 


69 22 19 


67 55 51 




23 


Sun 


W. 


95 46 40 


97 18 68 


98 60 67 


100 22 36 






Spica 


W. 


44 52 35 


46 31 55 


48 10 67 


49 49 40 






Mars 


E. 


42 33 42 


40 66 19 


39 17 20 


37 39 43 






a Aquilse 


E. 


60 63 40 


59 31 27 


58 10 3 


56 49 30 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


83 54 26 


82 23 19 


80 62 33 


79 22 10 




24 


Sun 


W. 


107 56 12 


109 26 2 


110 55 35 


112 24 61 






Spica 


W. 


67 58 51 


59 35 49 


61 12 31 


62 48 67 






Mars 


E. 


29 37 28 


28 2 13 


26 27 23 


24 52 59 






a Aquilse 


E. 


50 21 6 


49 6 39 


47 63 23 


46 41 26 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


71 56 4 


70 28 4 


69 30 


67 33 23 






a Pegasi 


E. 


92 41 1 


91 7 20 


89 33 55 


88 46 




25 


Sun 


W. 


119 47 10 


121 14 62 


122 42 20 


124 9 33 






Spica 


W. 


70 47 15 


72 22 10 


73 56 51 


76 31 20 






Antares 


W. 


24 57 31 


26 32 36 


28 7 26 


29 42 2 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


60 24 53 


59 42 


57 37 4 


66 14 1 






a Pegasi 


E. 


80 19 1 


78 47 28 


77 16 11 


75 46 9 




26 


Sun 


W. 


131 22 18 


132 48 13 


134 13 66 


135 39 25 






Spica 


W. 


83 20 25 


84 53 38 


86 26 39 


87 69 30 






Antares 


W. 


37 31 49 


39 5 10 


40 38 19 


42 11 17 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


49 28 23 


48 9 25 


46 61 16 


45 34 






a Pegasi 


E. 


68 14 3 


66 44 38 


66 15 30 


63 46 38 




27 


Spica 


W. 


95 41 4 


• 97 12 53 


98 44 33 


100 16 4 






Antares 


W. 


49 53 31 


61 26 28 


52 67 16 


64 28 66 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


89 22 54 


38 12 17 


37 3 6 


35 55 28 






a Pegasi 


E. 


56 26 41 


54 59 37 


63 32 52 


52 6 27 






a Arietis 


E. 


98 3 56 


96 32 18 


95 49 


93 29 29 




28 


Spica 


W. 


107 51 35 


109 22 18 


110 62 63 


112 23 21 






Antares 


W. 


62 5 7 


63 35 58 


66 6 42 


66 37 19 






a Pegasi 


E. 


45 


43 35 59 


42 12 27 


40 49 26 






a Arietis 


E. 


85 54 47 


84 24 14 


82 53 49 


81 23 31 




29 


Antares 


W. 


74 -8 46 


75 38 45 


77 8 39 


78 38 27 






Mars 


W. 


32 19 11 


33 47 8 


35 15 2 


36 42 54 






a Pegasi 


E. 


34 3 48 


32 44 69 


31 27 9 


30 10 24 






a Arietis 


E. 


73 53 47 


72 24* 9 


70 54 37 


69 25 10 






Aldebaran 


E. 


106 10 43 


104 42 6 


103 13 33 


101 45 4 




30 


Antares 


W. 


86 6 18 


87 36 39 


89 4 66 


90 34 9 






Mars 


w. 


44 1 29 


45 29 2 


46 66 33 


48 24 1 






a Aquilse 


w. 


41 41 52 


42 43 2 


43 45 26 


44, 49 






a Arietis 


E. 


61 59 13 


60 30 16 


59 1 25 


57 32 38 






Aldebaran 


E. 


94 23 43 


92 66 38 


91 27 37 


89 59 40 




31 


Antares 


W. 


97 59 24 


99 28 19 


100 57 11 


102 26 






Mars 


W. 


55 40 34 


57 7 46 


58 34 54 


60 2 






a Aquilse 


W. 


50 21 29 


61 30 27 


62 40 7 


53 50 24 






o Arietis 


E. 


50 9 47 


48 41 25 


47 13 7 


45 44 52 






Aldebaran 


E. 


82 40 44 


81 13 6 


79 45 31 


78 17 58 





SEPTEMBER, 1860. 



337 





GKEENWICH 


MEAN TTME. 








LUNAR DISTANCES. 






Day of 


star's Namt 


i 










tie 


and 




Noon. 


iii'>. 


VP'. 


IX". 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Antares 


W. 


1 il 

103 54 49 


105° 23 36 


O / // 

106 52 21 


108° 21 5 




Mars 


W. 


61 29 4 


62 56 7 


64 23 9 


65 60 8 




a Aquilse 


w. 


55 1 17 


66 12 44 


57 24 40 


58 37 6 




a Arietis 


E. 


44 16 41 


42 48 34 


41 20 31 


39 52 31 




Aldebaran 


E. 


76 50 29 


75 23 2 


73 55 37 


72 28 15 




Venus 


E. 


125 16 42 


123 63 18 


122 29 55 


121 6 33 


2 


Mars 


W. 


73 4 52 


74 31 47 


75 58 43 


77 25 40 


V 


a Aquilse 


W. 


64 45 25 


66 8 


67 15 9 


68 30 27 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


40 6 6 


41 15 58 


42 26 49 


43 38 34 




a Arietis 


E. 


32 33 33 


31 5 59 


29 38 30 


28 11 8 




Aldebaran 


E. 


65 11 59 


63 44 49 


62 17 41 


60 60 35 




Pollux 


E. 


107 13 11 


105 44 58 


104 16 44 


102 48 29 




Venus 


E. 


114 9 51 


112 46 31 


111 23 11 


109 59 60 


3 


Mars 


W. 


84 40 37 


86 7 41 


87 34 48 


89 1 58 




a Aquilae 


W. 


74 50 43 


76 7 25 


77 24 18 


78 41 22 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


49 48 31 


51 4 25 


52 20 51 


53 37 47 




a Pegasi 


w. 


27 12 2 


28 25 5 


29 39 30 


30 55 9 




Aldebaran 


E. 


53 35 29 


62 8 32 


50 41 38 


49 14 46 




Pollux 


E. 


95 26 49 


93 58 22 


92 29 51 


91 1 16 




Venus 


E. 


103 2 47 


101 39 17 


100 15 44 


98 52 9 




Jupiter 


E. 


118 54 30 


117 27 12 


116 59 50 


114 32 26 


4 


Mars 


W. 


96 18 41 


97 46 14 


99 13 53 


100 41 38 




a Aquilae 


W. 


85 9 4 


86 27 2 


87 45 7 


89 3 19 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


60 9 7 


61 28 34 


62 48 22 


64 8 30 




a Pegasi 


W. 


37 27 36 


38 48 22 


40 9 45 


41 31 40 




Aldebaran 


E. 


42 1 3 


40 34 29 


39 7 69 


37 41 36 




Pollux 


E. 


83 37 26 


82 8 24 


80 39 17 


79 10 6 




Venus 


E. 


91 53 17 


90 29 17 


89 5 12 


87 41 1 




Jupiter 


E. 


107 14 16 


105 46 23 


104 18 24 


102 60 18 


5 


Mars 


W. 


108 2 1 


109 30 28 


110 69 4 


112 27 50 




a Aquilae 


W. 


95 35 48 


96 54 33 


98 13 22 


99 32 15 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


70 53 63 


72 15 51 


73 38 5 


75 36 




a Pegasi 


W. 


48 28 46 


49 63 29 


51 18 36 


52 44 6 




Pollux 


E. 


71 42 14 


70 12 16 


68 42 9 


67 11 53 




Venus 


E. 


80 38 25 


79 13 31 


77 48 28 


76 23 16 




Jupiter 

Sun 


E. 


95 27 57 


93 59 3 


92 30 


91 47 




E. 


123 i6 40 


122 23 40 


121 30 


119 37 10 


6 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


81 57 8 


83 21 13 


84 45 34 


86 10 8 




a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


w. 


59 56 53 


61 24 30 


62 52 26 


64 20 42 




w. 


16 19 12 


17 47 22 


19 16 15 


20 45 49 




Pollux 


E. 


59 38 2 


58 6 41 


56 35 10 


65 3 26 




Venus 


E. 


69 14 40 


67 48 23 


66 21 63 


64 55 10 




Jupiter 

Sun 


E. 


83 31 55 


82 1 32 


80 30 56 


79 9 6 




E. 


112 37 41 


111 13 10 


109 48 26 


108 23 28 


7 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


93 16 41 


94 42 43 


96 8 59 


97 35 28 




a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


w. 


71 47 3 


73 17 21 


74 47 68 


76 18 55 




w. 


28 21 50 


29 54 26 


31 27 26 


33 51 




Pollux 


E. 


47 21 27 


45 48 21 


44 15 1 


42 41 26 




Venus 


E. 


57 38 3 


56 9 51 


54 41 23 


53 12 38 



22 



338 



SEPTEMBER, 1860. 



GREENWICH Ml^AN TIME. 






LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


XV. 


XTIII''. 


XXIk. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Antares 


W. 


109 49 48 


Ill 18 30 


1 H 

112 47 12 


o i n 

114 16 53 




Mars 


W. 


67 \1 6 


68 44 3 


70 11 


71 37 56 




a Aquilae 


w. 


59 49 58 


61 3 16 


62 16 57 


63 31 1 




a Arietis 


E. 


38 24 35 


36 56 43 


35 28 56 


34 1 13 




Aldebaran 


E. 


71 56 


69 33 39 


68 6 23 


66 39 10 




Venus 


E. 


119 43 12 


118 19 51 


116 56 31 


115 33 11 


2 


Mars 


W. 


78 52 37 


80 19 35 


81 46 34 


83 13 36 




a Aquilse 


W. 


69 45 2 


71 1 51 


72 17 55 


73 34 13 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


44 51 8 


46 4 28 


47 18 31 


48 33 12 




a Arietis 


E. 


26 43 54 


25 16 46 


23 49 49 


22 23 4 




Aldebaran 


E. 


59 23 81 


57 56 28 


56 29 27 


56 2 27 




Pollux 


E. 


101 20 13 


99 51 55 


98 23 35 


96 65 13 




Venus 


E. 


108 36 28 


107 13 5 


105 49 41 


104 26 15 


3 


Mars 


W. 


90 29 11 


91 56 27 


93 23 47 


94 51 12 




a Aquilse 


W. 


79 58 36 


81 16 


82 33 32 


83 51 14 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


54 55 12 


56 13 4 


57 31 21 


58 50 2 




a Pegasi 


w. 


32 11 52 


33 29 34 


34 48 8 


36 7 31 




Aldebaran 


E. 


47 47 56 


46 21 8 


44 54 23 


43 27 41 




Pollux 


E. 


89 32 39 


88 3 57 


86 35 11 


85 6 21 




Venus 


E. 


97 28 30 


96 4 48 


94 41 2 


93 17 12 




Jupiter 


E. 


113 4 57 


111 37 24 


110 9 47 


108 42 4 


4 


Mars 


W. 


102 9 29 


103 37 26 


105 5 31 


106 33 42 




a Aquilse 


w. 


90 21 37 


91 40 1 


92 58 31 


94 17 7 




Fpmalliaut 


w. 


65 28 58 


66 49 44 


68 10 49 


69 32 12 




a Pegasi 


w. 


42 54 9 


44 17 7 


45 40 34 


47 4 27 




Aldebaran 


E. 


36 15 19 


34 49 10 


33 23 12 


31 57 26 




Pollux 


E. 


77 40 45 


76 11 19 


74 41 45 


73 12 4 




Venus 


E. 


86 16 43 


84 52 19 


83 27 49 


82 3 11 




Jupiter 


E. 


101 22 5 


99 53 45 


98 25 17 


96 56 41 


5 


Mars 


W. 


113 56 44 


115 25 49 


116 55 4 


118 24 30 




a Aquilse 


W. 


100 51 11 


102 10 10 


103 29 10 


104 48 13 




Fomalbaut 


w. 


76 23 22 


77 46 25 


79 9 44 


80 33 18 




a Pegasi 


w. 


54 9 56 


55 36 10 


57 2 43 


58 29 38 




Pollux 


E. 


65 41 28 


64 10 52 


62 40 6 


61 9 9 




Venus 


E. 


74 57 54 


73 32 21 


72 6 38 


70 40 45 




Jupiter 


E. 


89 31 23 


88 1 48 


86 32 3 


85 2 6 




Sun 


E. 


118 13 39 


116 49 57 


115 26 4 


114 1 59 


6 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


87 34 57 


89 2 


90 25 22 


91 50 54 




a Pegasi 


W. 


65 49 17 


67 18 13 


68 47 30 


70 17 7 




a Arietis 


W. 


22 15 59 


23 46 41 


25 17 55 


26 49 39 




Pollux 


E. 


53 31 27 


51 59 18 


50 26 55 


48 54 17 




Venus 


E. 


63 28 14 


62 1 3 


60 33 38 


69 5 58 




Jupiter 


E. 


77 29 


75 57 40 


74 26 5 


72 64 13 




Sun 


E. 


106 58 15 


105 32 47 


104 7 4 


102 41 4 


1 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


99 2 11 


100 29 7 


101 56 17 


103 23 38 




a Pegasi 


W. 


77 50 14 


79 21 54 


80 63 55 


82 26 17 




a Arietis 


W. 


34 34 39 


36 8 52 


37 43 28 


39 18 28 




Pollux 


E. 


41 7 38 


39 33 35 


37 69 16 


36 24 43 


Venus 


E. 


51 43 36 


50 14 16 


48 44 38 


47 14 41 



SEPTEMBER, 1860. 



339 







GREENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Noon. 


III''. 


VI>>. 


IX\ 


Month. 


Position. 












n 


Jupiter 


E. 


o / n 

71 22 5 


o / // 

69 49 40 


O 1 II 

68 16 58 


o / n 

66 43 67 




Sun 


E. 


101 14 48 


99 48 16 


98 21 27 


96 54 19 


8 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


104 51 12 


106 18 58 


107 46 55 


109 15 12 




a Pegasi 


W. 


83 59 


85 32 4 


87 5 30 


88 39 18 




a Arietis 


W. 


40 63 52 


42 29 40 


44 5 63 


45 42 28 




Pollux 


E. 


34 49 57 


33 14 67 


31 39 44 


30 4 21 




Venus 


E. 


45 44 25 


44 13 49 


42 42 53 


41 11 38 




Jupiter 


E. 


58 54 8 


57 19 9 


56 43 49 


54 8 7 




Son 


E. 


89 33 51 


88 4 45 


86 36 18 


85 6 29 


9 


a Arietis 


W. 


53 51 41 


56 30 48 


67 10 20 


68 60 18 




Aldebaran 


W. 


23 6 26 


24 37 13 


26 9 24 


27 42 50 




Venus 


E. 


33 30 6 


31 66 43 


30 22 59 


28 48 54 




Jupiter 


E. 


46 3 56 


44 25 55 


42 47 30 


41 8 40 : 




Sun 


E. 


77 30 44 


75 58 36 


74 26 4 


72 53 8 


10 


a Arietis 


W. 


67 16 46 


68 69 26 


70 42 29 


72 26 2 




Aldebaran 


W. 


35 44 55 


37 23 52 


39 3 32 


40 43 56 




Jupiter 


E. 


32 48 16 


31 6 65 


29 25 9 


27 42 59 




Sun 


E. 


65 2 6 


63 26 37 


61 60 42 


60 14 22 


11 


a Arietis 


W. 


81 10 24 


82 56 35 


84 43 14 


86 30 18 




Aldebaran 


W. 


49 15 19 


50 59 22 


52 43 58 


64 29 6 




Sun 


E. 


52 6 13 


60 27 20 


48 48 1 


47 8 19 


12 


a Arietis 


W. 


95 31 51 


97 21 21 


99 11 13 


101 1 28 




Aldebaran 


W. 


63 22 11 


65 10 12 


66 68 38 


68 47 29 




Pollux 


w. 


21 14 36 


23 31 


24 47 20 


26 34 66 




Sun 


E. 


38 44 2 


37 2 7 


36 19 52 


33 37 19 


17 


Sun 


W. 


32 15 51 


33 69 8 


35 42 11 


37 24 56 




Antares 


E. 


40 58 58 


39 7 29 


37 16 18 


35 26 28 




Mars 


E. 


87 56 53 


86 8 19 


84 20 6 


82 32 14 




a Aquilffi 


E. 


95 12 35 


93 35 23 


91 58 25 


90 21 43 


18 


Sun 


Wi. 


45 53 50 


47 34 31 


49 14 50 


50 54 46 




Mars 


E. 


73 38 37 


71 53 6 


70 8 1 


68 23 21 




a Aquilse 


E. 


82 23 30 


80 49 7 


79 15 14 


77 41 52 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


107 3 43 


105 25 10 


103 46 50 


102 8 45 


19 


Sun 


W. 


59. 8 14 


60 45 39 


62 22 39 


63 59 13 




Mars 


E. 


69 46 39 


58 4 40 


66 23 7 


54 42 3 




a Aquilse 


E. 


70 3 47 


68 34 7 


67 6 10 


66 36 58 




Fomalbaut 


E. 


94 2 38 


92 26 26 


90 60 37 


89 15 11 




a Pegasi 


E. 


115 49 48 


114 9 18 


112 29 6 


110 49 13 


20. 


Sun 


W. 


71 55 41 


73 29 42 


75 3 18 


76 36 29 




Mars 


E. 


46 23 29 


44 45 9 


43 7 14 


41 29 47 




a Aquilfe 


E. 


68 28 18 


67 5 17 


65 43 16 


54 22 17 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


81 24 20 


79 61 31 


78 19 11 


76 47 19 




a Pegasi 


E. 


102 34 42 


100 56 51 


99 19 22 


97 42 16 


21 


Sun 


W. 


84 16 26 


85 47 15 


87 17 41 


88 47 46 




Antares 


W. 


16 10 46 


IQ 49 9 


18 27 11 


20 4 50 



340 




SEPTEMBER, 1860. 








GKEENWICH 


MEA^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVh. 


XVIIP-. 


XXW 


Month. 


Position. 


















o i II 


/ // 


O / // 


a 1 u 


1 


Jupiter 


E. 


65 10 38 


63 37 


62 3 3 


60 28 45 




Sun 


E. 


95 26 52 


93 59 6 


92 31 1 


91 2 36 


8 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


110 43 59 


112 11 45 


113 40 19 


115 9 




a Pegasi 


W. 


90 18 28 


91 48 


93 22 53 


94 68 9 




a Arietis 


w. 


47 19 29 


48 56 55 


50 34 46 


52 13 




Pollux 


E. 


28 28 46 


26 53 2 


25 17 13 


23 41 22 




Venus 


E. 


39 40 2 


38 8 5 


36 35 46 


35 3 7 




Jupiter 


E. 


52 32 3 


50 55 36 


49 18 46 


47 41 32 




Sdn 


E. 


83 35 18 


82 4 44 


80 33 48 


79 2 28 


9 


a Arietis 


W. 


60 30 43 


62 11 34 


63 52 51 


65 34 35 




Aldebaran 


W. 


29 17 22 


30 52 55 


32 29 24 


34 6 45 




Venus 


E. 


27 14 28 


25 39 41 


24 4 34 


22 29 8 




Jupiter 


E. 


39 29 25 


37 49 46 


36 9 41 


34 29 11 




Sun 


E. 


71 19 47 


69 46 


68 11 47 


66 37 9 


10 


a Arietis 


W. 


74 10 


75 54 25 


77 39 18 


79 24 37 




Aldebaran 


W. 


42 24 57 


44 6 38 


45 48 56 


47 31 50 




Jupiter 


E. 


26 23 


24 17 22 


22 33 59 


20 50 12 




Sun 


E. 


58 37 36 


57 23 


55 22 45 


63 44 41 


11 


a Arietis 


W. 


88 17 48 


90 5 42 


91 54 1 


93 42 44 




Aldebaran 


w. 


56 14 45 


58 53 


59 47 31 


61 34 37 




Sun 


E. 


45 28 13 


43 47 43 


42 6 51 


40 25 37 


12 


a Arietis 


W. 


102 52 3 


104 42 58 


106 34 13 


108 25 46 




Aldebaran 


w. 


70 36 43 


72 26 20 


74 16 19 


76 6 38 




Pollux 


w. 


28 23 14 


30 12 11 


32 1 42 


33 51 44 




Sun 


E. 


31 54 30 


30 11 25 


28 28 8 


26 44 40 


17 


Sun 


W. 


39 7 23 


40 49 31 


42 31 19 


44 12 46 




Antares 


E. 


33 35 1 


31 44 55 


29 55 12 


28 5 53 




Mars 


E. 


80 44 44 


78 57 37 


77 10 52 


75 24 33 




a Aquilse 


E. 


88 45 20 


87 9 18 


85 33 37 


83 58 21 


18 


Sun 


W. 


52 34 17 


54 13 24 


55 52 6 


57 30 23 




Mars 


E. 


66 39 7 


64 55 19 


63 11 58 


61 29 4 




a Aquilse 


E. 


76 9 2 


74 36 47 


73 5 8 


71 34 8 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


100 30 54 


98 53 21 


97 16 7 


95 39 13 


19 


Sun 


W. 


65 35 22 


67 11 5 


68 46 22 


70 21 15 




Mars 


E. 


53 1 25 


61 21 16 


49 41 33 


48 2 17 




a Aquilae 


E. 


64 9 33 


62 42 55 


61 17 8 


59 52 15 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


87 40 8 


86 6 32 


84 31 22 


82 57 38 




a Pegasi 


E. 


109 9 39 


107 30 23 


105 51 29 


104 12 65 


20 


Sun 


W. 


78 9 17 


79 41 40 


81 13 38 


82 46 14 




Mars 


E. 


39 52 48 


38 16 13 


36 40 6 


36 4 25 




a Aquilse 


E. 


53 2 23 


51 43 38 


50 26 6 


49 9 48 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


75 15 56 


73 45 4 


72 14 42 


70 44 52 




a Pegasi 


E. 


96 5 29 


94 29 6 


92 53 5 


91 17 26 


21 


Sun 


W. 


90 17 29 


91 46 50 


93 15 51 


94 44 31 





Antares 


W. 


21 42 9 


23 19 6 


24 55 43 


26 32 



SEPTEMBER, 1860. 



341 





GKEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAK DISTANCES. 


°r^ 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


III''. 


VI'. 


IX'. 


Month. 


Position. 












21 


Mars 


E. 


O 1 II 

33 29 12 


o / // 

31 54 25 


O i II 

30 20 4 


o / // 

28 46 10 




Fomalhaiit 


E. 


69 15 34 


67 46 49 


66 18 37 


64 50 59 




a Pegasi 


E. 


89 42 9 


88 7 15 


86 32 43 


84 58 33 


22 


Sun 


W. 


96 12 51 


97 40 51 


99 8 33 


100 35 56 




Antares 


W. 


28 7 58 


29 43 35 


31 18 54 


32 53 64 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


57 41 50 


56 17 57 


54 54 43 


53 32 13 




a Pegasi 


E. 


77 13 8 


75 41 7 


74 9 28 


72 38 11 


23 


Sun 


W. 


107 48 27 


109 14 8 


110 39 32 


112 4 43 




Antares 


W. 


40 44 35 


42 17 55 


43 51 


45 23 51 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


46 51 33 


45 34 4 


44 17 34 


43 2 7 




o Pegasi 


E. 


65 6 57 


63 37 45 


62 8 54 


60 40 24 




a Arietis 


E. 


107 10 23 


105 37 26 


104 4 42 


102 32 12 


24 


Sun 


W. 


119 7 8 


120 30 68 


121 54 37 


123 18 3 




Antares 


W. 


53 4 44 


64 36 17 


56 7 39 


67 38 61 




a Pegasi 


E. 


53 23 17 


51 56 59 


50 31 6 


49 6 35 




a Arietis 


E. 


94 53 


93 21 46 


91 60 44 


90 19 51 


25 


Antares 


W. 


65 12 24 


66 42 40 


68 12 49 


69 42 51 




Mars 


W. 


15 31 44 


16 56 28 


18 21 23 


19 46 27 




a Pegasi 


E. 


42 4 45 


40 42 6 


39 20 1 


37 68 33 




a Arietis 


E. 


82 47 58 


81 18 2 


79 48 14 


78 18 33 




Aldebaran 


E. 


114 59 57 


113 31 10 


112 2 29 


110 33 62 


26 


Antares 


W. 


77 11 20 


78 40 45 


80 10 6 


81 39 21 




Mars 


W. 


26 52 50 


28 18 9 


29 43 28 


31 8 46 




a Arietis 


E. 


70 51 48 


69 22 45 


67 53 47 


66 24 64 




Aldebaran 


E. 


103 12 5 


101 43 57 


100 15 52 


98 47 50 


27 


Antares 


W. 


89 4 46 


90 33 42 


92 2 36 


93 31 28 




a Aquilse 


W. 


43 43 26 


44 47 


45 61 40 


46 57 20 




Mars 


w. 


38 14 57 


39 40 8 


41 6 17 


42 30 26 




a Arietis 


E. 


59 1 33 


57 33 4 


56 4 38 


64 36 16 




Aldebaran 


E. 


91 28 33 


90 49 


88 33 8 


87 5 27 


28 


Antares 


W. 


100 55 26 


102 24 12 


103 52 57 


105 21 42 




a Aquilae 


W. 


52 38 28 


53 48 52 


54 59 53 


66 11 28 




Mars 


W. 


49 35 59 


51 1 5 


52 26 12 


53 51 18 




a Arietis 


E. 


47 15 1 


45 46 53 


44 18 47 


42 50 44 




Aldebaran 


E. 


79 47 36 


78 20 5 


76 52 36 


76 26 7 


29 


a Aquilse 


W. 


62 16 43 


63 31 8 


64 45 43 


66 44 




Mars 


W. 


60 56 57 


62 22 9 


63 47 24 


65 12 37 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


37 47 9 


38 54 46 


40 3 33 


41 13 25 




a Arietis 


E. 


35 31 3 


34 3 15 


32 35 40 


31 7 69 




Aldebaran 


E. 


68 7 54 


66 40 28 


65 13 4 


63 46 39 




Pollux 


E. 


110 11 41 


108 43 23 


107 15 2 


105 46 40 


30 


Mars 


W. 


72 19 19 


73 44 47 


75 10 18 


76 35 52 




a Aquilae 
Fomalhaut 


W. 


72 20 15 


73 36 56 


74 53 60 


76 10 57 




w. 


47 16 22 


48 31 14 


49 46 43 


51 2 48 




Aldebaran 


E. 


56 28 43 


55 1 21 


53 34 


52 6 40 


Pollux 


E. 


98 24 12 


90 55 34 


95 26 52 


93 58 7 



342 



SEPTEMBER, 1860. 







GEEENWIOH MEAN TTATE. 












LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 








Day of 
the 


Star's Name 












and 




Midnight. 


XVi>. 


XVIIP'. 


XXIk. 




Month. 


Position. 














21 


Mars 


E. 


O / tl 

27 12 44 


o / // 

25 39 45 


O 1 II 

24 7 14 


22 35 12 




1 


Fomalhaut 


E. 


63 23 56 


61 57 29 


60 31 38 


69 6 24 






a Pegasi 


E. 


83 24 45 


81 51 18 


80 18 13 


78 45 30 




22 


Sto 


W. 


102 3 1 


103 29 47 


104 66 17 


106 22 30 






Antares 


W. 


34 28 36 


36 3 1 


37 37 9 


39 11 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


52 10 27 


50 49 28 


49 29 18 


48 9 58 






a. Pegasi 


E. 


71 7 15 


69 36 39 


68 6 24 


66 36 30 




23 


Sun 


W. 


113 29 39 


114 54 21 


116 18 49 


117 43 6 






Antares 


W. 


46 56 28 


48 28 51 


50 1 1 


51 32 69 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


41 47 47 


40 34 39 


39 22 48 


38 12 20 






a Pegasi 


E. 


69 12 15 


57 44 28 


56 17 2 


54 49 58 






a Arietis 


E. 


100 59 55 


99 27 53 


97 66 3 


96 24 26 




24 


Sun 


W. 


124 41 19 


126 4 24 


127 27 19 


128 50 4 






Antares 


W. 


59 9 53 


60 40 45 


62 11 27 


63 42 






a Pegasi 


E. 


47 40 30 


46 15 61 


44 61 40 


43 27 67 






a Arietis 


E. 


88 49 10 


87 18 38 


85 48 16 


84 18 2 




25 


Antares 


W. 


71 12 45 


72 42 32 


74 12 13 


76 41 49 






Mars 


W. 


21 11 38 


22 36 53 


24 2 10 


26 27 30 






a Pegasi 


E. 


36 37 45 


35 17 41 


33 58 25 


32 40 






a Arietis 


E. 


76 48 59 


75 19 33 


73 50 11 


72 20 66 






Aldebaran 


E. 


109 5 21 


107 36 66 


106 8 36 


104 40 18 




26 


Antares 


W. 


83 8 33 


84 37 41 


86 6 45 


87 35 47 






Mars 


W. 


32 34 2 


33 59 18 


35 24 32 


36 49 45 






a Arietis 


E. 


64 56 5 


63 27 21 


61 58 42 


60 30 6 






Aldebaran 


E. 


97 19 53 


96 51 58 


94 24 7 


92 56 19 




27 


Antares 


W. 


95 18 


96 29 7 


97 57 55 


99 26 41 






a Aquilse 


W. 


48 3 55 


49 11 24 


60 19 41 


61 28 44 






Mars 


w. 


43 65 33 


45 20 41 


46 45 48 


48 10 53 






a Arietis 


E. 


63 7 66 


51 39 38 


50 11 23 


48 43 11 






Aldebaran 


E. 


85 37 50 


84 10 14 


82 42 40 


81 15 7 




28 


Antares 


W. 


106 50 27 


108 19 13 


109 48 


111 16 48 






a Aquilse 


W. 


57 23 34 


58 36 11 


59 49 16 


61 2 47 






Mars 


W. 


55 16 24 


66 41 32 


58 6 39 


69 31 48 






a Arietis 


E. 


41 22 43 


39 54 44 


38 26 47 


36 58 53 






Aldebaran 


E. 


73 57 40 


72 30 12 


71 2 46 


69 36 20 




29 


a Aquilae 


W. 


67 16 4 


68 31 43 


69 47 38 


71 3 49 






Mars 


w. 


66 37 52 


68 3 11 


69 28 31 


70 63 63 






Fomalhaut 


w. 


42 24 17 


43 36 6 


44 48 45 


46 2 12 






a Arietis 


E. 


29 40 12 


28 12 40 


26 45 15 


26 17 58 




i 
( 


Aldebaran 


E. 


62 18 16 


60 50 52 


59 23 29 


57 56 6 






Pollux 


E. 


104 18 15 


102 49 48 


101 21 19 


99 62 47 




30 


Mai's 


W. 


78 1 29 


79 27 10 


80 52 54 


82 18 42 






a Aquilse 


W. 


77 28 15 


78 45 44 


80 3 24 


81 21 13 






Fomalhaut 


w. 


62 19 24 


53 36 33 


64 54 11 


56 12 16 






Aldebaran 


E. 


50 39 23 


49 12 5 


47 44 50 


46 17 38 







Pollux 


E. 


92 29 19 


91 27 


89 31 31 


88 2 31 





OCTOBER, 1860. 



343 





GKEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAU DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Nam* 


) 










the 


and 




Noon. 


III''. 


VI"-. 


IX". 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Mars 


w. 


o / // 

83 44 34 


85° 10 31 


O / // 

86 36 31 


O / // 

88 2 36 




a Aquilae 


w. 


82 39 11 


83 67 18 


85 15 32 


86 33 54 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


57 30 45 


58 49 40 


60 8 57 


61 28 36 




Aldebaran 


E. 


44 50 27 


43 23 19 


41 56 16 


40 29 16 




Pollux 


E. 


86 33 27 


85 4 18 


83 35 5 


82 5 48 


2 


Mars 


W. 


95 14 18 


96 40 55 


98 7 38 


99 34 28 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


68 11 41 


69 33 10 


70 54 55 


72 16 55 




a Pegasi 


W. 


45 48 19 


47 12 24 


48 36 52 


50 1 43 




Pollux 


E. 


74 38 3 


73 8 14 


71 38 18 


70 8 15 




Jupiter 


E. 


103 34 39 


102 5 41 


100 36 37 


99 7 27 




Venus 


E. 


107 11 54 


105 49 3 


104 26 6 


103 3 3 


3 


Mars 


W. 


106 50 22 


108 17 56 


109 46 38 


111 13 28 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


79 10 22 


80 33 42 


81 57 14 


83 20 58 




a Pegasi 


w. 


57 10 56 


58 37 42 


60 4 45 


61 32 4 




Pollux 


E. 


62 36 26 


61 5 43 


59 34 52 


58 3 56 




Jupiter 


E. 


91 39 41 


90 9 43 


88 39 36 


87 9 20 




Venus 


E. 


96 6 3 


94 42 16 


93 18 20 


91 54 16 




Saturn 


E. 


106 5 45 


104 35 30 


103 5 6 


101 34 33 


4 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


90 22 24 


91 47 12 


93 12 9 


94 37 16 


> 


a Pegasi 


W. 


68 52 40 


70 21 34 


71 50 43 


73 20 7 




a Arietis 


W. 


25 22 


26 b- 52 


28 24 7 


29 55 43 




Pollux 


E. 


50 26 59 


48 55 11 


47 23 13 


45 61 6 




Jupiter 


E. 


79 35 31 


78 4 13 


76 32 44 


75 1 3 




Venus 


E. 


84 51 35 


83 26 32 


82 1 18 


80 35 53 




Regulus 


E. 


87 12 50 


85 40 16 


84 7 31 


82 34 35 




Saturn 


E. 


93 59 17 


92 27 41 


90 55 65 


89 23 57 


5 


a Pegasi 


W. 


80 50 56 


82 21 52 


83 63 3 


86 24 30 




a Arietis 


W. 


37 38 28 


39 11 66 


40 45 42 


42 19 45 




Pollux 


E. 


38 8 24 


36 35 29 


35 2 27 


33 29 17 




Jupiter 


E. 


67 19 28 


65 46 28 


64 13 14 


62 39 46 




Venus 


E. 


73 25 45 


71 69 5 


70 32 11 


69 5 2 




Regulus 


E. 


74 46 43 


73 12 28 


71 37 59 


70 3 15 




Saturn 


E. 


81 40 55 


80 7 38 


78 34 7 


77 p 22 




Sun 


E. 


119 16 47 


117 50 13 


116 23 25 


114 56 21 


6 


a Arietis 


W. 


50 14 35 


51 50 29 


53 26 42 


56 3 14 




Jupiter 


E. 


54 48 31 


53 13 26 


51 38 4 


50 2 26 




Venus 


E. 


61 45 30 


60 16 47 


58 47 48 


57 18 30 




Regulus 


E. 


62 5 43 


60 29 23 


58 52 46 


57 15 61 




Saturn 


E. 


69 7 43 


67 32 22 


65 56 44 


64 20 49 




Sun 


E. 


107 37 2 


106 8 19 


104 39 19 


103 10 


7 


a Arietis 


W. 


63 10 54 


64 49 28 


66 28 22 


68 7 38 




Aldebaran 


W. 


31 43 36 


33 17 68 


34 53 1 


36 28 45 




Jupiter 

Regulus 

Venus 


E. 


41 59 33 


40 22 2 


38 44 10 


37 5 69 




E. 


49 6 43 


47 27 56 


45 48 49 


44 9 22 




E. 


49 47 33 


48 16 24 


46 44 56 


45 13 8 




Saturn 


E. 


56 16 40 


54 38 64 


53 48 


51 22 22 




Sun 


E. 


95 38 41 


94 7 26 


92 36 51 


91 3 55 


8 


a Arietis 


W. 


76 29 31 


78 11 2 


79 52 56 


81 35 12 



344 



OCTOBER, 1860. 



^X 



GREENWICH ME ATT TIME. 






LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's ITame 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XV'. 


XVIIIi-. 


WTi. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


Mars 


W. 


O / it 

89 28 46 


O / // 

90 55 2 


O / // 

92 21 22 


/ // 

93 47 46 




a Aquilsa 


W. 


87 52 22 


89 10 56 


90 29 36 


91 48 20 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


62 48 36 


64 8 55 


65 29 33 


66 50 29 




Aldebaran 


E. 


39 2 23 


37 35 35 


36 8 56 


34 42 26 




Pollux 


E. 


80 36 26 


79 6 58 


77 37 25 


76 7 47 


2 


Mars 


W. 


101 1 25 


102 28 28 


103 66 38 


105 22 56 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


73 39 9 


75 1 38 


76 24 20 


77 47 15 




a Pegasi 


w. 


51 26 56 


52 62 27 


54 18 18 


65 44 28 




Pollux 


E. 


68 38 7 


67 7 52 


65 37 30 


64 7 2 




Jupiter 


E. 


97 38 10 


96 8 44 


94 39 11 


93 9 30 




Venus 


E. 


101 39 54 


100 16 37 


98 63 13 


97 29 42 


3 


Mars 


W. 


112 41 27 


114 9 36 


115 37 54 


117 6 21 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


84 44 53 


86 9 


87 33 17 


88 57 45 




a Pegasi 


w. 


62 59 40 


64 27 31 


65 55 39 


67 24 2 




Pollux 


E. 


56 32 48 


55 1 34 


53 30 11 


61 58 39 




Jupiter 


E. 


85 38 54 


84 8 19 


82 37 34 


81 6 38 




Venus 


E. 


90 30 3 


89 5 41 


87 41 9 


86 16 27 




Saturn #, 


E. 


100 3 50 


98 32 57 


97 1 54 


95 30 41 


4 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


96 2 31 


97 27 55 


98 63 28 


100 19 9 




a Pegasi 


W. 


74 49 46 


76 19 40 


77 49 60 


79 20 f6 




a Arietis 


w. 


31 27 38 


32 69 53 


34 32 27 


36 6 18 




Pollux 


E. 


44 18 51 


42 46 27 


41 13 64 


39 41 12 




Jupiter 


E. 


73 29 10 


71 57 4 


70 24 45 


68 52 14 




Venus 


E. 


79 10 17 


77 44 28 


76 18 27 


74 52 13 




Regulus 


E. 


81 1 26 


79 28 5 


77 64 31 


76 20 44 




Saturn 


E. 


87 51 46 


86 19 22 


84 46 46 


83 13 68 


5 


a Pegasi 


W. 


86 56 12 


88 28 10 


90 24 


91 32 54 




a Arietis 


W. 


43 54 7 


46 28 47 


47 3 45 


48 39 1 




Pollux 


E. 


31 56 1 


30 22 38 


28 49 9 


27 15 33 




Jupiter 


E. 


61 6 3 


69 32 4 


57 57 50 


56 23 19 




Venus 


E. 


67 37 39 


66 10 


64 42 6 


63 13 56 




Eegulus 


E. 


68 28 16 


66 53 2 


65 17 32 


63 41 46 




Saturn 


E. 


75 26 22 


73 52 6 


72 17 35- 


70 42 47 




Sun 


E. 


113 29 2 


112 1 26 


110 33 35 


109 6 27 


6 


a Arietis 


W. 


56 40 6 


58 17 18 


69 64 50 


61 32 42 




Jupiter 


E. 


48 26 28 


46 50 12 


45 13 38 


43 36 45 




Venus 


E. 


55 48 56 


54 19 3 


52 48 62 


51 18 22 




Eegulus 


E. 


55 38 39 


54 1 9 


62 23 19 


50 46 10 




Saturn 


E. 


62 44 36 


61 8 4 


59 31 16 


57 54 7 




Sun 


E. 


101 40 23 


100 10 27 


98 40 11 


97 9 35 


7 


a Arietis 


W. 


69 47 16 


71 27 17 


73 7 39 


74 48 24 




Aldebaran 


W. 


38 5 8 


39 42 7 


41 19 41 


42 57 49 




Jupiter 


E. 


35 27 28 


33 48 37 


32 9 26 


30 29 54 




Regulus 


E. 


42 29 35 


40 49 27 


39 8 58 


37 28 9 




Venus 


E. 


43 41 


42 8 31 


40 35 42 


39 2 32 




Saturn 


E. 


49 43 37 


48 4 31 


46 26 6 


44 45 20 




Sun 


E. 


89 31 38 


87 68 59 


86 25 69 


84 62 37 


8 


a Arietis 


W. 


83 17 52 


86 56 


86 44 22 


88 28 13 



OCTOBER, 1860. 



345 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


"r^ 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


Illk. 


Vlk. 


IX''. 


Month. 


Position. 


















O / il 


o ; // 


O / // 


/ // 


8 


Aldebaran 


W. 


44 36 29 


46 15 41 


47 55 24 


49 35 38 




Regulus 


E. 


35 46 59 


34 5 29 


32 23 38 


30 41 27 




Venus 


E. 


37 29 1 


35 55 8 


34 20 55 


32 46 21 




Saturn 


E. 


43 5 15 


41 24 50 


39 44 4 


38 2 68 




Sun 


E. 


83 18 53 


81 44 47 


80 10 18 


78 35 26 


9 


a Arietis 


W. 


90 12 27 


91 57 4 


93 42 5 


95 27 30 




Aldebaran 


W. 


58 4 7 


59 47 13 


61 30 46 


63 14 46 




Saturn 


E. 


29 32 54 


27 50 3 


26 6 59 


24 23 44 




Sun 


E. 


70 35 24 


68 58 15 


67 20 42 


65 42 4"^ 


10 


a Arietis 


W. 


104 20 19 


106 8 


107 56 2 


109 44 26 




Aldebaran 


W. 


72 1 16 


78 47 48 


75 34 44 


77 22 4 




Pollux 


W. 


29 51 2 


31 36 51 


33 23 16 


35 10 13 




Sun 


E. 


57 27 36 


55 47 28 


54 7 


52 26 12 


11 


Aldebaran 


W. 


86 24 3 


88 13 26 


90 3 8 


91 53 7 




Pollux 


W. 


44 12 11 


46 1 51 


47 51 52 


49 42 16 




Sun 


E. 


43 57 30 


42 14 55 


40 32 6 
30 10 % 


38 49 3 


16 


Sun 


W. 


26 49 38 


28 29 66 


31 49 61 




a Aquilae 


E. 


75 4 42 


73 30 3 


71 56 1 


70 22 35 




Mars 


E. 


78 25 3 


76 39 51 


74 55 1 


73 10 37 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


99 32 22 


97 52 26 


96 12 45 


94 33 20 


IT 


Sun 


W. 


40 4 41 


41 42 36 


43 20 9 


44 57 18 




a Aquilae 


E. 


62 46 10 


61 17 20 


59 49 24 


68 22 26 




Mars 


E. 


64 34 45 


62 51 54 


61 11 29 


59 30 31 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


86 21 36 


84 44 29 


83 7 48 


81 31 35 


18 


Sun 


W. 


52 56 56 


54 31 36 


66 5 51 


67 39 40 




Mars 


E. 


51 12 40 


49 34 29 


47 56 46 


46 19 32 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


73 38 11 


72 5 9 


70 32 42 


69 61 




a Pegasi 


E. 


94 11 43 


92 32 39 


90 54 1 


89 15 48 


19 


Sun 


W. 


65 22 26 


66 63 44 


68 24 38 


69 55 8 




Antares 


w. 


23 56 56 


25 36 7 


27 14 62 


28 53 13 




Mars 


E. 


38 20 24 


36 45 58 


35 12 


33 38 29 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


61 31 13 


60 3 20 


58 36 11 


57 9 48 




a Pegasi 


E. 


81 11 15 


79 35 40 


78 30 


76 25 47 


20 


Sun 


W. 


77 21 47 


78 49 59 


80 17 50 


81 45 19 




Antares 


W. 


36 59 5 


38 35 7 


40 10 48 


41 46 8 




Fomalhaut 


E. 


50 10 4 


48 48 49 


47 28 32 


46 9 17 




a Pegasi 


E. 


68 38 47 


67 6 42 


65 35 4 


64 3 52 


21 


Sun 


W. 


88 57 50 


90 23 23 


91 48 39 


93 13 39 




Antares 


W. 


49 37 46 


51 11 9 


62 44 15 


64 17 4 




a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


E. 


56 34 30 


55 5 59 


53 37 55 


52 10 18 




E. 


98 18 16 


96 45 14 


95 12 29 


93 40 


22 


Sun 


W. 


100 14 45 


101 38 15 


103 , 1 32 


104 24 37 




Antares 


W. 


61 57 17 


63 28 37 


64 59 44 


66 30 39 




a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


E. 


44 59 39 


43 35 5 


42 11 5 


40 47 42 




E. 


86 1 28 


84 30 29 


82 59 43 


81 29 8 



346 



OCTOBER, 1860. 



GEEENWICH MEAN TIME. 










LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 




s 




Day of 


Star's Name 












the 


and 




Midnight. 


XTh. 


XVIIIii. 


XXI'. 




Month. 


Position 














8 


Aldebaran 


W. 


o / // 

51 16 21 


o / // 

52 57 35 


54 39 18 


O 1 II 

56 21 28 






Regulus 


E. 


28 58 56 


27 16 6 


25 32 57 


23 49 30 






Venus 


E. 


31 11 25 


29 36 9 


28 32 


26 24 34 






Saturn 


E. 


36 21 34 


34 39 50 


32 67 48 


31 15 29 






Sun 


E. 


77 12 


75 24 35 


73 48 34 


72 12 11 




9 


a Arietis 


W. 


97 13 18 


98 59 30 


100 46 4 


102 33 






Aldebaran 


W. 


64 69 13 


66 44 7 


68 29 26 


70 15 9 






Saturn 


E. 


22 40 23 


20 57 


19 13 38 


17 30 23 






Sun 


E. 


64 4 30 


62 25 50 


60 46 46 


59 7 22 




10 


a Arietis 


W. 


111 33 11 


113 22 16 


116 11 41 


117 1 24 






Aldebaran 


W. 


79 9 45 


80 57 48 


82 46 12 


84 34 58 






Pollux 


w. 


36 57 42 


38 45 39 


40 34 5 


42 22 65 






Sun 


E. 


50 45 4 


49 3 37 


47 21 52 


46 39 49 




11 


Aldebaran 


W. 


93 43 23 


95 33 64 


97 24 39 


99 15 38 






Pollux 


w. 


51 32 57 


53 23 59 


55 15 18 


57 6 55 






Sun 


E. 


37 5 49 


35 22 24 


33 38 49 


31 55 8 




16 


Sun _ * 


W. 


33 29 28 


35 8 45 


36 47 44 


38 26 23 






a Aquilas 


E. 


68 49 49 


67 17 45 


65 46 26 


64 15 53 






Mars 


E. 


71 26 35 


69 43 


67 59 49 


66 17 4 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


92 54 14 


91 15 30 


89 37 8 


87 59 9 




17 


Sun 


W. 


46 34 3 


48 10 23 


49 46 19 


51 21 50 






a Aquilae 


E. 


56 56 28 


55 31 33 


54 7 45 


52 45 8 






Mars 


E. 


57 50 1 


56 10 


64 30 25 


62 61 18 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


79 55 52 


78 20 38 


76 45 66 


75 11 46 




18 


Sun 


W. 


59 13 4 


60 46 2 


62 18 36 


63 50 43 ' 






Mars 


E. 


44 42 47 


43 6 29 


41 30 39 


39 55 17 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


67 29 37 


65 69 2 


64 29 5 


62 59 49 






a Pegasi 


E. 


87 38 2 


86 41 


84 23 46 


82 47 17 




19 


Sun 


W. 


71 25 14 


72 54 66 


74 24 15 


76 53 12 






Antares 


W. 


30 31 10 


32 8 44 


33 45 53 


35 22 40 






Mars 


E. 


32 5 26 


30 32 52 


29 46 


27 29 8 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


56 44 10 


54 19 22 


52 55 23 


61 32 17 






a Pegasi 


E. 


74 51 30 


73 17 40 


71 44 16 


70 11 18 




20 


Sun 


W. 


83 12 29 


84 39 18 


86 6 47 


87 31 68 






Antares 


W. 


43 21 7 


44 55 45 


46 30 4 


48 4 4 






Fomalhaut 


E. 


44 51 7 


43 34 6 


42 18 17 


41 3 46 






a Pegasi 


E. 


62 33 6 


61 2 47 


59 32 64 


58 3 29 




21 


Sun 


W. 


94 38 23 


96 2 51 


97 27 4 


98 51 2 






Antares 


W. 


55 49 37 


67 21 54 


58 53 57 


60 25 44 






a Pegasi 


E. 


50 43 11 


49 16 33 


47 50 24 


46 24 46 






a Arietis 


E. 


92 7 47 


90 35 50 


89 4 8 


87 32 41 




22 


Sun 


W. 


106 47 29 


107 10 9 


108 32 39 


109 64 69 






Antares 


W. 


68 1 22 


69 31 63 


71 2 14 


72 32 26 






a Pegasi 


E. 


39 24 56 


38 2 61 


36 41 28 


35 20 53 






a Arietis 


E. 


79 58 46 


78 28 35 


76 68 35 


75 28 45 





















OCTOBER, 1860. 



347 





GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 


II 


LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


III''. 


Yl\ 


IX'. 


Montli. 


Position. 












23 


Sun 


W. 


O 1 n 

111 17 9 


O 1 II 

112 39 9 


114 1 


o / // 

115 22 44 




Antares 


W. 


74 2 27 


75 32 19 


77 2 3 


78 31 40 




a Arietis 


E. 


73 59 6 


72 29 35 


71 13 


69 31 


24 


Sun 


W. 


122 9 32 


123 30 36 


124 51 S4 


126 12 27 




Antares 


w. 


85 57 59 


87 26 59 


88 65 54 


90 24 46 




Mars 


w. 


21 19 42 


22 42 58 


24 6 19 


26 29 43 




a Arietis 


E. 


62 6 39 


60 38 5 


59 9 37 


67 41 13 




Aldebaran 


E. 


94 34 66 


93 7 7 


91 39 21 


90 11 39 


25 


Antares 


W. 


97 48 23 


99 17 1 


100 45 39 


102 14 16 




a Aquilse 


W. 


50 6 50 


51 15 58 


52 25 48 


63 36 18 




Mars 


W. 


32 27 22 


33 50 59 


35 14 38 


36 38 19 




a Arietis 


E. 


50 20 9 


48 52 5 


47 24 4 


45 66 5 




Aldebaran 


E. 


82 53 49 


81 26 21 


79 58 66, 


78 31 30 


26 


a Aquilae 


W. 


59 37 13 


60 50 52 


62 4 57 


63 19 26 




Mars 


W. 


43 37 16 


45 1 11 


46 25 10 


47 49 12 




a Arietis 


E. 


38 36 35 


37 8 46 


36 40 67 


34 13 11 




Aldebaran 


E. 


71 14 26 


69 47 


68 19 34 


66 62 7 




Pollux 


E. 


113 18 14 


111 50 7 


110 21 66 


108 63 42 


27 


a Aquilse 


W. 


69 37 11 


70 63 41 


72 10 28 


73 27 30 




Mars 


W. 


64 50 21 


56 14 48 


57 39 19 


69 3 56 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


44 42 1 


45 55 16 


47 9 16 


48 23 59 




Aldebaran 


E. 


69 34 31 


58 6 55 


56 39 18 


66 11 40 




Pollux 


E. 


101 31 35 


100 2 66 


98 34 14 


97 6 26 


28 


a Aquilse 


W. 


79 56 12 


81 14 34 


82 33 6 


83 51 49 




Mars 


W. 


66 8 26 


67 33 38 


68 58 56 


70 24 21 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


54 47 1 


66 5 14 


57 23 56 


58 43 4 




Aldebaran 


E. 


47 63 12 


46 25 28 


44 57 46 


43 30 3 




Pollux 


E. 


89 40 2 


88 10 39 


86 41 10 


85 11 36 


29 


Mars 


W. 


77 33 11 


78 59 19 


80 25 34 


81 51 68 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


65 24 39 


66 46 1 


68 7 43 


69 29 42 




a Pegasi 


W. 


42 58 53 


44 22 50 


45 47 15 


47 12 7 




Aldebaran 


E. 


36 12 12 


34 44 64 


33 17 44 


31 50 46 




Pollux 


E. 


77 42 


76 11 44 


74 41 20 


73 10 60 




Jupiter 


E. 


110 45 48 


109 16 3 


107 46 11 


106 16 11 1 


30 


Mars 


W. 


89 5 53 


90 33 5 


92 25 


93 27 54 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


76 23 43 


77 47 16 


79 11 2 


80 35 




a Pegasi 


W. 


54 22 10 


55 49 13 


57 16 34 


58 44 13 




Pollux 


E. 


66 36 28 


64 5 13 


62 33 61 


61 2 20 




Jupiter 


E. 


98 44 2 


97 13 11 


96 42 11 


94 11 3 




Saturn 


E. 


111 44 6 


110 13 11 


108 42 6 


107 10 52 


31 


Mars 


W. 


100 47 29 


102 16 51 


103 44 22 


105 13 3 




a Pegasi 


W. 


66 6 32 


67 35 46 


69 6 14 


70 34 66 




a Arietis 


W. 


22 31 52 


24 2 42 


25 33 55 


27 6 31 




Pollux 


E. 


63 22 66 


51 50 42 


60 18 20 


48 45 61 




Jupiter 


E. 


86 33 1 


86 66 


83 28 41 


81 56 17 




Begulus 
Saturn 


E. 


90 9 24 


88 36 24 


87 3 15 


86 29 57 




E. 


99 32 22 


98 12 


96 27 52 


94 65 21 



348 



OCTOBER, 1860. 



GREENWICH MEAN TIME. 










LUNAE 


DISTANCES. 








Day of 


Star's Name 












tfie 


and 




Midnight. 


XYK 


XVIIR 


XXTk. 




Month. 


Position 














23 


Sun 


W. 


/ // 

116 44 19 


O i II 

. 118 5 47 


O / // 

119 27 8 


o / // 

120 48 23 






Antares 


W. 


81 1 8 


81 30 30 


82 59 46 


84 28 54 






a Arietis 


E. 


68 1 54 


66 32 56 


65 4 3 


63 35 18 




24 


Sun 


W. 


• 127 38 16 


128 54 1 


130 14 43 


131 35 21 






Antares 


W. 


91 53 34 


93 22 19 


94 51 2 


96 19 43 






Mars 


W. 


26 53 11 


28 16 41 


29 40 12 


31 3 46 






a Arietis 


E. 


56 12 53 


54 44 37 


53 16 25 


61 48 16 






Aldebaran 


E. 


88 44 


87 16 24 


85 48 50 


84 21 19 




25 


Antares 


W. 


103 42 53 


105 11 31 


106 40 10 


108 8 50 






a Aquilse 


w. 


54 47 24 


55 59 5 


57 11 18 


58 24 1 






Mars 


w. 


38 2 1 


39 25 46 


40 49 34 


42 13 24 






fl! Arietis 


E. 


44 28 8 


43 13 


41 32 19 


40 4 27 






Aldebaran 


E. 


77 4 5 


75 36 40 


74 9 16 


72 41 51 




26 


a Aquilse 


• W. 


64 34 18 


65 49 31 


67 5 5 


68 21 59 






Mars 


W. 


49 13 17 


50 37 27 


52 1 41 


53 25 59 






a Arietis 


E. 


32 45 27 


31 17 45 


29 50 6 


28 22 31 






Aldebaran 


E. 


65 24 38 


63 57 9 


62 29 38 


61 2 5 






Pollux 


E. 


107 25 25 


105 57 4 


104 28 38 


103 9 




11 


a Aquilse 


W. 


74 44 47 


76 2 19 


77 20 4 


78 38 2 






Mars 


W. 


60 28 38 


61 53 27 


63 18 20 


64 43 20 






Fomalbaut 


w. 


49 39 24 


60 55 27 


52 12 6 


53 29 17 






Aldebaran 


E. 


53 44 1 


52 16 20 


50 48 38 


49 20 55 






Pollux 


E. 


95 36 32 


94 7 33 


92 38 28 


91 9 19 




28 


a Aquilse 


W. 


85 10 41 


86 29 42 


87 48 52 


89 8 10 






Mars 


W. 


71 49 53 


73 15 32 


74 41 18 


76 7 11 






Fomalhaut 


w. 


60 2 37 


61 22 35 


62 42 56 


64 3 38 






Aldebaran 


E. 


42 2 22 


40 34 43 


39 7 9 


37 39 38 






Pollux 


E. 


83 41 54 


82 12 5 


80 42 10 


79 12 9 




29 


Mars 


W. 


83 18 29 


84 45 8 


86 11 55 


87 38 50 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


70 51 58 


72 14 31 


73 37 20 


75 24 






a Pegasi 


W. 


48 37 23 


50 3 2 


51 29 4 


52 56 27 






Aldebaran 


E. 


30 24 2 


28 57 35 


27 31 28 


26 5 48 






Pollux 


E. 


71 40 13 


70 9 28 


68 38 35 


67 7 35 






Jupiter 


E. 


104 46 2 


103 15 45 


101 45 19 


100 14 45 




30 


Mars 


W. 


94 55 31 


96 23 17 


97 51 12 


99 19 16 






Fomalhaut 


W. 


81 59 11 


83 23 34 


84 48 7 


86 12 61 






a Pegasi 


W. 


60 12 9 


61 40 21 


63 8 49 


64 37 33 






Pollux 


E. 


59 30 42 


57 68 57 


56 27 4 


54 65 4 






Jupiter 


E. 


92 39 45 


91 8 18 


89 36 42 


88 4 56 






Saturn 


E. 


105 39 29 


104 7 56 


102 36 14 


101 4 23 




31 


Mars 


W. 


106 41 53 


108 10 52 


109 40 1 


111 9 19 






a Pegasi 


W. 


72 4 51 


73 35 


75 5 22 


76 35 57 






a Arietis 


W. 


28 37 28 


30 9 44 


31 42 18 


33 16 9 






Pollux 


E. 


47 13 16 


45 40 32 


44 7 43 


42 34 48 






Jupiter 


E. 


80 23 43 


78 50 59 


77 18 5 


75 45 1 






Regulus 


E. 


83 56 29 


82 22 51 


80 49 3 


79 15 6 






Saturn 


E. 


93 22 41 


91 49 61 


90 16 51 


88 43 41 





NOVEMBER, 1860. 



349 





GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


"r^ 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


IIR 


TP. 


IXi. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o ; n 


/ tl 


O / // 


O / // 


1 


a Pegasi 


W. 


18 6 45 


79 37 46 


81 8 58 


82 40 23 




a Arietis 


W. 


34 48 17 


36 21 40 


37 56 18 


39 29 11 




Pollux 


E. 


41 1 48 


39 28 41 


37 56 30 


36 22 14 




Jupiter 


E. 


74 11 47 


72 38 22 


71 4 47 


69 31 1 




Eegulus 


E. 


77 40 67 


76 6 39 


74 32 10 


72 57 30 




Saturn 


E. 


87 10 20 


85 36 49 


84 3 8 


82 29 15 




Venus 


E. 


105 43 21 


104 17 56 


102 52 21 


101 26 36 


2 


a Pegasi 


W. 


90 20 25 


91 52 69 


93 25 44 


94 68 41 




a Arietis 


W. 


47 22 9 


48 57 26 


50 32 57 


52 8 42 




Jupiter 


E. 


61 39 27 


60 4 35 


68 29 30 


56 54 14 




Regulus 


E. 


65 1 29 


63 25 43 


61 49 45 


60 13 36 




Saturn 


E. 


74 37 11 


73 2 13 


71 27 3 


69 51 41 




Venus 


E. 


94 15 4 


"92 48 12 


91 21 9 


89 63 64 


3 


a Arietis 


W. 


60 10 51 


61 47 58 


63 26 20 


65 2 66 




Aldebaran 


W. 


28 45 56 


30 18 15 


31 61 16 


33 24 54 




Jupiter 


E. 


48 54 55 


47 18 26 


45 41 44 


44 4 50 




Regulus 


E. 


52 9 60 


50 32 28 


48 54 53 


47 17 6 




Saturn 


E. 


61 61 56 


60 16 21 


68 38 36 


57 1 37 




Venus 


E. 


82 34 41 


81 6 14 


79 37 34 


78 8 41 




Sun 


E. 


125 34 .3 


124 4 29 


122 34 40 


121 4 37 


4 


a Arietis 


W. 


73 14 36 


74 53 41 


76 33 1 


78 12 37 




Aldebaran 


W. 


41 21 6 


42 57 43 


44 34 46 


46 12 12 




Jupiter 


E. 


35 57 8 


34 18 57 


32 40 34 


31 1 59 




Regulus 


E. 


39 4 53 


37 25 47 


36 46 29 


34 6 57 




Saturn 


E. 


48 53 32 


47 16 17 


46 36 49 


43 68 8 




Venus 


E. 


70 41 


69 10 47 


67 40 20 


66 9 40 




Sun 


E. 


113 30 39 


111 59 6 


110 27 17 


108 65 13 


5 


a Arietis 


W. 


86 34 33 


- 88 16 45 


89 57 13 


91 38 57 




Aldebaran 


W. 


54 25 


- 56 4 38 


57 44 36 


59 24 55 




Saturn 


E. 


35 41 40 


34 1 48 


32 21 46 


30 41 36 




Venus 


E. 


58 32 45 


57 40 


66 28 21 


53 55 47 




Sun 


E. 


101 10 56 


99 37 13 


98 3 16 


96 29 2 


6 


Aldebaran 


W. 


67 51 29 


69 33 47 


71 16 23 


72 69 19 




Pollux 


W. 


25 60 20 


27 31 3 


29 12 23 


30 54 17 




Venus 


E. 


46 9 27 


44 35 30 


43 1 20 


41 26 68 




Sun 


E. 


88 33 37 


86 57 40 


85 21 26 


83 44 66 


7 


Aldebaran 


W. 


81 38 36 


83 23 21 


85 8 23 


86 53 43 




Pollux 


W. 


39 31 1 


41 15 39 


43 40 


44 46 3 




Venus 


E. 


33 32 31 


31 57 13 


30 21 50 


28 46 26 




Sun 


E. 


75 38 3 


73 59 49 


72 21 19 


70 42 33 


8 


Aldebaran 


W. 


95 44 26 


97 31 19 


99 18 27 


101 5 49 




Pollux 


W. 


63 38 2 


56 26 22 


57 13 


59 54 




Jupiter 
Regulus 

Sun 


W. 


19 19 40 


21 5 48 


22 52 22 


24 39 22 




w. 


16 38 26 


18 24 66 


20 11 58 


21 69 29 




E. 


62 24 42 


60 44 23 


59 3 48 


57 23 3 


9 


Pollux 


W. 


68 4 13 


69 63 33 


71 43 6 


73 32 49 




Jupiter 


W. 


33 39 20 


35 28 9 


37 17 11 


39 6 27 



350 



NOVEMBER, 1860. 







GEEENWICH 


MEAT^ TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










tie 


aod 




Midnight. 


xv. 


XVIII'". 


VXTi. 


Month. 


Position, 












1 


a Pegasi 


W. 


o / // 

84 12 


85 43 49 


D / // 

87 16 49 


O / // 

88 48 1 




a Arietis 


w. 


41 3 19 


42 37 40 


44 12 16 


45 47 6 




Pollux 


E. 


34 48 55 


33 15 33 


31 42 10 


30 8 47 




Jupiter 


E. 


67 57 4 


66 22 56 


64 48 38 


63 14 8 




Regulus 


E. 


71 22 40 


69 47 39 


68 12 27 


66 37 3 




Saturn 


E. 


80 55 12 


79 20 59 


77 46 34 


76 11 58 




Venus 


E. 


100 39 


98 34 31 


97 8 13 


95 41 44 


2 


a Pegasi 


W. 


96 31 49 


98 5 7 


99 38 36 


101 12 15 




a Arietis 


W. 


53 44 40 


55 20 52 


66 57 18 


58 33 57 




Jupiter 


E. 


55 18 47 


53 43 7 


62 7 15 


50 31 11 




Regulus 


E. 


58 37 15 


57 42 


55 23 57 


63 47 




Saturn 


E. 


68 16 8 


66 40 23 


6-5 4 26 


63 28 17 




Venus 


E. 


88 26 28 


86 58 49 


85 30 59 


84 2 66 


3 


a Arietis 


W. 


66 40 46 


68 18 51 


69 57 11 


71 36 46 




Aldebaran 


W. 


34 59 8 


36 33 55 


38 9 11 


39 44 55 




Jupiter 


E. 


42 27 43 


40 60 23 


39 12 61 


37 35 6 




Regulus 


E. 


45 39 5 


44 61 


42 22 25 


40 43 45 




Saturn 


E. 


65 24 25 


53 47 


52 9 24 


60 31 34 




Venus 


E. 


76 39 35 


75 10 16 


73 40 44 


72 10 69 




Sun 


E. 


119 34 19 


118 3 46 


116 32 69 


116 1 56 


4 


a Arietis 


W. 


79 52 28 


81 32 36 


83 12 69 


84 53 38 




Aldebaran 


W. 


47 50 1 


49 28 13 


61 6 47 


52 45 43 




Jupiter 


E. 


29 23 12 


27 44 13 


26 5 3 


24 26 43 




Regulus 


E. 


32 27 13 


30 47 16 


29 7 7 


27 26 46 




Saturn 


E. 


42 19 14 


40 40 9 


39 52 


37 21 22 




Venus 


E. 


64 38 46 


63 7 38 


61 36 15 


60 4 37 




Sun 


E. 


107 22 54 


105 50 19 


104 17 27 


102 44 19 


5 


a Arietis 


W. 


93 20 59 


95 3 17 


96 45 52 


98 28 44 




Aldebaran 


W. 


61 5 35 


62 46 34 


64 27 52 


66 9 31 




Saturn 


E. 


29 1 16 


27 20 50 


25 40 21 


23 69 50 




Venus 


E. 


52 22 59 


50 49 56 


49 16 40 


47 43 10 




Sun 


E. 


94 54 31 


93 19 43 


91 44 38 


90 9 16 


6 


Aldebaran 


W. 


74 42 34 


76 26 7 


78 9 59 


79 54 9 




Pollux 


W. 


32 36 43 


34 19 38 


36 3 


37 46 48 




Venus 


E. 


39 52 25 


38 17 40 


36 42 45 


35 7 42 




Sun 


E. 


82 8 8 


80 31 2 


78 53 39 


77 16 


1 


Aldebaran 


W. 


88 39 19 


90 26 12 


92 11 21 


93 67 46 




Pollux 


W. 


46 31 47 


48 17 51 


50 4 15 


51 61 




Venus 


E. 


27 11 2 


25 35 41 


24 29 


22 25 31 




Sun 


E. 


69 3 30 


67 24 11 


65 44 37 


64 4 47 


8 


Aldebaran 


W. 


102 53 24 


104 41 11 


106 29 10 


108 17 19 




Pollux 


W. 


60 49 4 


62 37 30 


64 26 11 


66 15 5 




Jupiter 


W. 


26 26 44 


28 14 26 


30 2 27 


31 60 46 




Regulus 


W. 


23 47 26 


25 35 45 


27 24 25 


29 13 23 




Sun 


E. 


55 42 2. 


54 50 


62 19 26 


50 37 60 


9 


Pollux 


W. 


75 22 43 


77 12 46 


79 2 68 


80 53 17 





Jupiter 


W. 


40 55 53 


42 45 30 


44 35 17 


46 25 13 



NOVEMBER, 1860. 



351 









GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 






LUNAB DISTANCES. 




Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Noon. 


int. 


VII'. 


IXh. 




9 


Eegulus 

Saturn 

Sun 


W. 
W. 
E. 


O 1 II 

31 2 37 
21 21 22 
48 56 4 


O 1 II 

32 52 7 
23 8 3 
47 14 8 


34 41 51 
24 55 18 
45 32 3 


36 31 47 
26 43 4 
43 49 50 




10 


Pollux 
Jupiter 
Regulus 
Saturn 

Sun 


W. 
W. 
W. 
W. 
E. 


82 43 44 
48 15 16 
45 44 13 
35 47 6 
35 17 24 


84 34 17 
50 5 27 
47 35 6 
37 36 89 
33 34 48 


86 24 54 
51 55 44 
49 26 6 
39 26 22 
31 52 12 


88 15 35 
53 46 5 
51 17 11 
41 16 14 
30 9 40 




14 


Sun 
Mars 

Fomalhaut 
a Pegasi 


W. 

E. 
E. 
E. 


20 6 45 
73 25 58 
79 9 8 
99 56 18 


21 42 56 
71 44 51 
77 32 36 
98 13 53 


23 19 3 
70 4 7 
75 56 33 
96 31 46 


24 55 5 
68 23 46 
74 20 59 
94 50 




15 


Sun 
Mars 

Fomalhaut 
a Pegasi 


W. 

E. 
E. 
E. 


32 51 59 
60 8 1 
66 31 14 
86 26 36 


34 26 32 
58 30 6 
64 59 6 

84 47 6 


36 45 
56 52 36 
63 27 36 
83 8 


37 34 37 
55 15 32 
61 56 47 
81 29 20 




16 


Sun 
Mars 

Fomaltaut 
a Pegasi 


W. 
E. 
E. 
E. 


45 18 36 
47 16 40 
54 34 2 
73 22 29 


46 50 16 
45 42 12 
53 7 59 
71 46 29 


48 21 34 
44 8 9 
51 42 51 
70 10 55 


49 52 30 
42 34 33 

50 18 41 
68 35 50 




17 


Sun 
Mars 
a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


W. 
E. 
E. 
E. 


57 21 33 

34 53 8 

60 47 33 

102 46 49 


58 50 15 
33 22 10 

59 15 22 
101 10 32 


60 18 36 
31 51 39 
57 43 41. 
99 34 36 


61 46 36 
30 21 34 
56 12 30 
97 59 2 




18 


Sun 

a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


W. 

E. 
E. 


69 1 30 
48 44 32 
90 6 24 


70 27 31 
47 16 37 
88 32 52 


71 53 13 
45 49 17 
86 59 38 


73 18 37 
44 22 33 
85 26 43 




19 


Sun 

a Arietis 

Aldebaran 


W. 

E. 

E. 


80 21 26 

77 46 25 

110 9 51 


81 45 14 

76 15 9 

108 39 33 


83 8 47 

74 44 7 

107 9 28 


84 32 6 

73 13 20 

105 39 35 




20 


Sun 

a Arietis 

Aldebaran 


W. 

E. 

E. 


91 25 41 
65 42 34 
98 12 59 


92 47 51 
64 13 
96 44 10 


94 9 52 
62 43 35 

95 15 30 


95 31 45 
61 14 21 
93 46 59 




21 


Sun 

a Aquilse 
a Arietis 
Aldebaran 


W. 
W. 
E. 

E. 


102 19 9 
47 14 56 
53 50 12 
86 26 13 


103 40 19 
48 22 40 
52 21 44 
84 58 23 


105 1 24 

49 31 12 

50 53 23 
83 30 37 


106 22 25 

• 50 40 28 

49 25 6 

82 2 56 




22 


Sun 

a Aquilae 

Mars 

a Arietis 

Aldebaran 


W. 
W. 

w. 

E. 

E. 


113 6 48 
56 36 6 
23 30 3 
42 4 51 
74 45 22 


114 27 35 
57 48 50 
24 52 16 
40 36 59 
73 17 58 


115 48 22 
59 2 1 
26 14 38 
39 9 10 
71 50 36 


117 9 10 
60 15 39 
27 37 7 
37 41 24 
70 23 14 




23 


SCN 

a Aquilse 


W. 
W. 


123 53'24 
66 29 34 


126 14 22 
67 45 23 


126 35 23 
69 1 31 


127 56 28 
70 17 56 



352 






NOVEMBER, 1860. 










GEEEN WICH 


MEAN TIME. 












LUNAR 


DISTANCES. 








Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name 

and 

Position. 


Midnight. 


XVK 


XVIIP'. 


XXI*. 




9 


Regulus 
Saturn 

Sun 


W. 

w. 

E. 


O / // 

38 21 57 
28 31 15 
42 7 30 


O i II 

40 12 17 
30 19 47 
40 25 5 


42° 2 47 
32 8 38 
38 42 35 


o / // 

43 53 26 

33 57 45 ; 
37 




10 


Pollux 
Jupiter 
Eegulus 
Saturn 

Sun 


W. 

w. 
w. 
w. 

E. 


90 6 19 
55 36 30 
53 8 19 
43 6 14 

28 27 12 


91 57 5 
57 26 59 
64 69 30 
44 56 19 
26 44 52 


93 47 52 
59 17 29 
66 50 43 
46 46 29 
25 2 42 


95 38 39 
61 8 
58 41 57 
48 36 41 
23 20 46 




14 


Sun 
Mars 

Fomalhaut 
a Pegasi 


W. 
E. 
E. 
E. 


26 30 57 
66 43 49 
72 45 54 
93 8 34 


28 6 36 
65 4 16 
71 11 22 
91 27 30 


29 42 
63 25 6 
69 37 24 
89 46 49 


31 17 9 
61 46 21 
68 4 1 
S8 6 30 




15 


Sun 
Mars 

Fomalhaut 
a Pegasi 


W. 
E. 
E. 
E. 


39 8 8 
53 38 53 
60 26 41 
79 51 4 


40 41 18 
62 2 41 
58 67 20 
78 13 16 


42 14 6 
50 26 55 
57 28 45 
76 36 53 


43 46 32 
48 51 34 
56 58 
74 58 68 




16 


Sun 
Mars 

Fomalhaut 
a Pegasi 


W. 

E. 

E. 

E. 


51 23 4 
41 1 23 
48 55 30 
67 1 13 


62 53 14 
39 28 39 
47 33 24 
65 27 5 


54 23 2 
37 56 22 
46 12 25 
63 63 25 


66 52 29 
36 24 32 
44 52 36 
62 20 15 




17 


Sun 
Mars 
a Pegasi 
a Arietis 


W. 
E. 
E. 
E. 


63 14 15 
28 51 57 
54 41 50 
96 23 49 


64 41 33 
27 22 47 
63 11 41 
94 48 58 


66 8 31 
25 64 6 
5a 42 5' 
93 14 26 


67 35 10 
24 25 54 
50 13 1 
91 40 15 




18 


Sun 

o Pegasi 
a Arietis 


W. 

E. 
E. 


74 43 43 
42 56 27 
83 54 6 


76 8 33 
41 31 1 
82 21 46 


77 33 6 
40 6 16 
80 49 43 


78 67 24 
38 42 15 

79 17 66 




19 


Sun 

a Arietis 

Aldebaran 


W. 

E. 

E. 


85 55 13 

71 42 46 

104 9 54 


87 18 7 

70 12 25 

102 40 23 


88 40 49 

68 42 17 

101 11 5 


90 3 20 
67 12 20 
99 41 67 




20 


SUN_ 

a Arietis 
Aldebaran 


W. 

E. 

E. 


96 53 26 
59 45 15 
92 18 36 


98 15 2 
58 16 18 
90 50 20 


99 36 31 
66 47 29 
89 22 11 


100 67 53 
55 18 47 
87 64 9 




21 


. Sun 
a Aquilse 
o Arietis 
Aldebaran 


W. 
W. 
E. 
E. 


107 43 23 
51 50 24 
47 56 55 
80 35 19 


109 4 18 
63 69 
46 28 48 
79 7 45 


110 25 9 
54 12 8 
45 45 
77 40 16 


111 45 59 
55 23 51 
43 32 46 
76 12 48 




22 


Sun 

a Aquilse 

Mars 

a Arietis 

Aldebaran 


W. 

W. 

W. 

E. 

E. 


118 29 57 
61 29 41 
28 59 44 
36 13 40 
68 55 53 


119 50 46 
62 44 7 
30 22 27 
34 45 59 
67 28 32 


121 11 36 
63 58 56 
31 45 18 
33 18 21 
66 1 11 


122 32 28 
65 14 4 
33 8 15 
31 60 46 
64 33 50 




23 


Sun 

a Aquilse 


W. 
W. 


129 17 37 
71 34 39 


130 38 51 

72 51 38 


132 9 
74 8 53 


133 21 33 

75 26 22 





NOVEMBER, 1860. 



353 







GEEENWIOH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAE DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










and 




Noon. 


IIP. 


Vlk. 


IX'. 


Month. 


Position. 












23 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


O / Jl 

41 56 24 


43 7 5 


/ // 

44 18 42 


O / // 

45 31 11 




Mars 


W. 


34 31 19 


35 54 29 


37 17 46 


38 41 9 




Aldebaran 


E. 


63 6 27 


61 39 3 


60 11 38 


58 44 12 




Pollux 


E. 


105 2 64 


103 34 38 


102 6 18 


100 37 54 


24 


a Aquilse 


W. 


76 44 7 


78 2 6 


79 20 18 


80 38 43 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


51 44 47 


53 1 27 


54 18 40 


56 36 27 




Mars 


W. 


45 39 58 


47 4 7 


48 28 25 


49 62 50 




a Pegasi 


W. 


29 5 


30 16 8 


31 33 27 


32 51 51 




Aldebaran 


E. 


51 26 30 


49 58 51 


48 31 10 


47 3 27 




Pollux 


E. 


93 14 28 


91 45 27 


90 16 19 


88 47 4 


25 


a Aquilae 


W. 


87 13 48 


88 33 22 


89 53 4 


91 12 66 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


62 12 29 


63 33 


64 53 64 


66 15 12 




Mars 


w. 


56 57 22 


58 22 46 


59 48 19 


61 14 3 




a Pegasi 


w. 


39 36 28 


40 59 30 


42 23 7 


43 47 17 




Aldebaran 


E. 


39 44 35 


38 16 50 


36 49 7 


35 21 28 




Pollux 


E. 


81 18 44 


79 48 37 


78 18 20 


76 47 54 




Jupiter 


E. 


116 51 47 


115 21 43 


113 51 27 


112 21 1 


26 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


73 6 54 


74 30 13 


75 63 49 


77 17 44 




Mars 


W. 


68 25 33 


69 52 26 


71 19 29 


72 46 46 




a Pegasi 


w. 


50 55 20 


52 22 15 


53 49 34 


55 17 14 




Pollux 


E. 


69 13 13 


67 41 45 


66 10 7 


64 38 18 




Jupiter 


E. 


104 46 8 


103 14 35 


101 42 49 


100 10 51 




Saturn 


E. 


117 3 31 


115 32 11 


114 38 


112 28 52 


21 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


84 21 12 


85 46 38 


87 12 18 


88 38 10 




Mars 


W. 


80 6 10 


81 34 41 


83 3 23 


84 32 18 




a Pegasi 


w. 


,62 40 50 


64 10 32 


65 40 31 


67 10 49 




Pollux 


E. 


56 56 32 


55 23 38 


63 60 35 


52 17 21 




Jupiter 


E. 


92 28 2 


90 64 50 


89 21 26 


87 47 47 




Regulus 


E. 


93 44 34 


92 10 59 


90 37 12 


89 3 12 




Saturn 


E. 


104 46 56 


103 13 54 


101 40 39 


100 7 12 


28 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


95 50 15 


97 17 9 


98 44 11 


100 11 21 




Mars 


W. 


92 2 


93 30 13 


95 36 


96 31 11 




a Pegasi 


w. 


74 46 31 


76 18 27 


77 50 38 


79 23 3 




a Arietis 


w. 


31 22 31 


32 56 41 


34 31 9 


36 5 56 




Pollux 


E. 


44 28 46 


42 54 36 


41 20 19 


39 45 55 




Jupiter 


E. 


79 56 31 


78 21 38 


76 46 32 


76 11 13 




Regulus 


E. 


81 10 2 


79 34 46 


77 59 18 


76 23 37 




Saturn 


E. 


92 16 43 


90 41 59 


89 7 2 


87 31 63 


29 


Mars 


W. 


104 7 11 


105 38 59 


107 10 68 


108 43 9 




a Arietis 


W. 


44 3 55 


45 40 17 


47 16 63 


48 53 43 




Jupiter 


E. 


67 11 34 


65 35 1 


63 68 16 


62 21 20 




Regulus ■ 


E. 


68 22 11 


66 45 17 


65 8 12 


63 30 54 




Saturn 


E. 


79 32 59 


77 56 36 


76 20 1 


74 43 14 


30 


a Arietis 


W. 


57 1 18 


68 39 28 


60 17 50 


61 56 24 




Aldebaran 


w. 


25 43 24 


27 16 36 


28 48 39* 


30 22 25 




Jupiter 


E. 


64 13 46 


52 35 42 


50 57 27 


49 19 2 




Regulus 
Saturn 


E. 


55 21 36 


63 43 11 


62 4 36 


50 25 49 




E. 


66 36 29 


64 58 36 


63 20 31 


61 42 16 



23 



354 



NOVEMBER, 1860. 







GEEENWICH 


: MEAN TIME. 


1 








LUNAE ] 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 

tbe 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


iVt. 


XTIIP'. 


XXI"". 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


o / // 


o ; // 


O 1 II 


23 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


46 44 28 


47 58 31 


49 13 17 


50 28 42 




Mars 


W. 


40 4 40 


41 28 19 


42 52 4 


44 16 56 




Aldebaran 


E. 


57 16 44 


56 49 13 


54 21 41 


52 54 6 




Pollux 


E. 


99 9 24 


97 40 49 


96 12 9 


94 43 21 


24 


a Aquilae 


W. 


81 57 20 


83 16 10 


84 36 12 


85 64 25 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


56 54 43 


58 13 29 


59 32 42 


60 52 23 




Mars 


W. 


51 17 26 


52 42 11 


54 7 5 


66 32 8 




a Pegasi 


W. 


34 11 11 


35 31 21 


36 52 18 


38 14 1 




Aldebaran 


E. 


45 35 43 


44 7 57 


42 40 10 


41 12 22 




Pollux 


E. 


87 17 42 


85 48 10 


84 18 30 


82 48 42 


25 


a Aquilae 


W. 


92 32 56 


93 53 4 


95 13 19 


96 33 42 




Fomalliaut 


w. 


67 36 51 


68 58 52 


70 21 13 


71 43 54 




Mars 


w. 


62 39 59 


64 6 6 


65 32 23 


66 68 53 




a Pegasi 


w. 


45 11 67 


46 37 7 


48 2 46 


49 28 50 




Aldebaran 


E. 


33 53 54 


32 26 28 


30 59 11 


29 32 7 




Pollux 


E. 


75 17 19 


73 46 33 


72 16 37 


70 44 30 




Jupiter 


E. 


110 50 25 


109 19 38 


107 48 39 


106 17 29 


26 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


78 41 54 


80 6 21 


81 31 4 


82 56 




Mars 


W. 


74 14 14 


76 41 55 


77 9 48 


78 37 52 




a Pegasi 


W. 


56 45 16 


58 13 40 


59 42 24 


61 11 28 




Pollux 


E. 


6'3 6 18 


61 34 7 


60 1 46 


68 29 15 




Jupiter 


E. 


98 38 42 


97 6 20 


95 33 47 


94 1 1 




Saturn 


E. 


110 56 54 


109 24 43 


107 52 20 


106 19 45 


27 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


90 4 12 


91 30 28 


92 56 64 


94 23 30 




Mars 


W. 


86 1 26 


87 30 47 


89 20 


90 30 -4 




a Pegasi 


w. 


68 41 24 


70 12 16 


71 43 25 


73 14 50 




Pollux 


E. 


50 43 57 


49 10 23 


47 36 40 


46 2 48 




Jupiter 


E. 


86 13 57 


84 39 56 


83 6 40 


81 31 11 




Regulus 


E. 


87 28 59 


85 64 34 


84 19 56 


82 46 6 




Saturn 


E. 


98 33 32 


96 59 39 


95 25 33 


93 51 14 


28 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


101 38 36 


103 5 57 


104 33 22 


106 61 




Mars 


W. 


98 1 59 


99 32 59 


101 4 11 


102 36 35 




a Pegasi 


w. 


80 55 43 


82 28 37 


84 1 45 


85 35 6 




a Arietis 


w. 


37 40 59 


39 16 19 


40 61 56 


42 27 48 




Pollux 


E. 


38 11 24 


36 36 48 


35 2 8 


33 27 23 




Jupiter 


E. 


73 35 42 


71 59 59 


70 24 3 


68 47 64 




Regulus 


E. 


74 47 45 


73 11 40 


71 35 22 


69 58 52 




Saturn 


E. 


85 56 31 


84 20 56 


82 45 9 


81 9 10 


29 


Mars 


W. 


110 15 31 


111 48 6 


113 20 50 


114 63 46 




a Arietis 


W. 


50 30 48 


52 8 6 


53 46 37 


55 23 21 




Jupiter 


E. 


60 44 12 


59 6 63 


57 29 22 


66 51 39 




Regulus 


E. 


61 53 26 


60 16 46 


58 37 53 


56 69 50 




Saturn 


E. 


73 6 16 


71 29 6 


69 51 44 


68 14 12 


30 


a Arietis 


W. 


63 35 11 


65 14 9 


66 53 19 


68 32 40 




Aldebfcran 


W. 


31 56 52 


33 31 54 


35 7 28 


36 43 32 




Jupiter 


E. 


47 40 27 


46 1 42 


44 22 47 


42 43 42 




Regulus 


E. 


48 46 52 


47 7 45 


46 28 28 


43 49 2 




Saturn 


E. 


60 3 50 


58 25 16 


56 46 80 


55 7 35 



DECEMBER, 1860. 



355 





GEEENWICH 


MEAN TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 












and 




Noon. 


IIP". 


VR 


IX^. 


Month. 


Position. 


















^ o / // 


O 1 n 


o / // 


o / // 


1 


a Arietis 


W. 


70 12 13 


71 51 58 


73 31 54 


75 12 




Aldebaran 


W. 


38 20 3 


39 56 58 


41 34 16 


43 11 67 




Jupiter 


E. 


41 4 27 


39 26 4 


37 45 32 


36 5 53 




Regulus 


E. 


42 9 26 


40 29 40 


38 49 46 


37 9 44 




Saturn 


E. 


53 28 31 


51 49 18 


50 9 56 


48 30 27 




Spica 


E. 


96 10 45 


94 30 45 


92 60 34 


91 10 13 


2 


a Arietis 


W. 


83 35 12 


85 16 22 


86 57 41 


88 39 10 




Aldebaran 


W. 


51 25 1 


53 4 28 


54 44 10 


56 24 7 




Saturn 


E. 


40 11 5 


38 30 53 


36 50 37 


35 10 16 




Spica 


E. 


82 45 51 


81 4 28 


79 22 56 


77 41 14 




Venus 


E. 


93 38 4 


92 6 24 


90 34 35 


89 2 35 




Sun 


E. 


131 28 25 


129 54 49 


128 21 3 


126 47 7 


3 


a Arietis 


W. 


97 9 2 


98 51 29 


100 34 5 


102 16 51 




Aldebaran 


W. 


64 47 14 


66 28 30 


68 9 57 


69 51 36 




Spica 


E. 


69 10 19 


67 27 40 


65 44 51 


64 1 63 




Venus 


E. 


81 20 14 


79 47 17 


78 14 12 


76 40 59 




Sun 


E. 


118 54 43 


117 19 43 


115 44 34 


114 9 14 


4 


Aldebaran 


W. 


78 22 33 


80 5 17 


81 48 10 


83 31 12 




Pollux 


W. 


36 20 7 


38 2 24 


39 44 57 


41 27 47 




Spica 


E. 


55 24 49 


53 40 58 


51 56 59 


50 12 51 




Venus 


E. 


68 52 40 


67 18 35 


66 44 23 


64 10 3 




Sun 


E. 


106 10 12 


104 33 54 


102 67 28 


101 20 62 


5 


Aldebaran 


W. 


92 8 39 


93 52 35 


95 36 38 


97 20 49 




Pollux 


W. 


50 5 26 


51 49 37 


53 33 59 


55 18 32 




Spica 


E. 


41 30 11 


39 45 16 


38 14 


36 15 7 




Venus 


E. 


56 16 31 


54 41 28 


63 6 19 


51 31 5 




Sun 


E. 


93 15 35 


91 38 5 


90 27 


88 22 39 


6 


Pollux 


W. 


64 3 54 


65 49 27 


67 36 9 


69 20 59 




Jupiter 


W. 


28 2 9 


29 47 25 


31 32 64 


33 18 36 




Regulus 


w. 


■ 27 2 7 


28 47 38 


30 33 22 


32 19 18 




Venus 


E. 


43 33 48 


41 58 11 


40 22 33 


38 46 54 




Sun 


E. 


80 11 38 


78 33 2 


76- 54 18 


75 15 28 


1 


Pollux 


W. 


78 12 4 


79 58 37 


81 45 16 


83 32 1 




Jupiter 


W. 


42 9 40 


43 56 19 


46 43 6 


47 29 59 




Regulus 


w. 


41 11 26 


42 58 ,16 


44 45 14 


46 32 18 




Saturn 


w. 


30 6 11 


31 51 30 


33 37 4 


35 22 61 




Sun 


E. 


66 59 35 


65 20 6 


63 40 31 


62 52 


8 


Pollux 


W. 


92 26 51 


94 13 59 


96 1 9 


97 48 21 




Jupiter 

Regulus 

Saturn 


W. 


56 25 52 


68 13 15 


60 42 


61 48 12 




W. 


55 29 


57 16 32 


59 4 8 


60 51 46 




W. 


44 14 28 


46 1 11 


47 48 1 


49 34 55 




Sun 


E. 


53 41 38 


52 1 38 


50 21 37 


48 41 34 


9 


Jupiter 

Rcgulus 

Saturn 


W. 


70 46 1 


72 33 35 


74 21 7 


76 8 37 




W. 


69 50 14 


71 37 54 


73 25 34 


75 13 11 




w. 


58 30 9 


60 17 16 


62 4 21 


63 51 26 




Sun 


E. 


40 21 19 


38 41 21 


37 1 26 


35 21 35 



356 



DECEMBER, 1860. 





GKEENWICH 


MEAIT TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 


Star's Name 










and 




Midnight. 


}L\K 


XVIII''. 


XXP. 


Month. 


Position. 












1 


a Arietis 


W. 


V6 52 18 


78 32 46 


o / // 

80 13 26 


/ ;/ ■ 

81 54 13 




Aldebaran 


w. 


44 49 57 


46 28 17 


48 6 55 


49 45 50 




Jupiter 


E. 


34 26 5 


32 46 10 


31 6 9 


29 26 3 




Regnlus 


E. 


35 29 34 


33 49 15 


32 8 49 


30 28 16 




Saturn 


E. 


46 50 49 


45 11 3 


43 31 10 


41 51 10 




Spica 


E. 


89 29 41 


87 48 59 


86 8 6 


84 27 3 


2 


a Arietis 


W. 


90 20 49 


92 2 39 


93 44 38 


96 26 46 




Aldebaran 


W. 


58 4 18 


59 44 42 


61 25 20 


63 6 11 




Saturn 


E. 


33 29 53 


31 49 27 


30 9 2 


28 28 37 




Spica 


E. 


15 59 22 


74 17 20 


72 35 9 


70 52 49 




Venus 


E. 


87 30 26 


85 58 7 


84 25 39 


82 63 1 




Sun 


E. 


125 12 59 


123 38 40 


122 4 12 


120 29 33 


3 


a Arietis 


W. 


103 59 46 


105 42 50 


107 26 4 


109 9 27 




Aldebaran 


W. 


71 33 26 


73 15 27 


74 57 39 


76 40 1 




Spica 


E. 


62 18 46 


60 35 30 


58 52 5 


67 8 31 




Venus 


E. 


75 7 36 


73 34 6 


72 25 


70 26 37 




Sun 


E. 


. 112 33 45 


110 58 7 


109 22 19 


107 46 21 


4 


Aldebaran 


W. 


85 14 23 


86 57 43 


88 41 13 


90 24 52 




Pollux 


W. 


43 10 51 


44 54 10 


46 37 43 


48 21 29 




Spica 


E. 


48 28 34 


46 44 10 


44 59 38 


43 14 59 




Venus 


E. 


62 35 34 


61 59 


59 26 15 


67 51 27 




Sun 


E. 


99 44 7 


98 7 13 


96 30 10 


94 52 57 


5 


Aldebaran 


W. 


99 5 8 


100 49 34 


102 34 7 


104 18 47 




Pollux 


W. 


57 3 15 


58 48 10 


60 33 15 


62 18 30 




Spica 


E. 


34 29 53 


32 44 34 


30 69 9 


29 13 41 




Venus 


E. 


49 55 47 


48 20 23 


46 44 55 


45 9 23 




Sun 


E. 


86 44 44 


85 6 40 


83 28 26 


81 50 6 


6 


Pollux 


W. 


71 6 57 


72 53 3 


74 39 16 


76 25 37 




Jupiter 


W. 


35 4 29 


36 60 33 


38 36 46 


40 23 9 




Regulus 


w. 


34 5 25 


35 51 42 


37 38 8 


39 24 43 




Venus 


E. 


37 11 16 


35 35 40 


34 8 


32 24 41 




Sun 


E. 


73 36 30 


71 57 26 


70 18 16 


68 38 68 


n 


Pollux . 


W. 


85 18 61 


87 5 45 


88 62 44 


90 39 46 




Jupiter 


W. 


49 16 59 


61 4 4 


52 51 16 


54 38 32 




Regulus 


W. 


48 19 28 


50 6 43 


61 54 4 


53 41 30 




Saturn 


W. 


37 8 50 


38 66 1 


40 41 22 


42 27 51 




Sun 


E. 


60 21 9 


68 41 22 


67 1 30 


56 21 36 


8 


Pollux 


W. 


99 35 34 


101 22 47 


103 10 


104 57 12 




Jupiter 


W. 


63 35 44 


65 23 16 


67 10 51 


68 68 26 




Regulus 


W. 


62 39 26 


64 27 7 


66 14 50 


68 2 31 


1 


Saturn 


W. 


61 21 52 


53 8 53 


54 55 67 


56 43 2 


I 


Sun 


E. 


47 1 30 


46 21 26 


43 41 22 


42 1 20 


; 9 


Jupiter 


W. 


77 56 5 


79 43 29 


81 30 49 


83 18 5 




Regulus 


W. 


77 45 


78 48 16 


80 35 42 


82 23 3 




Saturn 


W. 


65 38 29 


67 25 29 


69 12 26 


70 69 19 


Sun 

1 


E. 


33 41 48 


32 2 7 


30 22 33 


28 43 7 



DECEMBER, 1860. 



357 







GEEENWICH 


MEAN TTME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


Star's Name ■ 
and 
Position. 


Noon. 


III''. 


Tlk. 


IX'. 


14 


Sun 


W. 


O 1 II 

24 40 21 


O 1 II 

26 11 29 


O / 11 

27 42 19 


o 1 II 

29 12 54 




Mars 


E. 


58 32 


56 26 47 


54 53 23 


53 20 21 




a Pegasi 


E. 


65 50 30 


64 15 17 


62 40 30 


61 6 9 




a Arietis 


E. 


108 3 55 


106 24 59 


104 46 23 


103 8 6 


15 


Sun 


W. 


36 41 12 


38 9 56 


39 38 22 


41 6 29 




Mars 


E. 


45 40 37 


44 9 47 


42 39 17 


41 9 11 




a Pegasi 


E. 


53 21 33 


51 50 9 


50 19 17 


48 48 59 




a Arietis 


E. 


95 1 45 


93 25 29 


91 49 32 


90 13 55 


16 


Sun 


W. 


48 22 26 


49 48 44 


51 14 45 


52 40 29 




Mars 


E. 


33 44 13 


32 16 22 


30 48 53 


29 21 50 




o Pegasi 


E. 


41 26 39 


40 13 


38 34 33 


37 9 41 




a Arietis 


E. 


82 20 35 


80 46 50 


79 13 23 


77 40 14 


11 


Son 


W. 


59 45 6 


61 9 16 


62 33 11 


63 56 53 




a Arietis 


E. 


69 58 42 


68 27 12 


66 55 55 


65 24 54 




Aldebaran 


E. 


102 29 39 


100 58 59 


99 28 33 


97 68 20 


18 


Sun 


W. 


TO 52 15 


72 14 46 


■ 73 37 7 


74 59 18 




a Aquilae 


W. 


44 5 25 


45 11 31 


46 18 35 


47 26 29 




a Arietis 


E. 


57 53 4 


56 23 19 


54 53 45 


53 24 21 




Aldebaran 


E. 


90 30 17 


89 1 14 


87 32 22 


86 3 39 


19 


Sun 


W. 


81 48 8 


83 9 33 


84 30 53 


85 52 9 




a Aquilae 


W. 


53 16 44 


54 28 34 


55 40 53 


56 53 39 




a Arietis 


E. 


45 59 48 


44 31 19 


43 2 58 


41 34 44 




Aldebaran 


E. 


78 42 10 


77 14 15 


75 46 25 


74 18 42 


20 


Sun 


W. 


92 37 38 


93 58 38 


95 19 37 


96 40 36 




a Aquilae 


W. 


63 3 29 


64 18 29 


65 33 47 


66 49 22 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


38 59 57 


40 7 32 


41 16 12 


42 25 54 




a Arietis 


E. 


34 15 11 


32 47 35 


31 20 5 


29 52 40 




Aldebaran 


E. 


67 1 15 


65 33 56 


64 6 40 


62 39 25 


21 


Sun 


W. 


103 25 55 


104 47 8 


106 8 25 


107 29 46 




a Aquilae 


w. 


73 11 13 


74 28 18 


75 45 36 


77 3 6 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


48 27 19 


49 41 48 


50 56 54 


52 12 36 




Mars 


w. 


23 52 26 


25 14 23 


26 36 33 


27 58 56 




Aldebaran 


E. 


55 23 32 


53 56 22 


52 29 12 


51 2 3 




Pollux 


E. 


97 11 68 


95 43 40 


94 15 18 


92 46 61 


22 


Sun 


W. 


114 18 7 


115 40 9 


117 2 20 


118 24 41 




a Aquilae 


w. 


83 33 40 


84 52 21 


86 11 12 


87 30 13 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


58 39 3 


59 57 46 


61 16 56 


62 36 31 




Mars 


w. 


34 53 58 


36 17 36 


37 41 27 


39 5 31 




Aldebaran 


E. 


43 46 2 


42 18 50 


40 51 37 


39 24 23 




Pollux 


E. 


85 23 1 


83 53 53 


82 24 37 


80 55 12 


23 


Sun 


W. 


125 18 59 


126 42 25 


128 6 3 


129 29 55 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


69 20 17 


70 42 9 


72 4 22 


73 26 56 




a Pegasi 
Mars 


w. 


46 53 51 


48 19 15 


49 45 5 


51 11 21 




w. 


46 8 59 


47 34 21 


48 59 57 


50 25 46 




Pollux 


E. 


73 25 38 


71 55 10 


70 24 31 


68 53 40 




Jupiter 


E. 


109 13 31 


107 42 23 


106 11 1 


104 39 26 



358 






DECEMBER, 1860. 








GKEENWICH 


MEAI^ TIME. 










LUNAR ] 


DISTANCES. 






Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight 


XVK 


xvn)>. 


XXTi-. 


Month. 


Position. 












14 


Sun 


W. 


O 1 it 

30 43 11 


o 1 n 

32 13 9 


o / // 

33 42 48 


35° 12 9 




Mars 


E. 


51 47 40 


50 15 22 


48 43 25 


47 11 50 




a Pegasi 


E. 


59 32 15 


57 58 50 


56 25 54 


54 53 28 




a Arietis 


E. 


101 30 10 


99 52 34 


98 15 18 


96 38 21 


15 


Sun 


W. 


42 34 17 


44 1 46 


45 28 57 


46 55 60 




Mars 


E. 


39 39 26 


38 10 5 


36 41 5 


35 12 27 




a Pegasi 


E. 


47 19 16 


45 50 9 


44 21 39 


42 53 49 




a Arietis 


E. 


88 38 37 


87 3 39 


85 28 59 


83 54 38 


16 


Sun 


W. 


54 5 56 


55 31 6 


56 56 1 


58 20 41 




Mars 


E. 


27 55 9 


26 28 55 


25 3 8 


23 37 46 




a Pegasi 


E. 


35 45 40 


34 22 36 


33 32 


31 39 34 




a Arietis 


E. 


76 7 23 


74 34 49 


73 2 31 


71 30 28 


11 


Sun 


W. 


65 20 22 


66 43 38 


68 6 42 


69 29 34 




a Arietis 


E. 


63 54 5 


62 23 31 


60 53 9 


59 23 1 




Aldebaran 


E. 


96 28 19 


94 58 31 


93 28 56 


91 59 31 


18 


Sun 


W. 


• 76 21 19 


77 43 12 


79 4. 58 


80 26 36 




a Aquilae 


W. 


48 35 11 


49 44 37 


50 54 42 


52 5 26 




a Arietis 


E. 


51 55 8 


50 26 5 


48 57 11 


47 28 25 




Aldebaran 


E. 


84 35 4 


83 6 39 


81 38 21 


80 10 13 


19 


Sun 


W. 


87 13 21 


88 34 29 


89 55 34 


91 16 37 




a Aquilae 


W. 


58 6 51 


59 20 28 


60 34 27 


61 48 48 




a Arietis 


E. 


40 6 36 


38 38 35 


37 10 40 


35 42 52 




Aldebaran 


E. 


72 51 3 


71 23 30 


69 56 1 


68 28 37 


20 


Sun 


W. 


98 1 36 


99 22 37 


100 43 40 


102 4 46 




a Aquilae 


W. 


68 5 14 


69 21 22 


70 37 45 


71 54 22 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


43 36 33 


44 48 5 


46 25 


47 13 31 




a Arietis 


E. 


28 25 21 


26 58 9 


25 31 3 


24 4 3 




Aldebaran 


E. 


61 12 13 


59 45 1 


58 17 51 


56 50 41 


21 


Sun 


W. 


108 51 32 


110 12 46 


111 34 26 


112 56 13 




a Aquilae 


W. 


78 20 49 


79 38 44 


80 56 51 


82 15 10 




Fomalbaut 


w. 


53 28 52 


54 45 40 


56 2 59 


57 20 47 




Mars 


w. 


29 21 31 


30 44 19 


32 7 19 


33 30 32 




Aldebaran 


E. 


49 34 52 


48 7 41 


46 40 28 


45 13 16 




Pollux 


E. 


91 18 18 


89 49 39 


88 20 53 


86 52 1 


22 


Sun 


W. 


119 47 11 


121 9 51 


122 32 43 


123 55 45 




a Aquilae 


W. 


88 49 24 


90 8 45 


91 28 15 


92 47 55 




Fomalhaut 


w. 


63 56 30 


65 16 53 


66 37 39 


67 58 48 




Mars 


w. 


40 29 47 


41 54 15 


43 18 56 


44 43 51 




Aldebaran 


E. 


37 57 12 


36 30 4 


35 2 59 


33 36 




Pollux 


E. 


79 25 38 


77 55 53 


76 25 59 


74 55 54 


23 


Sun 


W. 


130 54 


132 18 18 


133 42 51 


135 7 38 




Fomalhaut 


W. 


74 49 49 


76 13 2 


77 36 35 


79 26 




a Pegasi 


W. 


52 38 3 


54 5 10 


55 32 42 


57 38 


1 


Mars 


W. 


51 51 51 


53 18 11 


54 44 46 


56 11 36 




Pollux 


E. 


67 22 36 


65 51 19 


•64 19 49 


62 48 6 





Jupiter 


E. 


103 7 38 


101 35 35 


100 3 19 


98 30 47 



DECEMBER, 1860. 



359 





GREENWICH 


MF,AN TIME. 




LUNAE DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


aud 




Noon. 


IIIK 


VII'. 


IXt. 


Month. 


Position. 












24 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


80 24 36 


a 1 it 

81 49 4 


O / ii 

83 13 51 


/ ;/ 

84 38 53 




a Pegasi 


W. 


58 28 55 


59 57 37 


61 26 41 


62 66 7 




Mars 


W. 


57 38 42 


69 6 4 


60 33 41 


62 1 36 




Pollux 


E. 


61 16 10 


69 44 


58 11 36 


66 38 58 




Jupiter 


E. 


96 58 1 


96 24 69 


93 51 42 


•92 18 8 




Eegulus 


E. 


98 6 25 


96 33 37 


95 34 


93 27 16 


25 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


TO 28 41 


72 16 


73 32 8 


75 4 22 




Mars 


W. 


69 25 20 


70 64 67 


72 24 50 


73 66 3 




a Arietis 


w. 


26 59 6 


28 32 40 


30 6 39 


31 41 4 




Pollux 


E. 


48 52 18 


47 18 17 


46 44 3 


44 9 35 




Jupiter 


E. 


84 26 13 


82 51 


81 16 30 


79 39 42 




Kegulus 


E. 


85 86 42 


84 1 44 


82 26 29 


80 50 68 


26 


a Pegasi 


W. 


82 50 23 


84 24 32 


85 58 59 


87 33 43 




Mars 


W. 


81 30 26 


83 2 24 


84 34 39 


86 7 13 




a Arietis 


w. 


39 38 50 


41 15 29 


42 62 27 


44 29 47 




Pollux 


E. 


36 14 13 


34 38 38 


33 2 55 


31 27 7 




Jupiter 


E. 


VI 36 18 


69 58 45 


68 20 64 


66 42 46 




Regulus 


E. 


72 48 59 


71 11 42 


69 34 9 


67 56 19 




Saturn 


E. 


84 19 7 


82 42 1 


81 4 38 


79 26 67 


27 


a Pegasi 


W. 


95 31 38 


97 8 


98 44 37 


100 21 28 




Mars 


W. 


93 54 16 


95 28 31 


97 3 2 


98 37 51 




a Arietis 


W. 


52 41 11 


54 20 24 


65 69 55 


57 39 44 




Aldebaran 


W. 


21 42 57 


23 13 37 


24 45 38 


26 18 50 




Jupiter 


E. 


68 27 52 


66 48 4 


56 8 


53 27 40 




Regulus 


E. 


59 42 53 


68 3 22 


56 23 35 


54 43 32 




Saturn 


E. 


71 14 22 


69 35 1 


67 66 25 


66 15 33 


28 


Mars 


W. 


106 35 41 


108 11 59 


109 48 31 


111 25 16 




a Arietis 


W. 


66 2 55 


67 44 21 


69 26 1 


71 7 56 




Aldebaran 


w. 


34 17 57 


35 56 49 


37 34 13 


39 13 6 




Jupiter 


E. 


45 2 19 


43 20 34 


41 38 36 


39 56 26 




Regulus 


E. 


46 19 36 


44 38 7 


42 56 26 


41 14 31 




Saturn 


E. 


67 52 31 


66 11 13 


64 29 43 


52 48 1 




Spica 


E. 


100 21 22 


98 39 41 


96 67 46 


95 15 36 


29 


a Arietis 


W. 


79 40 55 


81 24 8 


83 7 32 


84 51 8 




Aldebaran 


W. 


47 33 60 


49 15 3 


50 56 34 


52 38 22 




Jupiter 


E. 


31 23 5 


29 40 


27 66 51 


26 13 39 




Regulus 


E. 


32 42 16 


30 69 20 


29 16 17 


27 33 8 




Saturn 


E. 


44 16 50 


42 34 9 


40 51 21 


39 8 27 




Spica 


E. 


86 41 29 


84 68 3 


83 14 26 


81 30 39 


30 


a Arietis 


W. 


93 31 33 


96 18 4 


97 2 43 


98 47 29 




Aldebaran 


W. 


61 11 1 


62 54 11 


64 37 32 


66 21 3 




Saturn 


E. 


30 33 13 


28 60 13 


27 7 20 


25 24 38 




Spica 
Venus 


E. 


72 49 15 


71 4 32 


69 19 42 


67 34 46 




E. 


118 51 


116 25 46 


114 60 32 


113 15 10 


31 


Aldebaran 


W. 


75 46 


76 45 3 


78 29 26 


80 13 53 




Pollux 


W. 


33 1 49 


34 45 21 


36 29 8 


38 13 8 




Spica 
Venus 


E. 


58 48 28 


67 2 58 


65 17 24 


53 31 47 




E. 


106 16 30 


103 40 27 


102 4 20 


100 28 8 



360 



DECEMBER, 1860. 







GEEENWICH 


MEAK TIME. 




LUNAR DISTANCES. 


Day of 


Star's Name 










the 


and 




Midnight. 


XVI. 


XVIIR 


XX I'. 


Month. 


Position. 


















o / // 


/ // 


O / // 


/ // 


24 


Fomalhaut 


W. 


86 4 13 


,87 29 51 


88 55 44 


90 21 63 




a Pegasi 


W. 


64 25 56 


65 56 6 


67 26 37 


68 67 28 




Mars 


w. 


63 29 47 


64 58 15 


66 26 59 


67 56 1 




Pollux 


E. 


55 6 6 


53 33 


51 59 40 


60 26 6 




Ju^ter 


E. 


90 44 19 


89 10 13 


87 35 50 


86 1 10 




Regulus 


E. 


91 53 42 


90 19 52 


88 46 45 


87 11 22 


25 


a Pegasi 


W. 


76 36 55 


78 9 48 


79 43 1 


81 16 35 




Mars 


W. 


75 25 31 


76 56 19 


78 27 23 


79 58 46 




a Arietis 


w. 


33 15 52 


34 51 4 


36 26 37 


38 2 34 




Pollux 


E. 


42 34 54 


41 


39 24 55 


37 49 39 




Jupiter 


E. 


78 3 36 


76 27 12 


74 50 31 


73 13 33 




Regulus 


E. 


79 15 9 


77 39 2 


76 2 38 


74 25 57 


26 


a Pegasi 


W. 


89 8 45 


90 44 4 


92 19 39 


93 55 31 




Mars 


W. 


87 40 3 


89 13 11 


90 46 36 


92 20 18 




a Arietis 


W. 


46 7 25 


47 45 23 


49 23 40 


61 2 17 




Pollux 


E. 


29 51 14 


28 15 19 


26 39 26 


25 3 39 




Jupiter 


E. 


65 4 21 


63 25 39 


61 46 40 


60 7 24 




Regulus 


E. 


66 18 12 


64 39 47 


63 1 5 


61 22 7 




Saturn 


E. 


77 49 


76 10 46 


74 32 15 


72 63 27 


27 


a Pegasi 


W. 


101 68 32 


103 35 49 


105 13 18 


106 60 58 




Mars . 


W. 


100 12 54 


101 48 13 


103 23 48 


104 59 37 




a Arietis 


W. 


59 19 49 


61 12 


62 40 50 


64 21 45 




Aldebaran 


W. 


27 53 2 


29 28 9 


31 4 4 


32 40 41 




Jupiter 


E. 


51 47 5 


50 6 15 


48 25 10 


46 43 51 




Regulus 


E. 


53 3 15 


51 22 42 


49 41 64 


48 61 




Saturn 


E. 


64 35 26 


62 55 4 


61 14 27 


59 33 36 


28 


Mars 


W. 


113 2 14 


114 39 25 


116 16 47 


117 54 21 




a Arietis 


W. 


72 50 6 


74 32 29 


76 16 4 


77 67 63 




Aldebaran 


w. 


40 52 28 


42 32 16 


44 12 25 


45 62 57 




Jupiter 


E. 


38 14 5 


36 31 34 


34 48 62 


33 6 3 




Regulus 


E. 


39 32 25 


37 50 7 


36 7 39 


34 26 1 




Saturn 


E. 


51 6 7 


49 24 2 


47 41 47 


45 69 23 




Spica 


E. 


93 33 11 


91 50 34 


90 7 45 


88 24 43 


29 


a Arietis 


W. 


86 34 54 


88 18 50 


90 2 55 


91 47 10 




Aldebaran 


W. 


54 20 25 


56 2 44 


57 45 17 


69 28 3 




Jupiter 


E. 


24 30 26 


22 47 13 


21 4 4 


19 21 4 




Regulus 


E. 


25 49 54 


24 6 39 


22 23 27 


20 40 21 




Saturn 


E. 


37 25 29 


35 42 26 


33 59 22 


32 16 17 




Spica 


E. 


79 46 41 


78 2 33 


76 18 16 


74 33 60 


30 


a Arietis 


W. 


100 30 22 


102 15 21 


104 25 


106 45 35 




Aldebaran 


W. 


68 4 44 


69 48 33 


71 32 30 


73 16 34 




Saturn 


E. 


23 42 9 


21 59 69 


20 18 17 


18 37 12 




Spica 


E. 


65 49 41 


64 4 31 


62 19 15 


60 33 64 




Venus 


E. 


111 39 40 


110 4 3 


108 28 18 


106 52 27 


31 


Aldebaran 


W. 


81 58 27 


83 43 5 


85 27 45 


87 12 27 




Pollux 


W. 


39 57 21 


41 41 44 


43 26 17 


45 10 58 




Spica 


E. 


51 46 7 


50 24 


48 14 39 


46 28 62 


' r-r- 


Venns 


E. 


98 51 52 


97 15 31 


95 39 7 


94 2 41 



MARS. 



361 



JANUARY, 


1860 




FEBRITARY, 


1S60. 


MEXS TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




BBOCBNTEIO. 






GBOOBNTRIO. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 








Day of 

the. 
Month. 






Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Noon. 


Passage. 


iRw». 


Passage. 




o / // 


h. 


m. 




o / // 


h. m. 


1 


S.14 26 83 


19 


55-6 


1 


S.19 35 59 


19 9-9 


2 


14 38 13 


19 


54*1 


2 


19 43 59 


19 8-5 


3 


14 49 47 


19 


52-6 


3 


19 51 52 


19 7-0 


4 


15 1 14 


19 


51-1 


4 


19 59 36 


19 5-6 


5 


15 12 36 


19 


49-6 


5 


20 7 13 


19 4-1 


6 


15 23 51 


19 


48-1 


6 


20 14 41 


19 2-7 


1 


15 35 


19 


46-6 


7 


20 22 2 


19 1-3 


8 


15 46 2 


19 


45-1 


8 


20 29 14 


18 59-8 


9 


15 56 58 


19 


43-6 


9 


20 36 18 


18 68-4 


10 


16 7 48 


19 


42-1 


10 


20 43 14 


18 67-0 


11 


16 18 31 


19 


40-6 


11 


20 50 2 


18 56-5 


12 


16 29 7 


19 


39-1 


12 


20 56 41 


18 64-1 


13 


16 39 37 


19 


37-6 


13 


21 3 12 


18 52-6 


14 


16 49 59 


19 


36-1 


14 


21 9 35 


18 51-2 


15 


17 16 


19 


34-7 


15 


21 15 49 


18 49-8 


16 


17 10 24 


19 


33-2 


16 


21 21 56 


18 48-3 


17 


17 20 25 


19 


31-7 


17 


21 27 54 


18 46-9 


18 


17 30 20 


19 


30-2 


18 


21 33 43 


18 45-6 


19 


17 40 7 


19 


28-8 


19 


21 39 25 


18 44-0 


20 


17 49 47 


19 


27-3 


20 


21 44 68 


18 42-6 


21 


17 59 20 


19 


25-9 


21 


21 50 22 


18 41-2 


22 


18 8 45 


19 


24-4 


22 


21 66 38 


18 39-7 


23 


18 18 3 


19 


22-9 


23 


22 46 


18 38-3 


24 


18 27 13 


19 


21-5 


24 


22 6 45 


18 36-9 


25 


18 36 16 


19 


20-0 


25 


22 10 37 


18 36-4 


26 


18 45 11 


19 


18-6 


26 


22 15 20 


18 34-0 


27 


18 53 58 


19 


17-1 


27 


22 19 54 


18 32-5 


28 


19 2 38 


19 


16-7 


28 


22 24 21 


18 31-1 


29 


19 11 10 


19 


14-2 


29 


22 28 40 


18 29-6 


30 


19 19 34 


19 


12-8 








31 


19 27 50 


19 


11-3 


30 
31 


22 32 50 
22 36 62 


18 28-1 
18 26-6 


32 


S. 19 35 59 


19 


9-9 


32 


S. 22 40 46 


18 25-2 



362 



MARS. 



raARCM, 1§60. 


APRII., 1860. 


MEAN TIME. 


ME A IV TIME. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


GEOCENTEIC. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


GEOCENTEIO. 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Mon. 


Noon. 


1 

2 
3 


O i u 

S.22 82 50 
22 36 52 
22 40 46 


h. 
18 
18 
18 


m. 
28-1 
26-6 
25-2 


1 
2 
3 


S. 2°3 39 16 
23 39 38 
23 39 54 


h. 
17 
17 
17 


m. 

40-3 
38-6 
36-9 


4 
5 
6 


22 44 32 
22 48 9 
22 51 39 


18 
18 
18 


23-7 
22-2 
20-8 


4 
5 
6 


23 40 6 
23 40 12 
23 40 13 


17 

17 
17 


35-2 
33-5 
31-8 


1 
8 
9 


22 65 1 

22 58 15 

23 1 21 


18 
18 
18 


19-3 
17-8 
16-3 


7 
8 
9 


23 40 9 
23 40 1 
23 39 48 


17 
17 
17 


30-1 
28-4 
26-6 


10 
11 
12 


23 4 19 
23 7 9 
23 9 52 


18 
18 
18 


14-8 
13-3 
11-8 


10 
11 
12 


23 39 31 
23 39 9 
23 38 44 


17 
17 
17 


24-8 
23-1 
21-3 


13 
14 
15 


23 12 27 
23 14 55 
23 17 14 


18 
18 
18 


10-3 
8-8 
7-3 


13 
14 
15 


23 38 15 
23 37 43 
23 37 7 


17 
17 
17 


19-6 

17-7 
15-8 


16 

17 
18 


23 19 27 
23 21 32 
23 23 30 


18 
18 
18 


6-8 
4-2 

2-7 


16 
17 
18 


23 36 28 
23 35 46 
23 35 1 


17 
17 
17 


14-0 
12-1 
10-2 


19 
20 
21 


23 25 21 
23 27 4 
23 28 41 


18 
17 
17 


1-1 

59-6 
58-0 


19 
20 
21 


23 34 14 
23 33 25 
23 32 34 


17 
17 
17 


8-3 
6-4 
4-5 


22 
23 

24 


23 30 11 
23 31 34 
23 32 50 


17 

17 
17 


56-5 
54-9 
53-3 


22 
23 
24 


23 31 41 
23 30 46 
23 29 50 


17 
17 
16 


2-5 

0-5 

58-5 


25 
26 

27 


23 34 
23 35 4 
23 36 1 


17 
17 
17 


51-7 
50-1 
48-5 


25 
26 

27 


23 28 53 
23 27 55 
23 26 57 


16 
16 
16 


66-5 
64-5 
52-5 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


23 36 52 
23 37 37 
23 38 16 
23 38 49 

8.23 39 16 


17 
17 
17 
17 

17 


46-9 
46-2 
43-6 
41-9 

40-3 


28 
29 
30 

31 
32 


23 25 58 
23 24 69 
23 24 

23 23 1 
S. 23 22 3 


16 
16 
16 

16 

16 


50-4 
48-3 
46-2 

44-1 
41-9 



MARS. 



363 



IttAY, 1§60. 




JITNi:, 1S60. 




MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




GEOOBNTKIO. 






GEOOENTEIO. 




Day of 

the 








Day of 
the 








Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Appm-ent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


S/bon. 


Passage. 


Month. 


Sbon. 


Passage. 




oil! 


h. 


m. 




O J tl 


h. 


m. 


1 


S.23 23 1 


16 


44-1 


1 


S.23 22 10 


15 


23-9 


2" 


23 22 3 


16 


41-9 


2 


23 23 58 


15 


20-T 


3 


23 21 6 


16 


39-T 


3 


23 25 55 


16 


lT-6 


4 


23 20 10 


16 


3T-5 , 


4 


23 28 2 


15 


14-2 


6 


23 19 15 


16 


35-3 


6 


23 30 19 


16 


11-0 


6 


23 18 22 


16 


33-1 


6 


23 32 46 


15 


T-6 


7 


23 IT 31 


16 


30-8 


T 


23 35 23 


15 


4-2 


8 


23 16 42 


16 


28-6 


8 


23 38 11 


15 


0-8 


9 


23 15 66 


16 


26-1 


9 


23 41 9 


14 


5T-3 


10 


23 15 13 


16 


23-8 


10 


23 44 19 


14 


53-8 


11 


23 14 33 


16 


21-4 


11 


23 4T 40 


14 


50-2 


12 


23 13 56 


16 


19-0 


12 


23 51 12 


14 


46-6 


13 


23 13 23 


16 


16-6 


13 


23 54 55 


14 


42-9 


14 


23 12 55 


16 


14-1 


14 


23 58 50 


14 


39-2 


15 


23 12 31 


16 


11-6 


15 


24 2 55 


14 


35-4 


16 


23 12 12 


16 


9-1 


16 


24 T 12 


14 


31-5 


IT 


23 11 58 


16 


6-5 


IT 


24 11 39 


14 


27-6 


18 


23 11 49 


16 


3-9 


18 


24 16 16 


14 


23-7 


19 


23 11 46 


16 


1-3 


19 


24 21 4 


14 


19-7 


20 


23 11 50 


15 


58-6 


20 


24 26 2 


14 


15-6 


21 


23 12 


15 


55-9 


21 


24 31 9 


14 


11-5 


22 


23 12 16 


15 


53-2 


22 


24 36 25 


14 


7-3 


23 


23 12 40 


15 


50-4 


23 


24 41 51 


14 


3-1 


24 


23 13 11 


15 


4T-6 


24 


24 4T 24 


13 


58-8 


, 25 


23 13 50 


15 


44-8 


25 


24 53 6 


13 


54-5 


26 


23 14 36 


15 


41-9 


26 


24 58 54 


13 


50-1 


27 


23 15 30 

/ 


15 


39-0 


2T 


25 4 49 


13 


46-7 


28 


23 16 32 


15 


36-1 


28 


25 10 50 


13 


41-2 


29 


23 IT 43 


15 


33-1 


29 


25 16 67 


13 


36-7 


30 


23 19 3 


15 


30-0 


30 


■ 26 23 8 


13 


32-1 


31 


23 20 32 


15 


2T-0 


















31 


25 29 23 


13 


27-5 


32 


S.23 22 10 


15 


23-9 


32 


S.25 36 41 


13 


22-8 



364 



MARS. 



JUL.Y, 1§60. 


AVOVST, 1§60. 


MEAN TIME 


MEAN TIME. 




SBOCENTEIO. 






GEOCENTBIC. 




Day of 
the 








Day of 
the 








Appa/rent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


Soon. 


Passage. 


Mouth. 


Noon. 


Passage. 




1 II 


h. 


m. 




O 1 II 


h. 


m. 


1 


S.25 29 23 


13 


27 


5 


1 


s.28 47 


10 


52-7 < 


2 


25 35 41 


13 


22 


8 


2 ; 


28 2 16 


10 


47'- 9 


3 


25 42 2 


13 


18 


1 


3 ': 


28 3 29 


10 


43-1 


4 


25 48 24 


13 


13 


3 


. 4 


28 4 26 


10 


38-4 


5 


25 54 48 


13 


8 


6 


6 


28 6 8 


10 


33-7 


6 


26 1 11 


13 


3 


7 


6 


28 5 34 


10 


29-0 


n 


26 T 33 


12 


58 


8 


7 


28 5 44 


10 


24-4 


8 


26 13 54 


12 


53 


9 


8 


28 5 40 


10 


19-9 


9 


26 20 12 


12 


49 





9 


28 5 20 


10 


15-4 


10 


26 26 2*7 


12 


44 





10 


28 4 46 


10 


10-9 


11 


26 32 38 


12 


39 





11 


28 3 58 


10 


6'- 6 


12 


26 38 43 


12 


33 


9 


12 


28 2 55 


10 


2-2 


13 


26 44 42 


12 


28 


9 


13 


28 1 39 


9 


57-9 


14 


26 60 33 


12 


23 


8 


14 


28 9 


9 


53-6 


15 


26 56 16 


12 


18 


7 


15 


27 58 25 


9 


49-5 


16 


27 1 50 


12 


13 


6 


16 


27 56 29 


9 


46-4 


17 


27 7 14 


12 


8 


5 


17 


27 54 20 


9 


41-4 


18 


27 12 27 


12 


3 


3 


18 


27 51 59 


9 


37-4 


19 


27 17 28 


11 


58 


2 


19 


27 49 26 


9 


33-4 


20 


27 22 16 


11 


53 


1 


20 


27 46 40 


9 


29-6 


21 


27 26 52 


11 


47 


9 


21 


27 43 43 


9 


25-9 


22 


27 31 14 


11 


42 


8 


22 


27 40 35 


9 


22-1 


23 


27 35 21 


11 


37 


7 


23 


27 37 16 


9 


18-4 


24 


27 39 14 


11 


32 


6 


24 


27 33 46 


9 


14-9 


25 


27 42 51 


11 


27 


5 


25 


27 30 6 


9 


11-3 


26 


27 46 13 


11 


22 


4 


26 


27 26 16 


9 


7-8 


2V 


27 49 19 


11 


17 


4 


27 


27 22 16 


9 


4-3 


28 


27 52 9 


11 


12 


4 


28 


27 18 6 


9 


1-0 


29 


27 54 43 


11 


7 


4 


29 


27 13 46 


8 


57-7 


30 


27 57 


11 


2 


5 


30 


27 99 17 


8 


54-5 


31 


27 59 2 


10 


57-6 


31 


27 4 40 


8 


51-8 


32 


S.28 47 


10 


52-7 


32 


S.26 59 53 


8 


48-1 



MARS. 



365 



SEPTEMBER, 


1§60. 


OCTOBER, 1§60 


• 




MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




Day of 

the 
Month. 


GEOCBNTEIO. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


aEOCBNTBIO. 




Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 




Noon. 


Noon. 




1 
2 
3 


S. 2°6 59 53 
26 54 58 
26 49 54 


li. m. 
8 48 
8 44 
8 41 


1 
9 
9 


1 
2 
3 


S. 2°3 30 10 
23 20 58 
23 11 38 


h. 

7 

• 7 

7 


m. 
33-1 
31-1 
29-1 




4 
5 
6 


26 44 41 
26 39 20 
26 33 49 


8 38 
8 36 
8 33 


9 




4 
6 
6 


23 2 9 
22 52 31 
22 42 46 


7 
7 
7 


27-2 
25-3 
23-3 




8 
9 


26 28 10 
26 22 23 • 
26 16 28 


8 30 
8 27 
8 24 


2 

3 

•6 


7 
8 
9 


22 32 51 
22 22 48 
22 12 36 


7 
7 
7 


21-4 
19-5 
17-7 




10 
11 
12 


26 10 24 
26 4 12 
25 57 52 


8 21 
8 19 
8 16 


•8 
•0 
•5 


10 
11 
12 


22 2 16 
21 61 46 
21 41 8 


7 
7 
7 


16-9 
14-1 
12-3 




13 
14 
15 


25 61 22 
25 44 44 
25 37 68 


8 13 
8 11 

8 8 


9 
3 

8 


13 

14 
15 


21 30 21 
21 19 25 
21 8 21 


7 
7 
7 


10-6 

8-7 
7-0 




16 
It 

18 


25 31 3 
25 24 
25 16 47 


8 6 
8 3 
8 1 


3 
9 
5 


16 

17 
18 


20 67 7 
20 46 45 
20 34 14 


7 
7 
7 


5-2 
3-6 
1-8 




19 
20 
21 


25 9 26 
25 1 57 
24 54 19 


7 69 
7 56 
7 64 


1 

7 
4 


19 
20 
21 


20 22 35 
20 10 48 
19 68 62 


7 
6 
6 


0-1 
68-3 
66-6 




22 
23 
24 


24 46 33 
24 38 38 
24 30 35 


7 52 
7 60 
7 47 


2 


8 


22 
23 

24 


19 46 47 
19 34 35 
19 22 14 


6 
6 
6 


65-0 
53-3 
61-7 




25 
26 

27 


24 22 23 
24 14 2 
24 5 33 


7 45 
7 43 
7' 41 


6 

4 
2 


25 
26 

27 


19 9 46 
18 67 9 
18 44 24 


6 
6 
6 


50-0 
48-4 
46-8 




28 
29 
30 

31 
32 


23 56 56 
23 48 9 
23 39 14 

23 30 10 
8.23 20 58 


7 39 
7 37 
7 35 

7 33 
7 31 


1 
1 

1 

1 

1 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


18 31 32 
18 18 32 
18 5 24 
17 52 8 

S. 17 38 44 


6 
6 
6 
6 

6 


45-2 
43-6 
42-0 
40-4 

38-8 





366 



MAES. 



IVOTEMBER, 


1860. 


DECEMBER, 


1860. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




GBOCENTKIO. 




GBOCENTEIC. | 


Day of 

the 






Day of 

the 
Month. 






Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


Nbcm. 


Passage. 


Noon. 


Passage. 




O 1 II 


h. m. 




O 1 II 


h. m. 


1 


S.17 38 44 


6 38-8 


1 


S.IO 5 35 


5 53-1 


2 


17 25 13 


6 37-2 


2 


9 49 6 


6 61-6 


3 


17 11 34 


6 35-6 


3 


9 32 32 


5 50-2 


4 


16 57 48 


6 34-0 


4 


9 15 55 


5 48-7 


5 


16 43 54 


6 32-6 


5 


8 59 14 


5 47-2 


6 


16 29 53 


6 31-0 


6 


8 42 29 


5 45-8 


V 


16 15 44 


6 29-4 


7 


8 25 41 


6 44-3 


8 


16 1 29 


6 27-8 


8 


8 -8 49 


5 42-8 


9 


15 47 7 


6 26-3 


9 


7 51 55 


5 41-3 


10 


15 32 38 


6 24-7 


10 


7 34 57 


5 39-8 


11 


15 18 2 


6 23-2 


11 


7 17 56 


5 38-4 


12 


15 3 20 


6 21-7 


12 


7 52 


5 36-9 


13 


14 48 31 


6 20-2 


13 


6 43 45 


5 35-4 


14 


14 33 36 


6 18-7 


14 


6 26 35 


5 33-9 


15 


14 18 35 


6 17-1 


15 


6 9 24 


5 32-4 


16 


14 3 27 


6 15-6 


16 


5 52 10 


5 30-9 


17 


13 48 14 


6 14-1 


17 


5 34 53 


5 29-5 i 


18 


13 32 54 


6 12-6 


18 


5 17 35 


5 28-0 


19 


13 17 29 


6 11-1 


19 


5 15 


5 26-5 


20 


13 1 58 


6 9-6 


20 


4 42 53 


5 25-0 


21 


12 46 22 


6 8-1 


21 


4 25 30 


5 23-5 


22 


12 30 40 


6 6-6 


22 


4 8 5 


5 22-0 


23 


12 14 52 


6 5-0 


23 


3 50 39 


5 20-6 


24 


11 59 


6 3-6 


24 


3 33 12 


5 19-1 


25 


11 43 2 


6 2-1 


25 


3 15 44 


5 17-6 


26 


11 26 59 


6 0-6 


26 


2 58 16 


5 16-2 


27 


11 10 51 


5 59-1 


27 


2 40 46 


5 14-7 


28 


10 54 39 


5 67-6 


28 


2 23 16 


5 13-2 


29 


10 38 22 


5 56-1 


29 


2 6 45 


5 11-8 


30 


10 22 1 


5 54-6 


30 


1 48 14 


6 10-3 








31 


1 30 42 


5 8-8 


31 


10 5 35 


5 53-1 








32 


S. 9 49 6 


5 51-6 


32 


S. 1 13 11 


5 7-3 



JUPITER. 



367 



JAHTIJARY, 


L§60 




FEBRUARY, 1§60. 




MTIAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 






GBOCENTEIC. 






GEOCENTRIC. 






Day of 
the 








Day of 

the 
Month. 










Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 




Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 


Noon. 


Passage. 






o / // 


h. 


m. 




O 1 It 


h. 


m. 




1 


N.22 1 35 


12 


49-3 


1 


N.22 39 58 


10 


30 


5 




2 


22 2 57 


12 


44-9 


2 


22 40 56 


10 


26 


1 




3 


22 4 20 


12 


40-4 


3 


22 41 52 


10 


21 


7 




4 


22 5 42 


12 


36-9 


4 


22 42 47 


10 


17 


3 




5 


22 7 5 


12 


31-4 


5 


22 43 40 


10 


12 


9 




6 


22 8 27 


12 


26-9 


6 


22 44 32 


10 


8 


5 




1 


22 9 49 


12 


22-5 


7 


22 45 23 


10 


4 


2 




8 


22 11 11 


12 


17-9 


8 


22 46 12 


9 


59 


9 




9 


22 12 32 


12 


13-4 


9 


22 47 


9 


66 


6 




10 


22 13 63 


12 


8-9 


10 


22 47 46 


9 


61 


3 




11 


22 15 13 


12 


4-4 


11 


22 48 31 


9 


47 







12 


22 16 33 


11 


59-9 


12 


22 49 14 


9 


42 


7 




13 


22 17 52 


11 


56-4 


13 


22 49 66 


9 


38 


4 




14 


22 19 11 


11 


50-9 


14 


22 50 37 


9 


34 


1 




15 


22 20 28 


11 


46-4 


16 


22 51 16 


9 


29 


8 




16 


22 21 45 


11 


41-9 


16 


22 51 63 


9 


25 


5 




17 


22 23 2 


11 


37-4 


17 


22 62 29 


9 


21 


3 




18. 


22 24 17 


11 


32-9 


18 


22 63 4 


9 


17 


1 




19 


22 25 31 


11 


28-4 


19 


22 63 37 


9 


12 


9 




20 


22 26 45 


11 


23-9 


20 


22 64 8 


9 


8 


7 




21 


22 27 57 


11 


19-4 


21 


22 64 38 


9 


4 


6 




22 


22 29 9 


11 


14-9 


22 


22 65 7 


9 





3 




23 


22 30 19 


11 


10-4 


23 


22 55 34 


8 


66 


1 




24 


22 31 28 


11 


6-0 


24 


22 56 


8 


51 


9 




25 


22 32 36 


11 


1-5 


25 


22 66 24 


8 


47 


8 




26 


22 33 43 


10 


57-0 


26 


22 66 46 


8 


43 


7 




27 


22 34 49 


10 


52-5 


27 


22 67 8 


8 


39 


6 




28 


22 35 68 


10 


48-1 


28 


22 57 27 


8 


36 


5 




29 


22 36 57 


10 


43-7 


29 


22 57 46 


8 


31 


4 




30 


22 37 58 


10 


39-3 














31 


22 38 59 


10 


34-9 


30 


22 68 3 


8 


27 


3 












31 


22 58 18 


8 


23 


2 




32 


N.22 39 58 


10 


30-5 


32 


N.22 58 32 


8 


19-2 


tt 



368 



JUPITER. 



niARCH, 1S60. 




APRII., 1860. 




MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


aSOOEKTEIO. 


Day of 

the 
Month. 


aEOCENTEIC. 


Apparmt 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Appwrent 
Declination. 


Meridian 
Passage. 


Noon. 


Nbon. 


1 
2 
3 


o / // 

N.22 68 3 
22 58 18 
22 58 32 


h. 
8 
8 
8 


m. 

27-3 
23-2 
19-2 


1 
2 
3 


N.22 56 16 
22 54 49 
22 54 20 


h. 
6 
6 
6 


m. 
28-1 
24-5 
20-9 


4 
5 
6 


22 58 44 
22 58 55 
22 59 5 


8 
8 
8 


15-2 
11-2 

7-2 


4 
5 
6 


22 63 50 
22 53 19 
22 52 46 


6 
6 
6 


17-3 
13-7 
10-1 


1 
8 
9 


22 69 13 
22 59 20 
22 59 26 


8 

7 
7 


3-2 
69-2 
55-2 


7 
8 
9 


22 52 12 
22 5l 37 
22 51 


6' 
6 
5 


6-5 

2-9 

59-3 


10 
11 
12 


22 59 30 
22 59 38 
22 69 35 


7 
7 
7 


61-3 

47-4 
43-5 


10 
11 
12 


22 50 22 
22 49 42 
22 49 1 


5 
5 


56-8 
62-3 
48-8 


13 
14 
15 


22 59 36 
22 59 33 
22 59 31 


7 
7 
7 


39-6 
35-7 
31-8 


13 

14 
15 


22 48 19 
22 47 35 
22 46 50 


5 

5 
6 


46-3 
41-8 
38-3 


16 
17 
18 


22 59 27 
22 59 21 
22 59 14 


7 
7 
7 


27-9 
24-1 
20-3 


16 
17 
18 


22 46 3 
22 45 15 
22 44 26 


5 
6 
5 


34-8 
31-3 
27-8 


19 
20 
21 


22 69 6 
22 58 57 
22 58 46 


7 
7 
7 


16-6 

12-7 

8-9 


19 
20 
21 


22 43 35 
22 42 42 
22 41 49 


5 
6 
5 


24-3 
20-9 
17-5 


22 
23 
24 


22 58 34 
22 58 20 
22 58 5 


7 
7 
6 


5-1 

1-3 

57-6 


22 
23 
24 


22 40 53 
22 39 56 
22 38 58 


5 
5 
5 


14-1 

10-7 

7-3 


25 
26 

27 


22 57 49 
22 57 31 
22 57 12 


6 
6 
6 


63-9 
60-2 
46-6 


25 
26 
27 


22 37 59 
22 36 57 
22 35 55 


5 
5 
4 


3-9 

0-5 

57-1 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


22 56 52 
22 56 30 
22 56 7 
22 56 42 

lSr.22 55 16 


6 
6 
6 
6 

6 


42-8 
39-1 , 
36-4 
31-7 

28-1 


28 
29 
30 

31 

32 


22 34 61 
22 33 45 
22 32 38 

22 31 29 
N.22 30 19 


4 
4 
4 

4 

4 


63-7 
50-4 
47-0 

43-7 
40-4 



JUPITER. 



369 



MAY, 1§60. 


JUlfE, 1§60. 




MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 






GBOCBNTEIC. 






GBOOENTHIC. 






Day of 








Day of 

the 










the 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 




Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 






O t II 


h. 


m. 




O 1 II 


h. 


m. 




1 


N.22 31 29 


4 


43-7 


1 


N.21 43 22 


3 


3-8 




2 


22 80 19 


4 


40-4 


2 


21 41 24 


3 


0-7 




3 


22 29 8 


4 


37-1 


3 


21 39 24 


2 


57-5 




4 


22 27 55 


4 


33-8 


4 


21 37 23 


2 


54-4 




5 


22 26 40 


4 


30-5 


6 


21 35 20 


2 


51-3 




6 


22 25 24 


4 


27-2 


6 


21 33 16 


2 


48-2 




1 


22 24 6 


4 


23-9 


7 


21 31 10 


2 


45-1 




8 


22 22 47 


4 


20-6 


8 


21 29 3 


2 


42-0 




9 


22 21 26 


4 


17-3 


9 


21 26 54 


2 


38-9 




10 


22 20 4 


4 


14-0 


10 


21 24 43 


2 


35-8 




H 


22 18 41 


4 


10-7 


11 


21 22 31 


2 


32-7 




12 


22 17 15 


4 


7-5 


12 


21 20 18 


2 


29-6 




13 


22 15 49 


4 


4-3 


13 


21 18 2 


2 


26-5 




14 


22 14 20 


4 


1-1 


14 


21 16 46 


2 


23-4 




15 


22 12 50 


3 


67-9 


la. 


21 13 28 


2 


20-3 




16 


22 11 19 


3 


54-7 


16 


21 11 8 


2 


17-3 




17 


22 9 46 


3 


51-5 


17 


21 8 47 


2 


14-2 




18 


22 8 11 


3 


48-3 


18 


21 6 24 


2 


11-2 




19 


22 6 35 


3 


45-1 


19 


21 4 


2 


8-1 




20 


22 4 57 


3 


41-9 


20 


21 1 34 


2 


5-0 




21 


22 3 18 


3 


38-7 


21 


20 59 7 


2 


2-0 




22 


22 1 37 


3 


35-5 


22 


20 56 38 




68-9 




23 


21 59 55 


3 


32-3 


23 


20 54 8 




66-9 




24 


21 58 11 


3 


29-1 


24 


20 51 36 




52-8 




25 


21 56 25 


3 


25-9 


25 


20 49 3 




49-7 




26 


21 54 38 


3 


22-7 


26 


20 46 29 




46-7 




27 


21 62 49 


3 


19-5 


27 


20 48 53 




43-6 




28 


21 60 59 


■ 3 


16-3 


28 


20 41 16 




40-6 




29 


21 49 7 


3 


13-2 


29 


20 38 37 




37-5 




30 


21 47 14 


3 


10-1 


30 


20 85 57 




34-5 




31 


21 45 19 


3 


7-0 


31 


20 S3 16 




31-4 




32 


N.21 43 22 


3 


3-8 


82 


N,20 30 33 




28-4 





24 



370 



JUPITER. 



JUIY, 1860. 


AUGUST, I860. 




MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 






GEOCBNTKIO. 




GEOOENTKIC. 






Day of 

the 
Month. 






Day of 










Apparent 
Decimation. 


Meridian 


the 
Month. 


Appwrent 
Declination. 


Meridian 




Noon. 


Passage. 


Noon. 


Passage. 






O 1 II 


h. m. 




a 1 H 


h. 


m. 




1 


N.20 33 16 


1 31-4 


1 


N.18 59 42 


23 


54-5 




2 


20 30 33 


1 28'4 


2 


18 56 25 


23 


51-4 




3 


20 27 49 


1 25-3 


3 


18 63 6 


23 


48-4 




4 


20 25 4 


1 22-3 


4 


18 49 47 


23 


45-4 




5 


20 22 17 


1 19-2 


5 


18 46 27 


23 


42-3 




6 


20 19 29 


1 16-2 


6 


18 43 6 


23 


39-3 




7 


20 16 39 


1 13-2 


7 


18 39 44 


23 


36-3 




8 


20 13 49 


1 10-1 


8 


18 36 22 


23 


33-2 




9 


20 10 57 


1 7-1 


9 


18 32 59 


23 


30-2 




10 


20 8 3 


1 4-1 


10 


18 29 35 


23 


27-2 




U 


20 5 9 


1 1-1 


11 


18 26 11 


23 


24-1 




12 


20 2 13 


58-0 


12 


18 22 46 


23 


21-1 




13 


19 59 16 


55-0 


13 


18 19 20 


23 


18-0 




14 


19 , 56 18 


52-0 


14 


18 15 54 


23 


15-0 




15 


19 53 18 


49-0 


15 


18 12 28 


23 


11-9 




16 


19 50 17 


45-9 


16 


18 9 1 


23 


8-9 




17 


19 47 16 


42-9 


17 


18 5 33 


23 


6-8 




18 


19 44 13 


39-9 


18 


18 2 5 


23 


2-8 




19 


19 41 8 


36-9 


19 


17 58 37 


22 


69-7 




20 


19 38 3 


33-8 


20 


17 55 8 


22 


56-7 




21 


19 34 57 


30-8 


21 


17 51 39 


22 


53-6 




22 


19 31 50 


27-8 


22 


17 48 9 


22 


50-6 




23 


19 28 41 


24-8 


23 


17 44 40 


22 


47-5 




24 


19 25 32 


21-7 


24 


17 41 10 


22 


44-4 




25 


19 22 22 


18-7 


25 


17 37 40 


22 


41-3 




26 


19 19 10 


15-7 


26 


17 34 9 


22 


38-2 




11 


19 15 58 


12-6 


27 


17 30 39 


22 


35-1 




28 


19 12 44 


^- 9-6 


28 


17 27 8 


22 


32-1 




29 


19 9 30 


6-6 


29 


17 23 37 


22 


29-0 




30 


19 6 15 


3-5 


30 


17 20 7 


22 


25-9 




31 


19 2 59 


r o.Ei 

\m 6T6f 


31 


17 16 36 


22 


22-8 




32 


N.18 59 42 


23 54-5 


32 


N.17 13 5 


22 


22-8 





JUPITER. 



371 



SEPTEMBER, 


I860. 


OCTOBER, 


1§60 






MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 






GEOCENTRIC. | 




GEOCENTEIC. 






Day of 
the 






Day of 

the 
Month. 










Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 




Month. 


iRjon.. 


Passage. 


Mon. 


Passage. 






o / // 


h. m. 




O 1 II 


h. 


m. 




1 


N.17 13 5 


22 19-7 


1 


N.15 30 42 


20 


44-9 




2 


17 9 34 


22 16-6 


2 


15 27 30 


20 


41-7 




3 


17 6 4 


22 13-5 


3 


15 24 19 


20 


38-5 




4 


17 2 33 


22 10-4 


4 


15 21 9 


20 


35-2 




5 


16 59 3 


22 7-3 


5 


15 18 1 


20 


31-9 




6 


16 55 32 


22 4-2 


6 


15 14 54 


20 


28-6 




1 


16 52 2 


22 1-1 


7 


15 11 49 


20 


25-4 




8 


16 48 32 


21 58-0 


8 


15 8 45 


20 


22-1 




9 


16 45 2 


21 54-9 


9 


15 5 43 


20 


18-8 




10 


16 41 33 


21 51-8 


10 


15 2 42 


20 


15-5 




11 


16 38 4 


21 48-6 


11 


14 59 43 


20 


12-2 




12 


16 34 35 


21 45-4 


12 


14 56 46 


20 


8-9 




13 


16 31 7 


21 42-3 


13 


14 53 50 


20 


5-6 




14 


16 27 39 


21 39-2 


14 


14 50 56 


20 


2-3 




15 


16 24 12 


21 36-1 


15 


14 48 4 


19 


69-0 




16 


16 20 46 


21 32-9 


16 


14 l5 14 


19 


55-7 




17 


16 17 20 


21 29-7 


17 


14 42 26 


19 


52-4 




18 


16 13 54 


21 26-5 


18 


14 39 40 


19 


49-1 




19 


16 10 29 


21 23-3 


19 


14 36 56 


19 


45-7 




20 


16 7 6 


21 20-1 


20 


14 34 14 


19 


42-3 




21 


16 3 42 


21 16-9 


21 


14 31 34 


19 


38-9 




22 


16 20 


21 13-7 


22 


14 28 57 


19 


35-5 




23 


15 56 59 


21 10-5 


23 


14 26 21 


19 


32-1 




24 


15 53 38 


21 7-3 


24 


14 23 48 


19 


28-7 




26 


15 50 18 


21 4-1 


25 


14 21 18 


19 


25-3 




26 


15 46 59 


21 0-9 


26 


14 18 49 


19 


21-9 




27 


15 43 42 


20 57-7 


27 


14 16 23 


19 


18-5 




28 


15 40 25 


20 54-5 


28 


14 14 


19 


15-1 




29 


15 37 10 


20 51-3 


29 


14 11 39 


19 


11-6 




30 


15 33 55 


20 48-1 


30 


14 9 20 


19 


8-1 










31 


14 7 4 


19 


4-6 




31 


15 30 42 


20 44-9 












32 


N.15 27 30 


20 41-7 


32 


K14 4 51 


19 


1-1 





372 



JUPITER. 



NOTEJHBER, 


1860. 


DECEMBER, 


1S60. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 


Day of 

the 


GEOOENTEIO. 


Day of 
the 


OEOOBNTBIC. 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Afpairent 
Declination. 


Meridian 




ffbon. 


Passage. 




Noon. 


Passage. 


1 
2 
3 


O 1 II 

N.14 4 51 
14 2 41 
14 33 


h. m. 
19 1-1 
18 57-6 
18 54-1 


1 
2 
3 


N.l°3 22 42 
13 22 13 
13 21 48 


h. m. 
17 12-4 
17 8-6 
17 4-8 


4 
5 
6 


13 58 28 
13 56 26 
13 54 26 


18 60-6 
18 47-1 
18 43-6 


4 
5 
6 


13 21 27 
13 21 10 
13 20 57 


17 1-0 
16 57-2 
16 53-3 


7 
8 
9 


13 52 30 
13 50 37 
13 48 47 


18 40-1 
18 36-6 
18 33-1 


7 
8 
9 


13 20 48 
13 20 43 
13 20 42 


16 49-4 
16 45-5 
16 41-6 


10 
11 
12 


13 46 59, 
13 45 15 
13 43 35 


18 29-6 
18 26-0 
18 22-4 


10 
11 
12 


13 20 45 
13 20 53 
13 21 4 


16 37-7 
16 33-8 
16 29-9 


13 

14 
15 


13 41 57 
13 40 23 
13 38 52 


18 18-8 
18 15-2 
18 11-6 


13 

14 
15 


13 21 19 
13 21 39 
13 22 2 


16 26-0 
16 22-0 
16 18-0 


16 

11 
18 


13 37 25 
13 36 1 
13 34 41 


18 8-0 
18 4-4. 
18 0-8 


16 
17 
18 


13 22 30 
13 23 1 
13 23 37 


16 14-0 
16 10-0 
16 6-0 


19 
20 
21 


13 33 23 
13 32 10 
13 31 


17 57-2 
17 53-5 
17 49-8 


19 
20 
21 


13 24 17 
13 25 
13 25 48 


16 2-0 
15 58-0 
15 54-0 


22 
23 
24 


13 29 53 
13 28 61 
13 27 51 


17 46-1 
17 42-4 
17 38-7 


22 
23 
24 


13 26 39 
13 27 35 
13 28 34 


15 50-0 
15 45-9 
15 41-8 


25 
26 

21 


13 26 56 
13 26 4 
13 25 16 


17 35-0 
17 31-3 
17 27-6 


25 
26 
27 


13 29 37 
13 30 44 
13 31 54 


15 37-7 

15 33-6 

16 29-5 


28 
29 
30 

31 
32 


13 24 32 
13 23 51 
13 23 15 

13 22 42 
N.13 22 13 


17 23-8 
17 20-0 
17 16-2 

17 12-4 
17 8-6 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


13 33 9 
13 34 27 
13 35 49 
13 37 14 

N.13 38 43 


15 25-4 
15 21-3 
15 17-2 
15 13-1 

15 8-9 



SATURN. 



373 



JAIVITARY, 18«^0. 




FEBRVARY, 


1860. 




MEAN TIME. 






MEAN TIME, 




Day of 

the > 


GEOCENTRIC. 


-Day of 

the 
Month. 


BBOCBNTRIC. 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month, 


AOOTI. 


Paasage. 


Wooti. 


Passage. 


1 
2 
3 


o / // 

N.14 15 3 
14 16 10 
14 17 18 


h. 
15 
15 
15 


m. 
8-8 
4-7 
0-6 


1 
2 
3 


1 It 

N.15 2 
15 1 42 
15 3 24 


h. m. 
12 59-3 
12 55-0 
12 50-8 


4 
5 
6 


14 18 28 
14 19 39 
14 20 62 


14 
14 
14 


56-5 
52-3 
48-2 


4 
5 
6 


15 ^ 5 

15 6 47 
15 8 28 


12 46-5 
12 42-3 
12 38-1 


1 
8 
9 


14 22 7 
14 23 24 
14 24 42 


14 
14 
14 


44-1 
39-9 
35-8 


7 
8 
9 


15 10 10 
15 11 52 
15 13 33 


12 33-8 
12 29-6 
12 25-3 


10 
11 
12 


14 26 1 
14 27 22 
14 28 45 


14 
14 
14 


31-6 
27-5 
23-3 


10 
11 
12 


15 15 15 
15 16 56 
15 18 37 


12 21-1 
12 16-8 
12 12-6 


13 
14 
15 


14 30 9 
14 31 34 
14 33 


14 
14 
14 


19-2 
15-0 
10-8 


13 
14 
15 


15 20 18 
15 21 59 
15 23 39 


12 8-4 
12 4-1 
11 59-9 


16 
17 
18 


14 34 28 
14 35 57 
14 37 27 


14 
14 
13 


6-7 

2-5 

58-3 


16 
17 
18 


15 25 18 
15 26 57 
15 28 36 


11 65-6 
11 51-4 
11 47-2 


19 
20 
21 


14 38 59 
14 40 31 
14 42 5 


13 
13 
13 


54-1 
49-9 
45-7 


19 

20 
21 


15 30 14 
15 31 51 
15 33 28 


11 42-9 
11 38-7 
11 34-4 


22 
23 
24 


14 43 39 
14 45 14 
14 46 50 


13 
13 
13 


41-6 
37-3 
33-1 


22 
23 

24 


15 35 4 
15 36 39 
15 38 13 


11 30-2 
11 25-9 
11 21-7 


25 
26 

27 


14 48 27 
14 50 4 
14 51 43 


13 
13 
13 


28-8 
24-6 
20-4 


25 
26 

27 


15 39 46 
15 41 18 
15 42 49 


11 17-5 
11 13-2 
11 9-0 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


14 53 21 
14 55 1 
14 56 41 
14 58 21 

N.15 2 


13 
13 
13 
13 

12 


16-2 
11-9 

7-7 
3-5 

59-3 


28 
29 

30 
31 
32 


15 44 19 
15 45 48 

15 47 16 

15 48 42 

N.15 50 08 


11 4-8 
11 0-6 

10 66-3 
10 52-1 
10 47-9 



374 



SATURN. 



MARCH, 1860. 


APRII., 1860. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 




GBOCENTEIO. 






GEOCENTBIC. 




Day of 

the 
Month. 








Day of 

the 
Month. 








Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Apparent 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Xixm. 


Passage. 


ifOOTl. 




1 
2 
3 


Ota 

N.15 47 16 
15 48 42 
15 50 8 


h. 
10 
10 
10 


m. 

66-3 
52-1 
47-9 ■ 


1 
2 
3 


o / // 

N.16 19 54 
16 20 28 
16 21 


h. 
8 
8 
8 


m. 

47-7 
43-7 
39-6 


4 
5 
6 


15 51 32 
15 52 64 
15 54 16 


10 
10 
10 


43-7 
39-5 
35-3 


4 
5 
6 


16 21 30 
16 21 58 
16 22 24 


8 
8 
8 


36-6 
31-6 
27-6 


1 
8 
9 


15 55 36 
15 56 54 
15 58 11 


10 
10 
10 


31-1 

26-9 
22-7 


7 
8 
9 


16 22 47 
16 23 9 
16 23 29 


8 
8 
8 


23-5 
19-5 
15-5 


10 
11 

12 


15 59 27 

16 41 
16 1 54 


10 
10 
10 


18-5 
14-3 
10-1 


10 
11 
12 


16 23 47 
16 24 2 
16 24 16 


8 
8 
8 


11-5 
7-6 
3-5 


13 
14 
15 


16 3 5 
16 4 14 

16 5 22 


10 

10 

9 


5-9 

1-7 

57-6 


13 
14 
15 


16 24 27 
16 24 37 
16 24 44 




59-6 
65-5 
51-5 


16 

11 
18 


16 6 28 
16 7 32 
16 8 34 


9 
9 
9 


53-4 
49-3 
45-2 


16 
17 
18 


16 24 49 
16 24 53 
16 24 64 




47-6 
43-6 
39-6 


19 
20 
21 


16 9 35 
16 10 34 
16 11 31 


9 
9 
9 


41-0 
36-9 
32-8 


19 
20 
21 


16 24 63 
16 24 60 
16 24 46 




35-7, 
31-8 
27-8 


22 
23 
24 


16 12 27 
16 13 20 
16 14 12 


9 
9 
9 


28-6 
24-5 
20-4 


22 
23 
24 


16 24 38 
16 24 28 
16 24 17 




23-9 
20-0 
16-1 


25 
26 
27 


16 15 1 
16 15 49 
16 16 35 


9 
9 
9 


16-3 

12-2 

8-1 


25 
26 

27 


16 24 4 
16 23 48 
16 23 31 




12-2 
8-3 
4-4 


28 
29 
30 
31 


■ 16 17 19 
16 18 1 
16 18 41 
16 19 18 


9 

8 
8 
8 


4-0 
69-9 
55-9 
51-8 


28 
29 
30 


16 23 11 
16 22 50 
16 22 26 


7 
6 
6 


0-6 

56-7 
52-8 


32 


N.16 19 54 


8 


47-7 


31 
32 


16 22 1 
N.16 21 33 


6 
6 


49-0 
45-2 



SATURN. 



375 



MAT, 1860. 


JVIfE, 1S60. 


MEAN TIME. 


MEAN TIME. 


Day of 
the 


GEOCENTEIO. 


Day of 
the 


GEOOBNTEIC. 


Apparent 
Decimation. 


Meridian 


Appwrmt 
Declination. 


Meridian 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 


Month. 


Noon. 


Passage. 


1 
2 
3 


O 1 II 

N.16 22 1 
16 21 33 
16 21 4 


h. 
6 
6 
6 


m. 

49-0 
45-2 
41-3 


1 
2 
3 


oil! 

N.15 53 11 
15 51 47 
15 50 22 


h. 
4 
4 
4 


m. 
62-7 
49-0 
45-4 


4 
5 
6 


16 20 32 
16 19 59 
16 19 23 


6 
6 
6 


37-5 
33-7 
29-9 


4 
5 
6 


15 48 55 
15 47 26 
15 45 56 


4 
4 
4 


41-7 
38-1 
34-5 


8 
9 


16 18 46 
16 18 7 
16 17 25 


6 
6 
6 


26-0 
22-2 
18-4 


7 
8 
9 


15 44 24 
15 42 51 
15 41 16 


4 
4 
4 


30-8 
27-2 
23-6 


10 
11 
12 


16 16 42 
16 15 57 
16 15 10 


6 
6 
6 


14-6 

10-8 

7-0 


10 
11 
12 


15 39 40 
15 38 2 
15 36 23 


4 
4 
4 


20-0 
16-3 
12-7 


13 
14 
15 


16 14 22 
16 13 31 
16 12 39 


6 
5 
5 


3-2 

59-5 
55-7 


13 

14 
15 


15 34 42 
15 33 
15 31 17 


4 
4 
4 


9-1 
5-5 
1-9 


16 
17 
18 


16 11 44 
16 10 48 
16 9 50 


5 
5 
5 


51-9 

48-2 
44-4 


16 
17 
18 


15 29 32 
15 27 45 
15 25 58 


3 
3 
3 


58-3 
54-7 
51-1 


19 
20 
21 


16 8 50 
16 7 48 
16 6 45 


5 
5 
5 


40-7 
37-0 
33-3 


19 
20 
21 


15 24 9 
15 22 18 
15 20 26 


3 
3 
3 


47-5 
43-9 
40-4 


22 
23 
24 


16 5 39 
16 4 32 
16 3 23 


5 
5 
6 


29-5 
25-8 
22-1 


22 
23 
24 


15 18 33 
15 16 39 
15 14 43 


3 
3 
3 


36-8 
33-3 

29-7 


25 
26 

27 


16 2 13 
16 1 
15 59 46 


5 
5 
5 


18-4 
14-7 
11-0 


25 
26 

27 


15 12 46 
15 10 48 
15 8 49 


3 
3 
3 


26-2 
22-7 
19-1 


28 
29 
30 
31 

32 


15 58 31 
15 57 13 
15 55 54 
15 54 34 

N.15